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Geologic units containing sand

Earth material > Unconsolidated material
Sand
A loose aggregate of unlithified mineral or rock particles of sand size (1/16 to 2 mm); an unconsolidated deposit consisting essentially of medium-grained clastic particles.
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Alabama
Chilhowee Group undifferentiated (Cambrian)
Chilhowee Group undifferentiated - light to medium-gray arkose, arkosic conglomerate, and discontinous mudstone overlain by greenish-gray mudstone with minor siltstone and sandstone; dominantly light-gray pebbly quartzose sandstone in upper part.
Citronelle Formation (Pleistocene-Pliocene)
Citronelle Formation - moderate-reddish-brown deeply weathered fine to very coarse quartz sand and varicolored typically mottled lenticular beds of clay and clayey gravel. Limonite pebbles and lenses of limonite cemented sand occur locally in weathered exposures. Gravel is composed of chert and quartz pebbles.
Claiborne Group; Gosport Sand and Lisbon Formation undifferentiated in part (Eocene)
Lisbon Formation undifferentiated in part - (Claiborne Group), greenish-gray calcareous, glauconitic, fossiliferous clayey sand; marl; carbonaceous sand; carbonaceous silty clay; and coarse glauconitic, fossiliferous, quartz sand.
Claiborne Group; Gosport Sand and Lisbon Formation undifferentiated in part (Eocene)
Gosport Sand - (Claiborne Group), highly fossiliferous, glauconitic, quartz sand and lenses of greenish-gray clay; occurs between MS state line and AL River.
Claiborne Group; Tallahatta Formation (Eocene)
Tallahatta Formation - (Claiborne group), White to very light-greenish-gray thin-bedded to massive siliceous claystone; interbedded with thin layers of fossiliferous clay, sandy clay, and glauconitic sand and sandstone. White to light-greenish-gray fine to coarse sand and fine gravel occur at the base of the formation in southwest Alabama (Meridian Sand Member).
Claiborne/Jackson Group; Residuum (Eocene-Oligocene)
Residuum - (Claiborne/Jackson Group), White to moderate-reddish-orange locally mottled sandy clay and residual clay with scattered layers of gravelly medium to coarse sand, fossiliferous chert and limestone boulders and limonitic sand masses. Derived from solution and collapse of limestone in the Jackson Group and Oligocene Series and the slumping of Pliocene and Miocene sediments.
Eutaw Formation (Cretaceous)
Eutaw Formation - Light-greenish-gray to yellowish-gray cross-bedded, well-sorted, micaceous, fine to medium quartz sand that is fossiliferous and glauconitic in part and contains beds of greenish-gray micaceous, silty clay and medium-dark-gray carbonaceous clay. Light-gray glauconitic fossiliferous sand, thin beds of sandstone, and massive accumulations of fossil oyster shells occur locally in the upper part of the formation in western AL (Tombigbee Sand Member). In eastern AL thin to thick-bedded accumulations of the fossil oyster Ostrea cretacea Morton occur throughout much of the formation.
Greensport Formation (Ordovician)
Greensport Formation - variegated dusky-red and dark-yellowish-orange shale, calcareous mudstone, limestone, siltstone, and minor sandstone.
Jackson Group undifferentiated (Eocene)
Jackson Group undifferentiated - The units of the Jackson Group are the Yazoo Clay and Crystal River and Moodys Branch Formations. Descriptions of the members of the Yazoo Clay follow in decending order. Shubuta Member - in western Alabama consists of light-greenish-gray to white plastic fossiliferous, calcareous clay containing irregular calcareous nodules. From the Tombigbee River eastward the Shubuta becomes more calcareous and grades into massive clayey glauconitic limestone. Eastward from the Alabama River , equivalent beds grade into the Crystal River Formation. Pachuta Marl Member - light-greenish-grey glauconitic, fossiliferous clayey sand and sandy limestone traceable from western Alabama eastward to Covington County where it grades into the Crystal River Formation. Cocoa Sand Member - yellowish-gray firm calcareous, fossiliferous fine to medium sand or sandy limestone or greenish-grey micaceous, calcareous, very clayey sand. Calcareous and clayey sand equivalent to the Cocoa is traceable from western Alabama to the Conecuh River area. North Twistwood Creek Clay Member - greenish-gray plastic calcareous, sparsely fossiliferous, blocky massive clay; grades into Crystal River formation in southeast AL. Crystal River Formation - white to yellowish-grey medium-grained to coquinoid limestone that is soft and chalky to compact and brittle; principally in southeastern AL but interfingers westward with members of the Yazoo Clay. Moodys Branch Formation - greenish-gray to pale-yellowish-orange glauconitic, calcareous, fossiliferous sand and sandy limestone; underlies the Yazoo Clay and the Crystal River Formation.
Midway Group; Clayton Formation (Paleocene)
Clayton Formation - (Midway Group), White to yellowsih-gray argillaceous limestone occurs in the upper part (McBryde Limestone Member): the lower part is medium-gray fossiliferous calcareous silt, glauconitic sand and thin beds of sandy limestone and calcareous sandstone (Pine Barren Member). At the base of the formation in southeast AL is a gravelly medium to coarse sand containing clay pebbles. The formation thins west of Wilcox County and westward from Thomaston in eastern Marengo County is mapped with the Porters Creek Formation. The formation is generally deeply weathered and fresh exposures are rare. In western areas exposures consist of weathered white to yellowish-gray argillaceous, fossiliferous sandy limestone, ferruginous sand, and fossiliferous sandstone. In eastern areas exposures consist of residual accumulations of chert boulders, moderate-reddish-orange sand, and clay containing masses and thin layers of iron minerals (limonite-goethite).
Midway Group; Naheola Formation (Paleocene)
Naheola Formation - (Midway Group), The Naheola Formation is restricted to western AL and pinches out in western Butler County. Descriptions of the members of the formation follow in descending order. Coal Bluff Marl Member - glauconitic sand, thin-bedded silty clay, and sandy fossiliferous marl; Oak Hill Member - laminated silt, clay, and fine sand; contains a prominent bed of lignite near the top. The Coal Bluff Marl Member in Sumter County and in parts of Marengo County is mostly cross-bedded fine to coarse sand that is indistinguishable from the overlying lower beds of the Nanafalia Formation. Therefore, in these areas, the contact between the two is mapped at the top of the Oak Hill Member of the Naheola.
Midway Group; Porters Creek Formation (Paleocene)
Porters Creek Formation - (Midway Group), dark-gray massive plastic clay in western AL with a thin bed of glauconitic shell marl at the top (Mathews Landing Marl Member). Becomes calcareous eastward grading into light-greenish-gray calcareous, micaceous, clayey fine to medium sand, medium-gray sandy, calcareous clay and white to light-gray thin bedded partly clayey, fossiliferous limestone. East of Crenshaw County, owing to lithologic similarity, beds correlative with the Porters Creek are included in the Clayton Formation.
Miocene Series undifferentiated (Miocene)
Miocene Series undifferentiated - Moderate-yellowish-orange thin-bedded to massive fine to coarse sand, gravelly sand, thin-bedded to massive clay and sandy clay. Clays are plastic in part. Limonite pellets occur in places along clay-sand contacts. Gravel is composed of quartz and chert granules and pebbles. Locally the upper part of the unit is Pliocene in age.
Nichols Formation (Cambrian)
Nichols Formation - massive to laminated greenish-gray and black micaceous mudstone containing minor interbeds of siltstone and very fine-grained sandstone.
Oligocene Series undifferentiated (Oligocene)
Oligocene Series undifferentiated - Descriptions of the units of the Oligocene Series follow in descending order. Paynes Hammock Sand - locally fossiliferous, calcareous, argillaceous medium to coarse sand; pale-blue-green clay; and thin-bedded sandy limestone; exposed at Paynes Hammock and at St. Stephens. Chickasawhay Limestone - white to yellowish-gray fossiliferous, glauconitic limestone and soft marl. Byram Formation includes three members in descending order: Bucatunna Clay Member - dark, bentonitic, carbonaceous, sparsely fossiliferous clay and greyish-yellow sand; unnamed marl member - light-grey to yellowish-grey sandy, glauconitic , fossiliferous marl; Glendon Limestone Member - irregularly indurated coquinoid and crystalline limestone, weathering to indurated rock containing large tubular cavities, locally known as 'horsebone'. Marianna Limestone - white to yellowish-grey soft, porous, very fossiliferous limestone. Forest Hill sand - dark-greenish-grey carbonaceous clay with lenses of glauconitic fossiliferous sand; extends eastward from MS into Choctaw, Clarke and Washington Counties. Red Bluff Clay - greenish-gray calcareous clay locally containing selenite crystals, yellowish-grey glauconitic, fossiliferous limestone; and light-gray silty clay with interbeds of sand (Forest Hill equivalent); from Tombigbee River eastward grades into glauconitic fossiliferous limestone equivalent to the Bumpnose Limestone. Bumpnose Limestone - very light-gray to yellowish-gray chalky, subcoquinoid, glauconitic, argillaceous, fossiliferous limestone; intertongues with Red Bluff Clay in vicinity of the Alabama River and is readily differentiated eastward from the Sepulga River.
Paleozoic shale undifferentiated (Mississippian)
Paleozoic shale undifferentiated - Dark-gray shale and mudstone, locally containing thin interbeds and lenses of dark-greenish-gray sandstone includes Athens Shale and probable Floyd Shale in the structural windows near Anniston, Calhoun County.
Paleozoic shale undifferentiated (Mississippian)
Paleozoic shale undifferentiated - Dark-gray shale and mudstone, locally containing thin interbeds and lenses of dark-greenish-gray sandstone includes probable Floyd Shale in area east of Gadsden, Etowah County.
Pennington Formation (Mississippian)
Pennington Formation - Medium-gray shale, containing interbedded limestone, dolomite, argillaceous sandstone, dusky-red and grayish-olive mudstone, and minor shaly coal. Mainly restricted to northeastern AL and part of the Sequatchie anticline. Where less than 100 feet thick the formation is included in the Bangor Limestone.
Pennington Formation (Mississippian)
Pennington Formation - Medium-gray shale, containing interbedded limestone, dolomite, argillaceous sandstone, dusky-red and grayish-olive mudstone, and minor shaly coal. Mainly restricted to eastern part of Interior Low Plateaus province and where less than 100 feet thick the formation is included in the Bangor Limestone.
Pottsville Formation (upper part) (Pennsylvanian)
Pottsville Formation (upper part) - Interbedded dark-gray shale, siltstone, medium-gray sandstone, and coal in cyclic sequences. The members present in the Cahaba synclinorium in descending order include: the Straven Conglomerate Member, Rocky Ridge Sandstone Member, and Chestnut Sandstone Member. The members present in the Coosa synclinorium in descending order include: Straight Ridge Sandstone Member and Wolf Ridge Sandstone Member.
Pottsville Formation (upper part) (Pennsylvanian)
Pottsville Formation (upper part) - Interbedded dark-gray shale, siltstone, medium-gray sandstone, and coal in cyclic sequences. In descending order the members include: Razburg Sandstone Member, Camp Branch Sandstone Member, Lick Creek Sandstone Member, and the Bremen Sandstone Member.
Pride Mountain Formation (Mississippian)
Pride Mountain Formation - Medium to dark-gray shale, containing one to three units of a variable combination of sandstone and limestone in the lower part; locally contains rare interbeds of dusky-red and greenish-gray mudstone.
Pride Mountain Formation (Mississippian)
Pride Mountain Formation - Medium to dark-gray shale, containing one to three units of a variable combination of sandstone and limestone in the lower part; locally contains rare interbeds of dusky-red and greenish-gray mudstone.
Pride Mountain Formation (Mississippian)
Pride Mountain Formation - Medium to dark-gray shale, containing one to three units of a variable combination of sandstone and limestone in the lower part; locally contains rare interbeds of dusky-red and greenish-gray mudstone.
Rome Formation (Cambrian)
Rome Formation - variegated thinly interbedded mudstone, shale, siltstone, and sandstone; limestone and dolomite occur locally. Quartzose sandstone commonly present near top of formation.
Selma Group; Blufftown Formation (Cretaceous)
Blufftown Formation - (Selma Group), The Blufftown extends from the Chattahoochee River Valley westward into central Russell County where it is divided into two westward-extending tongues by an eastward-extending tongue of the Mooreville Chalk. In the Chattahoochee River Valley the Blufftown is mainly glauconitic calcareous fine sand, micaceous clay and marl, fossiliferous clay, gray calcareous fossiliferous sandstone, and carbonaceous clay and silt. To the west the lower tongue of the Blufftown is gravelly sand, glauconitic sand, calcareous clay, and sandy clay and merges with the lower part of the Mooreville Chalk in southwestern Macon County. The upper tongue is mainly calcareous sandy clay and micaceous silty fine sand with thin layers of limestone and sandstone. The upper tongue merges with the Mooreville Chalk and the lower part of the Demopolis Chalk in western Bullock County.
Selma Group; Cusseta Sand Member of the Ripley Formation (Cretaceous)
Cusseta Sand Member of the Ripley Formation - (Selma Group), Cross-bedded, medium to coarse sand; glauconitic, fossiliferous fine sand; and dark-gray fossiliferous, micaceous, carbonaceous clay. The member occurs at the base of the Ripley Formation and extends from Georgia westward into Montgomery County where it merges with the Demopolis Chalk.
Selma Group; Demopolis Chalk (Cretaceous)
Demopolis Chalk - (Selma Group), Light-gray to medium-light-gray compact, brittle chalk overlain by abundantly fossiliferous chalky marl, very clayey chalk, and calcareous clay (Bluffport Marl Member). In south-central Montgomery County the Demopolis is split into two eastward extending tongues by a westward-extending tongue of the Cusseta Sand Member of the Ripley Formation. The lower tongue is pale-olive to yellowish-gray silty to finely sand, micaceous, fossiliferous chalk that eastward becomes more sandy and merges with the Cusseta in central Bullock County. The upper tongue is yellowish-gray clayey, very finely sandy, micaceous chalk that merges with the Ripley in southeastern Montgomery County.
Selma Group; Mooreville Chalk (Cretaceous)
Mooreville Chalk - (Selma Group), Yellowish-gray to olive-gray compact fossiliferous clayey chalk and chalky marl. The unconformable contact at the base is characterized by a bed of glauconitic, chalky sand containing phosphate pellets and molds of fossils. The Arcola Limestone Member at the top consists of two to four beds of light-gray brittle, dense, fossiliferous limestone separated by beds of light-gray to pale-olive calcareous clay.
Selma Group; Prairie Bluff Chalk (Upper Cretaceous)
Prairie Bluff Chalk - (Selma Group), Very light-gray to light-bluish-gray firm sandy, fossiliferous brittle chalk and grayish-black silty sandy calcareous glauconitic, fossiliferous clay; semi-indurated beds of sandy, clayey limestone are present in some exposures. Abscent locally in parts of Marengo, Dallas and Wilcox Counties where overlapped by the Clayton Formation or eroded. The Prairie Bluff thins eastward from southwestern Lowndes County to northern Pike County where it interfingers with the Providence Sand.
Selma Group; Providence Sand (Cretaceous)
Providence Sand - (Selma Group), Upper part consists of cross-bedded fine to coarse sand and white, dark-gray and pale-red-purple mottled clay containing lignite, sand, and kaolin; lower part consists of dark-gray laminated to thin-bedded silty clay and abundantly micaceous, carbonaceous, fossiliferous very fine to fine sand. The Providence Sand extends eastward from southeastern Lowndes County into Georgia.
Selma Group; Ripley Formation (Cretaceous)
Ripley Formation - (Selma Group), Light-gray to pale-olive massive, micaceous, glauconitic, fossiliferous fine sand; sandy calcareous clay; and thin indurated beds of fossiliferous sandstone.
Sequatchie Formation, Colvin Mountain Sandstone, Greensport Formation undifferentiated (Ordovician)
Sequatchie Formation, Colvin Mountain Sandstone, Greensport Formation undifferentiated - variegated dusky-red and pale-yellowish-orange shale, calcareous mudstone, dolomite, siltstone, and minor sandstone. Mapped in areas of facies transition with the Chickamauga Limestone (Canoe Creek, Dunaway, and Hensley Mountains).
Sequatchie Formation, Colvin Mountain Sandstone, Greensport Formation undifferentiated (Ordovician)
Sequatchie Formation, Colvin Mountain Sandstone, Greensport Formation undifferentiated - variegated dusky-red and pale-yellowish-orange shale, calcareous mudstone, dolomite, siltstone, and minor sandstone. Mapped in areas of facies transition with the Chickamauga Limestone (Scraper Mountain) and in the structurally complex area at the east end of Dry Creek Mountain.
Silurian System undivided (Includes Wayne Group and Brassfield Limestone) (Silurian)
Silurian System undivided (Includes Wayne Group and Brassfield Limestone) - Wayne Group - medium-gray, greenish-gray, and moderate-red argillaceous limestone; moderate-red and greenish-gray shale; and grayish-green fossiliferous limestone with scattered pink calcite crystals. Brassfield Limestone - greenish-gray to light-brownish-gray argillaceous, dolomitic, cherty, sandy, glauconitic limestone.
Sylacauga Marble Group; Jumbo Dolomite (Cambrian?-Ordovician?)
Jumbo Dolomite - light to medium-gray thin to thick-bedded dolomite marble; contains intraclast-bearing dolomite, locally sandy in middle part.
Tuscaloosa Group; Coker Formation (Cretaceous)
Coker Formation - (Tuscaloosa Group), Light-colored micaceous very fine to medium sand, cross-bedded sand, varicolored micaceous clay, and a few thin gravel beds containing quartz and chert pebbles. Beds of thinly laminated finely glauconitic very fine to fine sand, silt and dark-gray carbonaceous clay (Eoline Member) occur locally in the lower part in western AL. Locally quartz and chert gravels at the base of the formation range in size from very fine pebbles to large cobbles. In southeastern Elmore County the formation includes marine sediments consisting of glauconitic, fossiliferous, quartzose fine to medium sand and medium-gray carbonaceous silty clay. Not mapped east of the Tallapoosa River.
Tuscaloosa Group; Gordo Formation (Cretaceous)
Gordo Formation - (Tuscaloosa Group), Massive beds of cross-bedded sand, gravelly sand, and lenticular beds of locally carbonaceous partly mottled moderate-red and pale-red-purple clay; lower part is predominantly a gravelly sand consisting chiefly of chert and quartz pebbles. Not mapped east of the Tallapooza River.
Tuscaloosa Group undifferentiated (Cretaceous)
Tuscaloosa Group undifferentiated - Light-gray to moderate-reddish-orange clayey, gravelly fine to very coarse sand; massive mottled sandy clay; local wood and leaf beds; and thin beds of indurated sandstone. Gravel consists mainly of quartz and quartzite and range in size from very fine pebbles to large cobbles. Mapped eats of the Tallapoosa River.
Wilcox Group; Hatchetigbee Formation (Eocene)
Hatchetigbee Formation - (Wilcox Group), Light to dark-gray laminated carbonaceous clay, silt and very fine to fine sand, and cross-bedded glauconitic sand; one or more thin beds of fossiliferous marly glauconitic sand and sandstone occur in the upper part. Near the base is a prominent bed of glauconitic calcareous sand containing abundant fossils and spheroidal to pillow-shaped sandstone concretions (Bashi Marl Member). In parts of southeast AL the upper beds of the Th were either eroded or not deposited and the overlying Tt formation directly overlies the Bashi Marl Member.
Wilcox Group; Nanafalia Formation (Paleocene)
Nanafalia Formation - (Wilcox Group), Members of the Nanafalia Formation follow in descending order. Grampian Hills Member - medium-gray massive clay, claystone, sandy fossiliferous clay, and fossiliferous fine sand. "Ostrea thirsae beds" - glauconitic, abundantly fossiliferous, quartzose fine to medium sand. Gravel Creek Sand Member - pale-yellowish-orange to moderate-reddish-brown micaceous cross-bedded fine to very coarse sand containing gravel and clay pebbles in some exposures. Gravel Creek Member is absent locally and near the base may contain thin beds of lignite. Updip deposits in northern Henry County and southern Barbour County include beds of alternating medium-gray and white clay, carbonaceous clay, white and grayish-yellow fine to coarse sand and lenses of bauxite and bauxitic clay. Sand beds commonly are cross-bedded, gravelly, and contain numerous clay pebbles. The sequence of beds is often obscured by weathering and the collapse of beds into sinkholes in the underlying Clayton Formation.
Wilcox Group; Tuscahoma Sand (Paleocene)
Tuscahoma Sand - (Wilcox Group), Light-gray to light-olive-gray laminated and thin-bedded carbonaceous silt and clay interbedded with fine sand; thin lignite beds occur locally. Lower part of the formation includes beds of fossiliferous, glauconitic fine quartz sand containing speroidal sandstone concretions, gravel and clay pebbles.
Arkansas
Arkadelphia Marl (Phanerozoic | Mesozoic | Cretaceous-Late)
Arkadelphia Marl
Brownstown Marl (Phanerozoic | Mesozoic | Cretaceous-Late)
Brownstown Marl
Cason Shale and Fernvale Limestone (Upper Ordovician) and Kimmswick Limestone, Plattin Limestone, and Joachim Dolomite (Middle Ordovician) (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Ordovician-Middle Ordovician-Late)
Cason Shale and Fernvale Limestone (Upper Ordovician) and Kimmswick Limestone, Plattin Limestone, and Joachim Dolomite (Middle Ordovician)
Chattanooga Shale (Lower Mississippian and Upper Devonian), Clifty Limestone (Middle Devonian), and Penters Chert (Lower Devonian) (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Devonian-Early Devonian-Middle(?) Devonian-Late(?) Carboniferous Mississippian-Early)
Chattanooga Shale (Lower Mississippian and Upper Devonian), Clifty Limestone (Middle Devonian), and Penters Chert (Lower Devonian)
Claibourne Group (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Eocene-Middle)
Claibourne Group
Cotter and Jefferson City Dolomites (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Ordovician-Early)
Cotter and Jefferson City Dolomites
Jackson Group (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Eocene-Late)
Jackson Group
Midway Group (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Paleocene)
Midway Group
Nacatoch Sand (Phanerozoic | Mesozoic | Cretaceous-Late)
Nacatoch Sand
Powell Dolomite (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Ordovician-Early)
Powell Dolomite
Sand and clay (Phanerozoic | Mesozoic | Cretaceous)
Sand and clay
Sand and gravel (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene-Early)
Sand and gravel
Sartoga Chalk (Phanerozoic | Mesozoic | Cretaceous-Late)
Sartoga Chalk
Silt and sand (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene-Early)
Silt and sand - Contains lenses of gravel and clay
Tokio Formation (Phanerozoic | Mesozoic | Cretaceous-Late)
Tokio Formation
Trinity Group (Phanerozoic | Mesozoic | Cretaceous-Early)
Trinity Group
Wilcox Group (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Eocene-Early)
Wilcox Group
Womble Shale (Middle Ordovician) (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Ordovician-Middle)
Womble Shale (Middle Ordovician)
Woodbine Formation (Phanerozoic | Mesozoic | Cretaceous-Late)
Woodbine Formation
Arizona
Early Pleistocene to late Miocene basin deposits (Late Pliocene to Early Pleistocene)
Poorly sorted, variably consolidated gravel and sand that range widely in age. These sediments are generally light gray or tan. This unit is generally mapped in areas of deep late Cenozoic stream incision and landscape degradation where thin Quaternary deposits (map units Qy, Qm, Qo) discontinuously blanket older deposits (map units Tsy or Tsm) and the two cannot be differentiated at the scale of this map. (0.75-10 Ma)
Early Pleistocene to latest Pliocene surficial deposits (Late Pliocene to Early Pleistocene)
Coarse relict alluvial fan deposits that form rounded ridges or flat, isolated surfaces that are moderately to deeply incised by streams. These deposits are generally topographically high and have undergone substantial erosion. Deposits are moderately to strongly consolidated, and commonly contain coarser grained sediment than younger deposits in the same area. (0.75-3 Ma)
Early Proterozoic metasedimentary rocks (Early Proterozoic)
Metasedimentary rocks, mostly derived from sandstone and shale, with minor conglomerate and carbonate rock. Includes quartz-rich, mostly nonvolcanic Pinal Schist in southeastern Arizona and variably volcanic-lithic sedimentary rocks in the Yavapai and Tonto Basin supergroups in central Arizona. (1600-1800 Ma)
Early Proterozoic metavolcanic rocks (Early Proterozoic)
Weakly to strongly metamorphosed volcanic rocks. Protoliths include basalt, andesite, dacite, and rhyolite deposited as lava or tuff, related sedimentary rock, and shallow intrusive rock. These rocks, widely exposed in several belts in central Arizona, include metavolcanic rocks in the Yavapai and Tonto Basin supergroups. (1650 to 1800 Ma)
Glen Canyon Group (Early Jurassic)
Conspicuous red, cross-bedded Wingate Sandstone and the conspicuously cross-bedded, eolian, red to buff Navajo Sandstone form prominent cliffs in northern Arizona. These two sandstone units are separated by variably colored siltstone, silty sandstone, and sandstone of the Kayenta and Moenave Formations. (180-210 Ma)
Holocene river alluvium (Holocene)
Unconsolidated to weakly consolidated sand and gravel in river channels and sand, silt, and clay on floodplains. Also includes young terrace deposits fringing floodplains. (0-10 ka)
Holocene surficial deposits (Holocene)
Unconsolidated deposits associated with modern fluvial systems. This unit consists primarily of fine-grained, well-sorted sediment on alluvial plains, but also includes gravelly channel, terrace, and alluvial fan deposits on middle and upper piedmonts. (0-10 ka)
Holocene to middle Pliocene basaltic rocks (Middle Pliocene to Holocene)
Mostly dark-colored basaltic lava and cinders young enough that some original volcanic landforms are still apparent. Includes a small amount of andesite, dacite, and rhyolite. Rocks of this map unit are largely restricted to six areas widely distributed in Arizona: San Francisco and Uinkaret volcanic fields in northern Arizona (0-4 Ma); Springerville (0-4 Ma) and San Carlos (0-2 Ma) volcanic fields in east-central Arizona; and San Bernardino (0-1 Ma) and Sentinel (1-4 Ma) volcanic fields in southern Arizona. Rocks of this unit are also present in the extreme southwestern part of Arizona where they were erupted at the edge of the Pinacate volcanic field (0-2 Ma) in northwestern Sonora. (0-4 Ma)
Jurassic to Cambrian metamorphosed sedimentary rocks (Cambrian to Jurassic)
Highly faulted and folded rocks of units Jv, J_, and Pz, deformed and metamorphosed in Jurassic, Cretaceous and Tertiary time. This unit is restricted to west-central Arizona. (160-540 Ma)
Jurassic volcanic rocks (Jurassic)
Massive quartz-feldspar porphyry, generally interpreted as thick, welded rhyolitic tuffs, with locally abundant lava, and sandstone and conglomerate derived from volcanic rocks. Rare eolian quartzite units are interbedded in southern Arizona. Includes Ali Molina Formation, Mount Wrightson Formation, part of the Canelo Hills Volcanics, Cobre Ridge tuff, Black Rock volcanics, Planet Volcanics, and equivalent rocks. (160-200 Ma)
Late and middle Pleistocene surficial deposits (Middle to Late Pleistocene)
Unconsolidated to weakly consolidated alluvial fan, terrace, and basin-floor deposits with moderate to strong soil development. Fan and terrace deposits are primarily poorly sorted, moderately bedded gravel and sand, and basin-floor deposits are primarily sand, silt, and clay. (10-750 ka)
Late to middle Miocene basaltic rocks (Middle to Late Miocene)
Mostly dark, mesa-forming basalt deposited as lava flows. Rocks of this unit are widely exposed south of Camp Verde (Hickey Formation basalts), in the Mohon Mountains north of Bagdad, "The Mesa" east of Parker, and at other scattered locations in western Arizona. Rocks of this unit were not tilted by middle-Tertiary normal faulting except in a narrow belt from north of Phoenix to the northwest corner of the state. (8-16 Ma)
Middle Miocene to Oligocene shallow intrusions (Oligocene to Middle Miocene)
Generally very fine-grained, porphyritic rhyolite to dacite in small, irregular-shaped bodies formed as subvolcanic intrusions in volcanic fields of southern and western Arizona, or in concentrated zones of dikes in the Mohave and Black Mountains of northwestern Arizona. The unit consists of mafic tuff, breccia and shallow intrusions at Buell Park in northeastern Arizona. (14-35 Ma)
Middle Miocene to Oligocene volcanic and sedimentary rocks, undivided (Oligocene to Middle Miocene)
Sequences of diverse volcanic rocks with abundant interbedded sedimentary rocks. (11-32 Ma)
Middle Miocene to Oligocene volcanic rocks (Oligocene to Middle Miocene)
Lava, tuff, fine-grained intrusive rock, and diverse pyroclastic rocks. These compositionally variable volcanic rocks include basalt, andesite, dacite, and rhyolite. Thick felsic volcanic sequences form prominent cliffs and range fronts in the Black (Mohave County), Superstition, Kofa, Eagletail, Galiuro, and Chiricahua Mountains. This unit includes regionally extensive ash-flow tuffs, such as the Peach Springs tuff of northwestern Arizona and the Apache Leap tuff east of Phoenix. Most volcanic rocks are 20-30 Ma in southeastern Arizona and 15 to 25 Ma in central and western Arizona, but this unit includes some late Eocene rocks near the New Mexico border in east-central Arizona. (11-38 Ma)
Pliocene to late Miocene basaltic rocks (Late Miocene to Pliocene)
Mostly dark, inconspicuously flat, low-lying or mesa-forming basalt deposited as lava flows. Rocks included in this unit are located almost entirely in the large volcanic fields south and west of Flagstaff, in smaller fields in northwesternmost Arizona, and in the Hopi Buttes volcanic field on the Navajo and Hopi Indian Reservations north of Holbrook. Original volcanic landforms have been obscured by erosion. (4-8 Ma)
Pliocene to middle Miocene deposits (Middle Miocene to Pliocene)
Moderately to strongly consolidated conglomerate and sandstone deposited in basins during and after late Tertiary faulting. Includes lesser amounts of mudstone, siltstone, limestone, and gypsum. These deposits are generally light gray or tan. They commonly form high rounded hills and ridges in modern basins, and locally form prominent bluffs. Deposits of this unit are widely exposed in the dissected basins of southeastern and central Arizona. (2-16 Ma)
Pliocene to middle Miocene volcanic rocks (Middle Miocene to Pliocene)
Rhyolite to andesite deposited as lava flows and related rocks associated with basaltic rocks of map units Tby and Tb. (2-12 Ma)
Quaternary surficial deposits, undivided (Quaternary)
Unconsolidated to strongly consolidated alluvial and eolian deposits. This unit includes: coarse, poorly sorted alluvial fan and terrace deposits on middle and upper piedmonts and along large drainages; sand, silt and clay on alluvial plains and playas; and wind-blown sand deposits. (0-2 Ma)
Sedimentary rocks of the Late Cretaceous Mesaverde Group (Late Cretaceous)
Gray to buff sandstone with interbedded shale and coal. These rocks, which are similar to slightly younger rocks that form Mesa Verde in southwestern Colorado, were deposited on the margin of a shallow sea. Rocks of this map unit host the only large coal deposits in Arizona. (84-88 Ma)
California
Carboniferous marine rocks, unit 2 (SE California Carbonate Assemblage) (Mississippian to Early Permian)
Shale, sandstone, conglomerate, limestone, dolomite, chert, hornfels, marble, quartzite; in part pyroclastic rocks
Carboniferous marine rocks, unit 4 (Eastern Klamath Mountains) (Mississippian to Early Permian)
Shale, sandstone, conglomerate, limestone, dolomite, chert, hornfels, marble, quartzite; in part pyroclastic rocks
Carboniferous marine rocks, unit 8 (Mono Lake) (Ordovician to Devonian)
Shale, sandstone, conglomerate, limestone, dolomite, chert, hornfels, marble, quartzite; in part pyroclastic rocks
Cretaceous marine rocks (in part nonmarine), unit 3 (Mescal Range) (Middle Jurassic to late Early Cretaceous)
Undivided Cretaceous sandstone, shale, and conglomerate; minor nonmarine rocks in Peninsular Ranges
Devonian marine rocks, unit 1 (Death Valley) (Middle to Late Devonian)
Limestone and dolomite, sandstone and shale; in part tuffaceous
Devonian marine rocks, unit 2 (Eastern Klamath Mountains) (Devonian)
Limestone and dolomite, sandstone and shale; in part tuffaceous
Jurassic marine rocks, unit 6 (Mono Lake) (Ordovician(?) to Triassic(?))
Shale, sandstone, minor conglomerate, chert, slate, limestone; minor pyroclastic rocks
Mesozoic volcanic rocks, unit 2 (Western Sierra Foothills and Western Klamath Mountains) (Jurassic)
Undivided Mesozoic volcanic and metavolcanic rocks. Andesite and rhyolite flow rocks, greenstone, volcanic breccia and other pyroclastic rocks; in part strongly metamorphosed. Includes volcanic rocks of Franciscan Complex: basaltic pillow lava, diabase, greenstone, and minor pyroclastic rocks
Oigocene nonmarine rocks (?), unit 1 (Klamath Mountains) (Oligocene(?) to Pleistocene(?))
Paleozoic marine rocks, undivided, unit 2 (Northern Mojave Desert and Southeastern Sierra Nevada) (Cambrian to Jurassic)
Undivided Paleozoic metasedimentary rocks. Includes slate, sandstone, shale, chert, conglomerate, limestone, dolomite, marble, phyllite, schist, hornfels, and quartzite
Paleozoic marine rocks, undivided, unit 3 (Eastern Sierra Nevada) (Late Proterozoic(?) to Mesozoic(?))
Undivided Paleozoic metasedimentary rocks. Includes slate, sandstone, shale, chert, conglomerate, limestone, dolomite, marble, phyllite, schist, hornfels, and quartzite
Paleozoic marine rocks, undivided, unit 4 (Western Sierra Nevada) (Ordovician to Triassic)
Undivided Paleozoic metasedimentary rocks. Includes slate, sandstone, shale, chert, conglomerate, limestone, dolomite, marble, phyllite, schist, hornfels, and quartzite
Paleozoic marine rocks, undivided, unit 6 (Northwestern Sierra Nevada) (Permian(?) to Jurassic(?))
Undivided Paleozoic metasedimentary rocks. Includes slate, sandstone, shale, chert, conglomerate, limestone, dolomite, marble, phyllite, schist, hornfels, and quartzite
Paleozoic marine rocks, undivided, unit 9 (Western Klamath Mountains) (Devonian to Jurassic)
Undivided Paleozoic metasedimentary rocks. Includes slate, sandstone, shale, chert, conglomerate, limestone, dolomite, marble, phyllite, schist, hornfels, and quartzite
Paleozoic metavolcanic rocks, unit 1 (Eastern Klamath Mountains) (Devonian and Permian)
Undivided Paleozoic metavolcanic rocks. Mostly flows, breccia and tuff, including greenstone, diabase, and pillow lavas; minor interbedded sedimentary rocks
Paleozoic metavolcanic rocks, unit 5 (Mono Lake) (Triassic to Jurassic)
Undivided Paleozoic metavolcanic rocks. Mostly flows, breccia and tuff, including greenstone, diabase, and pillow lavas; minor interbedded sedimentary rocks
pre-Cenozoic metasedimentary and metavolcanic rocks undivided (Early Proterozoic to Cretaceous)
Undivided pre-Cenozoic metasedimentary and metavolcanic rocks of great variety. Mostly slate, quartzite, hornfels, chert, phyllite, mylonite, schist, gneiss, and minor marble.
Schist of various types and ages, unit 3 (Santa Cruz Island) (Jurassic)
Schists of various types; mostly Paleozoic or Mesozoic age; some Precambrian.
Triassic marine rocks, unit 1 (Death Valley area and Mojave Desert) (Early to Middle Triassic)
Shale, conglomerate, limestone and dolomite, sandstone, slate, hornfels, quartzite; minor pyroclastic rocks
Triassic marine rocks, unit 2 (Eastern Klamath Mountains) (Middle to Late Triassic)
Shale, conglomerate, limestone and dolomite, sandstone, slate, hornfels, quartzite; minor pyroclastic rocks
Colorado
Belden Fm (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Carboniferous Pennsylvanian)
Shale, limestone, and sandstone. Includes Kerber Fm in south-central
Chinle, Moenkopi, and Park City Fms (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic Mesozoic | Permian Triassic)
Red and gray siltstone, shale, and sandstone
Dolores Fm (Phanerozoic | Mesozoic | Triassic)
Red siltstone, shale, sandstone, and limestone-pellet conglomerate
Green River Fm (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary)
Marlstone, sandstone, and oil shale
Green River Fm--Laney Member (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary)
Claystone, oil shale, and sandstone; in Sand Wash basin
Green River Fm--Lower Part (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary)
Shale, sandstone, marlstone, and limestone in Anvil Points, Garden Gulch, and Douglas Creek Members; in Piceance basin
Laramie Fm (Phanerozoic | Mesozoic | Cretaceous)
Shale, claystone, sandstone, and major coal beds
Leadville, Gilman, Dyer, Parting, and Sawatch Fms in west-central and south-central. Leadville Limestone, Ouray Limestone, Elbert Fm, and Ignacio Quartzite in far southwest (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Cambrian Ordovician(?) Silurian(?) Devonian(?) Carboniferous)
Elbert Fm: shale and sandstone.
Madison Limestone (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Carboniferous Mississippian)
Upper part includes equivalents of Upper Mississippian Doughnut and Humbug Fms (shale, limestone, and sandstone)
Manitou Limestone and Sawatch Quartzite in Southern Front Range and Wet Mountains. One or more Ordovician Fms (Fremont Limestone, Harding Sandstone, and Manitou Dolomite), Dotsero Fm, Peerless Fm, and Sawatch Quartzite in west-ce (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Cambrian Ordovician)
Dotsero Fm: Dolomite, in White River plateau only. Peerless Fm: sandstone and dolomite.
San Jose Fm (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary)
Siltstone, shale, and sandstone
Triassic and Permian rocks (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic Mesozoic | Permian Triassic)
Red siltstone, shale, and sandstone. Includes various combinations of Nugget, Jelm, Popo Agie, Chugwater, Red Peak, Forelle, Satanka, and Goose Egg Fms near Wyoming border
Upper Permian rocks, undivided (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Permian)
Siltstone, dolomite, and sandstone; in southeast
Wasatch Fm (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary)
Claystone, shale, and sandstone
Wasatch Fm--Cathedral Bluffs Tongue (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary)
Claystone, mudstone, and sandstone; in Sand Wash basin
Connecticut
East Berlin Formation (Lower Jurassic)
East Berlin Formation - Maroon siltstone, silty and sandy shale, and fine-grained silty sandstone, generally well laminated and commonly well indurated, alternating with dark fissile shale; dolomitic carbonate common in cement, concretions, and thin argillaceous laminae. Local arkose; grades eastward into coarse conglomerate close to eastern border fault. The East Berlin Formation of the Hartford basin contains eight facies: trough cross-bedded sandstones, horizontally stratified sandstones, interbedded sandstones and mudrocks, ripple cross-laminated siltstones, black shales, stratified mudrocks, disrupted shales, and disrupted mudstones. These facies are interpreted as a continental depositional system and are divided into two assemblages. Sandflat/alluvial plain facies assemblage (sandstones and siltstones) is composed of sheet-flood deposits. The lacustrine assemblage (shales and mudrocks) represents a saline lake-playa system (Gierlowski-Kordesch and Rust, 1994).
New Haven Arkose (Upper Triassic; possibly Lower Jurassic at top)
New Haven Arkose - Red, pink, and gray coarse-grained, locally conglomeratic, poorly sorted and indurated arkose, interbedded with brick-red micaceous, locally shaly siltstone and fine-grained feldspathic clayey sandstone.
New Haven Arkose plus Buttress Dolerite (Upper Triassic; possibly Lower Jurassic at top plus Middle? Jurassic)
New Haven Arkose plus Buttress Dolerite - New Haven Arkose - Red, pink, and gray coarse-grained, locally conglomeratic, poorly sorted and indurated arkose, interbedded with brick-red micaceous, locally shaly siltstone and fine-grained feldspathic clayey sandstone. Buttress Dolerite (Middle? Jurassic) - Dark-gray to greenish-gray (weathers brown or gray), medium- to fine-grained, commonly porphyritic, generally massive with well-developed columnar jointing, grading from basalt near contacts to fine-grained gabbro in the interior, composed of plagioclase and pyroxene with accessory opaques and locally devitrified glass, quartz, or olivine.
Shuttle Meadow Formation (Lower Jurassic)
Shuttle Meadow Formation - Maroon to dark-gray, silty shale, siltstone, and fine-grained silty sandstone, generally well and thinly laminated. In the southern part of the State includes a layer, up to 5 m thick, of blue, commonly sandy, fine-grained limestone or dolomitic limestone, grading laterally into calcareous siltstone. Coarser and more arkosic to east and south, grading into conglomerate near the eastern border fault.
Stockbridge Marble (Lower Ordovician and Cambrian)
Stockbridge Marble (including Inwood Marble) - White to gray, massive to layered marble, generally dolomitic but containing calcite marble in upper part, locally interlayered with schist or phyllite and with calcareous siltstone or sandstone.
Unit b [of Stockbridge Marble] (Upper and Middle? Cambrian)
Unit b [of Stockbridge Marble] - White, pink, cream, and light-gray, generally well bedded dolomitic marble interlayered with phyllite and schist and with siltstone, sandstone, or quartzite, commonly dolomitic.
Units e and d [of Stockbridge Marble] (Lower Ordovician)
Units e and d [of Stockbridge Marble] - White to gray massive calcite marble, commonly mottled with dolomite and locally interlayered with dolomite marble and calcareous siltstone and sandstone.
Delaware
Bryn Mawr Formation (?)
Bryn Mawr Formation - Red and brown quartz sand with silt, clay and fine gravel.
Chesapeake Group (Tertiary)
Chesapeake Group - Bluish gray silt with quartz sand and some shell beds.
Columbia Formation (Pleistocene)
Columbia Formation - Yellow and reddish brown quartz sand with gravel and little clay
Estuarine deposits (Pleistocene)
Estuarine deposits - mottled, gray and brown, silt and clayey quartz sand
Magothy Formation (Cretaceous)
Magothy Formation - White and buff quartz sand with beds of gray and black clayey silt.
Merchantville Formation (Cretaceous)
Merchantville Formation - Dark gray to bluish-gray slightly glauconitic, micaceous silty, very fine sand.
Mt. Laurel-Navesink Formation (Cretaceous)
Mt. Laurel-Navesink Formation - Dark greenish brown and dark gray, highly glauconitic sandy silt and silty sand.
Other nearshore deposits (Pleistocene)
Other nearshore deposits - yellow and gray quartz sand with some interbedded gray silts; chiefly neritic, offshore bar, and lagoonal facies
Potomac Formation (Cretaceous)
Potomac Formation - Variegated silts and clays with beds of quartz sand.
Rancocas Formation (Tertiary)
Rancocas Formation - Grayish-green and green, silty, glauconitic sand.
Redbank Formation (Cretaceous)
Redbank Formation - Reddish-brown, slightly micaceous and glauconitic, fine to medium sand.
Unit C (Tertiary)
Unit C - Grayish-green, clayey glauconitic silt and sand.
Wenonah Formation (Cretaceous)
Wenonah Formation - Gray and rust-brown fine to medium, micaceous, sparingly glauconitic quartz sand.
Florida
Alluvium (Pleistocene/Holocene)
Alluvium - Undifferentiated Quaternary Sediments - Much of Florida's surface is covered by a varying thickness of undifferentiated sediments consisting of siliciclastics, organics and freshwater carbonates. Where these sediments exceed 20 feet (6.1 meters) thick, they were mapped as discrete units. In an effort to subdivide the undifferentiated sediments, those sediments occurring in flood plains were mapped as alluvial and flood plain deposits (Qal). Sediments showing surficial expression of beach ridges and dunes were mapped separately (Qbd) as were the sediments composing Trail Ridge (Qtr). Terrace sands were not mapped (refer to Healy [1975] for a discussion of the terraces in Florida). The subdivisions of the Undifferentiated Quaternary Sediments (Qu) are not lithostratigraphic units but are utilized in order to facilitate a better understanding of the State's geology. The siliciclastics are light gray, tan, brown to black, unconsolidated to poorly consolidated, clean to clayey, silty, unfossiliferous, variably organic-bearing sands to blue green to olive green, poorly to moderately consolidated, sandy, silty clays. Gravel is occasionally present in the panhandle. Organics occur as plant debris, roots, disseminated organic matrix and beds of peat. Freshwater carbonates, often referred to as marls in the literature, are scattered over much of the State. In southern Florida, freshwater carbonates are nearly ubiquitous in the Everglades. These sediments are buff colored to tan, unconsolidated to poorly consolidated, fossiliferous carbonate muds. Sand, silt and clay may be present in limited quantities. These carbonates often contain organics. The dominant fossils in the freshwater carbonates are mollusks.
Anastasia Formation (Pleistocene)
Anastasia Formation - The Atlantic Coastal Ridge is underlain by the Anastasia Formation from St. Johns County southward to Palm Beach County. Excellent exposures occur in Flagler County in Washington Oaks State Park, in Martin County at the House of Refuge on Hutchinson Island and at Blowing Rocks in Palm Beach County. An impressive exposure of Anastasia Formation sediments occurs along Country Club Road in Palm Beach County (Lovejoy, 1992). The Anastasia Formation generally is recognized near the coast but extends inland as much as 20 miles (32 kilometers) in St. Lucie and Martin Counties. The Anastasia Formation, named by Sellards (1912),is composed of interbedded sands and coquinoid limestones. The most recognized facies of the Anastasia sediments is an orangish brown, unindurated to moderately indurated, coquina of whole and fragmented mollusk shells in a matrix of sand often cemented by sparry calcite. Sands occur as light gray to tan and orangish brown, unconsolidated to moderately indurated, unfossiliferous to very fossiliferous beds. The Anastasia Formation forms part of the surficial aquifer system.
Citronelle Formation (Pliocene)
Citronelle Formation - The Citronelle Formation is widespread in the Gulf Coastal Plain. The type section for the Citronelle Formation, named by Matson (1916), is near Citronelle, Alabama. The Citronelle Formation grades laterally, through a broad facies transition, into the Miccosukee Formation of the eastern Florida panhandle. Coe (1979) investigated the Citronelle Formation in portions of the western Florida panhandle. The Citronelle Formation is a siliciclastic, deltaic deposit that is lithologically similar to, and time equivalent with, the Cypresshead Formation and, at least in part, the Long Key Formation (Cunningham et al., 1998) of the peninsula. In the western panhandle, some of the sediments mapped as Citronelle Formation may be reworked Citronelle. The lithologies are the same and there are few fossils present to document a possible younger age. The Citronelle Formation consists of gray to orange, often mottled, unconsolidated to poorly consolidated, very fine to very coarse, poorly sorted, clean to clayey sands. It contains significant amounts of clay, silt and gravel which may occur as beds and lenses and may vary considerably over short distances. Limonite nodules and limonite-cemented beds are common. Marine fossils are rare but fossil pollen, plant remains and occasional vertebrates are found. Much of the Citronelle Formation is highly permeable. It forms the Sand and Gravel Aquifer of the surficial aquifer system.
Cypresshead Formation (Pliocene)
Cypresshead Formation - The Cypresshead Formation named by Huddlestun (1988), is composed of siliciclastics and occurs only in the peninsula and eastern Georgia. It is at or near the surface from northern Nassau County southward to Highlands County forming the peninsular highlands. It appears that the Cypresshead Formation occurs in the subsurface southward from the outcrop region and similar sediments, the Long Key Formation, underlie the Florida Keys. The Cypresshead Formation is a shallow marine, near shore deposit equivalent to the Citronelle Formation deltaic sediments and the Miccosukee Formation prodeltaic sediments. The Cypresshead Formation consists of reddish brown to reddish orange, unconsolidated to poorly consolidated, fine to very coarse grained, clean to clayey sands. Cross bedded sands are common within the formation. Discoid quartzite pebbles and mica are often present. Clay beds are scattered and not areally extensive. In general, the Cypresshead Formation in exposure occurs above 100 feet (30 meters) above mean sea level (msl). Original fossil material is not present in the sediments although poorly preserved molds and casts of mollusks and burrow structures are occasionally present. The presence of these fossil "ghosts" and trace fossils documents marine influence on deposition of the Cypresshead sediments. The permeable sands of the Cypresshead Formation form part of the surficial aquifer system.
Hawthorn Group (Miocene)
Hawthorn Group - Undifferentiated Hawthorn Group - The undifferentiated Hawthorn Group occurs at or near the surface near the southern flank of the Ocala Platform from Gilchrist County southward to Pasco County with isolated occurrences in Pinellas County. Correlation of these sediments to the formations of the Hawthorn Group exposed to the east and in the subsurface is uncertain. There is little to no phosphate present in these sediments and fossils are rare. Ages have not been documented but stratigraphic position suggests inclusion in the Hawthorn Group. These sediments may be residual from the weathering and erosion of the Hawthorn Group. The Hawthorn Group sediments on the Brooksville Ridge are deeply weathered and in some outcrops look like Cypresshead Formation siliciclastics. The undifferentiated Hawthorn Group sediments are light olive gray and blue gray in unweathered sections to reddish brown in deeply weathered sections, poorly to moderately consolidated, clayey sands to silty clays and relatively pure clays. These sediments are part of the intermediate confining unit/aquifer system and provide an effective aquitard for the FAS, except where perforated by karst features. Hard-rock phosphate deposits are associated with the undifferentiated Hawthorn Group sediments on the eastern flank of the Brooksville Ridge. The hard rock phosphate deposits were formed by the dissolution of phosphate in the Hawthorn sediments and redeposition in karst features.
Hawthorn Group, Arcadia Formation (Oligocene/Miocene)
Hawthorn Group, Arcadia Formation - The undifferentiated Arcadia Formation and the Tampa Member crop out on the southwestern flank of the Ocala Platform from Pasco County southward to Sarasota County. Although ages of the outcropping sediments have not been accurately determined, stratigraphic position suggests that the Upper Oligocene parts of the Arcadia Formation and Tampa Member are exposed in this region, particularly from Hillsborough County northward to Pasco County. The Arcadia Formation, named by Scott (1988), is predominantly a carbonate unit with a variable siliciclastic component, including thin beds of siliciclastics. Within the outcrop area, the Arcadia Formation, with the exception of the Tampa Member, is composed of yellowish gray to light olive gray to light brown, micro to finely crystalline, variably sandy, clayey, and phosphatic, fossiliferous limestones and dolostones. Thin beds of sand and clay are common. The sands are yellowish gray, very fine to medium grained, poorly to moderately indurated, clayey, dolomitic and phosphatic. The clays are yellowish gray to light olive gray, poorly to moderately indurated, sandy, silty, phosphatic and dolomitic. Molds and casts of mollusks are common in the dolostones. Silicified carbonates and opalized claystone are found in the Arcadia Formation.
Hawthorn Group, Arcadia Formation, Tampa Member (Oligocene/Miocene)
Hawthorn Group, Arcadia Formation, Tampa Member - The Tampa Member consists predominantly of limestone with subordinate dolostone, sand and clay (Scott, 1988). The lithology of the Tampa Member is very similar to that of the subsurface limestone part of the Arcadia Formation except that the Tampa Member contains noticeably less phosphate (Scott, 1988). The limestone in the Tampa is white to yellowish gray, fossiliferous and variably sandy and clayey mudstone, wackestone and packstone with minor to no phosphate grains. Sand and clay beds are like those in the undifferentiated Arcadia Formation. Mollusks and corals are common in the Tampa Member as molds and casts, silicified pseudomorphs and original shell material. The Tampa Member and the lower part of the Arcadia Formation form the upper part of the Floridan aquifer system (FAS) in parts of southern Florida (Miller, 1986; Scott, 1991).
Hawthorn Group, Coosawhatchie Formation (Miocene)
Coosawhatchie Formation - The Coosawhatchie Formation is exposed or lies beneath a thin overburden on the eastern flank of the Ocala Platform from southern Columbia County to southern Marion County. Within the outcrop region, the Coosawhatchie Formation varies from a light gray to olive gray, poorly consolidated, variably clayey and phosphatic sand with few fossils, to an olive gray, poorly to moderately consolidated, slightly sandy, silty clay with few to no fossils. Occasionally the sands will contain a dolomitic component and, rarely, the dominant lithology will be dolostone or limestone. Silicified nodules are often present in the Coosawhatchie Formation sediments in the outcrop region. The sediment may contain 20 percent or more phosphate (Scott, 1988). Permeability of the Coosawhatchie sediments is generally low, forming part of the intermediate confining unit/aquifer system.
Hawthorn Group, Coosawhatchie Formation, Charlton Member (Miocene/Pliocene)
Hawthorne Group, Coosawhatchie Formation, Charlton Member - The Charlton Member (originally the Charlton formation, Veatch and Stevenson, 1911), crops out only in northern Nassau County near and along the St. Marys River. The Charlton Member in this area consists primarily of light gray to greenish gray, poorly to moderately consolidated, dolomitic to calcareous, silty, sandy, locally fossiliferous clays. Few carbonate beds occur.
Hawthorn Group, Peace River Formation, Bone Valley Member (Miocene/Pliocene)
Hawthorn Group, Peace River Formation, Bone Valley Member - The Bone Valley Member (originally the Bone Valley Formation of Matson and Clapp, 1909), Peace River Formation occurs in a limited area on the southern part of the Ocala Platform in Hillsborough, Polk and Hardee Counties. Throughout its extent, the Bone Valley Member is a clastic unit consisting of sand-sized and larger phosphate grains in a matrix of quartz sand, silt and clay. The lithology is highly variable, ranging from sandy, silty, phosphatic clays and relatively pure clays to clayey, phosphatic sands to sandy, clayey phosphorites (Webb and Crissinger, 1983). In general, consolidation is poor and colors range from white, light brown and yellowish gray to olive gray and blue green. Mollusks are found as reworked, often phosphatized casts. Vertebrate fossils occur in many of the beds within the Bone Valley Member. Shark's teeth are often abundant. Silicified corals and wood are occasionally present as well. The Bone Valley Member is an extremely important, unique phosphate deposit and has provided much of the phosphate production in the United States during the twentieth century. Mining of phosphate in the outcrop area began in 1888 (Cathcart, 1985) and continues to the present.
Jackson Bluff Formation (Pliocene)
Jackson Bluff Formation - The Jackson Bluff Formation, named by Vernon and Puri (1964), occurs at or near the surface in a limited area of the panhandle in Leon, Liberty and Wakulla Counties. It has attracted much attention due to its abundant fossil molluscan fauna (Huddlestun, 1984; Schmidt, 1984). In the outcrop area, the Jackson Bluff Formation is described as a sandy, clayey shell bed (Schmidt, 1984). It is composed of tan to orange-brown to gray green, poorly consolidated, fossiliferous, sandy clays to clayey sands. Fossils present include abundant mollusks, corals, foraminifers and occasional vertebrate remains.
Miami Limestone (Pleistocene)
Miami Limestone - The Miami Limestone (formerly the Miami Oolite), named by Sanford (1909), occurs at or near the surface in southeastern peninsular Florida from Palm Beach County to Dade and Monroe Counties. It forms the Atlantic Coastal Ridge and extends beneath the Everglades where it is commonly covered by thin organic and freshwater sediments. The Miami Limestone occurs on the mainland and in the southern Florida Keys from Big Pine Key to the Marquesas Keys. From Big Pine Key to the mainland, the Miami Limestone is replaced by the Key Largo Limestone. To the north, in Palm Beach County, the Miami Limestone grades laterally northward into the Anastasia Formation. The Miami Limestone consists of two facies, an oolitic facies and a bryozoan facies (Hoffmeister et al. [1967]). The oolitic facies consists of white to orangish gray, poorly to moderately indurated, sandy, oolitic limestone (grainstone) with scattered concentrations of fossils. The bryozoan facies consists of white to orangish gray, poorly to well indurated, sandy, fossiliferous limestone (grainstone and packstone). Beds of quartz sand are also present as unindurated sediments and indurated limey sandstones. Fossils present include mollusks, bryozoans, and corals. Molds and casts of fossils are common. The highly porous and permeable Miami Limestone forms much of the Biscayne Aquifer of the surficial aquifer system.
Miccosukee Formation (Pliocene)
Miccosukee Formation - The Miccosukee Formation, named by Hendry and Yon (1967), is a siliciclastic unit with a limited distribution in the eastern panhandle. It occurs in the Tallahassee Hills from central Gadsden County to eastern Madison County, often capping hills. The Miccosukee Formation grades to the west, through a broad facies transition, in central Gadsden County into the Citronelle Formation. The Miccosukee Formation is a prodeltaic deposit. The Miccosukee Formation is composed of grayish orange to grayish red, mottled, poorly to moderately consolidated, interbedded clay, sand and gravel of varying coarseness and admixtures (Hendry and Yon, 1967). The unit is relatively impermeable but is considered a part of the surficial aquifer system (Southeastern Geological Society, 1986).
Residuum on Eocene sediments (Eocene)
Residuum on Eocene sediments - The post-Eocene residuum lying on Eocene sediments in the panhandle consists of reddish brown, sandy clays and clayey sands with inclusions of weathered Eocene limestones. Some of the inclusions are silicified carbonates.
Residuum on Oligocene sediments (Oligocene)
Residuum on Oligocene sediments - The undifferentiated Oligocene residuum, mapped on parts of the Chattahoochee "Anticline", characteristically consists of reddish brown, variably sandy clay with inclusions of variably fossiliferous, silicified limestone (Huddlestun, 1993). The residuum includes Lower and Upper Oligocene weathered sediments (Huddlestun, 1993).
Reworked Cypresshead sediments (Pliocene/Pleistocene)
Reworked Cypresshead sediments - Undifferentiated reworked Cypresshead Formation- This unit is the result of post depositional reworking of the Cypresshead siliciclastics. The sediments are fine to coarse quartz sands with scattered quartz gravel and varying percentages of clay matrix.
Shelly sediments of Plio-Pleistocene age (Pliocene/Pleistocene)
Shelly sediments of Plio-Pleistocene age - Tertiary-Quaternary Fossiliferous Sediments of Southern Florida - Molluskbearing sediments of southern Florida contain some of the most abundant and diverse fossil faunas in the world. The origin of these accumulations of fossil mollusks is imprecisely known (Allmon, 1992). The shell beds have attracted much attention due to the abundance and preservation of the fossils but the biostratigraphy and lithostratigraphy of the units has not been well defined (Scott, 1992). Scott and Wingard (1995) discussed the problems associated with biostratigraphy and lithostratigraphy of the Plio-Pleistocene in southern Florida. These "formations" are biostratigraphic units. The "formations" previously recognized within the latest Tertiary-Quaternary section of southern Florida include the latest Pliocene - early Pleistocene Caloosahatchee Formation, the early Pleistocene Bermont formation (informal) and the late Pleistocene Fort Thompson Formation. This section consists of fossiliferous sands and carbonates. The identification of these units is problematic unless the significant molluscan species are recognized. Often exposures are not extensive enough to facilitate the collection of representative faunal samples to properly discern the biostratigraphic identification of the formation. In an attempt to alleviate the inherent problems in the biostratigraphic recognition of lithostratigraphic units, Scott (1992) suggested grouping the latest Pliocene through late Pleistocene Caloosahatchee, Bermont and Fort Thompson Formations in to a single lithostratigraphic entity, the Okeechobee formation (informal). In mapping the shelly sands and carbonates, a generalized grouping as Tertiary-Quaternary shell units (TQsu) was utilized. This is equivalent to the informal Okeechobee formation. The distribution of the Caloosahatchee and Fort Thompson Formation are shown on previous geologic maps by Cooke (1945), Vernon and Puri (1964) and Brooks (1982). The Nashua Formation occurs within the Pliocene - Pleistocene in northern Florida. However, it crops out or is near the surface is an area too small to be shown on a map of this scale. Lithologically these sediments are complex, varying from unconsolidated, variably calcareous and fossiliferous quartz sands to well indurated, sandy, fossiliferous limestones (both marine and freshwater). Clayey sands and sandy clays are present. These sediments form part of the surficial aquifer system
Tamiami Formation (Pliocene)
Tamiami Formation - The Tamiami Formation (Mansfield, 1939) is a poorly defined lithostratigraphic unit containing a wide range of mixed carbonate-siliciclastic lithologies and associated faunas (Missimer, 1992). It occurs at or near the land surface in Charlotte, Lee, Hendry, Collier and Monroe Counties in the southern peninsula. A number of named and unnamed members are recognized within the Tamiami Formation. These include: the Buckingham Limestone Member; an unnamed tan clay and sand; an oyster (Hyotissa) facies, a sand facies, the Ochopee Limestone Member, the Bonita Springs Marl Member; an unnamed limestone facies; the Golden Gate Reef Member; and the Pinecrest Sand Member (Missimer, 1992). The individual members of the Tamiami Formation were not separately mapped on the geological map. Lithologies of the Tamiami Formation in the mapped area include: 1) light gray to tan, unconsolidated, fine to coarse grained, fossiliferous sand; 2) light gray to green, poorly consolidated, fossiliferous sandy clay to clayey sand; 3) light gray, poorly consolidated, very fine to medium grained, calcareous, fossiliferous sand; 4) white to light gray, poorly consolidated, sandy, fossiliferous limestone; and 5) white to light gray, moderately to well indurated, sandy, fossiliferous limestone. Phosphate is present in virtually all lithologies as limited quantities of sand- to gravel-sized grains. Fossils present in the Tamiami occur as molds, casts and original material. The fossils present include barnacles, mollusks, corals, echinoids, foraminifers and calcareous nannoplankton. The Tamiami Formation has highly permeable to impermeable lithologies that form a complex aquifer. Locally, it is part of the surficial aquifer system. In other areas, it forms a part of the intermediate confining unit/aquifer system.
Trail Ridge sands (Pleistocene)
Trail Ridge Sands - Undifferentiated sediments - Undifferentiated Quaternary Sediments - Much of Florida's surface is covered by a varying thickness of undifferentiated sediments consisting of siliciclastics, organics and freshwater carbonates. Where these sediments exceed 20 feet (6.1 meters) thick, they were mapped as discrete units. In an effort to subdivide the undifferentiated sediments, those sediments occurring in flood plains were mapped as alluvial and flood plain deposits (Qal). Sediments showing surficial expression of beach ridges and dunes were mapped separately (Qbd) as were the sediments composing Trail Ridge (Qtr). Terrace sands were not mapped (refer to Healy [1975] for a discussion of the terraces in Florida). The subdivisions of the Undifferentiated Quaternary Sediments (Qu) are not lithostratigraphic units but are utilized in order to facilitate a better understanding of the State's geology. The siliciclastics are light gray, tan, brown to black, unconsolidated to poorly consolidated, clean to clayey, silty, unfossiliferous, variably organic-bearing sands to blue green to olive green, poorly to moderately consolidated, sandy, silty clays. Gravel is occasionally present in the panhandle. Organics occur as plant debris, roots, disseminated organic matrix and beds of peat. Freshwater carbonates, often referred to as marls in the literature, are scattered over much of the State. In southern Florida, freshwater carbonates are nearly ubiquitous in the Everglades. These sediments are buff colored to tan, unconsolidated to poorly consolidated, fossiliferous carbonate muds. Sand, silt and clay may be present in limited quantities. These carbonates often contain organics. The dominant fossils in the freshwater carbonates are mollusks.
Undifferentiated sediments (Pleistocene/Holocene)
Undifferentiated sediments - Undifferentiated Quaternary Sediments - Much of Florida's surface is covered by a varying thickness of undifferentiated sediments consisting of siliciclastics, organics and freshwater carbonates. Where these sediments exceed 20 feet (6.1 meters) thick, they were mapped as discrete units. In an effort to subdivide the undifferentiated sediments, those sediments occurring in flood plains were mapped as alluvial and flood plain deposits (Qal). Sediments showing surficial expression of beach ridges and dunes were mapped separately (Qbd) as were the sediments composing Trail Ridge (Qtr). Terrace sands were not mapped (refer to Healy [1975] for a discussion of the terraces in Florida). The subdivisions of the Undifferentiated Quaternary Sediments (Qu) are not lithostratigraphic units but are utilized in order to facilitate a better understanding of the State's geology. The siliciclastics are light gray, tan, brown to black, unconsolidated to poorly consolidated, clean to clayey, silty, unfossiliferous, variably organic-bearing sands to blue green to olive green, poorly to moderately consolidated, sandy, silty clays. Gravel is occasionally present in the panhandle. Organics occur as plant debris, roots, disseminated organic matrix and beds of peat. Freshwater carbonates, often referred to as marls in the literature, are scattered over much of the State. In southern Florida, freshwater carbonates are nearly ubiquitous in the Everglades. These sediments are buff colored to tan, unconsolidated to poorly consolidated, fossiliferous carbonate muds. Sand, silt and clay may be present in limited quantities. These carbonates often contain organics. The dominant fossils in the freshwater carbonates are mollusks.
Undifferentiated sediments (Pliocene/Pleistocene)
Undifferentiated sediments - Undifferentiated Tertiary-Quaternary Sediments - These sediments are siliciclastics that are separated from undifferentiated Quaternary sediments solely on the basis of elevation. Based on the suggestion that the Pleistocene sea levels reached a maximum of approximately 100 feet (30 meters) msl (Colquhoun, 1969), these sediments, which occur above 100 feet (30 meters) msl, are predominantly older than Pleistocene but contain some sediments reworked during the Pleistocene. This unit may include fluvial and aeolian deposits. The undifferentiated Tertiary-Quaternary sediments occur in a band extending from the Georgia-Florida state line in Baker and Columbia Counties southward to Alachua County. These sediments are gray to blue green, unconsolidated to poorly consolidated, fine to coarse grained, clean to clayey, unfossiliferous sands, sandy clays and clays. Organic debris and disseminated organics are present in these sediments. The undifferentiated Tertiary-Quaternary sediments are part of the surficial aquifer system.
Georgia
Aeolian sand deposits - formless deposits (Quaternary)
Aeolian sand deposits - formless deposits
Blufftown Formation (Cretaceous)
Blufftown Formation
Clayton Formation (Paleocene)
Clayton Formation
Clinchfield Sand (Eocene)
Clinchfield Sand
Cusseta, Blufftown, and Eutaw Formations, undifferentiated (Cretaceous)
Cusseta, Blufftown, and Eutaw Formations, undifferentiated
Cusseta Sand (Cretaceous)
Cusseta Sand
Eocene and Oligocene Residuum, undifferentiated (Eocene-Oligocene)
Eocene and Oligocene Residuum, undifferentiated
Eocene undifferentiated (Eocene)
Eocene undifferentiated, highly weathered sands and sandy clays of lower Tertiary age
Eutaw Formation (Cretaceous)
Eutaw Formation
"Hawthorn Formation" (Miocene)
"Hawthorn Formation", includes Marks Head Formation; Parachucia Beds (Sloan, 1905); and Alum Bluff Formation (Veatch and Stephenson, 1911).
Irwinton Sand (Eocene)
Irwinton Sand (Ei), up-dip equivalent of Twiggs Clay, Sandersville Limestone, and Cooper Marl. As mapped, also includes younger clastics of indefinite Late Tertiary age.
Lisbon Formation (Eocene)
Lisbon Formation
Lower Tertiary-Cretaceous undifferentiated (Lower Tertiary-Cretaceous)
Lower Tertiary-Cretaceous undifferentiated, as mapped includes Middendorf Formation (Sloan, 1904); "Channel Sands" (LaMoreaux, 1946); Tuscaloosa Formation (Cooke, 1939); and "Huber beds" (Buie, informal terminology)
Miccosukee Formation (Neogene)
Miccosukee Formation
Mississippian undifferentiated (Mississippian)
Mississippian undifferentiated: Includes Pennington Shale, Bangor Limestone (except in Floyd County), Hartselle Sandstone, Golconda Formation, Gasper Limestone, Ste. Genevieve Limestone and St. Louis Limestone
Nanafalia Formation (Paleocene)
Nanafalia Formation
Nanafalia, Porters Creek, and Clayton Formations, undifferentiated (Paleocene)
Nanafalia, Porters Creek, and Clayton Formations, undifferentiated
Pleistocene-Pliocene sands and gravels (Pleistocene-Pliocene)
Pleistocene-Pliocene sands and gravels, includes, in part, Sunderland, Coharie, and Brandywine "Formations" of Cooke, 1939
Providence Sand (Cretaceous)
Providence Sand, includes Perote Member
Ripley Formation (Cretaceous)
Ripley Formation
Tallahatta Formation (Eocene)
Tallahatta Formation
Tuscahoma Sand (Paleocene)
Tuscahoma Sand, as mapped includes lower Eocene Bashi Marl Member of the Hatchetigbee Formation
Tuscaloosa Formation (Cretaceous)
Tuscaloosa Formation
Iowa
Cherokee Group (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Carboniferous Pennsylvanian-Middle [Des Moines])
Cyclic deposits with carbonaceous shale, clay, siltstone, with lesser sandstone, and thick coal beds; minor but persistent limestone beds; may include parts of Atoka or Morrow Series.
Ft. Dodge Beds (Phanerozoic | Mesozoic | Jurassic)
Gypsum and red and green shale; in Webster CO only
Galena-Decorah-Platteville Formations (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Ordovician-Middle [Mohawkian])
Galena FM- dolomite, minor limestone; chert in lower half. Approx thickness 230 ft. Decorah FM- brown limestone and dolomite; gray-green and brown shales at top and base. Approx thickness 60 ft. Platteville FM- fossiliferous gray limestone and brown dolomite; grayish-green shale at base (Glenwood). Fine- to medium-grained sandstone occurs above the Glenwood in the subsurface of southeastern Iowa. Approx thickness 110 ft
LaPort City Chert (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Devonian-Early)
Predominantly chert with limestone and dolomite; minor shale and sandstone. Found in subsurface only.
Marmaton Group (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Carboniferous Pennsylvanian-Middle [Des Moines])
Alternating shale and limestone, with some sandstone and coal; Lenapah FM at top and Fort Scott at base.
Meramec Series (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Carboniferous Mississippian-Late)
Ste. Genevieve Limestone- fossiliferous limestone and red and green shale. Approx. thickness 50 ft. St. Louis Limestone- limestone and dolomite, sandstone locally perdominant; locally contains chert. Spergen Formation- sandy micaceous dolomite.
Osage Series (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Carboniferous Mississippian-Early)
Warsaw Formation- gray, dolomitic shale and argillaceous dolomite; chalcedonic chert. Locally contains many geodes.Approx thickness 85 ft. Keokuk Limestone- fossiliferous, gray or brown limestone and dolomite; gray and brown chert with white spicules, locally predominant in lower portion; minor brown or gray shale. Approx thickness 90 ft. Burlington Limestone- gray, fossiliferous limestone and darker gray dolomite; white and gray mottled fossiliferous chert, locally contains dolomite crystals; two widespread glauconite zones; basal sandstone locally in southeastern Iowa. Approx thickness 80 ft.
Wabaunsee Group (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Carboniferous Pennsylvanian-Late [Virgil])
Cyclic deposits, principally shale with limestone, siltstone, minor sandstone units and thin coal seams.
Idaho
Clay, silt, sand, and gravel; Late Pleistocene glacial-lake sediments; Basin and Range province (Late Pleistocene)
Pleistocene glacial-lake, ponded-water, and shoreline sediments.
Dolostone, limestone, sandstone, shale, and conglomerate; Devonian marine continental-shelf deposits; east-central and southeastern Idaho (Devonian)
Devonian bedded dolomite and limestone interval of eastern and southern Idaho.
Gravel and sand; Middle Pleistocene alluvial pediment gravel (Pleistocene )
Middle Pleistocene deposits; outwash, fanglomerate, flood and terrace gravels.
Gravel; Early Pleistocene alluvium; western Snake River Plain (Pleistocene)
Lower Pleistocene deposits; outwash, fanglomerate, flood and terrace gravels.
Gravel, sand, and clay; Quaternary-Tertiary colluvium and fanglomerate; western Idaho (Pleistocene and Pliocene)
Pleistocene and Pliocene fanglomerate, colluvium, and poorly sorted gravel deposits.
Gravel, sand, silt, clay; Late Pleistocene glacio-alluvial and lacustrine deposits; Basin and Range, and Snake River Plain (Late Pleistocene)
Upper Pleistocene deposits; outwash, fanglomerate, flood and terrace gravels.
Limestone, shale, siltstone, chert, and conglomerate; Mississippian western turbiditic flysch to eastern shallow-water carbonates; east-central Idaho (Mississippian)
Mississippian shallow-water carbonate-to-clastic sequence of east-central Idaho.
Sandstone, limestone, and shale; Upper Triassic marine to non-marine epicontinental deposits; southeastern Idaho (Late Triassic)
Upper Triassic shallow-marine to non-marine sediments; oxidized shale, siltstone, limestone, and conglomeratic sandstone of eastern Idaho.
Shale, conglomerate, sandstone, siltstone, limestone, and chert; Mississippian turbidite flysch from a western source; central Idaho (Mississippian)
Mississippian thrusted, shallow-to-deep marine detrital units of central Idaho.
Shale, limestone, and sandstone; Triassic marine to non-marine epicontinental deposits (subunits are TRl and TRu) (Triassic)
Triassic shallow-marine to non-marine sediments of eastern Idaho; subdivisions are (TRu and TRl).
Silt, clay, and diatomite; Middle Pleistocene lacustrine sediments of lava-dammed lakes; western Snake River Plain (Middle Pleistocene)
Middle Pleistocene lava-dammed Snake Plain lake beds of silt, clay and diatomite.
Silt, clay, sand, and gravel; Quaternary-Tertiary alluvial and lacustrine deposits; western Snake River Plain (Early Pleistocene and Late Pliocene)
Pleistocene and Pliocene stream and lake deposits.
Siltstone, evaporites, and redbeds; Late Jurassic Cordilleran retroarc-foreland-basin deposits; southeastern Idaho (Late Jurassic)
Upper Jurassic shallow-marine to non-marine sediments; glauconitic and variegated sandstone, siltstone and oolitic limestone of eastern Idaho.
Siltstone, shale, sandstone, and limestone; Jurassic Cordilleran retroarc-foreland-basin deposits (subunits are Jl and Ju); southeastern Idaho (Jurassic)
Jurassic shallow-marine to non-marine sediments of eastern Idaho; subdivisions are (Jl and Ju).
Illinois
Bond Formation (Pennsylvanian)
Bond Formation
Carbondale Formation (Pennsylvanian)
Carbondale Formation
Lower Chesterian (Glen Dean - Renault) Series (Mississippian)
Lower Chersterian (Glen Dean - Renault) Series
Middle Devonian (Devonian)
Middle Devonian
Upper Devonian (Devonian)
Upper Devonian
Indiana
Black River and Ancell Groups (Ordovician)
Black River and Ancell Groups - Dolomite, limestone, and sandstone
Knox Supergroup (Cambrian-Ordovician)
Knox Supergroup - P, base of Prairie du Chien Group
Kansas
Alluvium (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene Holocene)
unconsolidated sand, silt, clay, and gravel
Alluvium (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene)
unconsolidated sand, silt, clay, and gravel
Carlile Shale (Phanerozoic | Mesozoic | Cretaceous-Late)
chalky shale with bentonite and thick chalk beds, dark gray fissile shale containing septarian concretions, and fine-grained sandstone.
Dakota Formation (Phanerozoic | Mesozoic | Cretaceous-Early)
White, gray, red, brown and tan kaolinitic claystone, mudstone, shale and siltstone interbedded with grayish to yellowish brown thick lenticular sandstone beds. It also contains lignite and sandstone is commonly well cemented with iron oxide and calcite.
Drift (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene)
sand, silt, clay, and some gravel
Dune Sand (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene Holocene)
unconsolidated dune sand
Greenhorn Limestone and Graneros Shale (Phanerozoic | Mesozoic | Cretaceous-Late)
Greenhorn FM- thin bedded gray, chalky limestone and calcareous shale. Graneros Shale- fissile, noncalcareous, gray shale locally contains sandstone and siltstone beds.
Kansas City Group (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Carboniferous Pennsylvanian-Middle [Missourian])
Includes: Lane Shale,Wyandotte Limestone (base WY), Liberty Memorial Shale, Iola Limestone (base I), Chanute Shale (base CH), Dewey Limestone, Nellie Bly FM, Cherryvale FM, Dennis Limestone (base DN), Galeburg Shale, Mound Valley Limestone, Ladore Shale, Swope Limestone (base SW), Elm Branch Shale, Hertha Limestone.
Lansing Group (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Carboniferous Pennsylvanian-Middle [Missourian])
Stanton Limestone- three limestone and two shales members, ranges from 15 to 130 ft. thick. Vilas Shale- sandy, carbonaceous gray shale with some sandstone and limestone locally, ranges from 5 to 120 ft. thick. Plattsburg Limestone- two limestone members separated by shale, ranging from 25 to 115 ft. thick.
Marmaton Group (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Carboniferous Pennsylvanian-Early [Desmoinesian])
Includes: Lost Branch FM, Memorial Shale, Lenapah Limestone (base LE), Nowata Shale, Altamont Limestone (base PA), Bandera Shale, Pawnee Limestone (base PA), Labette Shale and Fort Scott Limestone.
Ogallala Formation (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Miocene)
massive to cross-bedded, generally arkosic sand, silt and gravel, locally cemented with calcium carbonate; also contains limestone, volcanic ash, diatomaceous marl, opaline sandstone and bentonitic clay
Shawnee Group (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Carboniferous Pennsylvanian-Late [Virgilian])
Includes: Topeka Limestone, Calhoun Shale, Deer Creek Limestone (base DC), Tecumseh Shale, Lecompton Limestone (base LC), Kanwaka Shale, Oread Limestone with Plattsmouth Limestone Member (base PL).
Kentucky
Alluvium (Pleistocene to Holocene)
Alluvium; includes glacial deposits along the Ohio River and its tributaries west of Cannelton locks
Breathitt Formation, lower part (Pennsylvanian)
Breathitt Formation, lower part; lower part which includes Livingston Conglomerate Member of Lee Formation in eastern Rockcastle County
Continental deposits and loess, undifferentiated (Tertiary to Quaternary)
Continental deposits and loess, undifferentiated; West of the Tennessee River
Continental deposits, undifferentiated (Tertiary to Quaternary)
Continental deposits, undifferentiated; East of the Tennessee River
Pennington Formation and Newman Limestone (Mississippian)
Pennington Formation and Newman Limestone; includes Carter Caves Sandstone in Carter County and vicinity
Pennington Formation (Paragon Formation), Bangor Limestone, Hartselle Formation, and Kidder Limestone Member of Monteagle Limestone, undivided (Mississippian)
Pennington Formation (Paragon Formation), Bangor Limestone, Hartselle Formation, and Kidder Limestone Member of Monteagle Limestone, undivided
Renfro and Muldraugh Members of Borden Formation and Fort Payne Formation, undivided (Mississippian)
Renfro and Muldraugh Members of Borden Formation and Fort Payne Formation, undivided
Rocks of Chesterian age, upper part (Upper Mississippian)
Rocks of Chesterian age, upper part
Ste. Genevieve and St. Louis Limestones, undivided (Mississippian)
Ste. Genevieve and St. Louis Limestones, undivided; includes Salem Limestone west of Christian County
Wildie, Nada, Halls Gap, Holtsclaw Siltstone, Cowbell, Nancy, Kenwood Siltstone, New Providence Shale, Sunbury Shale, Berea Sandstone, and Bedford Shale, undivided; Borden Formation locally includes Renfro Member in eastern Kentucky (Devonian to Mississippian)
Wildie, Nada, Halls Gap, Holtsclaw Siltstone, Cowbell, Nancy, Kenwood Siltstone, New Providence Shale, Sunbury Shale, Berea Sandstone, and Bedford Shale, undivided; Borden Formation locally includes Renfro Member in eastern Kentucky
Louisiana
Alluvium (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Holocene)
gray to brownish gray clay and silty clay, reddish brown in the Red River Valley, some sand and gravel locally.
Blounts Creek Member (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Miocene Pliocene)
gray to green silty clays, siltstones, and silts with abundant sand beds; some lignite and lenses of black chert gravel.
Braided Stream Terraces (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene)
light gray, tan and brown fine to coarse sand; some clay silt and gravel. Overlain by 1-9 meters of loess.
Braided Stream Terraces (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene)
light gray, tan and brown fine to coarse sand; some clay silt and gravel.
Catahoula Formation (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Oligocene)
gray to white sandstones; loose quartz sand, tuffaceous sandstone, volcanic ash, and brown sandy clays; petrified wood locally.
Catahoula Formation (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Oligocene)
gray to white sandstones; loose quartz sand, tuffaceous sandstone, volcanic ash, and brown sandy clays; petrified wood locally. Overlain by 1-9 meters of loess.
Cockfield Formation (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Eocene)
brown lignitic clays, silts and sands; some sideritic glauconite may weather to brown ironstone in lower part.
Deweyville Terrace (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene)
gray mixed with brown-to-red clay and silty clay; some sand and gravel locally.
High Terraces (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene)
tan to orange clay, silt, and sand with a large amount of basal gravels.
High Terraces (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene)
tan to orange clay, silt, and sand with a large amount of basal gravels. Overlain by 1-9 meters of loess.
Intermediate Terraces (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene)
light gray to orange-brown clay, sandy clay, and silt; much sand and gravel locally.
Intermediate Terraces (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene)
light gray to orange-brown clay, sandy clay, and silt; much sand and gravel locally. Overlain by 1-9 meters of loess.
Jackson Group (undifferentiated) (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Eocene)
light gray to brown liginitic clays with thin interbeds of limonitic sands or lignite; near base,calcareous, glauconitic, and fossiliferous beds may weather to black soil. Overlain by 1-9 meters of loess.
Jackson Group (undifferentiated) (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Eocene)
light gray to brown liginitic clays with thin interbeds of limonitic sands or lignite; near base,calcareous, glauconitic, and fossiliferous beds may weather to black soil.
Natural Levees (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Holocene)
gray and brown silt, silty clay, some very fine sand, reddish brown along the Red River.
Prairie Terraces (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene)
light gray to light brown clay, sandy clay, silt, sand, and some gravels.
Prairie Terraces (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene)
light gray to light brown clay, sandy clay, silt, sand, and some gravels. Overlain by 1-9 meters of loess.
Vicksburg Group (undifferentiated) (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Oligocene)
brown to gray liginitic clays with thin interbeds of lignite or micaceous sands; calcareous shale, petrified wood, and bluish fossilferous clay locally.
Vicksburg Group (undifferentiated) (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Oligocene)
brown to gray liginitic clays with thin interbeds of lignite or micaceous sands; calcareous shale, petrified wood, and bluish fossilferous clay locally. Overlain by 1-9 meters of loess.
Wilcox Group (undifferentiated) (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Paleocene)
gray to brown lignitic sands and silty to sandy lignitic clays, many seams of lignite; some limestone and glauconite.
Williamson Creek Member (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Miocene)
white to gray silts, siltstones, silty clays, and sand beds; some lenses of black chert gravel.
Massachusetts
Cambridge Argillite (Proterozoic Z to earliest Paleozoic)
Cambridge Argillite - Gray argillite and minor quartzite; rare sandstone and conglomerate. Contains acritarchs. Cambridge Argillite of Boston Bay Group contains sandy horizons which are in some places quartzite. Most prominent are Milton quartzite unit of Billings (1976), and Tufts Quartzite Member (described by Billings, 1929, and LaForge, 1932) in northern part of basin. Red sandstone and sandy argillite in Chelsea, Revere, and Milton-Quincy areas intertongue with green argillite (Kaye, 1980). Red beds lie above cleaner quartzites such as Tufts and Milton units. Core analysis by D.A. Ashenden (Metropolitan District Commission, 1980, written commun.) indicates that Cambridge and Braintree Argillites are identical. Age of Boston Bay rocks has been controversial and was once thought to be Cambrian to Pennsylvanian (the latter based on lithologic similarity to rocks of Narragansett basin and now discredited plant fossils). Age of Cambridge and of Boston Bay Group as a whole is Proterozoic Z and possibly Early Cambrian based on presence of acritarchs in Cambridge. Acritarchs are diagnostic species that ranges in age from Proterozoic Z to Early Cambrian, but is most abundant in Proterozoic Z time (Lenk and others, 1982; [also see Goldsmith and others, 1982]). Age is also supported by the following: 1) plant fossils so numerous in strata of Narragansett basin are absent in the Boston Bay Group strata, 2) Late Ordovician and Early Silurian Quincy Granite contains argillite inclusions that are on strike with Cambridge Argillite, and 3) Boston Bay Group stratigraphy is primarily marine, not similar to terrestrial stratigraphy of Narragansett basin (Goldsmith, 1991).
Cretaceous sediments (Cretaceous)
Cretaceous sediments - Clay, silt, sand, and gravel, mostly of non-marine and nearshore marine origin, Campanian and older.
Portland Formation (Lower Jurassic)
Portland Formation - Reddish-brown to pale red arkose and siltstone, and gray sandstone, gray siltstone, and black shale interpreted as lake beds.
Sugarloaf Formation (Upper Triassic)
Sugarloaf Formation - Red, pink, and gray coarse-grained, locally conglomeratic arkose, interbedded with brick-red shaley siltstone and fine-grained arkosic sandstone; boundary between Lower Jurassic (Js, Jsc) and Upper Triassic (TRs) parts are arbitrarily drawn through rocks of similar lithology on basis of Lower Jurassic palynofloral zone in gray mudstone immediately below Deerfield (Jdb); TRs is continuous with and lithically similar to TRn near Northampton. Assigned to Newark Supergroup and revised to include all sedimentary strata in the Deerfield basin below the Deerfield Basalt or its projected horizon. The Late Triassic-Early Jurassic boundary is arbitrarily drawn through clastic rocks consisting of coarse-grained, locally conglomeratic arkose interbedded with sandstone and siltstone below a Lower Jurassic palynofloral zone in gray mudstone just below the base of the Deerfield Basalt. The Sugarloaf is continuous with and lithologically similar to the New Haven Arkose in the Hartford basin (Robinson and Luttrell, 1985).
Tertiary sediments (Tertiary)
Tertiary sediments - Unconsolidated sand, silt, and clay in discontinuous patches; contains Tertiary fossils; may include Pleistocene sediments (cross section only).
Wamsutta Formation (Middle and Lower Pennsylvanian)
Wamsutta Formation - Red to pink, well-sorted conglomerate, graywacke, sandstone, and shale; fossil plants. Wamsutta Formation occurs in Narragansett and Norfolk basins. Consists of conglomerate, lithic graywacke, sandstone, and shale. Also contains rhyolite and basalt horizons near Attleboro. Northwest of Attleboro, Wamsutta overlies Diamond Hill Felsite as used by Skehan and Murray (in Skehan and others, 1979). Volcanic rocks similar to Diamond Hill Felsite crop out west of Lake Pearl, between Franklin and Wrentham, on west flank of Norfolk basin. These are shown within Wamsutta Formation on MA State bedrock map of Zen and others (1983) because of their proximity to Diamond Hill. They also resemble Proterozoic Z Mattapan Volcanic Complex. Chute (1966) described lenses of carbonate rock in red and green shale in Wamsutta in Norwood quad. Limestone also observed in rocks mapped as Wamsutta adjacent to exposed Dedham Granite at Manchester Pond Reservoir (J.P. Schafer, 1982, oral commun.). Red and green shales may actually be Cambrian. Upper member of Pondville Conglomerate grades into and interfingers with Wamsutta; in turn, Wamsutta interfingers with Rhode Island Formation in northwest part of Narragansett basin. Nonconformably overlies Dedham Granite. Partly equivalent to Rhode Island Formation. Age is Early and Middle Pennsylvanian. Contains a few plant fossils (Goldsmith, 1991).
Maryland
"Chemung" Formation, Parkhead Sandstone, Brallier Formation, and Harrell Shale (Devonian)
"Chemung" Formation - Predominantly marine beds characterized by gray to olive-green graywacke, siltstone, and shale; thickened ranges from 2,000 to 3,000 feet; Parkhead Sandstone - Gray to olive-green sandy shale, conglomeratic sandstone and graywacke; present in Washington County, identification uncertain in west; thickness averages 400 feet; Brallier Fomation - (Woodmont Shale of earlier reports). Medium to dark gray, laminated shale and siltstone; weathers to light olive-gray; grain size coarsens upward; thickness about 2,000 feet in west, about 1,7000 feet in east; and Harrell Shale - Dark gray laminated shale; absent in east where Brallier lies directly on Mahantango, Tully Limestone lies near base in west, in subsurface of Garrett County; total thickness in west 140 to 300 feet.
Chesapeake Group; Calvert Formation (Miocene)
Chesapeake Group; Calvert Formation - Plum Point Marls Member: Interbedded dark green to dark bluish-gray, fine-grained argillaceous sand and sandy clay; contains prominent shell beds and locally silica-cemented sandstones; and Fairhaven Member: Greenish-blue diatomaceous clay, weathers to pale gray; pale brown to white, fine-grained argillaceous sand; and greenish-blue sandy clay; total thickness 0 to 150 feet.
Chesapeake Group; Choptank Formation (Miocene)
Chesapeake Group; Choptank Formation - Interbedded brown to yellow very fine-grained to fine-grained sand and gray to dark bluish-green argillaceous silt; locally indurated to calcareous sandstone; prominent shell beds; thickness 0 to 50 feet.
Chesapeake Group; St. Marys Formation (Miocene)
Chesapeake Group; St. Marys Formation - Greenish-blue to yellowish-gray sandy clay and fine-grained argillaceous sand; thickness 0 to 80 feet.
Clinton Group, including Rochester Shale (Silurian)
Clinton Group, including Rochester Shale - Gray, thin-bedded calcareous shale and dark gray, thin- to medium-bed7 ded lenticular limestone; thickness 25 to 40 feet; Keefer Sandstone - White to yellowish-gray, thick-bedded protoquartzite and orthoquartzite; calcareous to west; thickness 10 feet in west, increases to 35 feet in east; and Rose Hill Formation - Olive-gray to drab, thin-bedded shale; some purple shale and gray, thin-bedded sandstone; including Cresaptown Iron Sandstone Member - Purple, hematite-cemented, quartzose sandstone; thickness 5 to 30 feet; occurs in lower half of formation; total thickness 300 feet in east, increases to 570 feet in west.
Conemaugh Formation (Pennsylvanian)
Conemaugh Formation - Includes the rocks between the base of the Pittsburgh coal and the top of the Upper Freeport coal; consists of two unnamed members which are separated by the Barton coal; both members are gray and brown claystone, shale, siltstone and sandstone, with several coal beds; lower member also contains redbeds and fossiliferous marine shales; thickness 825 to 925 feet.
Conococheague Limestone (Upper Cambrian to Lower Ordovician )
Conococheague Limestone - Dark blue, laminated, oolitic, argillaceaous, and siliceous limestone, algal limestone, and flat-pebble conglomerate; siliceous shale partings; some sandstone and dolomite; thickness 1,600 to 1,900 feet.
Dunkard Group (Permian)
Dunkard Group - Red and green shale, siltstone, and sandstone, with thin lenticular beds of argillaceous limestone and thin beds of impure coal; thick-bedded, white conglomeratic sandstone at base; thickness greater than 200 feet; occurs only on hilltop
Hamilton Group (including Mahantango Formation and Marcellus Shale), and including Tioga Metabentontite Bed, and Needmore Shale (Devonian)
Hamilton Group including Mahantango Formation - Dark gray, laminated shale, siltstone, and very fine-grained sandstone; thickness 600 feet in west, increases to 1,200 feet in east, and Marcellus Shale - Gray-black, thinly laminated, pyritic, carbonaceous shale; thickness 250 feet in east, increases to 500 feet in west. Also includes Tioga Metabentonite Bed - Brownish-gray, thinly laminated shale containing sand-size mica flakes; thickness less than one foot; and Needmore Shale - Olive-gray to black shale and dark, thin-bedded, fossiliferous, argillaceous limestone; thickness ranges from 70 to 145 feet.
Helderberg Formation and Keyser Limestone (Devonian)
Helderberg Formation, including Licking Creek Limestone Member - (Becraft Limestone of earlier reports.) Present only in east. Medium gray, medium-grained limestone near top; bedded black chert and thin-bedded limestone in middle; silty argillaceous limestone and shale near base; contains tongues of Shriver and Mandata; thickness 110 feet; Mandata Shale Member - Dark brown to black, thin-bedded shale; fossiliferous; thickness 20 to 30 feet in west, intertongues with Licking Creek Limestone Member in east; Corriganville Limestone Member (Head) - (New Scotland Limestone of earlier reports.) Medium gray, medium-grained, medium-bedded limestone, interbedded with chert; fossiliferous; thickness 15 to 30 feet; New Creek Limestone Member - (Coeymans Limestone of earlier reports.) Medium gray, thick-bedded, coarse-grained limestone; fossiliferous; thickness 9 to 10 feet. Limestone changes facies eastward into sandstone, the Elbow Ridge Sandstone Member - Medium-bedded, medium- to coarse-grained, calcarous sandstone; thickness 10 to 18 feet.; and the Keyser Limestone - Dark gray, thin- to thick-bedded, fine- to coarse-grained calcarenite; contains nodular limestone, dolomitic limestone, and calcarous shale; cherty near top; fossiliferous; thickness 200 to 300 feet.
Lowland Deposits (Quaternary)
Lowland Deposits - Gravel, sand, silt, and clay. Medium- to coarse-grained sand and gravel; cobbles and boulders near base; commonly contains reworked Eocene glauconite; varicolored silts and clays; brown to dark gray lignitic silty clay; contains estuarine to marine fauna in some areas (includes in part Pamlico, Talbot, Wicomico and Sunderland Formations of earlier reports); thickness 0 to 150 feet.
Magothy Formation (Cretaceous)
Magothy Formation - Loose, white, cross-bedded, "sugary", lignitic sands and dark gray, laminated silty clays; white to orange-brown, iron-stained, subrounded quartzose gravels in western Anne Arundel County; absent in outcrop southwest of Patuxent River; thickness 0 to 60 feet.
Matawan Formation (Cretaceous)
Matawan Formation - Dark gray micaceous, glauconitic, argillaceous, fine-grained sand and silt; absent in outcrop southwest of Patuxent River; thickness 0 to 70 feet.
Mauch Chunk Formation (Mississippian)
Mauch Chunk Formation - Red and green shale, reddish-purple mudstone, and red, green, brown, and gray thin-bedded and cross-bedded sandstones; thickness 500 feet in west, increases to about 800 feet in east.
McKenzie Formation (Silurian)
McKenzie Formation - Gray, thin-bedded shale and argillaceous limestone; interbedded red sandstone and shale in east; thickness 160 feet in western Washington County, increases to 300 feet in east and 380 feet in west.
Monmouth Formation (Cretaceous)
Monmouth Formation - Dark gray to reddish-brown, micaceous, glauconitic, argillaceous, fine- to coarse-grained sand; basal gravel in Prince Georges County; thickness 0 to 100 feet.
Monongahela Formation (Pennsylvanian)
Monongahela Formation - Interbedded claystone, argillaceous limestone, shale, sandstone, and coal beds; Waynesburg coal at top; Pittsburg coal at base; thickness 240 feet in west, increases to 375 feet in east.
Pamunkey Group; Aquia Formation (Paleocene)
Pamunkey Group; Aquia Formation - Dark green to gray-green, argillaceous, highly glauconitic, well-sorted fine- to medium-grained sand; locally indurated shell beds; thickness 0 to 100 feet.
Pamunkey Group; Nanjemoy Formation (Eocene)
Pamunkey Group; Nanjemoy Formation - Dark green to gray, argillaceous, glauconitic, fine- to medium-grained sand; minor gray to pale brown clay; total thickness 0 to 125 feet; Marlboro Clay member at base: Pink to gray, homogeneous plastic clay with local lenses of very fine-grained white sand; thickness 0 to 30 feet; present west of Chesapeake Bay only; total thickness 0 to 125 feet.
Potomac Group, including Raritan and Patapsco Formations, Arundel Clay, and Patuxent Formation (Cretaceous)
Potomac Group - Interbedded quartzose gravels; protoquartzitic to orthoquartzitic argillaceous sands; and white, dark gray, and multicolored silts and clays; thickness 0 to 800 feet. Includes Raritan and Patapsco Formations - Gray, brown, and red variegated silts and clays; lenticular, cross-bedded, argillaceous, subrounded sands; minor gravels; thickness 0 to 400 feet; Arundel Clay - Dark gray and maroon lignitic clays; abundant siderite concretions; present only in Baltimore-Washington area; thickness 0 to 100 feet; and Patuxent Formation - White or light gray to orange-brown, moderately sorted, cross-bedded, argillaceous, angular sands and subrounded quartz gravels; silts and clays subordinate, predominantly pale gray; thickness 0 to 250 feet.
Quaternary Deposits Undivided (Quaternary)
Quaternary Deposits Undivided - Undifferentiated gray to buff sand and gravel, gray to brown lignitic silt and clay, occasional boulders, and rare shell beds. Surficial deposits occur as intercalated fluvial sands and marsh muds (e.g. in upstream floodplain of the Wicomico and Nanticoke Rivers), well-sorted, stablized dune sands (e.g. eastern Wicomico County), shell-bearing estuarine clays and silts (e.g. lower Dorchester County) and Pocomoke River basin of Worcester County), and beach zone sands (e.g. Fenwick and Assateague Islands). Wisconsin to Holocene in age. Subsurface deposits of pre-Wisconsin age consist of buff to reddish-brown sand and gravel locally incised into Miocene sediments (e.g. Salisbury area), estuarine to marine white to gray sands, and gray to blue, shell-bearing clays (e.g. Worcester County).
Tonoloway Limestone (Silurian)
Tonoloway Limestone - Gray, thin-bedded limestone, dolomitic limestone, and calcareous shale; thin sandstone member in east 20 feet above base; fossiliferous; thickness 400 feet in east, increases to 600 feet in west.
Upland Deposits (Eastern Shore) (Quaternary)
Upland Deposits (Eastern Shore) - Gravel, sand, silt, and clay. Mostly cross-bedded, poorly sorted, medium- to coarse-grained white to red sand and gravel; boulders near base; minor pink and yellow silts and clays; (Wicomico Formation of earlier reports); thickness 0 to 90 feet, locally thicker in paleochannels.
Upland Deposits (Western Shore) (Quaternary)
Upland Deposits (Western Shore) - Gravel and sand, commonly orange-brown, locally limonite-cemented; minor silt and red, white, or gray clay; (includes Brandywine, Bryn Mawr, and Sunderland Formations of earlier reports); lower gravel member and upper loam member in Southern Maryland; thickness 0 to 50 feet.
Waynesboro Formation (Cambrian)
Waynesboro Formation - Upper part red, gray, and yellowish-brown, thin-bedded siltstone, shale, and ripple-marked, cross-bedded sandstone; lower part interbedded dark gray to red shale and thin-bedded dolomite; thickness approximately 600 feet.
Wills Creek Shale and Bloomsburg Formation (Silurian)
Wills Creek Shale - Olive to yellowish-gray, thin-bedded mudstone, calcareous shale, argillaceous limestone, and sandstone; thickness 450 feet in west, increases to 600 feet in east; and Bloomsburg Formation - Bright red, hematitic, thin- to thick-bedded sandstone and shale; some dark sandstone and green shale; Cedar Creek Limestone Member - Dark gray, fine- to medium-grained argillaceous limestone, occurs in middle part of formation; total thickness 20 feet in west, increases to 200 feet in east.
Maine
Devonian Beck Pond Limestone (Devonian)
Devonian Beck Pond Limestone
Devonian Tarratine Formation McKenny Pond Limestone (Devonian)
Devonian Tarratine Formation McKenny Pond Limestone
Silurian Hardwood Mountain Formation (Silurian)
Silurian Hardwood Mountain Formation
Michigan
Bass Island Dolomite (Late Silurian)
Bass Island Dolomite
Bayport Limestone (Mississippian)
Bayport Limestone
Cataract Formation (Early Silurian)
Cataract Formation
Coldwater Shale (Mississippian)
Coldwater Shale
Detroit River Group (Middle Devonian)
Detroit River Group
Ellsworth Shale (Late Devonian)
Ellsworth Shale
Michigan Formation (Mississippian)
Michigan Formation
Oronto Group; Nonesuch Shale (Middle Proterozoic)
Oronto Group; Nonesuch Shale - Gray, green, and brown lithic siltstone, shale, and sandstone. Copper sulfides and native copper occur locally near base
Paleozoic undivided (Paleozoic)
Paleozoic undivided
Minnesota
Jurassic rocks, undivided (Jurassic)
Jurassic rocks, undivided - Unnamed units of green, gray, brown, and red shale, white to tan micritic limestone and dolostone, and white, fine- to coarse-grained sandstone and siltstone; unit contains nodules of chert and gypsum
Lower Ordovician rocks, undivided (Lower Ordovician)
Lower Ordovician rocks, undivided - Shakopee and Oneota Formations of the Prairie du Chien Group in the Hollandale embayment of southeastern Minnesota. Unit consists dominantly of dolostone and dolomitic limestone. The Shakopee also contains intervals of quartz arenite, including a pronounced basal unit named the New Richmond Member
North Shore Volcanic Group; Reversely polarized volcanic rocks, undivided (Middle Proterozoic)
North Shore Volcanic Group; Reversely polarized volcanic rocks, undivided - Mixed tholeiitic diabasic and porphyritic basalt, trachybasalt, and rhyolite in far northeastern Minnesota and porphyritic and diabasic basalt near Duluth. Includes units of a basal quartz arenite, Puckwunge Sandstone and Nopeming Formation, in northeastern Minnesota and near Duluth, respectively.
Solor Church Formation (Middle Proterozoic)
Solor Church Formation - Dark-red to dark-brown shale, siltstone, and lithic sandstone of fluvial origin in Scott and Carver Counties; metamorphosed to zeolite facies
Missouri
CHESTERIAN SERIES (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Carboniferous Mississippian-Late [Chesterian])
CHESTERIAN SERIES - FAYETTEVILLE FORMATION, BATESVILLE FORMATION, HINDVILLE LIMESTONE, VIENNA LIMESTONE, TAR SPRINGS SANDSTONE, GLEN DEAN FORMATION, HARDINSBURG FORMATION, GOLCONDA FORMATION, CYPRESS FORMATION, PAINT CREEK FORMATION, YANKEETOWN SANDSTONE, RENAULT FORMATION, AUX VASES SANDSTONE, STE. GENEVIEVE LIMESTONE
ELVINS GROUP- (INCLUDING DERBY-DOERUN DOLOMITE, DAVIS FORMATION), BONNETERRE DOLOMITE (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Cambrian-Furongian [Croixian])
ELVINS GROUP - (INCLUDING DERBY - DOERUN DOLOMITE - alternating thin dolomite, siltstone, and shale; DAVIS FORMATION - glauconitic shale with fine - grained sandstone, limestone, and dolomite); BONNETERRE DOLOMITE - dolomite, dolomitic limestone, and limestone; glauconitic in lower part
HOLOCENE SERIES (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Holocene)
HOLOCENE SERIES - Alluvium - clay, silt, sand, and gravel
JOACHIM DOLOMITE, DUTCHTOWN FORMATION (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Ordovician-Middle [Mohawkian])
JOACHIM DOLOMITE, DUTCHTOWN FORMATION
KANSAS CITY GROUP (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Carboniferous Pennsylvanian-Late [Upper Missourian])
KANSAS CITY GROUP - cyclic deposits, limestone and shale with minor sandstone and coal.
KINDERHOOKIAN SERIES (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Carboniferous Mississippian-Early [Kinderhookian])
KINDERHOOKIAN SERIES - NORTHVIEW SHALE, SEDALIA FORMATION, COMPTON LIMESTONE, BACHELOR FORMATION CHOUTEAU GROUP, HANNIBAL SHALE, HORTON CREEK LIMESTONE
LANSING GROUP (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Carboniferous Pennsylvanian-Late [Upper Missourian])
LANSING GROUP - cyclic deposits of limestone and shale
LEEMON FORMATION, MAQUOKETA GROUP, CAPE LIMESTONE, KIMMSWICK LIMESTONE, NOIX-CYRENE LIMESTONE, MAQUOKETA SHALE (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Ordovician-Middle Ordovician-Late)
LEEMON FORMATION, MAQUOKETA GROUP INCLUDING: (GIRARDEAU LIMESTONE, ORCHARD CREEK SHALE, THEBES SANDSTONE, CAPE La CROIX SHALE), CAPE LIMESTONE, KIMMSWICK LIMESTONE, NOIX - CYRENE LIMESTONE, MAQUOKETA SHALE
MARMATON GROUP (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Carboniferous Pennsylvanian-Middle [Middle Desmonian])
MARMATON GROUP - cyclic deposits, shale and limestone with sandstone, clay and several coal beds, some workable
PENNSYLVANIAN UNDIFFERENTIATED (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Carboniferous Pennsylvanian)
PENNSYLVANIAN UNDIFFERENTIATED
PLEISTOCENE SERIES (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene)
PLEISTOCENE SERIES - Loess, till, drift, clay, silt, sand and gravel (shown on cross section, not on map)
SHAWNEE GROUP (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Carboniferous Pennsylvanian-Late [Upper Virgilian])
SHAWNEE GROUP - cyclic deposits, limestone and shale with sandstone and siltstone.
TERTIARY SYSTEM (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Paleocene Eocene(?) Oligocene(?) Miocene(?) Pliocene-Early(?) Pliocene-Middle(?) Pliocene-Late)
TERTIARY SYSTEM - PLIOCENE SERIES - Mounds Gravel (Lafayette Formation) - ferruginous, chert gravel, max of 60 ft. EOCENE SERIES - Wilcox Group - includes Holly Springs Formation - x - bedded sandstone, clay and gravel, max of 1200 ft.; Ackerman Formation - clay with lens of sand and gravel, max of 100ft. PALEOCENE SERIES - Midway Group - includes Porters Creek Clay - bentonitic clay, max of 200 ft.; Clayton Formation - marl, fossiliferous, calcareous, limonitic, glauconitic sand and clay, max of 20 ft.,
UNDIFFERENTIATED (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Ordovician)
UNDIFFERENTIATED (ORDOVICIAN ROCKS)
WABAUNSEE GROUP (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Carboniferous Pennsylvanian-Late [Upper Virgilian])
WABAUNSEE GROUP - cyclic deposits, principally shale, sitlstone, sandstone with thin limestone beds and minor coal
Mississippi
Catahoula formation (Miocene)
Catahoula formation - Irregularly bedded gray sand and sandstone; mottled red and gray, green, and chocolate-colored clay; some quartzite, and some gravel; the Paynes Hammock sand, sandy limestone cross-bedded fine green sand, and thin-bedded sand and clay, is mapped with the underlying Chickasawhay limestone in eastern MS.
Citronelle formation (Pleistocene)
Citronelle formation - Red sand and gravel and white clay; may be of Pliocene age; the formation mapped is equivalent to the Willis sand and does not include the terrace deposits, colluvium, and residuum commonly considered "Citronelle".
Clayton formation (Paleocene)
Clayton formation - (Midway group), Upper part, greenish-gray coarsely glauconitic sandy clay and marl; lower part, crystalline sandy limestone and loose sand, represented south of Houston by a discontinuous bed of indurated calcareous sandstone.
Coastal deposits (Holocene)
Coastal deposits - Loam, sand, gravel and clay.
Cockfield (Eocene)
Cockfield - (Claiborne group), Irregularly bedded, more or less laminated liginitic clay, sand, and lignite; sparingly glauconitic.
Coffee sand (Upper Cretaceous)
Coffee sand - (Selma group), Light-gray cross-bedded to massive glauconitic sand and sandy clay and calcareous sandstone.
Cook Mountain formation (Eocene)
Cook Mountain formation - (Claiborne group), Southeast of Pearl River, marl, limestone, glauconitic sand, and chocolate-colored clay; northwest of Pearl River, predominantly chocolate-colored clay with some glauconitic sand.
Eutaw formation (Upper Cretaceous)
Eutaw formation - More or less cross-bedded and thinly laminated glauconitic sand and clay; basal part includes the McShan formation, greenish-gray, micaceous, locally very glauconitic, very fine-grained sand and thin-bedded light-gray clay, small chert gravels may be present in basal beds, not recognized in northern Tishomingo County.
Eutaw formation (Tombigbee sand member) (Late Cretaceous)
Eutaw formation (Tombigbee sand member) - massive fine glauconitic sand.
Forest Hill formation and Red Bluff clay (Oligocene)
Forest Hill formation and Red Bluff clay - Forest Hill sand, cross-bedded fine gray sand, laminated fine sand and clay, and a little lignite; in Wayne and Clarke Counties lower part merges eastward into Red Bluff clay, blue-green glauconitic, gypsiferous, fossiliferous clay and thin limestone beds.
Jackson group (Eocene)
Jackson group - Yazoo clay, green and gray calcareous clay containing some sand and marl; Moodys Branch formation at base, shells embedded in glauconitic clayey quartz sand.
Kosciusko formation (Eocene)
Kosciusko formation - (Claiborne group), irregularly bedded sand, clay, and some quartzite.
Naheola formation (Paleocene)
Naheola formation - (Midway group) - Fine to coarse micaceous sand, kaolin, and bauxitic clay.
Pascagoula and Hattiesburg formation (Miocene)
Pascagoula and Hattiesburg formation - Green and bluish-green clay, sandy clay, and sand; gray siltstone and sand; locally fossiliferous.
Porters Creek formation (Paleocene)
Porters Creek formation - (Midway group), Dark-gray clay, north of Clay County contains slightly glauconitic, micaceous sand lenses.
Ripley formation (Upper Cretaceous)
Ripley formation - (Selma group), gray to greenish-gray fine glauconitic sand, clay, and sandy limestone; south of Oktibbeha County is very sandy micaceous chalk.
Ripley formation (McNairy sand member) (Upper Cretaceous)
Ripley formation (McNairy sand member) - (Selma group), red and white cross-bedded micaceous sand and white sandy clay.
Tallahatta formation and Neshoba sand (Eocene)
Tallahatta formation and Neshoba sand - (Claiborne group), Southeast of Pearl River predominantly more or less glauconitic claystone and clay with lenses of sand and some sandstone; highly cross-bedded sand at base; northwest of Pearl river predominantly sand, locally glauconitic, containing claystone and clay lenses and abundant clay stringers; Neshoba sand, sparingly glauconitic fairly coarse sand not recognized southeast of Newton County or north of Yalobusha River.
Tuscaloosa formation (Upper Cretaceous)
Tuscaloosa formation - Light and vari-colored irregularly bedded sand, clay, and gravel; gravel is mostly in lower portion.
Vicksburg group and Chickasawhay limestone (Oligocene)
Vicksburg group and Chickasawhay limestone - Chickasawhay limestone, sandy limestone, and sand, present only in eastern MS (mapped with it is the overlying Paynes Hammock sand of Miocene age); Vicksburg group, predominantly limestone and marl, but contains some bentonite and near the top, chocolate-colored clay and some sand.
Wilcox formation (Eocene)
Wilcox formation - Irregularly bedded fine to coarse sand, more or less lignitic clay and lignite; includes bauxite bearing Fearn Springs sand member at base.
Wilcox formation; Bashi marl member (Eocene)
Wilcox formation - Bashi marl member - glauconitic fossiliferous sand containing large calcareous fossiliferous concretions.
Zilpha formation and Winona formation (Eocene)
Zilpha formation and Winona formation - (Claiborne group), Zilpha clay, chocolate-colored clay containing some glauconitic sand, not recognized north of Yalobusha River; Winona sand, highly glauconitic sand, more or less clayey.
Montana
Belle Fourche shale (Phanerozoic | Mesozoic | Cretaceous-Late)
Belle Fourche shale: dark blue-gray siliceous shale with many calcareous and ferruginous concretions and intercalated thin layers of bentonite.
Cambrian, undifferentiated (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Cambrian)
Cambrian, undifferentiated: comprises Deadwood formation, in south-central Montana, and Red Lion formation, Dry Creek shale, Hasmark formation, Pilgrim limestone, Silver Hill formation, Park shale, Meagher limestone, Wolsey shale, Flathead quartzite, and other units. In a few places quartzite of Cambrian age may be mapped with the Belt series or quartzite of Belt age with the Cambrian rocks.
Fort Union formation (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary Cretaceous-Late | Paleocene)
Fort Union formation: Clay shale, siltstone, and sandstone; local lenses of impure limestone, and numerous lignitic beds; contains Tertiary plant and animal fossils but no dinosaurs; base generally placed at the lowest of the succession of lignite beds within it; includes the Tongue River member, Lebo shale member, and Tullock member.
Paleozoic rocks, undifferentiated (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic)
Paleozoic rocks, undifferentiated: in east-central Madison County where scale did not permit differentiation on map.
North Carolina
Beaufort Formation, Undivided (Tertiary)
Beaufort Formation, Undivided - Unnamed upper member: sand and silty clay, glauconitic, fossiliferous, and locally calcareous. Jericho Run Member: siliceous mudstone with sandstone lenses, thin bedded; basal phosphatic pebble conglomerate.
Belgrade Formation, Undivided (Tertiary)
Belgrade Formation, Undivided - Pollocksville Member: oyster-shell mounds in tan to orange sand matrix, indurated locally. Haywood Landing Member: fossiliferous clayey sand, gray to brown. Members grade into each other laterally.
Black Creek Formation (Cretaceous)
Black Creek Formation - clay, gray to black, lignitic; contains thin beds and laminae of fine-grained micaceous sand and thick lenses of cross-bedded sand. Glauconitic, fossiliferous clayey sand lenses in upper part.
Cape Fear Formation (Cretaceous)
Cape Fear Formation - sandstone and sandy mudstone, yellowish gray to bluish gray, mottled red to yellowish orange, indurated, graded and laterally continuos bedding, blocky clay, faint cross-bedding, feldspar and mica common.
Castle Hayne Formation; Spring Garden Member (Tertiary)
Spring Garden Member - molluscan-mold limestone, indurated, very sandy. Grades downward into a calcareous sand and laterally into Comfort Member.
Chilhowee Group; Upper Chilhowee (Cambrian)
Upper Chilhowee - vitreous quartz arenite, white to light gray; interbedded sandy siltstone and shale. Erwin and Hampton formations of Hot Springs window.
Middendorf Formation (Cretaceous)
Middendorf Formation - sand, sandstone, and mudstone, gray to pale gray with an orange cast, mottled; clay balls and iron-cemented concretions common, beds laterally discontinuous, cross-bedding common.
Ocoee Supergroup, Snowbird Group; Wading Branch Formation (Late Proterozoic)
Wading Branch Formation - sandy slate to coarse-grained pebbly metagraywacke with local graded bedding. Basal quartz-sericite schist or phyllite.
Peedee Formation (Cretaceous)
Peedee Formation - sand, clayey sand, and clay, greenish gray to olive black, massive, glauconitic, locally fossiliferous and calcareous. Patches of sandy molluscan-mold limestone in upper part.
Pinehurst Formation (Tertiary)
Pinehurst Formation - sand, medium- to coarse-grained, cross-bedding and rhythmic bands of clayey sand common, unconsolidated.
River Bend Formation (Tertiary)
River Bend Formation - limestone, calcarenite overlain by and intercalated with indurated, sandy, molluscan-mold limestone.
Rome Formation (Cambrian)
Rome Formation - shale and siltstone, variegated red to brown; interbedded fine-grained sandstone and shaly dolomite.
Surficial Deposits, Undivided (Quaternary)
Surficial Deposits, Undivided - sand, clay, gravel, and peat deposited in marine, fluvial, eolian, and lacustrine environments. Quaternary deposits not shown at altitudes greater than approx. 205 feet above mean sea level (Suffolk Scarp, in part).
Terrace Deposits and Upland Sediment (Tertiary)
Terrace Deposits and Upland Sediment - gravel, clayey sand, and sand, minor iron-oxide cemented sandstone.
Waccamaw Formation (Tertiary)
Waccamaw Formation - fossiliferous sand with silt and clay, bluish-gray to tan, loosely consolidated. Straddles Pleistocene-Pliocene boundary.
Yorktown Formation and Duplin Formation, Undivided (Tertiary)
Yorktown Formation and Duplin Formation, Undivided - Yorktown Formation: fossiliferous clay with varying amounts of fine-grained sand, bluish gray, shell material commonly concentrated in lenses; mainly in area north of Neuse River. Duplin Formation: shelly, medium- to coarse-grained sand, sandy marl, and limestone, bluish gray; mainly in area south of Neuse River.
North Dakota
Bullion Creek Formation (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Paleocene)
Yellow-brown silt, sand, clay, sandstone, and lignite; river, lake, and swamp sediment; as thick as 200 meters (600 feet).
Cannonball Formation (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Paleocene)
Olive-brown sand, shale, and sandstone; marine shoreline and offshore sediment; as thick as 120 meters (400 feet).
Coleharbor Formation- River Sediment- Collapsed River Sediment (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene Holocene)
Moderately well sorted cross-bedded sand and plane-bedded gravel, including sediment of melt-water and other rivers; as thick as 30 meters (100 feet). Faulted and contorted supraglacial sediment with hummocky topography.
Coleharbor Formation- River Sediment- Uncollapsed River Sediment (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene Holocene)
Moderately well sorted cross-bedded sand and plane-bedded gravel, including sediment of melt-water and other rivers; as thick as 30 meters (100 feet). Flat-bedded sediment of gently sloping plains and terraces, commonly with braided-channel scars.
Coleharbor Formation- Shoreline Sediment (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene Holocene)
Well-sorted sand and gravel of beach-ridge complexes; as thick as 5 meters (15 feet).
Fox Hills Formation (Phanerozoic | Mesozoic | Cretaceous-Late)
Olive-brown sand, shale, and sandstone; marine shoreline and offshore sediment; as thick as 120 meters (400 feet).
Glacial Sediment- Collapsed/Draped Transition Sediments (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene Holocene)
Unbedded, unsorted mixture of clay, silt, sand, and pebbles, and a few cobbles and boulders; as thick as 30 meters (100 feet)
Glacial Sediment- Collapsed Glacial Sediment (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene Holocene)
Unbedded, unsorted mixture of clay, silt, sand, and pebbles, and a few cobbles and boulders; as thick as 30 meters (100 feet)
Glacial Sediment- Collapsed Glacial Sediment (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene Holocene)
Unbedded, unsorted mixture of clay, silt, sand, and pebbles, and a few cobbles and boulders; as thick as 30 meters (100 feet)
Glacial Sediment- Collapsed Glacial Sediment (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene Holocene)
Unbedded, unsorted mixture of clay, silt, sand, and pebbles, and a few cobbles and boulders; as thick as 30 meters (100 feet)
Glacial Sediment- Collapsed Glacial Sediment (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene Holocene)
Unbedded, unsorted mixture of clay, silt, sand, and pebbles, and a few cobbles and boulders; as thick as 30 meters (100 feet)
Glacial Sediment- Glacial Sediment Draped Over Pre-existing Topography (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene Holocene)
Unbedded, unsorted mixture of clay, silt, sand, and pebbles, and a few cobbles and boulders; as thick as 30 meters (100 feet)
Glacial Sediment-Glacial Sediment Draped Over Pre-existing Topography (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene Holocene)
Unbedded, unsorted mixture of clay, silt, sand, and pebbles, and a few cobbles and boulders; as thick as 30 meters (100 feet)
Glacial Sediment- Glacial Sediment on Subglacially Molded Surfaces (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene Holocene)
Unbedded, unsorted mixture of clay, silt, sand, and pebbles, and a few cobbles and boulders; as thick as 30 meters (100 feet)
Glacial Sediment- Glacial Sediment on Thrust Masses (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene Holocene)
Unbedded, unsorted mixture of clay, silt, sand, and pebbles, and a few cobbles and boulders; as thick as 30 meters (100 feet)
Glacial Sediment- River-Eroded Glacial Sediment (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene Holocene)
Unbedded, unsorted mixture of clay, silt, sand, and pebbles, and a few cobbles and boulders; as thick as 30 meters (100 feet)
Glacial Sediment- Slopwash-Eroded Glacial Sediment (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene Holocene)
Unbedded, unsorted mixture of clay, silt, sand, and pebbles, and a few cobbles and boulders; as thick as 30 meters (100 feet)
Glacial Sediment- Wave-Eroded Glacial Sediment (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene Holocene)
Unbedded, unsorted mixture of clay, silt, sand, and pebbles, and a few cobbles and boulders; as thick as 30 meters (100 feet)
Golden Valley Formation (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Paleocene Eocene)
Upper member: Yellow-brown micaceous sandstone, sand, silt, and clay; fluvial sediment; as thick as 60 meters (200 feet). Lower member: White or yellow clay, silt, and sand; a weatering zone developed on underlying unit; as thick as 20 meters (65 feet).
Hell Creek Formation (Phanerozoic | Mesozoic | Cretaceous-Late)
Gray sand, silt, clay, and sandstone; river sediment; as thick as 150 meters (500 feet).
Ludlow Formation (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Paleocene)
Gray-brown and yellow-brown silt, sand, clay and sandstone, and lignite; river, lake, and swamp sediment; as thick as 100 meters (300 feet).
Oahe Formation- River Sediment (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Holocene)
Dark, obscurely bedded clay and silt (overbank sediment); generally overlying cross-bedded sand (channel sediment); as thick as ten meters (30 feet); on flood plains of modern streams.
Oahe Formation- Windblown Sand (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Holocene)
Well-sorted, medium sand with obscure bedding; poorly developed palesols common; as thick as 10 meters (30 feet); knobby topography consisting of inactive transverses or longitudinal dunes nearly obliterated by more recent blowouts.
Sand of the Oahe and Older Formations, Undivided (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary Quaternary | Pliocene Pleistocene(?) Holocene)
Windblown sand of the Oahe Formation, as thick as 3 meters (10 feet), and sand of older formations with an undulating wind-scoured surface.
Sentinel Butte Formation (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Paleocene)
Gray-brown silt, sand, clay, sandstone, and lignite; river, lake, and swamp sediment; as thick as 200 meters (600 feet).
Slope Formation (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Paleocene)
Gray-brown and yellow-brown silt, sand, clay, sandstone, and lignite; river, lake, and swamp sediment; as thick as 100 meters (300 feet).
Spring Pits (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary )
Spring pits, west and north of Grand Forks
White River Group (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Oligocene)
Brule Formation: Pinkish siltstone, clay, and sand; river and lake sediment; as thick as 50 meters (150 feet). Chadron Formation: Light-colored sand with quartzite and porphyry pebbles, overlain by dark clay; river and lake sediment; as thick as 30 meters (100 feet).
Nebraska
Admire Group (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Permian)
Shale and interbedded limestone. Shale is dark gray to light gray, brown, red, or green, sandy, calcareous, and fossiliferous. Interbedded dark- to light-gray, very thin to medium bedded, argillaceous, very fossiliferous limestone beds. Near top of unit a fine-grained, micaceous sandstone bed underlies a stromatolite limestone bed which has distinctive lobate bedding. Approx. max thickness 150 ft
Arikaree Group (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Oligocene Miocene)
Consists mainly of gray, fine, loose to compact sand that has layers of hard, fine-grained dark-gray concretions which vary from few in to 15 in and often have tabular form. Includes a large amount of volcanic ash mixed in with the sand. Contains a number of channels filled with coarse conglomerate along ridge south of North Platte River. About 500 ft thick.
Carlile Shale (Phanerozoic | Mesozoic | Cretaceous-Late)
Shale, limestone, and sandstone. At top, locally 5 feet of gray to pale-yellowish brown siltstone or very fine grained sandstone. Upper 200 feet of shale is drak gray to medium gray; locally contains ironstone concretions, and interbedded with thin siltstone. Lower 80 feet of shale is medium gray, calcareous, and contains many very thin bedded, fossiliferous, shaly limestone and calcareous shale layers. Approx. max thickness 300 ft.
Greenhorn Limestone and Graneros Shale (Phanerozoic | Mesozoic | Cretaceous-Late)
Greenhorn Limestone- medium- to light-gray limestone interbedded with argillaceous limestone, marl and calcareous shale; contains Inoceramus fossils. Upper and lower contacts gradational. Approx. max thickness 30 ft. Graneros Shale- medium- to dark-gray, partly calcareous shale. Interbeds of siltstone, sandstone, and carbonaceous shale, and thin bentonite layers in upper part. Approx. max thickness 60 ft.
New Hampshire
Fitch and Clough Formations, undivided (Silurian)
Fitch and Clough Formations, undivided.
New Jersey
Belleplain Member of the Kirkwood Formation (middle Miocene, Serravallian)
Belleplain Member - Clay to silty clay at the base and sand at the top. Clay, massive to laminated, gray-brown, locally contains abundant diatoms and scattered small shell fragments. Sand, fine- to medium-grained, pale-gray to white, somewhat micaceous and woody with scattered shell fragments. Most Belleplain sand is quartz with lesser amounts of feldspar and mica. Pyrite is common in clayey strata. The Belleplain subcrops beneath surficial deposits where the overlying Cohansey Formation was eroded away. Along the Atlantic Ocean, the member is exposed on the southern sheet between Beach Haven Terrace, Ocean County, and Brigantine, Atlantic County, where the unit is overlain by thin to thick deposits of alluvium. The member is as much as 15 m (49 ft) thick. The basal contact with the underlying Wildwood Member is sharp and unconformable with a thin bed of reworked coarse-grained quartz sand at the base. A middle Miocene age for the Belleplain was determined from diatoms. Specifics of the diatom biostratigraphy are discussed in the Description of Subsurface Units. Shells from this unit had a strontium-isotope age estimate of 13.2 Ma (Sugarman and others, 1993).
Berkshire Valley and Poxono Island Formations, undivided (Upper Silurian)
Berkshire Valley and Poxono Island Formations, undivided - Thickness ranges from 76 m (250 ft) at Greenwood Lake to 122 m (400 ft) in Longwood Valley. Berkshire Valley Formation (Barnett, 1970) - Commonly yellowish-gray weathering, medium-gray to pinkish-gray, very thin to thin-bedded fossiliferous limestone interbedded with gray to greenish-gray calcareous siltstone and silty dolomite, medium-gray to light-gray dolomite conglomerate, and grayish-black, thinly laminated shale. Lower contact conformable. Thickness ranges from 27 to 38 m (90-125 ft) thick. Poxono Island Formation, (White, 1882; Barnett, 1970) - Very thin to medium-bedded sequence of medium-gray, greenish-gray, or yellowish-gray, mud-cracked dolomite; light-green, pitted, medium-grained calcareous sandstone, siltstone, and edgewise conglomerate containing gray dolomite; and quartz-pebble conglomerate containing angular to subangular pebbles as much as 2 cm (0.8 in.) long. Interbedded grayish-green shales at lower contact are transitional into underlying Longwood Shale. Thickness ranges from 49 to 84 m (160-275 ft) thick.
Cheesequake Formation (Upper Cretaceous, lower Campanian and upper Santonian)
Cheesequake Formation - Clay and clay-silt, micaceous, thin-bedded to laminated, dark-gray; weathers light tan. Contains abundant wood fragments intercalated with light-colored, fine-grained micaceous quartz sand and is rarely crossbedded. Rock fragments and feldspar are minor sand constituents. Small cylindrical burrows occur in the updip area. Abundant, rounded, pale-gray siderite concretions (about 8 cm (3 in) in diameter) occur in thin discontinuous beds. Sand interfingers rapidly within a short distance with extensively bioturbated, dark-gray, very micaceous, somewhat woody clay-silt. The basal clay-silt has extensive cylindrical burrows filled with fine-grained, light- to medium-green botryoidal glauconite. The basal contact with the underlying Magothy Formation is sharp. Reworked siderite concretions and some glauconite and coarse-grained quartz sand are found along the contact within the Cheesequake. Unit exposed only in the South Amboy and Keyport quadrangles. The unit is about 14 m (46 ft) thick. The age of the Cheesequake was determined from pollen (Litwin and others, 1993), which indicates the unit is between the Merchantville Formation microflora (CA2 Zone of Wolfe, 1976, lower Campanian) and the uppermost Magothy microflora (?Pseudoplicapollis cunceata-Semioculopollis verrucosa Zone of Christopher, 1979, upper Santonian). It is probable that the Cheesequake Formation contains the Santonian-Campanian boundary. This unit was not recognized by Petters (1976) who concluded that the Magothy and Merchantville interfingered in the subsurface and the Merchantville was, in part, Santonian.
Cheesequake Formation (Upper Cretaceous, lower Campanian and upper Santonian)
Cheesequake Formation - New unit named herein for outcrops in gullies at Cheesequake in the eastern part of the South Amboy 7.5-min quadrangle. Basal sand, quartz and glauconite, fine-grained, clayey, thin-bedded, dark-greenish-gray; middle part, quartz sand, very fine grained, thick-bedded, dark-gray, micaceous, and clayey silt with scattered and varying amounts of glauconite sand; upper part, quartz sand, fine-grained, clayey, thinbedded. Sand, excluding glauconite sand beds, is primarily quartz with small amounts of feldspar and mica. In most areas, particularly in the updip sections, the upper sand has been eroded away. This formation underlies most of the map area and is as much as 43 m (141 ft) thick. Nannofossils obtained from the Toms River and Freehold drillholes indicate that the Cheesequake Formation is latest Santonian at the base to earliest Campanian at the top (P.C. Valentine, oral commun., 1989) or equivalent to Zones CC16 to CC17. Thus the Santonian-Campanian boundary lies within the Cheesequake Formation. Studies of pollen (Litwin and others, 1993) in outcrop indicate a pollen assemblage containing elements of the ?Pseudoplicapollis cuneata-Semioculopollis verrucosa Zone (Vc of Christopher, 1982) and the CA2 Zone of Wolfe (1976).
Cohansey Formation (Middle Miocene, Serravallian)
Cohansey Formation - Sand, white to yellow with local gravel and clay. Locally stained red or orange brown by iron oxides and (or) cemented into large blocks of ironstone. Unweathered clay is typically dark gray, but commonly weathers white where interbedded with thin beds of ironstone. Unit is a complex of interfingering marine and nonmarine facies. Sand is typically medium grained and moderately sorted although it ranges from fine to very coarse grained and from poorly to well sorted. Sand consists of quartz and siliceous rock fragments. Some beds are locally micaceous, and in the Lakehurst area, Ocean County, some beds have high concentrations of "black" sand (pseudorutile) that was once extensively mined. In general, the sand is crossbedded, although the style of crossbedding varies significantly with the paleoenvironment. Trough crossbedding predominates, especially in the nonmarine channel fill deposits, and the scale of the crossbeds varies from small to large. In some areas, planar bedding is well developed in sections that have abundant marine burrows (mostly the clay-lined trace fossil Ophiomorpha nodosa). Such marine-influenced beds (largely foreshore deposits) occur on the central sheet west of Asbury Park, near Adelphia, Monmouth County, north of the Lakehurst Naval Air Station, Ocean County, and at Juliustown, Burlington County (Owens and Sohl, 1969), and on the southern sheet as far north as Salem, Salem County. Gravel beds occur locally, especially in updip areas such as near New Egypt, Ocean County, in the Atlantic Highlands and in the highlands west of Barnegat, Ocean County, in the southern part of the central sheet and in mixed marine and nonmarine facies in the northeastern part of the southern sheet where gravel occurs in well-defined channels. Most of the gravel is 1.3 to 2.5 cm (0.5-1.0 in) in diameter, but pieces as long as 10 cm (4 in) are present. The gravel is composed of quartz with small amounts of black chert and quartzite. Clay commonly occurs as discrete, thin, discontinuous beds, is dark gray where unweathered, white or red where weathered. Lesser, thin laminated clay strata also are present. Locally, as near Lakehurst, thick, dark-gray, very lignitic clay was uncovered during the mining of ilmenite and is informally called the Legler lignite (Rachele, 1976). An extensive, well-preserved leaf flora was collected from a thick clay lens in a pit near Millville, Cumberland County. The leaf flora was dominated by Alangium sp., a tree no longer growing in eastern North America (J.A. Wolfe, written commun., 1992). Maximum thickness in the map area is about 60 m (197 ft); however, thickness is difficult to determine because of the irregular basal contact and extensive post-depositional erosion. There is as much as 18 m (59 ft) of relief along the basal contact. The basal contact is sharp, undulatory, and directly overlain by a thin gravel bed. The Cohansey Formation unconformably overlies the Kirkwood Formation and is found in channels cut down into the Kirkwood. Where the Kirkwood consists of sandy, light-colored sediments, the basal contact of the Cohansey is drawn below crossbedded sediments. Where the Kirkwood consists of dark-colored silty beds, the basal contact is drawn between light-colored Cohansey sediments and the underlying dark-colored sediments. The Cohansey was markedly thinned because of erosion prior to deposition of overlying units in the western and southern parts of the southern sheet (Owens and Minard, 1975). The unit has been extensively eroded and stripped from large areas of the New Jersey Coastal Plain, particularly in the central sheet where outliers are common. In spite of its widespread nature, the Cohansey is poorly exposed because of its loose sandy composition, which causes it to erode easily (Newell and others, in press). Because of this same sandy nature, the Cohansey has been widely mined for sand, and manmade exposures are common in many areas. The age of the Cohansey is controversial because no calcareous microfauna or macrofauna have been found in this formation. The best indication of age comes from pollen and spores obtained from dark carbonaceous clay. Rachele (1976) analyzed the microflora from the Legler site and noted that the Cohansey had a rich and varied assemblage including several genera labeled "exotics" which no longer occur in the northeastern United States: Engelhardia, Pterocarya, Podocarpus, and Cyathea. Greller and Rachele (1984) estimated a middle Miocene age. Ager's (in Owens and others, 1988) analysis of the Cohansey from a corehole at Mays Landing also suggests a middle Miocene (Serravallian) age.
Englishtown Formation (Upper Cretaceous, lower Campanian)
Englishtown Formation - Sand, quartz, fine- to coarsegrained, gravelly, massive, bioturbated, medium- to dark-gray; weathers light brown, yellow, or reddish brown, locally interbedded with thin to thick beds of dark clay. Abundant carbonaceous matter, with large lignitized logs occur locally, especially in clay strata. Feldspar, glauconite, and muscovite are minor sand constituents. Sand is extensively trough crossbedded particularly west of Mount Holly, Burlington County. In a few places in the western outcrop belt, trace fossils are abundant, typically the burrow Ophiomorpha nodosa. Unit is pyritic, especially in the carbonaceous-rich beds where pyrite is finely disseminated grains or pyritic masses as much as 0.6 m (2 ft) in diameter. Lowest part of unit is a massive sand that contains small to large, soft, light-gray siderite concretions. The Englishtown underlies a broad belt throughout the map area and ranges from about 45 m (148 ft) thick in the northern part of the central sheet to 30 m (98 ft) thick in the western part of the central sheet to 15 m (49 ft) in the southern sheet. Best exposures occur along Crosswicks Creek in the Allentown quadrangle and along Oldmans Creek. The basal contact with the underlying Woodbury Formation or Merchantville Formation is transitional over several meters. The age of the Englishtown in outcrop could not be determined directly but was inferred from stratigraphic position and pollen content. Wolfe (1976) designated the microflora of the unit as Zone CA4 and assigned it to the lower Campanian.
Hardyston Quartzite (Lower Cambrian)
Hardyston Quartzite (Lower Cambrian) (Wolff and Brooks, 1898) - Light- to medium-gray and bluish-gray conglomeratic sandstone. Varies from pebble conglomerate, to fine-grained, well-cemented quartzite, to arkosic or dolomitic sandstone. Conglomerate contains subangular to subrounded white quartz pebbles up to 2.5 cm (1 in.). Lower contact unconformable. About 0 to 9 m (1-30 ft) thick.
Hardyston Quartzite (Lower Cambrian)
Hardyston Quartzite (Wolff and Brooks, 1898) - Medium- to light-gray, fine- to coarse-grained, medium- to thick-bedded quartzite, arkosic sandstone and dolomitic sandstone. Basal pebble to cobble conglomerate typically contains clasts of local basement affinities. Contains fragments of the trilobite Olenellus thompsoni of Early Cambrian age. Thickness approximately 0.5 to 62 m (1.6-200 ft).
Hornerstown Formation (lower Paleocene, Danian)
Hornerstown Formation - Sand, glauconite, clayey, extensively bioturbated, massive, medium-green in the shallow subsurface. Common to abundant microfauna in the subsurface are not present in outcrop. In the deep subsurface, the Hornerstown Formation consists of glauconite sand at base, overlain by a thin, laminated, dark-gray clay-silt that grades upward into a finegrained, clayey glauconite quartz sand. The formation is very thin and rarely exceeds 7.5 m (25 ft) in thickness. The basal contact with the underlying Kc4 cycle is difficult to place because both units are glauconitic sand; however, the basal Hornerstown contains dark-brown phosphatic debris. Less commonly the contact is marked by extensive burrows filled with glauconite sand that project downward into the underlying unit. Gamma logs from the Hornerstown have a very large gamma kick at the base of the formation. The age of the Hornerstown is early Paleocene (Danian) based on the presence of calcareous nannofossils (Chiasmolithus consuetus and Ellipsolithus macellus) and foraminifera characteristic of zones NP 3 and NP 4, and P1a to P1c (Chengjie Liu, Rutgers University, written commun., 1993), respectively.
Hornerstown Formation (lower Paleocene, Danian)
Hornerstown Formation - Sand, glauconite, fine- to medium-grained, locally clayey, massive, dark-gray to dusky-green; weathers dusky yellow or red brown, extensively bioturbated, locally has a small amount of quartz at base. Glauconite grains are typically dark green and have botryoidal shapes. The Hornerstown weathers readily to iron oxide because of its high glauconite content. The Hornerstown in most areas is nearly pure glauconite greensand. The Hornerstown crops out in a narrow belt throughout most of the western outcrop area. In the northern part of the central sheet, it is extensively dissected and occurs as several outliers. Throughout its outcrop belt in the central sheet, the Hornerstown unconformably overlies several formations: the Tinton Formation in the extreme northern area; the Red Bank Formation in the northwestern and west-central areas; and the Navesink Formation in the west-central and southern areas. In the southern sheet, it unconformably overlies the Mount Laurel Formation. The unconformable basal contact locally contains a bed of reworked phosphatic vertebrate and invertebrate fossils. For the most part, however, the basal contact is characterized by an intensely bioturbated zone in which many burrows filled with bright green glauconite sand from the Hornerstown Formation project down into the dark-gray matrix of the underlying Navesink Formation. In a few exposures, a thin layer of medium- to coarse-grained quartz sand separates the Hornerstown from the underlying unit. The Hornerstown is 1.5 to 7 m (5-23 ft) thick. A Cretaceous age was assigned to this unit by Koch and Olsson (1977) based, in part, on a vertebrate fauna found at Sewell, Gloucester County. However, early Paleocene calcareous nannofossil Zones NP 2-4 were found in a core at Allaire State Park, Monmouth County. This is the only locality in New Jersey where Zone NP 2 was observed; otherwise, the Hornerstown is confined to Zones NP 3 and NP 4. Lowermost Paleocene Zone NP 1 was not identified, and it is thought that the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary in New Jersey may be unconformable. A complete Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary section was recovered at the Bass River borehole (ODP Leg 174AX). It contained the uppermost Maastrichtian calcareous nannofossil Micula prinsii Zone below a spherule layer and the basal Danian planktonic foraminiferal Guembeletria cretacea P0 Zone just above the layer (Olsson and others, 1997).
Jutland Klippe Sequence Unit B (Middle Ordovician)
Jutland Klippe Sequence Unit B of Perissoratis and others (1979) - Heterogeneous sequence of interbedded red, green, tan and gray shale; interlaminated dolomite and shale; interbedded fine-grained graywacke siltstone and beds or lenses of sandstone; light-gray to pale-pinkish-gray quartzite; and interbedded fine-grained, thin-bedded limestone and red and green shale. Limestone locally resembles an intraformational conglomerate because it is disrupted, boudinaged, and surrounded by shale beds. Lower contact gradational and within interbedded sequence of thin- to medium-bedded sandstone, siltstone, and limestone. Perissoratis and others (1979) placed this contact at boundary between graptolite faunas Isograptus caduceus and Paraglossograptus etheridgei of Berry (1968). The youngest graptolites occur within Climacograptus bicornis zone of Berry (1968). Some shale beds contain conodonts (Ethington and others, 1958; Karklins and Repetski, 1989) and brachiopod fragments. Carbonate and pelitic rocks locally contain conodonts of Prioniodus triangularis to Pygodus anserinus faunas of North Atlantic Realm. Thickness varies due to structural complexity, but may be about 460 to 550 m (1,500-1,800 ft).
Leithsville Formation (Middle and Lower Cambrian)
Leithsville Formation (Middle and Lower Cambrian) (Wherry, 1909) - Light- to dark-gray and lightolive-gray, fine- to medium-grained, thin- to medium-bedded dolomite. Grades downward through medium-gray, grayish-yellow, or pinkish-gray dolomite and dolomitic sandstone, siltstone and shale to medium-gray, medium-grained, medium-bedded dolomite containing quartz sand grains as stringers and lenses near the base. Lower contact gradational. Thickness ranges from 0 to 56 m (0-185 ft) due to erosion.
Lockatong Formation (Upper Triassic)
Lockatong Formation (Kummel, 1897) - Cyclically-deposited sequences consisting of light- to dark-gray, greenish-gray, and black, dolomitic or analcime-bearing silty argillite, laminated mudstone, silty to calcareous, argillaceous, very-fine-grained pyritic sandstone and siltstone, and minor silty limestone (Trl). Grayish-red, grayish-purple, and dark-brownish-red sequences (Trlr) common in upper half. Two types of cycles are recognized: detrital and chemical. Detrital cycles average 5.2 m (17 ft) thick and consist of basal, argillaceous, very fine grained sandstone to coarse siltstone; medial, dark-gray to black, laminated siltstone, silty mudstone, or silty limestone; and upper, light- to dark-gray, silty to dolomitic or analcime-rich mudstone, argillitic siltstone, or very-fine-grained sandstone. Chemical cycles are similar to detrital cycles, but thinner, averaging 3.2 m (10.5 ft). Cycles in northern Newark basin are thinner and have arkosic sandstone in lower and upper parts. Upper part of formation in northern basin composed mostly of light-gray to light-pinkish-gray or light-brown, coarse- to fine-grained, thick- to massive-bedded arkosic sandstone (Trla). Thermally metamorphosed into hornfels where intruded by diabase (Jd). Interfingers laterally and gradationally with quartz sandstone and conglomerate (Trls) and quartzite conglomerate (Trlcq) near Triassic border fault in southwestern area of map. Maximum thickness of Lockatong Formation about 1,070 m (3,510 ft).
Lockatong Formation (Upper Triassic)
Lockatong Formation - Predominantly cyclic lacustrine sequences of silty, dolomitic or analcime-bearing argillite; laminated mudstone; silty to calcareous, argillaceous very fine grained sandstone and pyritic siltstone; and minor silty limestone, mostly light- to dark-gray, greenishgray, and black. Grayish-red, grayish-purple, and dark-brownish-red sequences (Trlr) occur in some places, especially in upper half. Two types of cycles are recognized: freshwater-lake (detrital) and alkaline-lake (chemical) cycles. Freshwater-lake cycles average 5.2 m (17 ft) thick. They consist of basal, transgressive, fluvial to lake-margin deposits that are argillaceous, very fine grained sandstone to coarse siltstone with indistinct lamination, planar or cross lamination, or are disrupted by convolute bedding, desiccation cracks, root casts, soil-ped casts, and tubes. Medial lake-bottom deposits are laminated siltstones, silty mudstones, or silty limestones that are dark gray to black with calcite laminae and grains and lenses, or streaks of pyrite; fossils are common, including fish scales and articulated fish, conchostracans, plants, spores, and pollen. Upper regressive lake margin, playa lake, and mudflat deposits are light- to dark-gray silty mudstone to argillitic siltstone or very fine grained sandstone, mostly thick bedded to massive, with desiccation cracks, intraformational breccias, faint wavy laminations, burrows, euhedral pyrite grains, and dolomite or calcite specks. Alkaline-lake cycles are similar to freshwater-lake cycles, but are thinner, averaging 3 m (10 ft), have fewer fossils (mainly conchostracans), and commonly have red beds, extensive desiccation features, and abundant analcime and dolomite specks in the upper parts of cycles. Thickness near Byram is about 1,070 m (3,510 ft). The formation thins to the southeast and northeast; thickness near Princeton is less than 700 m (2,297 ft).
Lockatong Formation red bed (Upper Triassic)
Lockatong Formation red bed - Cyclically-deposited sequences consisting of light- to dark-gray, greenish-gray, and black, dolomitic or analcime-bearing silty argillite, laminated mudstone, silty to calcareous, argillaceous, very-fine-grained pyritic sandstone and siltstone, and minor silty limestone (Trl). Grayish-red, grayish-purple, and dark-brownish-red sequences (Trlr) common in upper half.
Lockatong Formation red bed (Upper Triassic)
Lockatong Formation red bed - Predominantly cyclic lacustrine sequences of silty, dolomitic or analcime-bearing argillite; laminated mudstone; silty to calcareous, argillaceous very fine grained sandstone and pyritic siltstone; and minor silty limestone, mostly light- to dark-gray, greenishgray, and black. Grayish-red, grayish-purple, and dark-brownish-red sequences (Trlr) occur in some places, especially in upper half. Two types of cycles are recognized: freshwater-lake (detrital) and alkaline-lake (chemical) cycles. Freshwater-lake cycles average 5.2 m (17 ft) thick. They consist of basal, transgressive, fluvial to lake-margin deposits that are argillaceous, very fine grained sandstone to coarse siltstone with indistinct lamination, planar or cross lamination, or are disrupted by convolute bedding, desiccation cracks, root casts, soil-ped casts, and tubes. Medial lake-bottom deposits are laminated siltstones, silty mudstones, or silty limestones that are dark gray to black with calcite laminae and grains and lenses, or streaks of pyrite; fossils are common, including fish scales and articulated fish, conchostracans, plants, spores, and pollen. Upper regressive lake margin, playa lake, and mudflat deposits are light- to dark-gray silty mudstone to argillitic siltstone or very fine grained sandstone, mostly thick bedded to massive, with desiccation cracks, intraformational breccias, faint wavy laminations, burrows, euhedral pyrite grains, and dolomite or calcite specks. Alkaline-lake cycles are similar to freshwater-lake cycles, but are thinner, averaging 3 m (10 ft), have fewer fossils (mainly conchostracans), and commonly have red beds, extensive desiccation features, and abundant analcime and dolomite specks in the upper parts of cycles. Thickness near Byram is about 1,070 m (3,510 ft). The formation thins to the southeast and northeast; thickness near Princeton is less than 700 m (2,297 ft).
Lower Member of the Kirkwood Formation (lower Miocene, Aquitanian)
Lower Member - Complex unit in which facies changes are common. In outcrop, some of the lower member is a light-colored quartz sand (Grenloch facies of Isphording, 1970). The facies pinches out rapidly in the subsurface, and the unit is primarily a massive to finely laminated, dark-gray clay (Alloway clay of Kummel and Knapp, 1904). This clay facies occurs as far south as Clayton, Gloucester County, where the lower part changes to a fossiliferous clayey silt. The lower clayey facies thickens to over 30 m (98 ft) in the coastal region. Here, the lower facies is mostly dark-gray clayey silt that is locally very fossiliferous. The unit varies in thickness but is thickest, as much as 80 m (262 ft), in the southeastern part of the central sheet. South of Bridgeton, Cumberland County, sand is present at the top of the member. This sand thickens to over 23 m (75 ft) at the coast where it is part of the "800 foot" sand, the principal aquifer in the coastal region. Quartz and siliceous rock fragments are the major sand minerals. Feldspars typically constitute less than 10 percent of the sand fraction except in the reworked beds where they make up as much as 25 percent of the sand. Mica and wood fragments are minor constituents. The basal contact with the underlying unit is sharp and unconformable. Commonly there is a 0.3- to 1-m (1- to 3-ft)-thick zone along this contact in which coarse-grained quartz sand and some gravel are present. Because of the quartz sand in the lower member in outcrop, some considered the lower member and the Cohansey Formation to be transitional (Isphording, 1970). Obviously this is not the case as there are three other members (Shiloh Marl, Wildwood, and Belleplain) lying between the lower member and the Cohansey. The age of the lower member was determined from planktic foraminifera and diatoms, and from strontium-isotope age estimates. The foraminiferal assemblage includes Globigerina praebulloides, Globigerinoides trilobus, G. altiapertura, and Globorotalia siakensis. These species are characteristic of the lower Miocene Zone 5 of Blow (1969) of Burdigalian age. The diatom assemblage is characterized by Actinoptychus heliopelta, Aulacodiscus rogersii, Coscinodiscus lewisianus, Sceptroneis caduceus, and Triceratium acutum. These diatoms are characteristic of ECDZ 1 of Andrews (1988), which is considered to be early Miocene (Burdigalian) in age. The strontium-isotope analyses of shells from this member indicate ages from 23 to 20.2 Ma (Aquitanian), thereby extending the age of this member (Sugarman and others, 1993). The pollen in the clay facies of the Kirkwood, as determined from the ACGS-4 drillhole, are oak, hickory, and pine with smaller amounts of beech, black gum, sweet gum, alder, elm, linden, and birch. The sandy facies has essentially the same assemblage but has unusually high concentrations of beech. Exotic species such as Podocarpus and Momipites are common in the unit. The cool floral elements found in the overlying Belleplain and Wildwood Members were not found in the lower member.
Lower Member of the Kirkwood Formation (lower Miocene, Burdigalian and Aquitanian)
Lower Member - Sand and clay. Upper sand facies: sand, typically fine- to medium-grained, massive to thick-bedded, locally crossbedded, light-yellow to white, locally very micaceous and extensively stained by iron oxides in near-surface beds. The thick-bedded strata commonly consist of interbedded fine-grained, micaceous sand and gravelly, coarse- to fine-grained sand. Some beds are intensely burrowed. Trough crossbedded strata with high concentrations of ilmenite and a few burrows are most commonly seen in the Lakewood quadrangle. Lower clay facies: clay and clay-silt, massive to thin-bedded, dark-gray, micaceous, contains wood fragments, flattened lignitized twigs, and other plant debris. Locally, the clay has irregularly shaped sand pockets, which may represent some type of burrow. In the least weathered beds, the sand of the upper sand facies is principally quartz and muscovite with lesser amounts of feldspar. The light-mineral fraction of the dark-colored clay has significantly more feldspar (10-15 percent) and rock fragments (10-15 percent) than the upper sand facies, where the feldspar was probably leached during weathering. The basal beds have a reworked zone 0.3 to 1.2 m (1-4 ft) thick that contains fine- to very coarse grained sand and, locally, gravel. These beds are very glauconitic and less commonly contain wood fragments. Reworked zones are present throughout the lower member. The lower member consists of a lower finegrained, clayey, dark-colored, micaceous sand (transgressive) and an upper massive or thick-bedded to crossbedded, light-colored sand (regressive). The lower, dark clayey unit was formerly called the Asbury Park Member. The clay-silt was previously called the Asbury Clay by Kummel and Knapp (1904). The upper sand facies has been observed only in pits and roadcuts. It is poorly exposed because of its sandy nature. In the central sheet, the lower clay facies is exposed in pits north of Farmingdale, Monmouth County; in a few cuts along the Manasquan River, north of Farmingdale; and along the Shark River, northeast of Farmingdale. In the southern sheet, the lower clay facies is exposed only where the Coastal Plain was deeply entrenched and stripped away. In the southwesternmost part of the southern sheet, for example, the Cohansey Formation and much of the upper sand facies were stripped away by successive entrenchments of the Delaware River. On the central sheet, the lower member ranges in thickness from 20 to 30 m (66-98 ft) along strike, but thickens to over 60 m (197 ft) to the southeast. On the southern sheet, the unit ranges in thickness from 15 to 25 m (49-82 ft). The age of the lower member is based on the presence of the diatom Actinoptychus heliopelta, which was recovered from an exposure southwest of Farmingdale near Oak Glen, Monmouth County (Goldstein, 1974). This diatom places the lower member in the lower part of the ECDZ 1 of Andrews (1987), indicative of an early Miocene (Burdigalian) age (Andrews, 1988). Sugarman and others (1993) report strontium-isotope ages of 22.6 to 20.8 Ma, thereby extending the age of the unit to Aquitanian.
Magothy Formation (Upper Cretaceous, middle and lower Santonian)
Magothy Formation - Sand, fine- to coarsegrained, locally very gravelly (pebbles less than 1.3 cm (0.5 in) in diameter) especially in updip areas, typically cross stratified, massive, horizontally bedded, light-gray to white, carbonized wood (several centimeters long) and colorless mica scattered throughout. Black to dark-gray, very carbonaceous clay is locally interstratified with the sand. No calcareous fossils were recovered from the Magothy Formation in the shallow subsurface. In the Freehold drillhole the thin basal bed of the Magothy is composed of quartz gravel (maximum clast diameter, about 2.5 cm (1 in)). The lower part of the formation above the gravel consists of thin-bedded white clay interbedded with fine- to coarse-grained, poorly sorted, thickbedded, light-colored, somewhat micaceous quartz sand. The interbedded clay becomes dark gray up section and the sand is slightly glauconitic and locally shelly. Quartz is the major sand mineral. Siliceous rock fragments, mica, and feldspar are minor constituents. In general, this formation appears to be fluvial near the base (upper delta plain) and gradually becomes more marine upward (shelf). The overall sedimentologic pattern suggests a net transgression during deposition of the Magothy with shelf deposits overriding a nonmarine (probably deltaic) facies. Downdip at Buena, Atlantic County, the Magothy is 22 m (72 ft) thick and is primarily a massive to finely laminated, dark-gray, woody clay-silt. Unit is as much as 55 m (180 ft) thick in the northern part of the central sheet and generally thins to the southwest. The age of the Magothy is best defined by pollen. Christopher (1979) placed this palynoflora in his Zone V of early and late Santonian age. He also recognized three assemblage zones within Zone V, the Complexiopollis exiqua-Santalacites minor Zone (lowest), the ?Pseudoplicapollis longiannulata-Plicapollis incisa Zone (middle), and the ?Pseudoplicapollis cuneata-Semioculopollis verrucosa Zone (highest). All three zones are present in the Magothy in New Jersey. The foraminifera Marginotruncana marginata and Rosita fornicata were collected from the Island Beach corehole at 550 m (1804 ft) and are indicative of the Dicarinella asymmetrica Zone. Because of the overall character of the foram assemblage it is probable that these fossils indicate a late Santonian rather than early Campanian age (H.J. Dowsett, written commun., 1992). The Magothy, therefore, is Santonian or older in age.
Magothy Formation (Upper Cretaceous, middle and lower Santonian)
Magothy Formation - Sand, quartz, fine- to coarse-grained, locally gravelly (especially at the base), white; weathers yellow brown or orange brown, interbedded with thin-bedded clay or dark-gray clay-silt mainly at the top of the formation. Muscovite and feldspar are minor sand constituents. Large wood fragments occur in many clay layers. Clay weathers to gray brown or white. Formation characterized by local vertical and lateral facies changes. The Magothy is best exposed and thickest (about 80 m (262 ft)) in the Raritan Bay area. The outcrop belt is widest in the north and narrows to the southwest. The formation is about 25 m (82 ft) thick or less in the southern sheet. The formation is poorly exposed because of its sandy nature and its widespread cover by younger sediments. The old geologic map of New Jersey (Lewis and Kummel, 1910-1912, revised 1950) showed the Magothy to consist of only one lithology (Cliffwood beds at Cliffwood Beach, Monmouth County). Subsequent pollen studies of the Magothy and the underlying Raritan Formation showed most of the Raritan to be the same age as the Magothy. Wolfe and Pakiser (1971) redefined and considerably expanded the Magothy. Kummel and Knapp (1904) had already recognized that the Magothy, as used here, contained a large number of lithologies. At the time of their study, the Magothy was extensively mined for clay and sand and was well exposed. Their subdivisions had economic designations (for example, Amboy stoneware clay). Barksdale and others (1943) later gave geographic names to these subdivisions, discussed individually below. The lower contact of the Magothy in the Delaware River valley is difficult to place because the lower part of the Magothy is lithically similar to the underlying Potomac Formation. The contact is placed at the base of the lowest dark-gray clay in the Magothy. The best faunas from the Magothy were obtained from siderite concretions and slabs in and near Cliffwood Beach representing only the top of the formation. These faunas were discussed in detail by Weller (1904, 1907) and supplemented by Sohl (in Owens and others, 1977). The presence of Ostrea cretacea in the Cliffwood Beach fauna suggests that the upper part of the Magothy is late Santonian in age. Wolfe and Pakiser (1971) and Christopher (1979, 1982) discussed the microfloral assemblage in the Magothy. Christopher subdivided the Magothy into three zones: Complexipollis exigua-Santalacites minor (oldest), ?Pseudoplicapollis longiannulata-Plicapollis incisa (middle), and ?Pseudoplicapollis cuneata-Semioculopollis verrucosa (youngest). The oldest zone, originally considered to be as old as Turonian, was subsequently considered to be post-Coniacian Christopher, 1982). The middle and upper zones are also probably Santonian. Christopher (1979) followed the nomenclature for the subdivisions elaborated upon earlier. The Cliffwood and Morgan beds, and, presumably the upper thin-bedded sequence, would include the youngest pollen zone; the Amboy Stoneware Clay Member and perhaps the uppermost part of the Old Bridge Sand Member, the middle pollen zone; and the lower part of the Old Bridge Sand Member and South Amboy Fire Clay Member, the oldest pollen zone. The Magothy is considered herein to be of Santonian age. Cliffwood beds - Typically very sandy, horizontally bedded to crossbedded, mainly small-scale trough crossbeds. Thin layers of dark, fine, carbonaceous matter are interbedded with sand. Carbonaceous units are conspicuously micaceous; the sand is less so. Sand is typically fine to medium grained and locally burrowed. Burrows include the small-diameter Ophiomorpha nodosa and some that are not clay lined. Slabs of dark-reddish-brown siderite were common at the base of the bluff at Cliffwood Beach before the outcrop was covered. Some of these slabs had many fossil molds, typically a large number of pelecypods. Lower in the section, between high and low tide level, there is a pale-gray clay-silt about 1.5 m (5 ft) thick with many small reddish-brown siderite concretions. These concretions have many fossils that were described in detail by Weller (1904). The Cliffwood beds are about 7.5 m (25 ft) thick in outcrop. Equivalents of the Cliffwood beds are exposed near the Delaware River between Trenton and Florence, Burlington County. These beds are mainly sand, as are those at Cliffwood Beach, but they tend to have more crossbedding than the typical Cliffwood strata and no burrows or marine fossils. In addition, beds of quartz gravel are present in the Cliffwood near Riverside, Burlington County. Morgan beds - Occur only in the northern part of the central sheet. They consist of interbedded, thin, dark-colored clay and fine-grained, light-colored, micaceous sand. Clay is locally more abundant in the Morgan than in the Cliffwood beds. Sand ranges from massive to locally crossbedded and locally has fine organic matter. This unit is exposed only in the South Amboy quadrangle where it is as much as 12 m (39 ft) thick. It grades downward into underlying clay. Amboy Stoneware Clay Member - Crops out only in the South Amboy quadrangle in the central sheet and is mainly dark-gray, white-weathering, interbedded clay and silt to fine-grained quartz sand. Clay has abundant, fine, carbonaceous matter and fine mica flakes. Small cylindrical burrows are abundant in this unit. Locally, the clay is interbedded with sand and contains large pieces of lignitized, bored (Teredolites) logs. Large slabs of pyrite-cemented sand are associated with the woody beds. Amber occurs in some of the wood. Unit is approximately 7.5 m (25 ft) thick, but pinches out along strike. The Amboy Stoneware is disconformable on the underlying sand. Old Bridge Sand Member - Predominantly a light-colored sand, extensively crossbedded and locally interbedded with dark-gray laminae; clay is highly carbonaceous, woody, in discontinuous beds, especially near the base. The scale of crossbedding varies from small to large. Locally, small burrows are present. Unit is as much as 12 m (39 ft) thick and rests disconformably on the underlying unit. South Amboy Fire Clay Member - Basal member of the Magothy Formation. Unit resembles the Amboy Stoneware Clay Member, particularly in its lensing character. Unit is best exposed in the central sheet in the South Amboy quadrangle and in the Delaware River valley at the base of the bluffs at Florence. The South Amboy is a dark, massive to finely laminated clay, locally oxidized to white or red. Unit fills large channels and has local concentrations of large, pyrite-encrusted, lignitized logs. Some of the clay is slumped, suggesting post-depositional undercutting during channel migration. The clay is interbedded with fine- to medium-grained, crossbedded sand. The basal contact with the underlying Raritan is well exposed in the Sayre and Fisher Pit in Sayreville, Middlesex County, where the contact is marked by a deeply weathered gravel zone.
Manasquan Formation (lower Eocene, Ypresian)
Manasquan Formation - Clay to clay-silt, massive to finely laminated, green to gray-green, extensively bioturbated. Calcareous microfossils are abundant in this unit. In the northwestern outcrop belt and shallow subsurface of the central sheet, the lower beds of the Manasquan Formation consist of a maximum of 10 m (33 ft) of fine- to coarse-grained, somewhat clayey, bluish-green glauconitic quartz sand. No calcareous macrofossils were found in this lithology. The sand minerals in the basal sand facies, excluding glauconite, consist of quartz, feldspar (10 to 25 percent), and siliceous rock fragments (a few percent). The glauconitic quartz sand is overlain to the southwest by a light- to dark-green, locally glauconitic, sandy clay-silt. This clay-silt is present at the base of the unit in the shallow subsurface. Eastward and in the intermediate subsurface, the Manasquan is primarily a clayey glauconite sand. In the deep subsurface, the Manasquan is primarily a massive to finely laminated, lightyellow clay-silt that has high concentrations of calcareous microfossils and has several hard indurated layers. In general, the formation thickens to the southeast where it is more than 60 m (197 ft) thick. The basal contact with the underlying Vincentown Formation is sharp and contains a thin zone, typically 0.61 m (2 ft) thick, of reworked glauconite sand, phosphatic debris, and sparse quartz granules. Gamma-ray logs through the Manasquan Formation have a large gamma spike along the basal contact. The age of the Manasquan was determined from calcareous nannofossils and, to a lesser degree, from foraminifera. The lower part of the Manasquan is assigned to the upper part of Zone NP 9 on the basis of the calcareous nannofossils Campylosphaera dela and Lophodolithus nascens and the absence of Zone NP 10 species. The upper part of the formation lies within Zone NP 13. This zone is characterized by the absence of Rhomboaster orthostylus and the presence of Discoaster lodoensis (Poore and Bybell, 1988). The foraminifera Planorotalites palmerae, which is present in this unit, has a range that correlates with the lower part of Zone NP 13 (Poore and Bybell, 1988).
Manasquan Formation (lower Eocene, Ypresian)
Manasquan Formation - Consists of several lithologies. In the northern part of the central sheet, unit consists of a lower, clayey, quartz-glauconite sand, which is exposed intermittently along the Manasquan River near Farmingdale, Monmouth County, and an upper, finegrained quartz sand or silt, which is exposed along Hog Swamp Brook west of Deal, Monmouth County. The Farmingdale Member and the Deal Member (of Enright, 1969) are not used on this map because they are not continuous through the outcrop belt or in the subsurface. The formation is best exposed in the central sheet from the Fort Dix Military Reservation, Burlington County, southwestward to the Medford Lakes quadrangle. Here the lower part of the formation consists of 5 m (16 ft) of medium- to coarse-grained, massive, dark-grayish-green, glauconite-quartz sand. The lowest 1 m (3 ft) mostly contains calcareous debris and phosphatized internal fossil molds reworked from the underlying Vincentown Formation. The upper part of the formation is approximately 8 m (26 ft) thick and is mostly a very clayey, blue-green to pale-gray, quartz-glauconite (about 20 percent glauconite) sand. Locally, the glauconite content of this interval is variable, and the unit becomes almost a bluegreen clay-silt, especially near Pemberton, Burlington County (Owens and Minard, 1964a). Casts and molds of mollusks (especially Venericardia perantiqua) occur in outcrop. The age of the formation was determined from microfauna in unweathered subsurface beds. Calcareous nannofossils indicates upper Zone NP 9 to mid Zone NP 14 (early Eocene).
Marcellus Shale (Middle Devonian)
Marcellus Shale (Vanuxem, 1840) - Medium-gray weathering, dark-gray to grayish-black, thin- to thick-bedded, fossiliferous, fissile and limonite-stained locally arenaceous shale. Lower contact grades downward over 12 m (40 ft) from black shale through limy shale, into silty limestone of the Buttermilk Falls Limestone (documented in drill core data of Fletcher and Woodrow, 1970). Approximately 274 m (900 ft) thick.
Marshalltown Formation (Upper Cretaceous, upper and middle Campanian)
Marshalltown Formation - Sand, quartz and glauconite, fine- to medium-grained, silty and clayey, massive, dark-gray; weathers light brown or pale red, extensively bioturbated. Very glauconitic in basal few meters; glauconite concentration decreases upward so that in upper part of unit, quartz and glauconite are nearly equal. Feldspar, mica, pyrite, and phosphatic fragments are minor sand constituents. Locally, very micaceous (mostly green chlorite) with sparse carbonized wood fragments. Fine-grained pyrite abundant throughout formation. Local thin, pebbly zones with large fossil impressions occur in the middle of the formation. In the upper part of the formation, quartz increases to about 40 percent. Unit crops out in a narrow belt throughout the map area and forms isolated outliers in the central sheet. Best exposures are along Crosswicks Creek in the Allentown quadrangle. In the southern sheet, the Marshalltown underlies a narrow belt in the uplands and broadens to the southwest. Many Marshalltown exposures occur along Oldmans Creek and its tributaries near Auburn, Gloucester County. The contact with the underlying Englishtown Formation is sharp and unconformable. The basal few centimeters of the Marshalltown contain siderite concentrations, clay balls, and wood fragments reworked from the underlying Englishtown. Many burrows, some filled with glauconite, project downward into the Englishtown for about one meter (3 ft) giving a spotted appearance to the upper part of the Englishtown (Owens and others, 1970). The Marshalltown is the basal transgressive unit of a sedimentation cycle that includes the regressive deposits of the overlying Wenonah and Mount Laurel Formations resembling the overlying Red Bank Formation to Navesink Formation cycle in its asymmetry. Within the map area, only a few long-ranging megafossils occur in the Moorestown quadrangle (Richards, 1967). To the south, in the type area, Weller (1907) reported diverse molluskan assemblages indicating a Campanian age. More importantly, Olsson (1964) reported the late Campanian foraminifera Globotruncana calcarata Cushman from the upper part of the formation. No G. calcarata were found during our investigations. Wolfe (1976) assigned the pollen assemblage of the Marshalltown to the CA5A Zone considered to be Campanian. The Marshalltown has most recently been assigned to Zone CC 20-21 (Sugarman and others, 1995) of middle and late Campanian age (Perch-Nielsen, 1985).
Merchantville Formation (Upper Cretaceous, lower Campanian)
Merchantville Formation - Sand, glauconite, locally has high quartz content, very clayey and silty, massive to thick-bedded, grayish-olive-green to dark-greenish-gray; weathers moderate brown or moderate yellow brown. Mica, feldspar, and pyrite are minor sand constituents. Very micaceous at base. Locally, has extensive iron incrustations in near-surface weathered beds. Fossil molds are mostly phosphatic. Fossils typically occur in siderite concretions. No calcareous fossils were found in outcrop. The Merchantville forms a continuous narrow to wide belt throughout the map area. The unit is about 6 m (20 ft) thick in the northern part of the central sheet, about 20 m (66 ft) thick in the Trenton area, and 12 to 15 m (39-49 ft) thick throughout the southern sheet. The formation is best exposed in the Trenton East quadrangle, mainly in the tributaries on the western side of Blacks Creek and south of Bordentown, Burlington County, where the entire thickness of the formation can be seen in gullies (Owens and Minard, 1964b). The basal contact with the underlying Magothy or Cheesequake Formations is sharp and disconformable. At most places, a reworked zone about 0.3 to 1 m (1-3 ft) thick is present at the base. This basal bed contains reworked lignitized wood, siderite concretions as much as 13 cm (5 in) in diameter, scattered pebbles and coarse-grained quartz sand and is burrowed. Most burrows project downward into the underlying formations. The Merchantville is the basal bed of a lower Campanian transgressive-regressive cycle that includes the overlying Woodbury and Englishtown Formations. Merchantville faunas were analyzed by Sohl (in Owens and others, 1977) who concluded that northern fauna represented deposition on a lower shoreface or in the transition to an inner shelf, whereas the southern fauna was a deeper water assemblage, probably inner shelf. Macrofossils occur as internal and external molds and include the ammonites Menabites (Delawarella) delawarensis and Scaphites (Scaphites) hippocrepis III. The Scaphites is of the type III variety of Cobban (1969) and is indicative of the lower, but not the lowest, Campanian. More recently, Kennedy and Cobban (1993), detailing the ammonite assemblage that includes Baculites haresi, Chesapeakella nodatum, Cryptotexanites paedomorphicus sp., Glyptoxoceras sp., Menabites (Delawarella) delawarensis, M. (Delawarella) vanuxemi, Menabites (Bererella) sp., Pachydiscus (Pachydiscus) sp., Placenticeras placenta, Pseudoscholenbachia cf. P. chispaensis, Scaphites (Scaphites) hippocrepis III, Submortoniceras punctatum, S. uddeni, and Texanites (Texanites) sp., concluded that the Merchantville is of late early Campanian age. Wolfe (1976) indicated that the Merchantville microflora was distinct from overlying and underlying units and designated it Zone CA2 of early Campanian age.
Mt. Laurel Formation (Upper Cretaceous, upper Campanian)
Mt. Laurel Formation - Sand, quartz, massive to crudely bedded, typically coarsens upward, interbedded with thin clay beds. Glauconite and feldspar are minor sand constituents. Muscovite and biotite are abundant near the base. Lower part of formation is a fine- to medium-grained, clayey, dark-gray, glauconitic (maximum 25 percent) quartz sand. Typically weathers to white or light yellow and locally stained orange brown by iron oxides. Small pebbles scattered throughout, especially in the west-central area. Locally, has small, rounded siderite concretions in the interbedded clay-sand sequence. Granules and gravel are abundant in the upper 1.5 m (5 ft). Upper beds are light gray and weather light brown to reddish brown. The Mount Laurel is 10 m (33 ft) thick from the Roosevelt quadrangle to the Runnemede quadrangle in the central sheet. Thickness varies in the northern part of the map area due, in part, to extensive interfingering of this formation with the underlying Wenonah Formation. Weller (1907) and Kummel (1940) recognized only about 1.5 m (5 ft) of the Mount Laurel in the north. In this report those beds are assigned to the overlying Navesink Formation. The interbedded sequence, the major facies in the north, ranges to about 4.5 m (15 ft) thick. These interbeds have well-developed large burrows (Martino and Curran, 1990), mainly Ophiomorpha nodosa, and less commonly Rosselia socialis. The Mount Laurel is gradational into the underlying Wenonah Formation. A transition zone of 1.5 m (5 ft) is marked by an increase in clay, silt, and mica into the Wenonah, especially in the west-central area of the central sheet. The oyster Agerostrea falcata occurs in the lower part of the formation. Exogyra cancellata and Belemnitella americana are abundant in upper beds in the west-central area of the central sheet (New Egypt quadrangle). The Mount Laurel Formation is of late Campanian age based on the assignment of Zone CC 22b to the formation by Sugarman and others (1995) and the occurrence of Exogyra cancellata near Mullica Hill, Gloucester County.
Navesink Formation (Upper Cretaceous, Maastrichtian)
Navesink Formation - Sand, glauconite, medium-grained, clayey and silty, massive, dark-gray to dark-gray-green, extensively bioturbated, locally contains large calcareous shells; sand-size mica, locally abundant; weathers light brown or red brown. Basal quartz sand is fine- to coarse-grained, pebbly, massive, light-yellow, and somewhat glauconitic, as much as 2 m (7 ft) thick and formed by the reworking of the underlying Mount Laurel Formation (Owens and others, 1977). Exogyra costata and the belemnite Belemnitella americana occur in the basal quartz sand. Crops out in a narrow belt throughout map area. Fresh exposures occur along tributaries of Raccoon Creek near Mullica Hill, Gloucester County. The Navesink is 3 to 7.5 m (10-25 ft) thick. The Navesink and Red Bank deposits represent a transgressive (Navesink)-regressive (Red Bank) cycle of sedimentation (Owens and Sohl, 1969). The cycle is unconformity-bounded at top and bottom. Within the cycle, the formational contact is gradational. The age of the Navesink was determined from both the macrofauna and microfauna. Planktic foraminifera from the lower part of the Navesink are indicative of the Rugotruncana subcircumnodifera Subzone of early Maastrichtian age (Smith, in Owens and others, 1977). The upper part contains the mollusks Exogyra costata, Sphenodiscus lobatus, and Pycnodonte vesicularis indicating a middle to late Maastrichtian age. Planktic foraminifera from the upper part represent the Gansserina gansseri Subzone of middle Maastrichtian age (Smith, in Owens and others, 1977). Pollen in the Navesink and Sandy Hook Member of the Red Bank are similar; the Navesink microflora is a CA6/MA-1 Zone in Wolfe's (1976) classification. The Navesink, therefore, ranges from early to late Maastrichtian. Sugarman and others (1995) assigned a middle Maastrichtian Zone CC 25 to the Navesink.
Passaic Formation gray bed (Lower Jurassic and Upper Triassic)
Passaic Formation gray bed - Upper Triassic gray lake deposits (Trpg) consist of gray to black silty mudstone, gray and greenish- to purplish-gray argillaceous siltstone, black shale, and medium- to dark-gray, argillaceous, fine-grained sandstone and are abundant in the lower half of the Passaic Formation. Gray lakebeds occur in groups of two to five cycles although they also occur as single cycles in some parts of the formation. Several lakebed sequences consisting of one or two thick groups of drab-colored beds as much as 30 m (98 ft) thick or more can be traced over tens of kilometers. Many gray-bed sequences are locally correlated within fault blocks; some can be correlated across major faults or intrusive rock units. Thickness of the (entire Passaic) formation between Sourland Mountain and Sand Brook syncline is about 3,500 m (11,483 ft).
Passaic Formation Limestone-clast Conglomerate facies (Lower Jurassic and Upper Triassic)
Passaic Formation Limestone-clast Conglomerate facies - Limestone conglomerate unit (JTrpcl) is medium-bedded to massive, pebble to boulder conglomerate. Clasts are subangular dolomitic limestone in matrix of brownish- to purplish-red sandstone to mudstone; matrix weathers light-gray to white near faults. Maximum thickness unknown.
Passaic Formation Mudstone facies (Lower Jurassic and Upper Triassic)
Passaic Formation Mudstone facies - Sandy mudstone (JTrpms) is reddish-brown to brownish-red, massive, silty to sandy mudstone and siltstone, which are bioturbated, ripple cross-laminated and interbedded with lenticular sandstone. To southwest where similar lithologic units also occur, they have not been mapped separately, but have been included in undivided unit JTrp.
Potomac Formation (Upper Cretaceous, lower Cenomanian)
Potomac Formation - Predominantly clay to clay-silt, thinly laminated to thick-bedded, mottled red, white, and orange-brown, less commonly dark-gray and woody; interbedded with thin beds and lenses of very fine to medium-grained, massive, white to orange-brown, micaceous sand. Lithologies are typical of the shallow subsurface. Down dip, these lithologies interfinger with thin to thick beds of marine clay-silt, commonly glauconitic and locally shelly. Marine beds are most prevalent in the southernmost part of the southern sheet. Unit 3 was cored in its entirety at Freehold where it is approximately 75 m (246 ft) thick. In the core, the basal 6 m (20 ft) consists of red or mottled red and white clay interbedded with gravel and fine- to coarse-grained sand. The clay is pervaded by reddish-brown siderite. Most of the overlying beds consist of interbedded dark-colored clay, locally weathered to pale yellow or white, and fine- to medium-grained, light-colored sand. Layers that contain fine black carbonaceous material to large lignitized wood pieces are common in unit 3 in this core. At Toms River, the unit is about 60 m (197 ft) thick and consists of dark- to pale-gray clay, locally weathering to white or yellowish gray, and light-colored, micaceous sand. In general, the darker colored clay is more common in the upper part of the section. Locally, the sand has very small amounts of glauconite which may indicate some local marine influence during sedimentation. The age of unit 3 was determined from pollen in the nonmarine deposits and foraminifera in the marine sections. Typical forms found in Zone III in New Jersey are Ajatipollis sp. A, Tricolpites nemejci, T. vulgaris, Tricolporoidites bohemicus, Tricolporoidites sp. A, T. sp. B, and Tricolporopollenites sp. B (Doyle and Robbins, 1977). In the marine facies, Petters (1976) reports a planktic foraminiferal suite containing Praeglobotruncana delrioensis and Rotalipora greenhornensis. Both the pollen and foraminiferal assemblages suggest an early Cenomanian age.
Potomac Formation, unit 3 (Upper Cretaceous, lower Cenomanian)
Potomac Formation - Sand, fine- to coarse-grained, locally gravelly, crossbedded, light-colored, interbedded with white or variegated red and yellow, massive clay, and rarely dark-gray, woody clay. The Potomac Formation crops out only in the Delaware River valley where the river and its tributaries have eroded away the overlying formations. The Potomac has been mapped in a broad belt parallel to the inner edge of the Coastal Plain. Although mapped in a broad belt, the Potomac is very poorly exposed because of the widespread cover of surficial sediments. The best exposures occur where surficial material is mined away in the Camden area. Unit is about 45 m (148 ft) thick. Contact with the overlying Magothy Formation is difficult to pick where the basal Magothy also contains variegated clays. Most of the basal Magothy has more dark-colored clay, and the contact was drawn by using this criterion. The basal contact of the Potomac with the underlying crystalline rock is not exposed in New Jersey. Biostratigraphically, the Potomac has been separated into pollen zones I, II, and III (Doyle, 1969; Doyle and Robbins, 1977). Samples from the Potomac Formation in the Camden area and along the Delaware River nearby contain pollen assemblages of early Cenomanian age (Zone III) (Les Sirkin, written commun., 1988).
Raritan Formation (Upper Cretaceous, upper Cenomanian)
Raritan Formation - Clay, silty, massive, dark-gray, shelly. Unit is generally restricted to the deep subsurface and only subcrops in the northern part of the central sheet. Petters (1976) proposed a new formation, the Bass River Formation, which included the Raritan as well as the lowermost part of the Magothy and the uppermost part of the Potomac Formation, unit 3. In this report, the name Bass River is not used. Thickness values were obtained from interpretations of geophysical logs from the few drillholes that penetrated this formation; consequently, these values are, at best, speculative. It is estimated that the Raritan is at most 100 m (328 ft) thick in the southernmost part of New Jersey. The formation contains both nonmarine and marine facies. The Freehold drillhole shows the best section containing both facies. In this drillhole the Raritan is approximately 60 m (197 ft) thick. The lower 12 m (39 ft) consists of interbedded, fine- to medium-grained, thin- to thick-bedded, light to dark-colored quartz sand and light- to dark-colored clay or clayey silt. Small to large pieces of lignitized wood are characteristic of and common to abundant in these beds. The middle 30 m (98 ft) consists of laminated to thinly bedded, dark-gray, micaceous clay and fine-grained, light-colored, micaceous quartz sand. Reddish-brown secondary cementation is common in the strata of this interval. Lignitized wood fragments are also locally abundant in these beds but on average the wood pieces are much smaller than those seen in the basal beds. The upper 18 m (59 ft) also is dominated by the laminated to thin-bedded sequences of micaceous clay and quartz sand but has small amounts of glauconite sand. A thin layer of large fossils (primarily Exogyra woolmani) is present in these upper beds. At the very top of this interval some of the beds are cemented by siderite. In general, the Raritan appears to be fluvial in the lower part, marginal marine in the middle, and marine at the top. North and west of the Freehold drillhole the Raritan is mostly interbedded nonmarine crossbedded sand and black to variegated clay. At Island Beach, southwest of Freehold, the Raritan is wholly marine and consists largely of dark-gray, shelly, micaceous clay at the base and fine-grained, dark-gray, shelly, micaceous clay at the top. It is assumed that the Raritan is late Cenomanian to possibly early Turonian in age as determined from northern New Jersey sections. In outcrop, the Raritan is early late Cenomanian in age on the basis of ammonites (Cobban and Kennedy, 1990). Pollen from these outcrops belongs to the Complexiopollis-Atlantopollis Assemblage Zone (zone IV, Christopher, 1979). Downdip, Petters (1976) reports the planktic foraminifer Marginotruncana helvetica, a middle Turonian marker, from beds assigned to pollen zone IV at Toms River, Ocean County.
Raritan Formation (Upper Cretaceous, upper Cenomanian)
Raritan Formation - Consists of an upper clayey silt (Woodbridge Clay Member) and a lower sand (Farrington Sand Member). Formation occurs only in northern part of central sheet. Woodbridge Clay Member - Silt, clayey, dark-gray; weathers to red brown or white, locally interbedded with light-gray, clayey, fine- to very fine grained sand (primarily quartz and mica with little feldspar). Very micaceous (muscovite, chlorite, and biotite) in both silty and sandy beds. Very woody, mostly fine pieces in layers and coated with pyrite. Locally, tree stumps, in upright position, are found near base of unit as are transported individual logs several feet in length. Siderite occurs in discontinuous beds and as flattened slab concretions as much as 0.6 m (2 ft) in maximum diameter. Fossil casts of marine mollusks are present, particularly near the top of the formation. Locally, well-developed burrows of Ophiomorpha nodosa filled with iron oxides weather out of the clay-silt. The Woodbridge is approximately 20 m (66 ft) thick in the vicinity of Sayreville, Middlesex County, where the South River has stripped away the overlying Magothy Formation, and it crops out in many places in the Perth Amboy and New Brunswick quadrangles to the north, but not in the quadrangles to the south or southwest. The Woodbridge does not crop out in the Delaware River valley southwest of Trenton. The late Cenomanian ammonites Metoicoceras bergquisti and Metengonoceras sp. were described from the upper part of the Woodbridge (Cobban and Kennedy, 1990). Pollen from the unit belongs to the Complexipollis-Atlantopollis Assemblage Zone of latest Cenomanian and early Turonian age (Christopher, 1979, 1982). Farrington Sand Member - Sand, quartz, fine- to medium-grained, crossbedded, very micaceous, white, interbedded with thin to thick, dark, silt beds. Rock fragments are a minor sand constituent. No burrows were observed in the unit. Unit is exposed only in pits dug below the overlying Woodbridge Clay Member. Typically, thickness is about 9 to 10.5 m (30-34 ft). Pollen from the Farrington is similar to the pollen in the Woodbridge.
Raritan Formation (Upper Cretaceous)
Raritan Formation (Cook, 1868) - Consists of upper clayey-silt (Woodbridge Clay Member) and lower sand (Farrington Sand Member) in map area. Woodbridge Clay Member is palered-orange weathering, grayish-black to dark-gray micaceous silt, very clayey; interbedded and locally interbedded with light-gray, very clayey, fine- to very-fine-grained micaceous sand containing primarily quartz and feldspar. Abundant layers of small, pyrite-coated wood fragments. Siderite in discontinuous beds and in flattened slab concretions as much as 1 m (3 ft) in diameter are common. Mollusk casts common in siderite near top of formation. Typically about 24 m (80 ft) thick. Farrington Sand Member is white, fine-to medium-grained, very micaceous, crossbedded sand, interbedded with thin to thick, darkgray, silty beds. Exposed only in pits dug below the overlying Woodbridge Clay Member. Typically about 8 m (25 ft) thick. Fossils include late Cenomanian ammonites Metoicoceras bergquisti and Metengonoceras sp. in upper part of Woodbridge (Cobban and Kennedy, 1990) and pollen of the Complexipollis-Atlantopollis assemblage zone (= Zone IV) of late Cenomanian to early Turonian age (Christopher, 1979; 1982).
Rondout and Decker Formations, undivided (Lower Devonian and Upper Silurian)
Rondout and Decker Formations, undivided - Rondout Formation (Clarke and Schuchert, 1899) - Upper part is medium-gray weathering, medium-dark-gray, very fine to fine-grained, medium-bedded, fossiliferous, argillaceous limestone. Middle part is light-medium-gray-weathering, medium-gray, laminated to medium-bedded, argillaceous dolomite. Locally contains deep desiccation polygons. Lower part is medium-gray-weathering, medium- to dark-gray, very fine to medium-grained, medium-bedded fossiliferous limestone. Silurian-Devonian boundary placed in middle of formation (Denkler and Harris, 1988). Lower contact abrupt and placed at top of highest calcareous quartz sandstone. Thickness approximately 12 m (40 ft). Decker Formation (White, 1882) - Light-gray- to yellowish-gray-weathering, light- to medium-gray, calcareous quartz siltstone, sandstone, and fine-pebble conglomerate locally interbedded with fossiliferous medium-gray, medium- to coarse-grained limestone and very fine grained, thin- to medium-bedded dolomite. Lower contact gradational. Thickness varies from 15 m (50 ft) near Duttonville to 25 m (82 ft) at Wallpack Center.
Sandy Hook Member of the Red Bank Formation (Upper Cretaceous, upper and middle Maastrichtian)
Sandy Hook Member - Sand, quartz, fine-grained, clayey, very micaceous, massive, dark-gray, fossiliferous. Feldspar, muscovite, chlorite, and biotite are minor sand constituents. Well exposed at Poricy Brook in the Long Branch quadrangle. The Sandy Hook is much thinner than the overlying Shrewsbury Member and is a maximum of 10 m (33 ft) thick.
Shark River Formation (upper and middle Eocene, Priabonian through Lutetian)
Shark River Formation - Glauconite sand, silt, and clay, medium- to coarse-grained, light-brown to medium-gray, locally indurated at top and noncalcareous throughout. Mollusk impressions (mainly Venericardia perantiqua) were observed in the Farmingdale quadrangle. The Shark River is exposed only at a few localities in the central sheet near Farmingdale, Monmouth County, along the Manasquan and Shark Rivers and in several tributaries to Deal Lake near Asbury Park in the Asbury Park quadrangle (Sugarman and Owens, 1994). Most outcrops are small, less than 3 m (10 ft) in height. The contact with the underlying Manasquan Formation was not observed. The Shark River is about 18 m (59 ft) thick and consists of two fining-upward cycles: a glauconite sand is present at the base and a clay or silt is present at the top of each cycle. Calcareous nannofossils in subsurface Shark River sections indicate Zones NP 14 through NP 18 (Martini, 1971) (middle Eocene and early late Eocene).
Shark River Formation (upper and middle Eocene, Priabonian through Lutetian)
Shark River Formation - Consists of three lithofacies, a basal clayey, greenish-gray glauconite sand; a middle dark-green to gray-green silty clay or clayey silt; and an upper medium-gray to gray-green, silty quartz sand. Updip beds are cyclic with a fine- to medium-grained, somewhat clayey, fossiliferous, dark-green, glauconite-quartz (25 percent) sand at the base. The basal lithofacies is about 12 m (39 ft) thick in the southern sheet and 3 m (10 ft) thick in the central sheet. There is a general increase in quartz sand upward and a change in color to dark gray or brownish gray. Locally, some of the beds are more clayey and have more calcareous shell fragments. The middle clay and silt facies is typically the thickest lithofacies in most Shark River sections (as much as 38 m (125 ft) thick) and is massive to thick bedded. The thick-bedded parts typically consist of intercalated silty and clayey beds that are extensively bioturbated. Macro- and microfossils are abundant in this facies. Most of the macrofossils are thin-walled pelecypods. This facies is gradational into the upper quartz-sand facies. The quartz sand is well developed in the Toms River Chemical Plant drillhole, Toms River, Ocean County (sheet 1). This facies apparently was beveled off in the updip areas during erosion prior to deposition of the Kirkwood Formation. The Shark River Formation in the updip area near Bridgeton, Cumberland County (sheet 2), is about 52 m (171 ft) thick. All of the Shark River lithologies in the downdip area are extensively bioturbated. The Shark River is thickest (more than 60 m (197 ft)) in a trough that lies near the middle of the southern sheet. The contact between the Shark River and the underlying Manasquan Formation is sharp and contains a thin zone of reworked glauconite sand, granules of quartz, and phosphatic debris. On most gamma-ray logs through this contact, there is a sharp gamma high reflecting the concentration of phosphatic sediment. The vertical arrangement of facies in this formation is from a transgressive (mostly clay) facies at the base to a regressive (mostly sand) facies at the top. Calcareous nannofossils and foraminifera were used to date this unit. Where the unit is thickest, the nannofossils range from the upper part of Zone NP 14 (Rhabdosphaera inflata) to the lower part of Zone NP 18 (Chiasmolithus oamaruensis). The entire sequence of Zones NP 14 through NP 18 was observed only in the ACGS-4 corehole near Mays Landing. The planktic foraminifera zones range from the Turborotalia frontosa Zone at the base to the Turborotalia pomeroli/Turborotalia cerroazulensis Zone at the top. A middle to early late Eocene age for the Shark River is indicated by these zones (Poore and Bybell, 1988).
Shiloh Marl Member of the Kirkwood Formation (lower Miocene, Burdigalian)
Shiloh Marl Member - Consists of (1) a lower laminated, micaceous, locally fossiliferous (typically thin-walled, small mollusks), dark-gray clay interbedded with very fine grained sand and (2) an upper medium- to coarse-grained, gravelly, massive, pale-brown to medium-gray sand with scattered thin-walled mollusks. Thin, dark-gray clay layers interbedded with thin layers of lignite are common in this upper interval. Like the Wildwood, this unit occurs mainly within the southern sheet and the southeastern part of the central sheet. Thicknesses vary within the basin but are a maximum of 55 m (180 ft). In the Island Beach corehole the unit is clayey at the base and sandy at the top. The basal contact with the underlying unit is sharp but there is little reworked debris along this contact. In detail, the lowest 4.5 m (15 ft) of the unit is a fine- to medium-grained, massive, micaceous, extensively bioturbated, somewhat clayey, quartz sand. Small wood fragments are common. This basal sand bed grades upward into a sequence of horizontally bedded, light- to dark-gray clay and very fine grained, somewhat micaceous quartz sand. Color banding in this interval is strong. A very coarse grained, pale-gray quartz sand with some granules is interbedded with this dominantly clayey sequence. The clayey sequence is overlain by a medium-grained, massive, bioturbated, medium-gray sand similar to the basal sand. This sand grades into a thin- to thick-bedded and crossbedded sequence of dark-gray and brown sand that increases in grain size from coarse to very coarse grained up section. Most of the sand is quartz with lesser amounts of potassium feldspar (6 to 16 percent of the sand fraction). Near the top of the unit, quartz gravel is a common constituent in the very coarse grained sand bed. The age of the Shiloh is early Miocene (Burdigalian) as determined from diatoms. The Shiloh contains Actinoptychus heliopelta (ECDZ 1 of Andrews, 1987, 1988). Strontium age determinations on shells from this unit yielded ages of 20.9 to 19.7 Ma confirming the early Burdigalian age. Pollen studies indicate that the Shiloh has unusually high concentrations of Fagus (beech). Other pollen includes Quercus (oak), Carya (hickory), Pinus (pine), and Ulmus (elm) along with exotics. Overall the assemblage, except possibly for the high concentration of Fagus, indicates a warm-temperate climate during the time of deposition.
Shrewsbury Member of the Red Bank Formation (Upper Cretaceous, upper and middle Maastrichtian)
Shrewsbury Member - Sand, quartz, fine- to coarse-grained, somewhat clayey and micaceous, mostly massive with local small-scale crossbedding, light-yellow to red or dark-brown, slightly glauconitic at the base. Feldspar is a minor sand constituent. The Shrewsbury is extensively burrowed but is otherwise unfossiliferous. Locally, small "Callianassa"-type burrows are present. Maximum thickness is over 30 m (98 ft) in the highlands near Matawan. Unit thins southwestward and pinches out near Arneytown, Ocean County. The transition to the underlying Sandy Hook Member occurs within several feet and is characterized by an increase in clay, quartz, silt, mica, and fine pieces of wood downward.
Stockton Formation (Upper Triassic)
Stockton Formation (Kummel, 1897) - Light-gray, light-grayishbrown, yellowish- to pinkish-gray, or violet-gray to reddish-brown, medium- to coarse-grained arkosic sandstone and reddish- to purplish-brown mudstone, silty mudstone, argillaceous siltstone, and shale. Mudstone, siltstone and shale beds thicker and more numerous in central Newark basin west of Round Valley Reservoir. Sandstones mostly planar-bedded, with scoured bases containing pebble lags and mudstone rip-ups. Unit is coarser near Newark basin border fault, where poorly exposed, reddish-brown to pinkish-white, medium- to coarse-grained, feldspathic pebbly sandstone and conglomerate (Trss) and pebble to cobble quartzite conglomerate (Trscq). Maximum thickness of formation about 1,240 m (4,070 ft).
Tinton Formation (Upper Cretaceous, upper Maastrichtian)
Tinton Formation - Sand, quartz and glauconite, sideritecemented, indurated, reddish-brown to dark-gray. The Tinton was extensively dissected prior to deposition of the overlying Hornerstown Formation. Unit can be traced in the subsurface only as far downdip (south) as the Freehold area, Monmouth County. The Tinton in the Freehold core is about 6 m (20 ft) thick and thickens to the east where at Rumson, Monmouth County, it is 12 m (40 ft) thick. The Tinton unconformably overlies the Kc4 cycle. The Tinton is more quartzose to the west and more glauconitic to the east. The unit represents an incomplete cycle of sedimentation as it consists only of subtidal marine beds and lacks nearshore sands. Siderite cement, which imparts the hardness to the Tinton, is irregularly distributed throughout the unit. Because of its extensive induration, sand and clay mineralogy was not determined. Gamma logs of the Tinton, because of the widespread presence of siderite cement in the matrix, have a relatively high intensity and are similar in shape to gamma logs for clayey units. No fossils were found in subsurface samples of this formation, but fossils from outcrops indicate a late Maastrichtian age.
Tinton Formation (Upper Cretaceous, upper Maastrichtian)
Tinton Formation - Sand, quartz, and glauconite in varying proportions, very clayey and locally indurated by siderite into hard, massive ledges. Sand is dark gray to dark yellow where unweathered; where weathered, siderite changes color of unit to orange brown because of iron oxides, and the formation is stained or cemented in exotic patterns. The Tinton crops out in the northern part of the central sheet from Sandy Hook, Monmouth County, to the northernmost part of the Roosevelt quadrangle, near Perrineville. Unit unconformably overlies the Red Bank Formation in the high hills of the northern Coastal Plain, most notably near Perrineville and Morganville, Monmouth County. In these updip areas, fine gravel, 1 cm (0.4 in) maximum diameter, or large shell concentrations are found along the basal contact. The typical basal bed is a massive, glauconitic (10-35 percent), fine to medium-grained quartz sand with scattered gravel. The massive character of the basal bed is the result of extensive bioturbation. Burrows, filled with glauconite sand of the Tinton, project down into the quartz sand of the underlying Red Bank Formation. At lower elevations downdip, the Tinton is less weathered, much darker, more glauconitic, and typically indurated. The type locality on Pine Brook at Tinton Falls, Monmouth County, is in this downdip area. At Tinton Falls, 7 to 8 m (23-26 ft) of the Tinton is exposed and has a higher glauconite content than in the updip area. Glauconite at Tinton Falls is light green to pale yellow, and many of the grains have a smooth polished surface that is almost lustrous. Thin sections of the Tinton reveal that many of the grains are oolitic (Owens and Sohl, 1973). X-ray analyses indicate the presence of mixed clay minerals; therefore, the unit is not pure glauconite. The Tinton Formation at Tinton Falls has scattered molds of calcitic fossils and aragonitic shells. Richards (1958) recorded 30 species of mollusks from the Tinton in this area. Of importance are Sphenodiscus lobatus, Cucullaea (Idonearca) littlei, and Scabrotrigonia cerulia. In New Jersey, Scabrotrigonia cerulia is restricted to the Tinton. All three species are common to the upper Maastrichtian Haustator bilira Zone of Sohl (in Owens and others, 1977). Strontium-isotope analysis on calcareous shells from the Tinton yielded ages of 66.2 to 65.6 Ma or a late Maastrichtian age (Sugarman and others, 1995).
Unnamed Formation at Cape May (upper Pliocene)
Unnamed Formation at Cape May - Interbedded gravel, sand, and clay, massive to thickbedded. Informal unit described from a corehole at the Cape May Airport. The lower 18.3 m (60 ft) consists of interbedded gravel; medium- to very coarse grained, poorly sorted sand; and thin to thick beds of medium- to dark-gray, very woody clay. Gravel clasts are typically less than 0.64 mm (0.025 in) in diameter. The upper 12.2 m (40 ft) consists of a thick-bedded, medium-gray, extensively bioturbated clay-silt, which is overlain by an extensively burrowed, fine- to medium-grained glauconitic (about 5 percent) quartz sand. Quartz and siliceous rock fragments compose most sand grains. Feldspar is present in most samples but usually constitutes less than 10 percent of the sand fraction. No calcareous macrofossils were found in the burrowed intervals. Unit is known only to occur on the Cape May peninsula where it lies within a large channel. The unit is about 60 m (197 ft) in maximum thickness. The contact with the underlying Belleplain Member of the Kirkwood Formation is sharp and unconformable; a basal gravel bed as much as 1 m (3 ft) thick is present along the contact. The pollen assemblage in the lower part of the unit is dominated by pine and oak with somewhat lesser amounts of hickory and basswood. Spruce, hemlock, beech, alder, and black gum are minor constituents. Traces of fir, willow, birch, and sweet gum are present, as is exotic Engelhardia. The nonarborial pollen are a Multisia-type composite of the present-day Andean provenance which indicate an exotic cool climate. The lower assemblage suggests a cool-temperate climatic regimen. The pollen assemblage in the upper beds is dominated by oak and hickory with minor amounts of basswood, sweet gum, pine, and Multisia-type composite. Traces of cedar, willow, birch, alder, grass, and Sphagnum spores also are present. This assemblage probably represents a temperate climatic regimen (Les Sirkin, Adelphi University, written commun., 1991). The low percentage of exotic species is characteristic of the late Pliocene, and therefore, the unnamed unit at Cape May may be equivalent to the Beaverdam Formation of the Delmarva Peninsula of Delaware, Maryland, and Virginia.
Vincentown Formation (upper Paleocene, Selandian)
Vincentown Formation - Upper part, sand, glauconite (35-40 percent) and quartz (60-65 percent), fine- to very fine grained, very clayey and silty, massive, dark-gray, bioturbated, very micaceous. Lower part, sand, massive, less micaceous and clayey, dark-gray-green. The lower 4.5 m (15 ft) of the formation is a fine- to medium-grained, clayey glauconite sand. Locally, there is an accumulation of disarticulated calcareous shells along the contact with the underlying Hornerstown Formation. These shells are commonly the brachiopod Oleneothyris harlani or the mollusk Gryphaea dissimilaris. Where the shell bed is absent it is difficult to separate glauconite sand of the basal part of the Vincentown from the underlying Hornerstown Formation, which also is a glauconite sand. Gamma logs through this interval show that there is a small gamma spike along the contact between the glauconite sands. The grain size decreases and the formation is significantly more clayey downdip. At Allaire State Park, Monmouth County (drillhole Allaire-C), for example, the bulk of the Vincentown is a clayey, very micaceous, dark-gray, slightly feldspathic quartz sand. Large fossils, which are abundant in the near-surface beds, are absent. In addition, the basal glauconite beds tend to thicken somewhat downdip. Farther basinward, the bulk of the formation is an unfossiliferous, gray-green to locally tan clayey silt or silty clay. Locally, a thin- to thick-bedded glauconite sand occurs at the base. In the thickest downdip section penetrated at Island Beach, the Vincentown is mostly a pale-gray to dark-gray clay-silt. No megafossils were observed in the Island Beach core. On the basis of geophysical log interpretations in the deepest subsurface, this unit has a maximum thickness of about 38 m (125 ft). The age of the Vincentown is best indicated by calcareous nannofossils, which indicate Zones NP 5 to NP 9 (Bybell, 1992). Common nannofossils from Zone NP 5 are Chiasmolithus bidens, Ellipsolithus distichus, Fasciculithus tympaniformis, Scapholithus fossilis, and Toweius eminens. Common nannofossils in Zone NP 9 are Biantholithus astralis, Chiasmolithus bidens, Discoaster multiradiatus, D. salisburgensis, Fasciculithus involutus, F. schaubii, F. thomasii, and Lophodolithus nascens. The upper part of the Vincentown falls within the upper part of Zone NP 9 and therefore is late Paleocene (Selandian) in age.
Vincentown Formation (upper Paleocene, Selandian)
Vincentown Formation - Sand, quartz, medium-grained, well- to poorly sorted, dusky-yellow to pale-gray; weathers orange brown or red brown, typically very glauconitic and clayey near base; glauconite decreases up section. Feldspar and mica are minor sand constituents. Unit best exposed in the Pemberton, New Egypt, and Mount Holly quadrangles of the central sheet where the overlying formations have been stripped away. The Vincentown Formation is as much as 30 m (98 ft) thick and averages 3 to 15 m (10-49 ft) in its subcrop belt. Where unweathered the unit is generally a shelly sand; where weathered the unit is largely a massive quartz sand. The unweathered sand of the Vincentown is exposed intermittently along the Manasquan River near Farmingdale, Monmouth County. The calcareous nature of the unweathered Vincentown was observed in several coreholes in the vicinity of Farmingdale. The contact with the underlying Hornerstown Formation is disconformable; locally shell beds (bioherms) up to 1.5 m (5 ft) thick are found along the contact. Shells in the bioherms are typical of a restricted environment and contain the brachiopod Oleneothyris harlani (Morton) in the lower beds and the oyster Pycnodonte dissimilaris in the upper beds. The basal contact and the Oleneothyris bioherms are exposed along Crosswicks and Lahaway Creeks and their tributaries. Where bioherms are absent, the basal contact is difficult to place within a sequence of glauconite beds. In general, glauconite beds of the Vincentown are darker gray than glauconite beds of the Hornerstown, and the Vincentown has more quartz sand. Upper beds of the Vincentown are as much as 12 m (39 ft) thick and are mostly silty, darkgray to green-gray, massive, glauconite sand that contains a small percentage of quartz. Calcarenite or coquina, characterized by an abundance of bryozoans, occurs locally along the western belt. These fossiliferous beds, 6 to 7.5 m (20-25 ft) thick, are best exposed along Shingle Run in the New Egypt quadrangle area and in streams that cross the Vincentown outcrop belt in the Pemberton quadrangle. Calcareous nannofossils, present in some Vincentown outcrops, are from Zones NP 5 (the Oleneothyris beds) and NP 9 (late Paleocene). Vincentown sediments are much more fossiliferous in the subsurface and contain Zones NP 5 through NP 9, inclusive. Therefore, the Vincentown corresponds in age with the Aquia Formation of Virginia and Maryland. Numerous studies of the foraminifera of the Vincentown from calcareous beds in the western outcrop belt indicate that the Vincentown includes the planktic foraminifera Zones P3b through P6a (Olsson and others, 1988). A potassium-argon age of 56.4 +/- 18 Ma was determined for basal beds near New Egypt, Ocean County (Owens and Sohl, 1973).
Wenonah Formation (Upper Cretaceous, upper Campanian)
Wenonah Formation - Sand, quartz and mica, fine-grained, silty and clayey, massive to thick-bedded, dark-gray to medium-gray; weathers light brown to white, extensively bioturbated, very micaceous, locally contains high concentrations of sand-sized lignitized wood and has large burrows of Ophiomorpha nodosa. Feldspar (5-10 percent) is a minor sand constituent. Unit crops out in a narrow belt from Sandy Hook Bay on the central sheet and pinches out southwest of Oldmans Creek, Salem County, on the southern sheet. Isolated outliers of the Wenonah are detached from the main belt in the central sheet area. Thickness is about 10 m (33 ft) in the northern part of the central sheet, 20 m (66 ft) in the southwestern part of the central sheet, and 7.5 m (25 ft) in the southern sheet. The Wenonah is gradational into the underlying Marshalltown Formation. A transition zone of several meters is marked by a decrease in mica and an increase in glauconite sand into the Marshalltown. Fossil casts are abundant in the Wenonah. Weller (1907) reported Flemingostrea subpatulata Hop Brook in the Marlboro quadrangle indicating a late Campanian age. Wolfe (1976) placed the Wenonah microflora in his CA5A assemblage, considered to be of late Campanian age. Kennedy and Cobban (1994) identified ammonites including Baculites cf. B. scotti, Didymoceras n. sp., Menuites portlocki, Nostoceras (Nostoceras) puzosiforme n. sp., Nostoceras (Nostoceras) aff. N. colubriformus, Parasolenoceras sp., Placenticeras placenta, P. minor n. sp., and Trachyscaphites pulcherrimus. The presence of M. portlocki and T. pulcherrimus indicates late, but not latest, Campanian.
Wildwood Member of the Kirkwood Formation (middle and lower Miocene, Langhian and Burdigalian)
Wildwood Member - New member named for a well drilled at Wildwood, Cape May County. Typically consists of a very fossiliferous, micaceous, darkgray clay-silt interbedded with fine- to medium-grained, pale-gray-brown sand in lower half of the member. The upper half of the member is more sandy (mostly fine-grained, micaceous quartz sand), thin-bedded to laminated, commonly interbedded with thin-bedded, gray-brown, micaceous clay; wood fragments are common. The basal contact with the underlying unit is sharp and has considerable relief. A 1-m (3-ft)-thick bed of gravel (1 cm (0.4 in) in maximum diameter) with pieces of quartz and worn shells, commonly occurs along the contact. Thickness of the unit varies widely because of the undulating basal contact. The maximum thickness, 80 m (262 ft), was penetrated in the Wildwood well. At the Island Beach well (290019) at Island Beach State Park, Ocean County, the Wildwood is over 30 m (98 ft) thick. The lower 6 m (20 ft) consists of thick interbeds of fine- to medium-grained, massive to locally thick-bedded, extensively bioturbated, micaceous quartz sand and dark-brown and grayish-brown silty clay. The middle part is mostly massive to finely laminated, dark-gray to gray-brown silt to clay. The upper 6 m (20 ft) consists of fine- to coarse-grained, locally gravelly, thin- to thick-bedded sand interbedded with the clay and silt. The age of the Wildwood was determined from diatoms and strontium-isotope age estimates of mollusk shells. The diatom assemblages in this unit fall within Andrews (1988) ECDZ 2, thus indicating a considerable unconformity between this member and the overlying Belleplain (ECDZ 6). ECDZ 2 is in the Delphineis ovata Zone and contains the characteristic diatoms Coscinodiscus lewisianus, Delphineis lineata, Rhaphidodiscus marylandicus, Rhaphoneis fusiformis, R. margaritata, R. wicomicoensis, Sceptroneis caduceus, S. grandis, and S. hungarica. Strontium-isotope analyses on shells from this interval indicate an age range of 17.4 to 15.5 Ma (Sugarman and others, 1993). The isotopic and paleontologic ages suggest that the Wildwood Member straddles the early-middle Miocene boundary (Langhian-Burdigalian boundary). Pollen from the Wildwood has warm-temperate affinities in the lower part and mixed warm- and cool-temperate affinities in the upper part suggesting an overall cooling of the climate during the time of deposition. Collectively, the Wildwood and Belleplain Members constitute the section that Woolman (1889-1902) assigned to his "great diatom bed".
Wildwood Member of the Kirkwood Formation (middle and lower Miocene, Langhian and Burdigalian)
Wildwood Member - Clay, silty, massive to finely bedded, dark-gray to olive-gray, locally interbedded with thin beds of light-colored sand. Contains small shell fragments primarily at base. Upper beds are more sandy than lower beds but also contain many thin to thick beds of clay. The sand is fine to medium grained, light gray, and commonly has dispersed wood fragments. Shell fragments are locally present in this facies. Basal beds are micaceous, locally diatomaceous, and contain wood fragments. Quartz is the major sand constituent with minor amounts of siliceous rock fragments and feldspar. The Wildwood subcrops beneath surficial deposits where the Belleplain Member and Cohansey Formation were stripped away. Along Delaware Bay, the Wildwood subcrops from near the Cohansey River to Fortescue, Cumberland County. Along the Atlantic Coast, the unit subcrops from Bay Shore Park to near Beach Haven Park, Ocean County. The maximum thickness of the unit is about 18 m (59 ft). The contact with the underlying Shiloh Marl Member is sharp and unconformable. Diatoms from the Wildwood Member are from the East Coast Diatom Zone (ECDZ) 2 of Andrews (1988) indicating a latest Burdigalian and Langhian age (late early and early middle Miocene).
Woodbury Formation (Upper Cretaceous, lower Campanian)
Woodbury Formation - Clay-silt, dark-gray; weathers brown and orange pink. Iron oxides fill fractures or form layers in the most weathered beds. Unit is massive except at the base where thin quartz sand layers occur. Locally, thin stringers of pale-greenish-brown, smooth-surface glauconite occur near the top. Unit conspicuously micaceous throughout and contains finely dispersed pyrite, carbonaceous matter, and small pieces of carbonized wood as much as 30 cm (12 in) in length. Small siderite concretions are abundant in the Woodbury in the northern part of the outcrop belt. Unit forms a broad belt in the central sheet from Sandy Hook Bay, southwest to area around East Greenwich, Gloucester County, where it pinches out or changes facies. The Woodbury maintains a thickness of about 15 m (49 ft) throughout most of its outcrop belt. Fossil imprints are abundant. An extensive Woodbury macrofauna was described by Weller (1907) from siderite concretions from a tributary to the Cooper River in the Camden quadrangle. This assemblage is unusual in that it is the only existing outcrop of the Woodbury where calcareous and aragonitic shells are still intact. Most fossils are small, fragmented, and concentrated in small pockets, but larger intact calcareous fossils are scattered throughout the Woodbury. Weller (1907) recorded 57 species from this locality. In addition, this is the same locality that contains fossils of the dinosaur Hadrosaurus foulkii. Pollen collected from the Woodbury was assigned to the CA3 Zone by Wolfe (1976). Biostratigraphic data suggest that the Woodbury is of early Campanian age.
New Mexico
Los Pinos Formation of Lower Santa Fe Group (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary)
Los Pinos Formation of Lower Santa Fe Group (Miocene and upper Oligocene); includes Carson Conglomerate (Dane and Bachman, 1965) in Tusas Mountains-San Luis Basin area
sedimentary units, Palogene (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary)
Paleogene sedimentary units; includes Baca, Galisteo, El Rito, Blanco Basin, Love Ranch, Lobo, Sanders Canyon, Skunk Ranch, Timberlake, and Cub Mountain Formations
Nevada
Alluvial deposits (Quaternary)
ALLUVIAL DEPOSITS-Locally includes beach and sand dune deposits
Antler Sequence of Silberling and Roberts (1962) (Pennsylvanian to Late Permian )
ANTLER SEQUENCE OF SILBERLING AND ROBERTS (1962) (Middle Pennsylvanian to Early or Late Permian) (Guadalupian)-Conglomerate, sandy to conglomeratic limestone, limestone, sandstone, and calcareous shale. Thin detrital and carbonate sequence within main part of Antler orogenic belt. Includes units such as Sunflower Formation of Bushnell (1967) in Elko County, Battle Formation, Antler Peak Limestone, and Edna Mountain Formation in Lander and western Eureka Counties, and Wildcat Peak Formation in northern Nye County
Argillaceous limestone, chert, and shale (Devonian)
ARGILLACEOUS LIMESTONE, CHERT, AND SHALE-Elko and Eureka Counties
Ash-flow tuffs and tuffaceous sedimentary rocks (Middle Miocene to Late Miocene)
ASH-FLOW TUFFS AND TUFFACEOUS SEDIMENTARY ROCKS
Banbury Formation (Middle Miocene to Late Miocene)
BANBURY FORMATION-Basalt, gravel, and tuffaceous sediments locally. Northeast Humboldt County and northwest Elko County
Cherty limestone and sparse dolomite, shale, and sandstone (Permian)
CHERTY LIMESTONE AND SPARSE DOLOMITE, SHALE, AND SANDSTONE (Lower and Upper Permian)-Includes units such as Park City Group and equivalent rocks in northern Nevada and Toroweap Formation and Kaibab Limestone in southern Nevada
Chinle Formation and associated rocks (Late Triassic)
CHINLE FORMATION AND ASSOCIATED ROCKS (Upper Triassic)-Continental deposits of variegated bentonitic claystone, siltstone, and clayey sandstone; ledge-forming sandstone; and red siltstone
Conglomerate, limestone, meta-andesite, phyllite, and shale (Devonian to Mississippian)
CONGLOMERATE, LIMESTONE, META-ANDESITE, PHYLLITE, AND SHALE-Includes Grossman, Banner, Nelson, and Mountain City Formation. Northern Elko County
Conglomerate, sandstone, shale, and dolomite of Diablo Formation below and shale, sandstone, and conglomerate of Candelaria Formation above (Early Permian to Early Triassic)
CONGLOMERATE, SANDSTONE, SHALE, AND DOLOMITE OF DIABLO FORMATION BELOW AND SHALE, SANDSTONE, AND CONGLOMERATE OF CANDELARIA FORMATION ABOVE (Lower or Upper Permian to Lower Triassic)-Mineral, Esmeralda, and northwestern Nye Counties
Dolomite, limestone, and minor amounts of sandstone and quartzite (Devonian)
DOLOMITE, LIMESTONE, AND MINOR AMOUNTS OF SANDSTONE AND QUARTZITE-Includes units such as Sevy and Simonson Dolomites, Guilmette and Nevada Formations, and Devils Gate Limestone.
Havallah sequence of Silberling and Roberts (1962) (Mississippian to Permian)
HAVALLAH SEQUENCE OF SILBERLING AND ROBERTS (1962)-Chert, argillite, shale, greenstone, and minor amounts of siltstone, sandstone, conglomerate, and limestone. Includes Schoonover Formation of Fagan (1962) and Reservation Hill Formation in Elko County, Farrel Canyon Formation in southwestern Humboldt County, Havallah and Pumpernickel Formations in Pershing, Lander, and parts of Humboldt Counties, and rocks originally considered a part of the Pablo and Excelsior Formations in northern Nye, northern Esmeralda, and southern Mineral Counties. Assignment of some rocks to the Havallah sequence in the East Range, Pershing County, is highly uncertain. Includes rocks ranging in age from Late Mississippian to Early Permian
Limestone and dolomite, locally thick sequences of shale and siltstone (Late Cambrian to Middle Cambrian)
LIMESTONE AND DOLOMITE, LOCALLY THICK SEQUENCES OF SHALE AND SILTSTONE-Includes units such as Pioche Shale, Eldorado Dolomite, Geddes Limestone, Secret Canyon Shale, Hamburg Dolomite, Dunderberg Shale, and Windfall Formation of northern Nevada and Carrara, Bonanza King, and Nopah Formations of southern Nevada.
Limestone and minor amounts of dolomite and shale (Mississippian)
LIMESTONE AND MINOR AMOUNTS OF DOLOMITE AND SHALE-Includes units such as Rogers Spring and Monte Cristo Limestones
Limestone, dolomite, and shale (Mississippian to Permian)
LIMESTONE, DOLOMITE, AND SHALE (Upper Paleozoic)-Includes Van Duzer Limestone of Decker (1962)
Limestone, minor amounts of dolomite, shale, and sandstone; locally thick conglomerate units (Triassic)
LIMESTONE, MINOR AMOUNTS OF DOLOMITE, SHALE, AND SANDSTONE; LOCALLY THICK CONGLOMERATE UNITS (Lower, Middle, and Upper Triassic)-Includes Tobin, Dixie Valley, Favret, Augusta Mountain, and Cane Spring Formations and Star Peak Group in central Nevada and Grantsville and Luning Formations in west-central Nevada
Massive limestone (Mississippian)
MASSIVE LIMESTONE-In the San Antonio Mountains, western Nye County
Moenkopi Formation, Thaynes Formation, and related rocks (Early Triassic to Middle Triassic)
MOENKOPI FORMATION, THAYNES FORMATION, AND RELATED ROCKS (Lower Triassic)-Marine deposits of siltstone, limestone, and sparse conglomerate
Phyllitc siltstone, quartzite, and lesser amounts of limestone and dolomite (Late Proterozoic to Early Cambrian)
PHYLLITIC SILTSTONE, QUARTZITE, AND LESSER AMOUNTS OF LIMESTONE AND DOLOMITE-Includes Reed Dolomite; Deep Spring, Campito, Poleta, Harkless, and Saline Valley Formations; and Mule Spring Limestone
Phyllite, shale, and limestone (Middle Cambrian to Ordovician)
PHYLLITE, SHALE, AND LIMESTONE-Locally includes chert and quartzite. Includes Tennessee Mountain Formation of Bushnell (1967) in western Elko County, Broad Canyon sequence of Means (1962) in Lander County, and rocks originally mapped as Palmetto Formation in Toiyabe and Toquima Ranges, northern Nye County
Quartzite and minor amounts of conglomerate, phyllitic siltstone, limestone, and dolomite (Late Proterozoic to Early Cambrian)
QUARTZITE AND MINOR AMOUNTS OF CONGLOMERATE, PHYLLITIC SILTSTONE, LIMESTONE, AND DOLOMITE-Includes Prospect Mountain Quartzite, Osgood Mountain Quartzite, and Gold Hill Formation in northern Nevada, and Stirling Quartzite, Wood Canyon Formation, and Zabriskie Quartzite in southern Nevada.
Sandy and silty limestone, conglomerate, and siltstone (Pennsylvanian to Late Permian)
SANDY AND SILTY LIMESTONE, CONGLOMERATE, AND SILTSTONE (Upper Pennsylvanian to Upper Permian)-Includes units such as Strathearn Formation of Dott (1955) and Buckskin Mountain, Beacon Flat, and Carlin Canyon Formations of Dott (1955)
Scott Canyon Formation (Early Cambrian to Middle Cambrian)
SCOTT CANYON FORMATION (Lower or Middle Cambrian)-Chert, shale, greenstone, and sparse limestone and quartzite. Southeast Humboldt County and northwest Lander County.
Shale and chert (Silurian)
SHALE AND CHERT-Includes Fourmile Canyon Formation in Eureka County and Noh Formation of Riva (1970) and unnamed rocks in Elko County.
Shale, chert, and minor amounts of quartzite, greenstone, and limestone (Ordovician)
SHALE, CHERT, AND MINOR AMOUNTS OF QUARTZITE, GREENSTONE, AND LIMESTONE-Includes units such as Vinini Formation of north-central Nevada, Palmetto Formation in southern and central parts of Esmeralda County, and Comus Formation in Humboldt County. Locally includes rocks of Silurian and Devonian age.
Shale, mudstone, siltstone, sandstone, and carbonate rock; sparse volcanic rock (Late Triassic to Early Jurassic)
SHALE, MUDSTONE, SILTSTONE, SANDSTONE, AND CARBONATE ROCK; SPARSE VOLCANIC ROCK (Upper Triassic and Lower Jurassic)-Includes Auld Lang Syne Group, Nightingale sequence of Bonham (1969), and Gabbs and Sunrise Formations
Shale, sandstone, volcanogenic clastic rocks, andesite, rhyolite, and locally thick carbonate units (Late Triassic to Early Cretaceous)
SHALE, SANDSTONE, VOLCANOGENIC CLASTIC ROCKS, ANDESITE, RHYOLITE, AND LOCALLY THICK CARBONATE UNITS-Undivided sequence locally containing recognizable equivalents of the Luning and Dunlap Formations
Shale, siliceous siltstone, chert, and minor amounts of limestone (Devonian)
SHALE, SILICEOUS SILTSTONE, CHERT, AND MINOR AMOUNTS OF LIMESTONE-Includes Cockalorum Wash Formation of northern Nye County and Woodruff Formation and unnamed rocks in Elko County
Shale, siltstone, sandstone, chert-pebble conglomerate, and limestone (Devonian to Mississippian)
SHALE, SILTSTONE, SANDSTONE, CHERT-PEBBLE CONGLOMERATE, AND LIMESTONE-Includes units such as Pilot Shale, Joana Limestone, Chainman Shale, and Diamond Peak Formation in northern and eastern Nevada and Narrow Canyon Limestone, Mercury Limestone, and Eleana Formation in southern Nevada
Slaven Chert (Devonian)
SLAVEN CHERT-Chert and sparse limy sandstone, siltstone, and limestone. Lander County
Volcanic flows and flow breccias, chiefly of andesitic composition, tuffs, sparse sandstone and graywacke (Permian to Jurassic)
VOLCANIC FLOWS AND FLOW BRECCIAS, CHIEFLY OF ANDESITIC COMPOSITION, TUFFS, SPARSE SANDSTONE AND GRAYWACKE-Includes Happy Creek Volcanic Series and related rocks in Humboldt County and similar rocks in Washoe and Pershing Counties; includes andesite breccias and volcanogenic sedimentary rocks in Mineral County
Wyman Formation (Late Proterozoic)
WYMAN FORMATION-Phyllite and phyllitic siltstone and minor amounts of limestone, dolomite, and sandstone
New York
Beekmantown Group (in part) (Cambrian)
Beekmantown Group (in part) - In Champlain Valley: Whitehall Formation-dolostone, limestone (with Cryptozoon reefs); Ticonderoga Formation-dolostone (locally cherty), sandstone. In Vermont: Clarendon Springs Dolostone; Danby Formation-sandstone, quartzite, dolostone.
"Enfield" and Kattel Formations (Upper Devonian)
"Enfield" and Kattel Formations - shale, siltstone, sandstone.
Irondequoit Limestone thru Kodak Sandstone (Lower Silurian)
Irondequoit Limestone thru Kodak Sandstone - includes: Irondequoit Limestone, Williamson Shale; Wolcott Furnace Hematite; Wolcott Limestone; Sodus Shale; Bear Creek Shale; Wallington Limestone; Furnaceville Hematite; Maplewood Shale; Kodak Sandstone.
Ludlowville Formation (Middle Devonian)
Ludlowville Formation - In west: Deep Run Shale, Tichenor Limestone, Wanakah and Ledyard Shales, Centerfield Limestone Members. In east: King Ferry Shale and other members, Stone Mill Sandstone Member.
Ludlowville Formation (Middle Devonian)
Ludlowville Formation - Deep Run Shale, Tichenor Limestone, Wanakah and Ledyard Shales, Centerfield Limestone Members.
Machias Formation (Upper Devonian)
Machias Formation - shale, siltstone; Rushford Sandstone; Caneadea, Canisteo, and Hume Shales; Canaseraga Sandstone; South Wales and Dunkirk Shales.
Machias Formation (Upper Devonian)
Machias Formation - shale, siltstone; Rushford Sandstone; Caneadea, Canisteo, and Hume Shales; Canaseraga Sandstone; South Wales and Dunkirk Shales; In Pennsylvania: Towanda Formation-shale, sandstone.
Marcellus Formation (Middle Devonian)
Marcellus Formation - Pecksport, Solsville, Otsego, and Chittenango shale and sandstone Members, Cherry Valley Limestone, and Union Springs Shale Members.
Monmouth Group, Matawan Group and Magothy Formation (Upper Cretaceous)
Monmouth Group, Matawan Group and Magothy Formation - silty clay, glauconitic sandy clay, sand, gravel.
Normanskill Shale (Middle Ordovician)
Normanskill Shale - minor mudstone, sandstone.
Oswayo and Venango Formations (Upper Devonian)
Oswayo and Venango Formations - shale, siltstone, sandstone; replaced eastwardly by Cattaraugus Formation-shale, sandstone, conglomerate.
Panther Mountain Formation (Middle Devonian)
Panther Mountain Formation - shale, siltstone, sandstone.
Panther Mountain Formation (Middle Devonian)
Panther Mountain Formation - shale, siltstone, sandstone.
Raritan Formation (Upper Cretaceous)
Raritan Formation - clay, silty clay, sand, gravel.
Rondout Formation (Upper Silurian)
Rondout Formation - dolostone, limestone; Binnewater Sandstone; High Falls Shale; Warwarsing Limestone; Decker Limestone; Bossardville Limestone; Poxono Island Formation-shale, dolostone.
Skaneateles Formation (Middle Devonian)
Skaneateles Formation - In west: Levanna Shale and Stafford Limestone Members; In east: Butternut, Pompey, and Delphi Station Shale Members, Mottville Sandstone Member.
Unadilla, Laurens, New Lisbon, and Gilboa Formations (Middle Devonian)
Unadilla, Laurens, New Lisbon, and Gilboa Formations - shale, siltstone, sandstone.
Undifferentiated Hamilton Group (Middle Devonian)
Undifferentiated Hamilton Group - shale, siltstone. In eastern Orange County: Skunnemunk Formation-sandstone, conglomerate; Bellvale Formation-shale, sandstone; Cornwall Shale.
Undifferentiated Lower Devonian and Silurian rocks (Lower Devonian - Silurian)
Undifferentiated Lower Devonian and Silurian rocks - in northern Ulster County: Port Ewen thru Manlius Limestones; Rondout Dolostone; Binnewater Sandstone; High Falls Shale. In Orange County: Kanhouse Sandstone; Woodbury Creek Formation-shale, sandstone; Esopus Shale; Connelly Conglomerate; Central Valley Sandstone; New Scotland Limestone thru Rondout Dolostone; Decker Limestone; Poxono Island Formation-shale, dolostone; Longwood Shale; Green Pond Conglomerate.
Ohio
Allegheny and Pottsville Groups, Undivided (Pennsylvanian)
Allegheny and Pottsville Groups, Undivided - Shale, siltstone, and underclay: Shale, black, gray, and olive; clayey to silty; locally contains marine fossils; calcareous in part. Siltstone, gray, greenish and olive; clayey to sandy; thin bedded to medium bedded; locally contain marine fossils. Underclay, gray and olive; generally 3 feet or less in thickness; clayey to silty; commonly rooted and underlying coal beds; nonbedded; locally varies from flint to plastic clay. Sandstone, light to medium gray weathers to shades of yellow-brown; mostly very fine to medium grained, locally quartzose and conglomeratic in lower one-third of unit; thin to massive to cross bedded; locally calcareous; Limestone, flint and coal. Limestone, black to light gray; micritic to medium grained; locally grades into flint; thin to medium bedded to discoidal concretions containing marine fossils; locally nonmarine, micritic limestones occur beneath coal beds in upper one third of unit. Coal, mostly banded bituminous, locally cannel; thin to locally as much as 12 feet thick; generally in discrete beds but locally contain shale partings and split into multiple beds. Lateral and vertical lithic variability and gradation common. Unit as much as 700 feet thick.
Conemaugh Group (Pennsylvanian)
Conemaugh Group - Shale, siltstone, and mudstone: Shale, black, gray, green and red; clayey to silty; locally contains marine fossils in lower half of unit; calcareous in part. Siltstone, gray, green and red, locally variegated; clayed to sandy; thin bedded to nonbedded. Mudstone, black, gray, green, red, and yellow, variegated in part; clayey to silty; locally calcareous; commonly nonbedded. Sandstone, green-gray weathers to shades of yellow-brown; mostly very fine to medium grained, locally conglomeratic; thin to massive to cross bedded; locally calcareous. Limestone and coal; thin and discontinuous. Limestone, black, gray and green; micritic to coarse grained; thin bedded to concretionary with marine fossils common in lower half of interval; thin to medium bedded, nonmarine limestone common in upper half of unit. Coal, thin, bituminous, impure; very locally thick enough for economic development. Lateral and vertical lithic variability and gradation common. Unit as much as 500 feet thick.
Detroit River Group (Devonian)
Detroit River Group - Dolomite; brown to gray; medium to thick bedded; laminated; nodules or interbeds of anhydrite and/or gypsum; basal part becomes sandy dolomite or fine-grained sandstone; as much as 170 feet thick.
Detroit River Group and Columbus Limestone, Undivided (Devonian)
Detroit River Group and Columbus Limestone, Undivided - Dolomite, pale yellow-gray to light brown weather brown; thin to massive bedded; fine crystalline; local quartz sand in lower portion.
Dunkard Group (Permian and/or Pennsylvanian)
Dunkard Group - Mudstone, shale, and siltstone (60-70 percent); shades of red, yellow, olive, and/or brown in southern areas of Ohio to gray, green and black in northern areas; clayey to sandy; nonbedded to thin bedded; locally calcareous. Sandstone (25-35 percent); blue-gray weathers to shades of yellow-brown; fine grained to locally conglomeratic; thin to massive to cross bedded. Limestone and coal (5 percent): Limestone, gray, micritic, clayey to silty, thin to medium bedded in northern areas of Ohio, nodular bedded to argillaceous in southern areas. Coal, black, banded, thin, discontinuous, impure; poorly developed in southern areas of Ohio. Limestones and coals best developed in lower 90 to 200 feet. Lateral and vertical lithic variability and gradation common. Unit greater than 600 feet thick in southeast Ohio.
Maxville Limestone; Rushville, Logan, and Cuyhoga Formations, Undivided (Mississippian)
Maxville Limestone; Rushville, Logan, and Cuyhoga Formations, Undivided - Shale, siltstone, and sandstone, interbedded; various shades of gray, yellow to brown weather similar color; sandstone, silty to granular, local stringers of quartz pebbles. Shale, clayey to silty, locally fossiliferous. Medium to dark gray, thin to thick bedded limestone locally preserved at top of interval where unit crops out in southern half of state. Lithologies percentages vary in different areas where unit crops out; laterial and vertical gradation common at regional scale.
Monongahela Group (Pennsylvanian)
Monongahela Group - Shale, siltstone, and mudstone; black, red, gray and green to variegated red and yellow in the southeastern areas of Ohio; clayey to sandy; nonbedded to thin bedded; locally calcareous. Sandstone, greenish-gray weathers to shades of yellow-brown, silty to locally conglomeratic; thin to massive to cross bedded; locally calcareous. Limestone, gray, micritic, clayey to silty, thin to medium bedded; generally more common in middle and lower portions of unit. Coal, banded, bituminous, thin to as much as 8 feet thick in central and northern areas, thinner to absent in southeastern Ohio. Lateral and vertical lithic variability and gradation common. Unit as much as 350 feet thick.
Oklahoma
Bloyd and Hale Formations (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Carboniferous Pennsylvanian-Early)
TULSA- "Bloyd Formation," limestone and shale. "Hale Formation," limestone and sandstone. FORT SMITH- IPbh "Bloyd Formation," shale and limestone; and "Hale Formation," limestone and sandstone.
Bokchito Formation (Phanerozoic | Mesozoic | Cretaceous-Early )
ARDMORE-SHERMAN- Clay, illitic, kaolinitic, with some tan limestones and sandstones. Subdivided into "Pawpaw Clay" at top, 40 to 60 feet thick; "Quarry Limestone," 13 feet thick; "Weno Clay," 100 to 135 feet thick; and basal "Denton Clay," 50 to 70 feet thick.
Bromide + Tulip Creek and McLish Formations (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Ordovician-Middle)
ARDMORE-SHERMAN- Limestone, buff; shale, grayish-green; and sandstone, brown to white, fine- to medium-grained: approximate sequence of rocks in each formation, from top to bottom. Thickness, 750 to 1,400 feet, thinning eastward. (Simpson Group) Occurs in the ARBUCKLE MTNS
Brownstown Marl (Phanerozoic | Mesozoic | Cretaceous-Late )
McALESTER TEXARKANA- Marl and clay, gray, calcareous, micaceous, sandy and fine-grained sand, with some interbedded chalky limestones; same as upper Austin Chalk of Texas; thickness, about 100 feet.
Chattanooga + Fernvale + Fite + Tyner + Burgen + Cotter Formations (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Ordovician-Early Ordovician-Middle(?) Ordovician-Late(?) Silurian(?) Devonian(?) Carboniferous Mississippian-Early(?) Mississippian-Middle(?) Mississippian-Late)
TULSA- "Chattanooga Formation," shale and minor sandstone. "Fernvale Formation," limestone. "Fite Formation," limestone "Tyner Formation," shale and dolomite "Burgen Sandstone," sandstone and minor dolomite and shale. "Cotter Formation," dolomite and minor sandstone.
Chickasha Formation (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Permian )
WOODWARD- The "Chickasha Formation" member of Flower Pot Shale (Pc) is a deltaic tongue of red-brown to greenish-gray to orange-brown cross-bedded mudstone conglomerate, siltstone, shale, and fine-grained sandstone, about 30 feet thick, in the middle of the Flowerpot Shale, pinching out northward. CLINTON- "Chickasha Formation," Pc, reddish-brown to maroon mudstone conglomerate with some shale, silstone, and fine- to coarse-grained sandstone; thickness, about 600 feet; gradational northward and westward into the Flowerpot Shale and the Blaine Formation and westward into Dog Creek Shale. OKLAHOMA CITY-Variegated mudstone conglomerate and red-brown to orange- brown silty shale and siltstone, with minor amounts of orange-brown fine-grained sandstone; upper part grades northward into "Dog Creek Shale", "Blaine Formation", "Flowerpot Shale", and upper part of "Cedar Hills Sandstone"; lower part grades into "Duncan Sandstone". Thickness, about 100 feet near Chickasha and 300 feet near Okarche. (El Reno Group) ARDMORE-SHERMAN- Mudstone conglomerate, siltstone, and sandstone, red-brown; thickness, 100 to 200 feet, decreasing southeastward. (El Reno Group)
Cloud Chief Formation (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Permian )
WOODWARD- Red-brown and greenish-gray shale and siltstone with some orange-brown fine-grained sandstone and siltstone. At base are two or more thin, pink to maroon to greenish-gray dolomite beds and (or) gypsum beds ("Moccasin Creek Bed") eroding into a mappable escarpment. About 25 feet above the base is a white to light-gray dolomite ("Day Creek Bed") not mapped. Thickness ranges up to 160 feet, with top eroded in many places. CLINTON- Reddish-brown to orange-brown shale, interbedded with siltstone and sandstone in the middle part and some dolomite and much gypsum in lower part; thickness about 400 feet, thinning northward to about 175 feet. The "Moccasin Creek Gypsum Member" is at the base. LAWTON- Represented in this area by the "Moccasin Creek Gypsum Member," which is about 30 feet (9 m) thick.
Cool Creek and McKenzie Hill Formations (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Ordovician-Early)
LAWTON- "Cool Creek Formation" and "McKenzie Hill Formation," Ocm, limestone and conglomerate with abundant quartz sand and cherty zones; thickness, approximately 2,000 feet (600 m). (Upper part of Arbuckle Group) ARDMORE-SHERMAN- Limestone, gray to tan, fine-grained, cherty, gradational eastward into dolomites and sandstones; thickness, 1,500 to 2,300 feet, decreasing eastward. (Arbuckle Group) Occurs in the ARBUCKLE MTNS
Dakota Group (Phanerozoic | Mesozoic | Cretaceous-Early )
CLINTON- Outliers of the "Kiowa Formation," Kk, dark-gray shale with some thin beds of fossiliferous tan limestone, range in thickness from a few feet to about 20 feet. Associated in some places is a 5- to 10-foot, gray to brown, coarse-grained sandstone and conglomerate assigned to the overlying "Dakota Group," Kd, (lower sandstone part).
Dockum Group (Phanerozoic | Mesozoic | Triassic-Late )
CIMARRON- Upper shale unit: Varicolored siltstone or claystone, conglomerate, fine-grained sandstone, and limestone. Lower sandstone unit: Varicolored, fine- to coarse-grained sandstone with some clay and interbedded shale.
Dornick Hills Group (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Carboniferous Pennsylvanian-Middle)
ARDMORE-SHERMAN- Series of tan shales with limestones, limestone conglomerate and sandstone. Top of "Otterville Limestone" down to base of "Lake Ardmore Sandstone;" thickness 1,800 feet. Occurs in the ARDMORE BASIN
Dune Sand (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene)
CLINTON- Wind-blown sand; thickness ranges from a thin Veneer to about 70 feet. LAWTON- Wind-laid sand; maximum thickness about 50 feet (15 m).
Dune Sand (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene)
CIMARRON- Fine- to medium-grained sand 0 to 40 feet thick. TEXAS- Fine to coarse windblown sand. Maximum thickness about 30 feet. BEAVER- Fine to coarse, round to sub-round, windblown sand consisting mostly of quartz grains. 0-50 feet thick
El Reno Group (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Permian )
CLINTON- Primarily evaporites and reddish-brown shale, with deltaic clastics to the southeast. Where separate formations have not been distinguished, the "El Reno Group" is mapped as Per; El Reno Group. Includes: "Dog Creek Shale," Pdc, reddish-brown shale with thin beds of siltstone and dolomite; thickness, about 220 feet; gradational eastward into the Chickasha Formation. "Blaine Formation," Pb, 3 to 4 gypsum and dolomite beds, about 100 to 200 feet thick, separated by reddish-brown shale. Gradational southward and eastward into Chickasha Formation. "Flowerpot Shale," Pf, reddish-brown shale containing several salt and gypsum beds in the upper part. Thickness, about 300 to 450 feet; gradational southward and eastward into Chickasha Formation and Duncan Sandstone. "Cedar Hill Sandstone," Pch, greenish-gray sandstone and reddish-brown shales; thickness, about 180 feet; gradational southward into Duncan Sandstone. "Chickasha Formation," Pc, reddish-brown to maroon mudstone conglomerate with some shale, silstone, and fine- to coarse-grained sandstone; thickness, about 600 feet; gradational northward and westward into the Flowerpot Shale and the Blaine Formation and westward into Dog Creek Shale. "Duncan Sandstone," Pd, light-gray and reddish-brown, cross-bedded, fine-grained sandstone and mudstone conglomerate with some interbedded yellowish-gray and reddish-brown shales; thickness, about 200 feet; gradational into the Cedar Hills Sandstone northward and into the Flowerpot Shale northward and westward. LAWTON- Primarily evaporites and reddish-brown shale, with deltaic clastics to the east. In the eastern part of the quadrangle, separate formations have not been distinguished, and the "El Reno Group" is mapped as Per; in the western part of the quadrangle, the group has been mapped as four separate formations. "El Reno Group undifferentiated," Per, in northeastern part of the quadrangle, includes "Chickasha Formation" sandstone, shale, and siltstone, 400 to 580 feet (120 to 180 m) thick-and underlying "Duncan Sandstone" (equivalent to San Angelo Sandstone)-sandstone with some shale, 100 to 250 feet (30 to 76 m) thick.
Flowerpot Shale (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Permian )
WOODWARD- Red-brown silty shale with some thin gypsum and dolomite beds in upper 50 feet and fine-grained sandstones in upper part to north. The middle and upper parts contain 50 feet or more of rock salt in the immediate subsurface, giving origin to the Ferguson Salt Plain in Blaine County and the Big and Little Salt Plains in Woods and Harper Counties on the Cimarron River. Thickness ranges from 180 feet in north part to 430 feet in south part. The "Chickasha Formation" (Pc) is a deltaic tongue of red-brown to greenish-gray to orange-brown cross-bedded mudstone conglomerate, siltstone, shale, and fine-grained sandstone, about 30 feet thick, in the middle of the Flowerpot Shale, pinching out northward. CLINTON- "Flowerpot Shale," Pf, reddish-brown shale containing several salt and gypsum beds in the upper part. Thickness, about 300 to 450 feet; gradational southward and eastward into Chickasha Formation and Duncan Sandstone. OKLAHOMA CITY- Mostly red-brown silty clay shale with stringers of gypsum (satin spar and selenite); grades southward into "Chickasha Formation". Thickness, 20 to 40 feet. (El Reno Group) LAWTON- "Flowerpot Shale," Pf, reddish-brown and greenish-gray shale, interbedded with greenish-gray siltstone; thickness, about 175 to 195 feet (53 to 59 m).
Hennessey Group (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Permian )
CLINTON- Reddish-brown shale with some thin, greenish-gray siltstone and orange-brown sandstone and siltstone beds; thickness, about 500 feet. The "Hennessey Group" is not subdivided in the southern part of the Clinton quadrangle; in the northeastern corner of the quadrangle, the upper part of the "Bison Formation," Pbi, is exposed as orange-brown and greenish-gray, fine-grained sandstone and siltstone. The Bison is gradational southward into reddish-brown shale; it thins southward and is about 120 feet thick. LAWTON- "Hennessey Group," Phy, reddish-brown to gray shale with some tan sandstones, 130 to 200 feet (40 to 60 m) thick (locally unconformable on Cambrian igneous rocks).
Hilltop Formation (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Carboniferous Pennsylvanian-Middle)
OKLAHOMA CITY- Mainly shale, grading upward into massive siltstone and fine- grained sandstone; grades northward into "Barnsdall Formation", "Chanute Formation", and "Dewey Limestone". Thickness ranges from 0 to 200 feet. ARDMORE-SHERMAN- Shale, blue-gray to red-brown, with buff siltstones and fine-grained sandstones at top; thickness, about 70 feet.
Kindblade Formation (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Ordovician-Early)
ARDMORE-SHERMAN- Limestone, gray to tan, fine-grained, gradational eastward into tan fine- to coarse-grained dolomite; some tan to gray sandstone and shale; thickness, 1,875 to 3,000 feet, decreasing eastward. (Arbuckle Group) Individual Fm description not found. Occurs in the ARBUCKLE MTNS
Kiowa Formation (Phanerozoic | Mesozoic | Cretaceous-Early )
WOODWARD- Gray and yellow shale and limestone, with many "Texigryphaea" shells locally. At base is 5 to 10 feet of greenish-gray sandstone in places. Thickness ranges up to 140 feet with top eroded. CLINTON- Outliers of the "Kiowa Formation," Kk, dark-gray shale with some thin beds of fossiliferous tan limestone, range in thickness from a few feet to about 20 feet. Associated in some places is a 5- to 10-foot, gray to brown, coarse-grained sandstone and conglomerate assigned to the overlying "Dakota Group," Kd, (lower sandstone part).
Lower part of Arbuckle Group and Timbered Hills Group (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Cambrian-Furongian)
LAWTON- Limestone, dolomite, siltstone, sandstone, conglomerate, and shale, with glauconitic and hematitic zones; thickness, 1,200 to 2,000 feet (370 to 600 m), faulted in isolated areas. Lower part of "Arbuckle Group" includes "Signal Mountain Formation, Royer Dolomite," and "Fort Sill Limestone; Timbered Hills Group" includes "Honey Creek Formation" and "Reagan Sandstone."
Missouri Mountain and Polk Creek Shales (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Ordovician-Late Silurian)
McALESTER TEXARKANA- Shale, greenish-gray to maroon to black; grades into phyllite in Broken Bow Uplift; contains some thin sandstones and gray conglomerates; a fossiliferous limestone occurs in Southeast quarter section 29, Township 4 South, Range 23 East; mapped as SmOp in Potato Hills, where it is included with Polk Creek Shale; thickness, 60 to 110 feet or less. Occurs in POTATO HILLS, BROKEN BOW UPLIFT or ADJACENT SMALLER UPLIFTS IN SOUTHEASTERN PART OF OUACHITA MOUNTAINS
Missouri Mountain Shale (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Silurian)
McALESTER TEXARKANA- Shale, greenish-gray to maroon to black; grades into phyllite in Broken Bow Uplift; contains some thin sandstones and gray conglomerates; a fossiliferous limestone occurs in Southeast quarter section 29, Township 4 South, Range 23 East; mapped as SmOp in Potato Hills, where it is included with Polk Creek Shale; thickness, 60 to 110 feet or less. Occurs in POTATO HILLS, BROKEN BOW UPLIFT or ADJACENT SMALLER UPLIFTS IN SOUTHEASTERN PART OF OUACHITA MOUNTAINS
Nellie Bly Formation and Hogshooter Limestone (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Carboniferous Pennsylvanian-Middle)
ENID- "Nellie Bly Formation" consists mainly of shale with a few layers of fine- to medium-grained sandstone. Thickness ranges from 80 to 550 feet (25 to 170 m). Underlying "Hogshooter Limestone" is massive crinoidal limestone 1 to 50 feet (0.3 to 14 m) thick. OKLAHOMA CITY- "Nellie Bly Formation," mainly shale with many fine-grained sandstone beds and limestone beds locally in upper part; thickness, about 250 to about 550 feet. Underlying"Hogshooter Limestone," massive crinoidal limestone 1 to 15 feet thick.
Ogallala Formation (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Pliocene)
CIMARRON- Generally semiconsolidated clay, silt, sand, gravel, and caliche 0 to 400 feet thick. BEAVER- Interbedded sand, siltstone, clay, gravel lenses, and thin limestone. Caliche common near surface but occurrence is not limited to the surface. Caliche accounts for most of the white color in the Ogallala. Other colors generally light tan or buff but locally may be pastel shades of almost any color. The Laverne and Rexroad Formations of Pliocene age and the Meade Group and Odee (of local usage) and other formations of Pleistocene age occur locally and are included with the Ogallala Formation, 0-700 feet thick. WOODWARD- Gravel, sand, silt, clay, caliche, and limestone, locally cemented with calcium carbonate. Generally light-tan to gray to white. Thickness ranges up to 400 feet and probably averages 150 feet. CLINTON- Gray to light-brown, fine- to medium-grained sand with some, clay, silt, gravel, volcanic ash, and caliche beds; locally cemented by calcium carbonate. Thickness ranges from 0 to about 320 feet. The formation thins eastward.
Oil Creek and Joins Formation (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Ordovician-Middle)
ARDMORE-SHERMAN- Limestone, gray to tan, granular, with greenish-gray shale and brown fine- to medium-grained sandstone; thickness, 600 to 1,100 feet, decreasing eastward. (Simpson Group) Occurs in the ARBUCKLE MTNS
Oolagah Formation (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Carboniferous Pennsylvanian-Middle)
TULSA- Thin-bedded limestone and some shale in the southern part of the area. North of Oolagah, in western Rogers County, the map unit, IPol, includes the following formations: "Altamont Formation," limestone and minor shale; "Bandera Formation," shale and thin sandstone; "Pawnee Formation," limestone and minor shale.
Ozan Formation (Phanerozoic | Mesozoic | Cretaceous-Late )
McALESTER TEXARKANA- Marl and clay, light- to dark- to brownish-gray, micaceous, calcareous, sandy, fine-grained sand, with interbedded chalky limestone; glauconitic marl and sand at base; same as lower Taylor Marl of Texas; thickness, about 100 feet.
Pitkin + Fayetteville + Batesville + Hindsville + Moorefield Formations (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Carboniferous Mississippian-Late)
TULSA- "Pitkin Formation," limestone. "Fayetteville Formation," shale and thin limestone "Batesville Formation," fine-grained sandstone "Hindsville Formation," limestone and shale "Moorefield Formation," limestone, shale, and siltstone.
Pleistocene and Pliocene deposits, undifferentiated (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary Quaternary | Pliocene Pleistocene)
TEXAS- Interfingering beds, tongues, and lenses of sand, silt, clay, gravel, sandstone, caliche, limestone, conglomerate, and volcanic ash. Includes Ogallala and Laverne Formations of Pliocene age and younger deposits of Pleistocene age. Locally the units are tightly cemented by calcium carbonate; other places, they are very poorly consolidated and nearly free of cementing materials. Thickness ranges from 0 to about 800 feet.
Terrace Deposits (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene)
WOODWARD- Lenticular and interfingering deposits of light-tan to gray gravel, sand, silt, clay, and volcanic ash. Sand dunes are common in many places. Thickness ranges up to 150 feet and averages about 60 feet. ENID- Sand, silt, clay, and gravel. Maximum thickness, about 75 feet (23 m) along major streams. TULSA- Fine gravel, sand, silt, and clay. CLINTON- Stream-laid deposits of sand, silt, clay, gravel, and volcanic ash; thickness ranges from 0 to about 120 feet. OKLAHOMA CITY- Lenticular beds of sand, silt, clay, and gravel. Thickness ranges from a few feet to about 100 feet and probably averages about 50 feet along major streams. FORT SMITH- Gravel, sand, silt, and clay. LAWTON- Sand, clay, and gravel as much as 75 feet (23 m) in Tillman County, ranging from 5 to 50 feet (2 to 15 m) elsewhere. ARDMORE-SHERMAN- Gravel, sand, silt, clay, and volcanic ash; thickness, about 5 to 50 feet; at various levels, as high as 160 feet above present flood plains. McALESTER TEXARKANA- Gravel, sand, silt, clay, and volcanic ash; several levels 20 to 160 feet or more above present flood plains, with each level containing deposits that average 20 to 30 feet in thickness, some windblown sand on top; may include colluvial wash down sides of hills
Undifferentiated, Mississisippian, Devonian, Silurian, and Ordovician (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Ordovician-Early Ordovician-Middle(?) Ordovician-Late(?) Silurian(?) Devonian(?) Carboniferous Mississippian-Early(?) Mississippian-Middle(?) Mississippian-Late)
FORT SMITH- Mississisippian, Devonian, Silurian, and Ordovician Rocks, Undifferentiated Mississippian and Devonian. "Chattanooga Shale," shale. Devonian. "Sallisaw Formation," limestone, sandstone, and chert; and "Frisco Formation," limestone. Silurian. "Quarry Mountain Formation," limestone; "Tenkiller Formation," limestone; and "Blackgum Formation," limestone and dolomite. Ordovician. "Sylvan Shale," shale; "Fernvale Limestone," limestone; "Fite Limestone," limestone; "Tyner Formation," shale, sandstone, dolomite, and limestone; "Burgen Sandstone," sandstone and minor shales and limestones; and "Cotter Dolomite," dolomite.
Vamoosa + Tallant + Barnsdall Formations (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Carboniferous Pennsylvanian-Middle)
TULSA- "Vamoosa Formation," shale, sandstone, siltstone, and thin limestone. "Tallant Formation," shale, sandstone, and thin limestone. "Barnsdall Formation," shale, siltstone, sandstone, and thin limestone
Vanoss Group (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Carboniferous Pennsylvanian-Late)
ENID- Alternating layers of limestone and shale to north, grading southward into limestone, shale, and fine-grained arkosic sandstone. Locally group contains thin coal seams. Near Kansas border, group includes (descending): "Salem Point Shale" (12 feet thick) at top, underlain by "Burr Limestone" (8 feet thick), "Legion Shale" (4 feet thick), "Sallyards Limestone" (3 feet thick), "Roca Shale" (15 feet thick), "Red Eagle Limestone," IPvre (20 feet thick), "Johnson Shale" (35 feet thick), "Long Creek Limestone," IPvlc (10 feet thick), unnamed shale (3 feet thick), "Hughes Creek Limestone (15 feet thick), unnamed shale (12 feet thick), "Americus Limestone, "IPvam, (12 feet thick), "Oaks Shale" (3 feet thick), "Houchen Creek Limestone (8 feet thick), "Stine Shale" (20 feet thick), "Five Point Limestone" (3 feet thick), unnamed shale (12 feet thick), "Brownville Limestone, IPvb (8 feet thick), "Pony Creek Shale" (40 feet thick), "Grayhorse Limestone," IPvg (5 feet thick), unnamed shale (12 feet thick), "Nebraska City Limestone" (5 feet thick), "French Creek Shale" (12 feet thick), "Jim Creek Limestone" (3 feet thick), "Friedrich Shale" (30 feet thick), "Grandhaven Limestone" (2 feet thick), "Dry Shale" (25 feet thick), "Dover Limestone" (30 feet thick), "Willard-Langdon Shale" (110 feet thick), "Elmont Limestone," IPve (10 feet thick), "Stonebreaker Shale" (20 feet thick), and "Reading Limestone" (20 feet thick) at base. Total thickness, about 500 feet (150 m). OKLAHOMA CITY- Red-brown to gray shale and orange-brown fine-grained, crossbedded sandstone; grades southward into arkosic sandstoneand conglomerate. Includes many thin limestone beds and shale units north of North Canadian River (descending): "Roca Shale"(75 feet thick), "Red Eagle Limestone," IPvre (3 to 8 feetthick), "Johnson Shale" (60 feet thick), "Long Creek Limestone," IPvlc (9 to 12 feet thick), "Hughes Creek Shale" (52 feet thick), "Americus Limestone," IPva (1.0 to 2.5 feetthick), "Admire Shale" (70 feet thick), "BrownvilleLimestone," IPvb (1 to 3 feet thick), "Pony Creek Shale" (75 feet thick), "Grayhorse Limestone," IPvg (1 foot thick), unnamed shale (70 feet thick), "Elmont Limestone," IPve (1.2to 7.8 feet thick), "Stonebreaker Shale" (60 feet thick), and"Reading Limestone" (1.5 feet thick), at base. Totalthickness of group ranges from 250 feet in south to 490 feet in north. ARDMORE-SHERMAN- Shale, maroon, arkose, and limestone conglomerate; thickness, 250 to 900 feet (subsurface), decreasing southward. (Pontotoc Group)
Viola Limestone and Bromide Formation (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Ordovician-Late)
CLINTON- Limestone, limestone and shale interbedded, and sandstone; thickness, about 900 feet; one outlier is shown in southern part of quadrangle. Simpson and lower units are covered. LAWTON- Limestone, interbedded limestone and shale, and sandstone; thickness about 900 feet (270 m), faulted in isolated areas, top eroded, base covered.
West Spring Creek and Kindblade Formations (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Ordovician-Early)
LAWTON- "West Spring Creek Formation" and "Kindblade Formation," Owk, dolomite, dolomitic sandstone, conglomerate, and limestone; thickness, approximately 2,000 feet (600 m). (Upper part of Arbuckle Group). ARDMORE-SHERMAN- Limestone, gray to tan, fine-grained, gradational eastward into tan fine- to coarse-grained dolomite; some tan to gray sandstone and shale; thickness, 1,875 to 3,000 feet, decreasing eastward. (Arbuckle Group) Individual Fm description not found. Occurs in the ARBUCKLE MTNS
West Spring Creek Formation (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Ordovician-Early)
ARDMORE-SHERMAN- Limestone, gray to tan, fine-grained, gradational eastward into tan fine- to coarse-grained dolomite; some tan to gray sandstone and shale; thickness, 1,875 to 3,000 feet, decreasing eastward. (Arbuckle Group) Individual Fm description not found Occurs in the ARBUCKLE MTNS
Oregon
Alluvial deposits (Holocene) (Holocene)
Sand, gravel, and silt forming flood plains and filling channels of present streams. In places includes talus and slope wash. Locally includes soils containing abundant organic material, and thin peat beds
Dune sand (Holocene) (Holocene)
Large areas of windblown sand composed of rock-forming minerals, mostly feldspar and small amounts of quartz, and, in southeastern Oregon, also pumice
Glaciofluvial, lacustrine, and pediment sedimentary deposits (Holocene and Pleistocene) (Pleistocene)
Unconsolidated, poorly sorted silt, sand, and gravel. Includes lacustrine deposits west of Columbia River Gorge (Trimble, 1963). Mostly in northern Morrow and Umatilla Counties where unit represents deposits of swollen late Pleistocene Columbia River (Hogenson, 1964)
Lacustrine and fluvial sedimentary rocks (Pleistocene) (Pleistocene)
Unconsolidated to semiconsolidated lacustrine clay, silt, sand, and gravel; in places includes mudflow and fluvial deposits and discontinuous layers of peat. Includes older alluvium and related deposits of Piper (1942), Willamette Silt (Allison, 1953; Wells and Peck, 1961), alluvial silt, sand, and gravel that form terrace deposits of Wells and others (1983), and Gresham and Estacada Formations of Trimble (1963). Includes deltaic gravel and sand and gravel bars, in pluvial lake basins in southeastern part of map area. In Rome Basin, includes discontinuous layers of poorly consolidated conglomerate characterized by well-rounded, commonly polished pebbles of chert and pebbles and cobbles of quartzite. In places contains mollusks or vertebrate fossils indicating Pleistocene age; mostly deposits of late Pleistocene age, but locally includes some deposits of early Holocene age. Includes Touchet Beds of Flint (1938), deposits of valley terraces of Newcomb (1965), and, in southeast Oregon, basin-filling deposits that incorporate Mazama ash deposits (Qma, Qmp) in the youngest layers
Loess (Holocene and Pleistocene) (Pleistocene to Holocene)
Windblown clayey silt and fine sand. Includes the Pleistocene Palouse Formation and deposits derived mostly from reworking of Palouse Formation. Contains local interbedded layers of soil, caliche, and some water-laid silt and gravel
Marine facies (Middle Eocene to Late Eocene)
Basaltic clastic rocks and pillow lavas, locally mapped separately by Wells and others (1983). Foraminiferal assemblages are assigned to the lower part of the Narizian Stage of Mallory (1959); see Wells and others (1983) for summary
Marine facies (Middle Eocene to Late Eocene)
Basaltic clastic rocks and pillow lavas, locally mapped separately by Wells and others (1983). Foraminiferal assemblages are assigned to the lower part of the Narizian Stage of Mallory (1959); see Wells and others (1983) for summary
Marine sedimentary rocks (Upper Triassic? and Upper and Middle Triassic) (Early Triassic)
Black, green, and gray argillite, mudstone, and shale; graywacke, sandy limestone, tuff, and some coarse volcaniclastic rocks; chert, sandstone comprised of chert clasts, and chert pebble conglomerate; thin-bedded and massive limestone. Locally contains some interbedded lava flows, mostly spilite or keratophyre. In places metamorphosed. Invertebrate marine fauna indicates unit mostly of Late Triassic (Karnian and Norian) age. Includes the Begg and Brisbois Formations of Dickinson and Vigrass (1965; Vester Formation of Brown and Thayer, 1966) and the Rail Cabin Argillite of Dickinson and Vigrass (1965); Fields Creek Formation and Laycock and Murderers Creek Graywackes of Brown and Thayer (1966); Martin Bridge Formation and lower sedimentary series in and near the Wallowa Mountains (Prostka, 1962; Nolf, 1966); and Doyle Creek and Wild Sheep Creek Formations (Vallier, 1977). Probably partly age correlative with rocks of the Applegate Group (Wells and Peck, 1961) of southwestern Oregon
Melange (Jurassic) (Jurassic)
Structurally complex mixture of basaltic rocks, serpentinite, chert, argillite, conglomerate, silty sandstone, and lenses of marble composing the melange of the Takilma area of Smith and others (1982)
Playa deposits (Holocene) (Holocene)
Clay, silt, sand, and some evaporites
Sedimentary rocks (Oligocene and upper Eocene) (Late Eocene to Oligocene)
Marine shale siltstone, sandstone, and conglomerate, in places partly composed of tuffaceous and basaltic debris; interbeds of arkosic, glauconitic, and quartzose sandstone. Foraminifers are referable to the Refugian and Zemorrian Stages (see marine sedimentary rocks-units Toes and Toem-of Wells and others, 1983). Includes Bastendorff Formation of Baldwin (1974)
Siletz River Volcanics and related rocks (middle and lower Eocene and Paleocene) (Paleocene to Middle Eocene)
Aphanitic to porphyritic, vesicular pillow flows, tuff-breccias, massive lava flows and sills of tholeiitic and alkalic basalt. Upper part of sequence contains numerous interbeds of basaltic siltstone and sandstone, basaltic tuff, and locally derived basalt conglomerate. Rocks of unit pervasively zeolitized and veined with calcite. Most of these rocks are of marine origin and have been interpreted as oceanic crust and seamounts (Snavely and others, 1968). Foraminiferal assemblages referred to the Ulatisian and Penutian Stages (Snavely and others, 1969); K-Ar ages range from 50.7 +/- 3.1 to 58.1 +/- 1.5 Ma (Duncan, 1982); includes the lower part of the Roseburg Formation of Baldwin (1974), which has yielded K-Ar ages as old as 62 Ma
Terrace, pediment, and lag gravels (Holocene and Pleistocene) (Pleistocene to Holocene)
Unconsolidated deposits of gravel, cobbles, and boulders intermixed and locally interlayered with clay, silt, and sand. Mostly on terraces and pediments above present flood plains. Includes older alluvium of Smith and others (1982) in the Klamath Mountains and both high- and low-level terraces along Oregon coast. Includes dissected alluvial fan deposits northeast of Lebanon, and Linn and Leffler Gravels of Allison and Felts (1956)
Tillamook Volcanics (upper and middle Eocene) (Middle Eocene to Late Eocene)
Subaerial basaltic flows and breccia and submarine basaltic breccia, pillow lavas, lapilli and augite-rich tuff with interbeds of basaltic sandstone, siltstone, and conglomerate. Includes some basaltic andesite and, near the top of the sequence, some dacite. Potassium-argon ages on middle and lower parts of sequence range from about 43 to 46 Ma (Magill and others, 1981): one potassium-argon age from dacite near top of sequence is about 40 Ma (see Wells and others, 1983)
Tuffaceous sedimentary rocks, tuffs, pumicites, and silicic flows (Miocene) (Miocene)
Moderately well indurated lacustrine and fluvial (flood-plain) deposits of tuff, pumicite, palagonite tuff, and lesser siltstone, arkosic sandstone, and pebble and cobble conglomerate. Locally contains some lignite beds. Former glass in silicic vitroclastic debris commonly crystallized and altered to secondary silica minerals, alkali feldspar, zeolites, and clay minerals. Contains some welded and nonwelded ash-flow tuffs, and minor rhyolite flows. Widespread and abundant vertebrate fossils and minor plant fossils indicate that most of unit is of middle Miocene (Barstovian) age; parts of unit between Goose Lake and Warner Valley may include rocks of early Miocene age. Locally interlayered with and locally overlies basalt and andesite flows of unit Tmb. Overlies and locally interfingers with Picture Gorge Basalt (Thayer and Brown, 1966) and with Miocene basalt south of Prineville. Includes Mascall Formation of Merriam (1901), Sucker (Succor) Creek Formation of Corcoran and others (1962) and Kittleman and others (1967), Drip Spring Formation of Kittleman and others (1965, 1967), Trout Creek Formation of Smith (1926), and "rocks of Miocene age" of Malde and Powers (1962) in the southern Owyhee Upland province. In southeast Oregon, some of these rocks represent caldera and moat-fill deposits
Tuffaceous siltstone and sandstone (upper and middle Eocene) (Middle Eocene to Late Eocene)
Thick- to thin-bedded marine tuffaceous mudstone, siltstone, and sandstone; fine to coarse grained. Contains calcareous concretions and, in places, is carbonaceous and micaceous. Includes the Nestucca Formation, which contains a foraminiferal assemblage assigned to the upper Narizian and lowermost Refugian Stages (Snavely and others, 1969; McKeel, 1980); the Spencer Formation, which contains Narizian Stage foraminifers; the Keasey Formation, which contains upper Narizian and lower Refugian Stage foraminifers (McDougall, 1975, 1980); the Coaledo and Bateman Formations of Baldwin (1974); upper Eocene sandstone of Bela (1981); and the Sager Creek formation (informal name) of Niem and Niem (1985)
Volcanic and metavolcanic rocks (Upper Triassic) (Late Triassic)
Green to gray spilite and keratophyre flows and flow breccia; and subordinate amounts of coarse volcaniclastic sandstone, tuff, sandstone, siltstone, chert, conglomerate, and limestone. Marine fauna from interlayered sedimentary rocks indicates unit is mostly of Karnian (Late Triassic) age. Includes Late Triassic "andesitic and basaltic rocks" of Nolf and Taubeneck (1963), and the basaltic to rhyolitic metavolcanic rocks and interbedded sedimentary rocks of the Huntington Formation of Brooks (1979). Equivalent, in part, to unit TrPv
Pennsylvania
Bellefonte and Axemann Formations, undivided (Ordovician)
Bellefonte and Axemann Formations, undivided - Includes, in descending order, the Bellefonte (Obf) and Axemann (Oa) Formations.
Berea Sandstone through Venango Formation, undivided (Devonian)
Berea Sandstone through Venango Formation, undivided - Greenish-yellow and gray sandstone, siltstone, and shale succession, becoming more shaly and more gray downward; bottom of interval is bottom of Panama Conglomerate; Venango not mapped separately because upper key bed (Woodcock Sandstone) is missing. Includes, in descending order: Berea Sandstone, Bedford Shale, Cussewago Sandstone, Riceville Shale, and Venango Formation equivalent; contains marine fossils.
Bloomsburg and Mifflintown Formations, undivided (Silurian)
Bloomsburg and Mifflintown Formations, undivided - Includes, in descending order, the Bloomsburg Formation (Sb) and the Mifflintown Formation--interbedded dark-gray shale and medium-gray fossiliferous limestone; equivalent to "McKenzie" and "Rochester" of earlier workers; not present east of Harrisburg.
Bloomsburg Formation (Silurian)
Bloomsburg Formation - Grayish-red and greenish-gray shale, siltstone, and very fine to coarse-grained sandstone; some calcareous mudstone in central Pennsylvania; thins to west and is replaced by Mifflintown beds; thickens eastward, replacing overlying Wills Creek and Tonoloway Formations and underlying Mifflintown Formation.
Bloomsburg Formation (Silurian)
Bloomsburg Formation - Grayish-red siltstone, shale, and sandstone arranged in fining-upward cycles.
Bryn Mawr Formation (Tertiary)
Bryn Mawr Formation - High-level terrace deposits; reddish-brown gravelly sand and some silt. Age uncertain.
Buffalo Springs Formation (Cambrian)
Buffalo Springs Formation - Light-gray to pinkish-gray, finely to coarsely crystalline limestone and interbedded dolomite; numerous siliceous and clayey laminae; stromatolitic limestone beds near top; some thin sandy beds.
Buttermilk Falls Limestone through Esopus Formation, undivided (Devonian)
Buttermilk Falls Limestone through Esopus Formation, undivided - In descending order: Buttermilk Falls Limestone--gray fossiliferous limestone and black chert; Palmerton Sandstone--massive white siliceous sandstone; Schoharie Formation--gray calcareous, argillaceous siltstone; Esopus Formation--gray silty shale and sandy siltstone.
Casselman Formation (Pennsylvanian)
Casselman Formation - Cyclic sequences of shale, siltstone, sandstone, red beds, thin, impure limestone, and thin, nonpersistent coal; red beds are associated with landslides; base is at top of Ames limestone.
Chadakoin Formation (Devonian)
Chadakoin Formation - Light-gray or brownish siltstone and some sandstone, interbedded with medium-gray shale; included in Conneaut Group and "Chemung" of earlier workers; marine fossils common; includes "pink rock" of drillers.
Cocalico Formation (Ordovician)
Cocalico Formation - Gray phyllitic shale, maroon shale, siltstone, and silty, siliceous shale; some interbedded argillaceous and quartzose sandstone; predominantly allochthonous, and probably closely related to Hamburg sequence, but includes some autochthonous elements.
Conemaugh Group (Pennsylvanian)
Conemaugh Group - Includes, in descending order, the Casselman Formation (PAcc) and the Glenshaw Formation (PAcg), which are described separately below. Casselman: Cyclic sequences of shale, siltstone, sandstone, red beds, thin, impure limestone, and thin, nonpersistent coal; red beds are associated with landslides; base is at top of Ames limestone. Glenshaw: Cyclic sequences of shale, sandstone, red beds, and thin limestone and coal; includes four marine limestone or shale horizons; red beds are involved in landslides; base is at top of Upper Freeport coal.
Cuyahoga Group (Mississippian)
Cuyahoga Group - Medium-gray siltstone and dark-gray shale containing interbedded light-gray, flaggy sandstone. Includes, in descending order: Meadville Shale, Sharpsville Sandstone, and Orangeville Shale; marine fossils common.
Decker Formation through Poxono Island Formation, undivided (Silurian)
Decker Formation through Poxono Island Formation, undivided -In descending order: Decker Formation--gray calcareous sandstone having lenses of calcareous conglomerate, siltstone, and shale, and lenses of limestone and dolomite (in Stroudsburg area, includes calcareous shale, limestone, and dolomite of Rondout Formation at top); Bossardville Limestone--gray argillaceous limestone and dolomitic limestone; Poxono Island Formation--thin-bedded dolomite, limestone, and shale; red shale in lower part. This undivided succession is equivalent to Keyser, Tonoloway, and Wills Creek (part) Formations of central Pennsylvania.
Gatesburg Formation (Cambrian)
Gatesburg Formation - Gray dolomite, limestone, and sandstone. Includes the Mines Member (CAgm) and four lower members (CAgl).
Gettysburg Formation (Triassic)
Gettysburg Formation - Reddish-brown to maroon, silty mudstone and shale containing thin red sandstone interbeds; several thin beds of impure limestone.
Graywacke and shale of Martinsburg Formation (Ordovician)
Graywacke and shale of Martinsburg Formation - Shale containing conspicuous graywacke; includes autochthonous sandstone and shale of Shochary Ridge.
Hamilton Group (Devonian)
Hamilton Group - Includes, in descending order, the Mahantango (Dmh) and Marcellus (Dmr) Formations.
Irish Valley Member of Catskill Formation (Devonian)
Irish Valley Member of Catskill Formation - Nonmarine, grayish-red siltstone and mudstone, and gray and grayish-red sandstone interbedded with minor, thin, light-olive-gray marine siltstone; arranged in fining-upward cycles. Lower part of member has conglomeratic sandstones.
Keyser Formation through Clinton Group, undivided (Devonian and Silurian)
Keyser Formation through Clinton Group, undivided - Same as Keyser-through-Mifflintown (DSkm) interval, plus Clinton Group at base. Clinton includes the following, in descending order: Keefer Formation--fossiliferous sandstone and hematitic, oolitic sandstone and shale; Rose Hill Formation--fossiliferous shale.
Keyser Formation through Mifflintown Formation, undivided (Devonian and Silurian)
Keyser Formation through Mifflintown Formation, undivided - In descending order: Keyser Formation--limestone; Tonoloway Formation--limestone and interbedded shale; Wills Creek Formation--interbedded shale, siltstone, limestone, and dolomite; Bloomsburg Formation--grayish-red and greenish-gray shale, siltstone, sandstone, and mudstone; Mifflintown Formation--interbedded shale and limestone.
Kinzers Formation (Cambrian)
Kinzers Formation - Base--dark-brown shale; middle--gray and white spotted limestone and, locally, marble having irregular partings; top--sandy limestone which weathers to a fine-grained, friable, porous, sandy mass.
Leithsville Formation (Cambrian)
Leithsville Formation - Medium- to dark-gray, crystalline dolomite, light-olive-gray in places, weathering to light gray and yellowish brown; massive bedded; oolitic; pink to gray, mottled chert and dark-gray chert; thin shale and dolomitic shale interbeds; scattered sand grains; upper part is very shaly.
Lock Haven Formation (Devonian)
Lock Haven Formation - Interbedded olive-gray mudstone, siltstone, sandstone, and thin conglomerate; marine fossils throughout; "Chemung" of earlier workers. Laterally equivalent to Scherr and Foreknobs Formations.
Mahantango Formation (Devonian)
Mahantango Formation - Gray, brown, and olive shale and siltstone; marine fossils. Includes the following members, in descending order: Tully-argillaceous limestone; Sherman Ridge, Montebello (sandstone), Fisher Ridge, Dalmatia, and Turkey Ridge. In south-central Pennsylvania, includes Clearville, Frame, Chaneysville, and Gander Run Members. Characterized by coarsening-upward cycles.
Mauch Chunk Formation (Mississippian)
Mauch Chunk Formation - Grayish-red shale, siltstone, sandstone, and some conglomerate; some local nonred zones. Includes Loyalhanna Member (crossbedded, sandy limestone) at base in south-central and southwestern Pennsylvania; also includes Greenbrier Limestone Member, and Wymps Gap and Deer Valley Limestones, which are tongues of the Greenbrier. Along Allegheny Front from Blair County to Sullivan County, Loyalhanna Member is greenish-gray, calcareous, crossbedded sandstone.
Monongahela Group (Pennsylvanian)
Monongahela Group - Cyclic sequences of limestone, shale, sandstone, and coal; commercial coals present; base is at bottom of Pittsburgh coal.
New Oxford conglomerate (Triassic)
New Oxford conglomerate - Quartz or quartzite pebbles, cobbles, and rare boulders set in a red, sandy, ferruginous matrix; some silica cement; some feldspar clasts.
New Oxford Formation (Triassic)
New Oxford Formation - Light-gray to buff, commonly arkosic sandstone interbedded with red shale, mudstone, and fine-grained sandstone
Patapsco(?) Formation (Cretaceous)
Patapsco(?) Formation - Intensely colored, variegated, ferruginous clay and, in places, beds of sand; occurs in isolated patches.
Pensauken and Bridgeton Formations, undifferentiated (Tertiary)
Pensauken and Bridgeton Formations, undifferentiated - Dark-reddish-brown, cross-stratified, feldspathic quartz sand and some thin beds of fine gravel and rare layers of clay or silt.
Pleasant Hill Formation (Cambrian)
Pleasant Hill Formation - Gray, thin-bedded, argillaceous limestone interbedded with shale, siltstone, and sandstone.
Quartz fanglomerate (Triassic)
Quartz fanglomerate - Well-rounded quartzite pebbles, cobbles, and rare boulders set in a reddish-brown, sandy matrix.
Reedsville Formation (Ordovician)
Reedsville Formation - Olive-gray to dark-gray shale, siltstone, and fine-grained, thin-bedded sandstone having graded bedding; upper sandstone is very fossiliferous; includes Antes Formation (black calcareous shale) at base along Nittany Arch.
Sands of Presque Isle (Quaternary)
Sands of Presque Isle - Fine-grained, unconsolidated sand deposited by lake currents.
Sherman Creek Member of Catskill Formation (Devonian)
Sherman Creek Member of Catskill Formation - Alternating grayish-red mudstone and siltstone in poorly defined fining-upward cycles, and minor intervals of gray sandstone; laterally equivalent to Berry Run, Sawmill Run, Packerton, and Long Run Members of eastern Pennsylvania.
Snitz Creek and Buffalo Springs Formations, undivided (Cambrian)
Snitz Creek and Buffalo Springs Formations, undivided - Includes, in descending order, the Snitz Creek (CAsc) and Buffalo Springs (CAbs) Formations. Snitz Creek Formation - thick-bedded. medium- to coarsely crystalline dolomite; in part oolitic, containing laminated limestone and sandstone interbeds. Buffalo Springs Formation - light-gray to pinkish-gray, finely to coarsely crystalline limestone and interbedded dolomite; numerous siliceous and clayey laminae; stromatolitic limestone beds near top; some thin sandy beds.
Snitz Creek Formation (Cambrian)
Snitz Creek Formation - Thick-bedded, medium- to coarsely crystalline dolomite, in part oolitic, containing laminated limestone and sandstone interbeds.
Stockton conglomerate (Triassic)
Stockton conglomerate - Quartz cobbles set in a poorly sorted, sandy matrix; includes conglomeratic sandstone.
Stockton Formation (Triassic)
Stockton Formation - Light-gray to buff, coarse-grained, arkosic sandstone; includes reddish-brown to grayish-purple sandstone, siltstone, and mudstone.
Trenton Gravel (Quaternary)
Trenton Gravel - Gray or pale-reddish-brown, very gravelly sand interstratified with crossbedded sand and clay-silt beds; includes areas of Holocene alluvium and swamp deposits.
Trimmers Rock Formation (Devonian)
Trimmers Rock Formation - Olive-gray siltstone and shale, characterized by graded bedding; marine fossils; some very fine grained sandstone in northeast; black shale of Harrell Formation at base in Susquehanna Valley.
Warrior Formation (Cambrian)
Warrior Formation - Gray, thin- to medium-bedded, fossiliferous, cyclic limestone bearing stromatolites; interbedded with thick-bedded crystalline dolomite and some sandstone.
Wills Creek Formation through Mifflintown Formation, undivided (Silurian)
Wills Creek Formation through Mifflintown Formation, undivided - Includes, in descending order, the Wills Creek Formation (Swc) and Bloomsburg and Mifflintown Formations, undivided (Sbm).
Zullinger Formation (Cambrian)
Zullinger Formation - Interbanded and interlaminated limestone and dolomite, thin- to thick-bedded; stromatolitic limestone; several thin, local quartz sandstone beds.
Rhode Island
Conanicut Group - undifferentiated rock (Cambro-Ordovician)
Conanicut Group - undifferentiated rock - Consists of associations of the above rock types.
Narragansett Bay Group - Dighton Conglomerate (Pennsylvanian)
Narragansett Bay Group - Dighton Conglomerate - Gray conglomerate consisting predominantly of quartz clasts set in a sand-sized matrix. Minor lenses of litharenite and arkosic sandstone.
Narragansett Bay Group - Wamsutta Formation (Pennsylvanian)
Narragansett Bay Group - Wamsutta Formation - Red sandstone, shale, and conglomerate, locally containing abundant volcanic detritus as clasts and matrix. Plant fossil localities occur in adjacent Massachusetts. Minor, but significant amounts of interstratified bimodal-composition volcanic lava flows consisting of alkalic basalt (locally pillowed) and rhyolite are present in adjacent Massachusetts.
Raritan Formation (Cretaceous)
Raritan Formation - Red, white, gray, and black clay and poorly lithified white sand. Black clay contains lignite fragments and pyrite and siderite nodules. Exposed only in a few wave-cut bluffs on Block Island, but inferred to have originally onlapped both the Esmond-Dedham and Hope Valley subterranes. This unit may occur as large glacial erratic blocks enclosed in till, and may not represent in situ bedrock.
South Carolina
Aeolian Sand Deposits (Holocene)
Aeolian Sand Deposits: Holocene dune sand, parabolic.
Alluvial Valley Swamp (Quaternary)
Alluvial Valley Swamp: Unconformable on all underlying units, fluvial sand and gravel at base, grading upwards into fine sands and silts, local peat. May be overrun with recent sediments from forest cutting and agriculture.
Beach (Holocene)
Beach: Holocene beach complex sediments. Sands and gravels of littoral zone, dune system, barrier system.
Black Creek/Cusseta/Blufftown Formations (Cretaceous)
Black Creek/Cusseta/Blufftown Formations: Moderately to poorly sorted sand and clay deposited in delta-dominated shallow marine environments. Unit is characterized by sands containing locally abundant (F-VC grained) tourmaline and (F-VC grained) muscovite with some monazite and garnet. Clay layers are also common and some lower delta plain deposits form commercial kaolin bodies. Generally very restricted marine in eastern Georgia becoming more open marine to the east and west.
Black Mingo/Clayton Formations (Tertiary)
Black Mingo/Clayton Formations: Poorly to well sorted sand and clay deposited in delta-dominated fluvial- and shallow marine environments. Older parts of unit are characterized by an abundance of feldspar and local sillimanite. Unit is generally delta plain and lagoon deposits in South Carolina becoming open marine calcareous sand and clay in western Georgia. In central Georgia, unit contains an abundance of commercial kaolin deposits formed in lower delta plain environments.
Brandywine Formation (Miocene)
Brandywine Formation: Upland gravel similar to Columbia group mapped in the uplands of southern Maryland southeast of DC. 10-40 ft thick. Extensive sand and gravel resources.
Cape Fear/Eutaw Formations (Cretaceous)
Cape Fear/Eutaw Formations Kcfe: Poorly sorted clayey sand and gravel deposited in delta-dominated fluvial- and restricted marine environments. Unit is characterized by an abundance of smoky quartz gravel, feldspar, monazite, and garnet typically concentrated in placer deposits. Generally non-marine from North Carolina to central Georgia but contains shallow-water delta-front deposits in western Georgia.
Duplin Formation (Pliocene)
Duplin Formation: Coastal terrace of Carolinas. Pliocene equivalent to Yorktown. Deeply weathered.
Huber/Lisbon/Barnwell Formations, undivided (Eocene)
Huber/Lisbon/Barnwell Formations, undivided: Poorly to well sorted sand, clay and carbonates deposited in delta-dominated fluvial- and open-marine environments. Unit is characterized by commercial kaolin bodies in older strata from westernmost South Carolina to central Georgia. Younger strata are cyclic marine deposits which deeper water facies exposed in western Georgia. Carbonate facies are locally mined in western Georgia for agricultural lime.
Neogene strata (undifferentiated) (Neogene)
Neogene strata (undifferentiated): Poorly sorted clayey sand and gravel deposited in a fluvial environment in South Carolina but becoming more fluvio-marine in Georgia. Unit is characterized by insitu weathered feldspar and an abundance of quartzite gravel and cobbles.
Peedee Formation (Cretaceous)
Peedee Formation
Peedee Formation /Black Creek Group, undivided (Cretaceous)
Peedee Formation /Black Creek Group, undivided
Penholoway Formation (Pleistocene)
Penholoway Formation: Similar to Cape May, broad lateral extent underlying terraces in the Carolinas; swamps and ridges on terrace surface were originally barrier islands and back bays. Superimposed on these landforms are swarms of Carolina bays.
Socastee Formation (Pleistocene)
Socastee Formation: Low coastal formation in Carolinas like Penholoway but younger and lower in altitude.
Tidal Marsh (Quaternary)
Tidal Marsh: Peat and muck deposits along tidal margins of esturaries and back bays. Deposits range from a few feet to 60+ feet deep. Locally include silt and fine sand and clay as levees on tidal channels. At depth peaty material may be accumulated from fresh water plants. Peat at the surface dominated by spartina and other salt tolerant species.
Waccamaw Formation (Pleistocene)
Waccamaw Formation: Another Carolina costalized terrace of early-middle Pleistocene age. Deeply weathered.
Wando Formation (Pleistocene)
Wando Formation: Another Carolina coastal terrace sequence like Penholoway . This is the youngest and lowest. Late Pleistocene
South Dakota
Alluvium (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary)
Clay to boulder-size clasts with locally abundant organic material. Thickness up to 75 ft (23m).
Batesland Formation (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Miocene)
Tan to green, calcareous siltstone, claystone, channel sandstone, conglomerate, and arkose. Thickness up to 50 ft (15 m).
Belle Fourche Shale, Mowry Shale, Newcastle Sandstone,and Skull Creek Shale (Phanerozoic | Mesozoic | Cretaceous-Early Cretaceous-Middle(?) Cretaceous-Late)
Note: see individual unit descriptions
Cannonball Formation (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Paleocene )
Gray and tan siltstone, sandy to silty claystone, and fine-grained, calcareous clayely to silty sandstone, and abundant, round to lenticular carbonate concretions. Thickness up to 180 ft (55 m).
Clayely Till, Ground Moraine (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene [Pre-Illinoian])
Heterogeneous, clay to boulder-size clasts of glacial orgin. Exhibits a distinctive weathered, dissected surface. Contains prominent oxidized joints and fractures with gypsum or calcite. Typically overlain by up to 45 ft (14 m) of loess. Thickness of uppermost Pre-Illinoian till may be up to 120 ft (37 m). Composite thickness of all Pre-Illinoian till may be up to 1,000 ft (305 m).
Colluvium (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary)
Clay to boulder-size clasts forming rubble residuum and talus. Thickness up to 30 ft (9m).
Eolian Deposits (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary)
(loess and sand dune) Silt to medium-grained sand. Deposited as sand sheets and barchan, linear, and dome-like dunes and as veneer on uplands. Thickness up to 300 ft (91m).
Gravel Deposits (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary )
Clay to boulder-size clasts primarily from igneous and metamorphic rocks of the central Black Hills. Also includes Phanerozoic lithic clasts and rare vertebrate fossils. Thickness up to 60 ft (18 m).
Hell Creek Formation (Phanerozoic | Mesozoic | Cretaceous-Late)
Tan to brown, light- to dark-gray, "somber beds" of shale. Interbedded with brown to red carbonaceous shale, gray and brown bentonitic silty shale, and gray, brown and yellow siltstone, sandstone, and claystone-pebble conglomerate. Thickness 260-600 ft (79-183 m).
Java Formation (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene-Early)
Sand to gravel of fluvial orgin. Upper portion is tan to reddish-brown eolian silt with minor clay and fine-grained sand. Thickness up to 180 ft (55 m).
Lacustrine Sediments (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene [Upper Wisconsin])
Glaciolacustrine clay and silt with minor sand and gravel. Forms flat, low-lying terrain. Includes deposits from Glacial Lake Dakota and Glacial Lake Agassiz. Thickness up to 60 ft (18m).
Lacustrine Sediments, Ice-walled (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene [Upper Wisconsin])
Glaciolacustrine clay and silt with minor sand and gravel. Forms elevated level terrain. Thickness up to 60 ft (18m).
Landslide Deposits (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary)
Landslide, slump, and collapsed material composed of chaotically mixed boulders and finer grained rock debris. Thickness up to 180 ft (55m).
Mowry Shale, Newcastle Sandstone, and Skull Creek Shale (Phanerozoic | Mesozoic | Cretaceous-Early )
Mowry Shale- Black to gray, siliceous, fissile shale and siltstone containing bentonite layers, and sparse sandstone dikes and sills. Thickness 125-250 ft (38-76 m). Newcastle Sandstone- Gray, light-brown to yellow, discontinuously distributed siltstone, claystone, sandy shale, and fine-grained sandstone. Thickness up to 290 ft (88 m). Skull Creek Shale- Dark-gray to blueish-gray shale containing ferruginous, and carbonate concretions. Thickness 150-275 ft (46-84 m).
Niobrara Formation (Phanerozoic | Mesozoic | Cretaceous-Late)
White to dark gray argillaceous chalk, marl, and shale. Weathers yellow to orange. Contains thin, laterally continuous bentonite beds, chalky carbonaceous shale, minor sand, and small concretions. Thickness 160-225 ft (49-69 m).
Outwash, Collapsed (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene [Upper Wisconsin])
Heterogeneous sand and gravel of glaciofluvial orgin. Deposited as outwash sediments that collapsed due to melting of buried ice. Thickness up to 90 ft (27m).
Outwash, Delta (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene [Upper Wisconsin])
Heterogeneous sand and gravel of glaciofluvial orgin. Typically forms level terrain at the mouths of meltwater streams which flowed into Glacial Lake Dakota. Thickness up to 30 ft (9m).
Outwash, Ice-walled (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene [Upper Wisconsin])
Heterogeneous sand and gravel of glaciofluvial orgin. Typically forms elevated, level terrain. Thickness up to 90 ft (27m).
Outwash, Terrace (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene [Upper Wisconsin])
Heterogeneous clay to gravel of glaciofluvial orgin. Thickness up to 60 ft (18m)
Outwash, Undifferentiated (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene [Upper Wisconsin])
Heterogeneous sand and gravel, with minor clay and silt. Deposits of glaciofluvial orgin including outwash plains, kame terraces, and other undifferentiated deposits. Thickness up to 30 ft (9m).
Outwash, Undifferentiated (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene [Illinoian(?) Pre-Illinoian])
Heterogeneous sand and gravel with minor clay of glaciofluvial orgin. Thickness up to 90 ft (27 m).
Outwash, Valley Train (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene [Upper Wisconsin])
Heterogeneous silt to gravel. Confined to valleys of glaciofluvial orgin. Thickness up to 60 ft (18m).
Pierre Shale (Phanerozoic | Mesozoic | Cretaceous-Late)
Blue-gray to dark-gray, fissile to blocky shale with persistent beds of bentonite, black organic shale, or light-brown chalky shale. Contains minor sandstone, conglomerate, and abundant carbonate and ferruginous concretions. Thickness 1,000-2,700 ft (305-823 m).
Pollock Formation (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene [Upper Wisconsin])
Glaciolacustrine clay and silty clay with laminae of very fine-grained sand near the middle and base of the formation. Thickness up to 165 ft (50 m).
Spearfish Formation (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic Mesozoic | Permian Triassic)
Red sandy shale, siltstone, sandstone, and minor limestone. Interbedded with abundant gypsum. Thickness 328-559 ft (100-170 m).
Terrace Deposits (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary)
Clay to boulder-size clasts deposited as pediments, paleochannels, and terrace fills of former flood plains. Thickness up to 75 ft (23m).
Till, End Moraine (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene [Upper Wisconsin])
Heterogeneous, clay with silt to boulder-size clasts of glacial orgin. A geomorphic feature that is characterized by elevated linear ridges with hummocky terrain locally at former ice sheet margins. Composite thicknessof all Upper Wisconsin till may be up to 300 ft (91 m).
Till, Ground Moraine (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene [Illinoian(?)])
Heterogeneous, clay with silt to boulder-size clasts. Exhibits a distinctive weathered, dissected surface. Contains prominent oxidized joints and fractures with gypsum or calcite. Typically overlain by up to 25 ft (8 m) of loess. Thickness up to 120 ft (37 m).
Till, Ground Moraine (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene [Upper Wisconsin])
Heterogeneous, clay with silt to boulder-size clasts of glacial orgin. A geomorphic feature that is characterized by smooth, rolling terrain. Composite thickness of all Upper Wisconsin till may be up to 300 ft (91 m).
Till, Minor Moraine (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene [Upper Wisconsin])
Heterogeneous, clay with silt to boulder-size clasts of glacial orgin. A geomorphic feature that is characterized by elevated linear ridges including minor, washboard, or recessional moraines. Composite thicknessof all Upper Wisconsin till may be up to 300 ft (91 m).
Till, Moraine (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene [Upper Wisconsin])
Heterogeneous, clay with silt to boulder-size clasts of glacial orgin. Exhibits a distinctive weathered, dissected surface.Typically overlain by up to 10 ft (3m) of loess. Thickness up to 150 ft (46 m).
Till, Stagnation Moraine (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene [Upper Wisconsin])
Heterogeneous, clay with silt to boulder-size clasts of glacial orgin. A geomorphic feature that is characterized by hummocky terrain with abundant sloughs resulting from stagnation of ice sheets. Composite thickness of all Upper Wisconsin till may be up to 300 ft (91 m).
White River Group (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Eocene Oligocene)
Includes: Brule Formation (Oligocene)- White, pink, light-green, and light-brown, massive to thin-bedded, bentonitic claystone, tuffaceous siltstone, and well-bedded, calcareous, tuffaceous quartz sandstone. Thickness up to 150 ft (46 m). Chadron Formation (Eocene)- Upper beds are gray, light-brown to maroon bentonite, claystone, siltstone tuffaceous fine-grained sandstone, and local, silicified carbonate lenses. Basal portion consists of poorly cemented, white, coarse-grained arkose and conglomerate. Thickness up to 160 ft (49 m). Chamberlain Pass Formation (Eocene)- Pale olive to pale red, mottled mudstone containing white, cross-bedded channel sandstone with basal conglomerate. Thickness up to 32 ft (10 m). Slim Buttes Formation (Eocene)- White, grayish- to yellowish-orange,pale-red to pink siltstone, clayey siltstone, bentonitic claystone,medium- to fine-grained sandstone, and conglomerate. Thickness up to 48 ft (15 m).
Tennessee
Alluvial deposits (Quaternary)
Alluvial Deposits - Sand, silt, clay, and gravel. In flood plain of Mississippi River more than 100 feet thick; in smaller streams generally less than 20 feet thick.
Alluvial deposits (Quaternary)
Alluvial Deposits - Sand, silt, clay, and gravel. As much as 60 feet thick in flood plains of Tennessee and Cumberland Rivers; in smaller streams generally less than 20 feet thick.
Alluvial deposits (Quaternary)
Alluvial Deposits - Sand, silt, clay and gravel. Mapped only in valley of Cumberland River and in Elk Valley. Thickness generally less than 30 feet.
Bays Formation (Ordovician)
Bays Formation - Maroon claystone and siltstone, commonly mottled greenish, evenly bedded; to northeast, light- gray to white, thick-bedded sandstone; metabentonite in upper part. Maximum thickness 1,000 feet.
Bays Formation (Ordovician)
Bays Formation - Maroon, well-jointed claystone and siltstone, commonly mottled greenish, evenly bedded; light- gray sandstone beds and metabentonite in upper part. Maximum thickness 1,000 feet.
Chepultepec Dolomite (Ordovician)
Chepultepec Dolomite - Light-gray, fine-grained, well-bedded dolomite, moderately cherty; fine-grained limestone locally in upper part; quartz sandstone beds at base. Thickness about 800 feet.
Chepultepec Dolomite (Ordovician)
Chepultepec Dolomite - Light-gray, fine-grained, well-bedded dolomite, moderately cherty; fine-grained limestone locally in upper part; quartz sandstone beds at base. Average thickness about 800 feet.
Chickamauga Group, includes Upper part of Chickamauga Group (Reedsville Shale, and Unnamed limestone unit) and Middle and Lower part of Chickamauga Group (Moccasin Formation, Bays Formation, Ottosee Shale, Holston Formation, Lenoir Limestone, Athens Shale, and Sevier Shale) (Ordovician)
Chickamauga Group - In the northwest part of the Valley and Ridge a predominantly limestone sequence about 2,000 feet thick. Becomes progressively more clastic and thicker to the southeast, including Upper part of Chickamauga Group (Reedsville Shale- Greenish-gray calcareous shale. Thickness 0 to 400 feet, and Unnamed Limestone Unit - Medium-grained, fossiliferous, gray limestone, shaly in part. Thickness as much as 600 feet ) and.Middle and lower parts of Chickamauga Group (Omlc)
Chilhowee Group; Cochran Conglomerate (Cambrian)
Chilhowee Gourp; Cochran Conglomerate - Quartz-pebble conglomerate, gray pebbly arkose, siltstone and shale; irregular bedding, scour features, crossbedding common; maroon micaceous arkose and shale near middle and base. Thickness about 1,200 feet.
Chilhowee Group, including Erwin Formation, Hesse Sandstone, Murray Shale, Nebo Sandstone, Nichols Shale, Cochran Conglomerate, Hampton Formation, and Unicoi Formation (Cambrian)
Chilhowee Group - Conformable sequence of dominantly clastic sediments. Thickness 3,000 to 7,500 feet; including Erwin Formation - White, vitreous quartzite, massive, with interbeds of dark-green silty and sandy shale, minor siltstone, and very fine-grained sandstone. Thickness 1,000 to 1,500 feet; Hesse Sandstone - White, vitreous quartzite, medium- to coarse-grained, occurs in massive ledges; Helenmode Member at top is gray to greenish sandstone and shale. Thickness about 600 feet; Murray Shale - Shale, silty, sandy, dull-green to brown, micaceous. Thickness about 500 feet; Nebo Sandstone - Medium-bedded, fine-grained, white, vitreous quartzite, in part feldspathic. Thickness 250 feet; Nichols Shale - Olive-gray to green, silty and sandy, micaceous shale and siltstone; local lenses of fine-grained feldspathic quartzite. Thickness about 700 feet; Cochran Conglomerate - Quartz-pebble conglomerate, gray pebbly arkose, siltstone and shale; irregular bedding, scour features, crossbedding common; maroon micaceous arkose and shale near middle and base. Thickness about 1,200 feet; Hampton Formation - Dark greenish-gray, silty and sandy, micaceous shale; numerous layers of medium-grained, feldspathic, thinly bedded sandstone. Thickness 500 to 2,000 feet; Unicoi Formation - Sequence of gray feldspathic sandstone, arkose, conglomerate, graywacke, siltstone and shale; greenish amygdaloidal basalt flows near middle and base. Thickness 2,000 to 5,000 feet.
Claiborne and Wilcox Formation (Tertiary)
Claiborne and Wilcox Formations -- Irregularly bedded sand, locally interbedded with lenses and beds of gray to white clay, silty clay, lignitic clay, and lignite. Thickness more than 400 feet.
Cochran Conglomerate (Cambrian)
Cochran Conglomerate - Quartz-pebble conglomerate, gray pebbly arkose, siltstone and shale; irregular bedding, scour features, crossbedding common; maroon micaceous arkose and shale near middle and base. Thickness about 1,200 feet.
Coffee Sand (Cretaceous)
Coffee Sand - Loose fine-grained sand, light-gray, sparsely glauconitic, locally interbedded with laminated lignitic clay. Thickness 25 to 200 feet; thins northward.
Coffee Sand (Cretaceous)
Coffee Sand - Loose fine-grained sand, light-gray, sparsely glauconitic; locally interbedded with laminated lignitic clay. Maximum preserved thickness about 40 feet.
Conasauga Group, includes Maynardville Limestone, Nolichucky Shale, Honaker Dolomite, Maryville Limestone, Rogersville Shale, Rutledge Limestone, Pumpkin Valley Shale, Rome Formation, Shady Dolomite (Cambrian)
Conasauga Group, includes Maynardville Limestone, Nolichucky Shale, Honaker Dolomite, Maryville Limestone, Rogersville Shale, Rutledge Limestone, Pumpkin Valley Shale, Rome Formation, Shady Dolomite
Conasauga Group, including Maynardville Limestone, Nolichucky Shale, the Maryville, Rogersville, and Rutledge Formations, Pumpkin Valley Shale, Rome Formation, and Shady Dolomite (Cambrian)
Conasauga Group - Mostly shale northwest of a line connecting Etowah and Bearden (Knoxville); to the east it consists of the six formations at right [Cmn, Maynardville Limestone. Ccl including Cn, Nolichucky Shale, Cmr Maryville, Rogersville, and Rutledge Formations, and Pumpkin Valley Shale; Cr, Rome Formation, and Cs, Shady Dolomite. Thickness about 2,000 feet.
Coon Creek Formation (Cretaceous)
Coon Creek Formation - Fossiliferous, micaceous sand, silty and glauconitic; locally fossiliferous sandy clay at base. Siderite concretions common in upper part. Thickness about 140 feet.
Devonian Formations, includes Pegram Formation, Camden Formation, Harriman Formation, Flat Gap Limestone, and Ross Formation (Devonian)
Devonian Formations - Characterized by marked north-south facies variations. Because of pre-Chattanooga and/or pre-Cretaceous warping and erosion, the distribution and thickness of Devonian formations is very irregular. Includes Pegram Formation - Thick-bedded, gray limestone and gray sandstone. Thickness 0 to 15 feet; Camden Formation - Light-gray novaculitic chert and tripolitic clay; and minor siliceous limestone. Thickness 0 to about 100 feet; Harriman Formation - Light-gray novaculitic chert and tripolitic clay; and minor siliceous limestone. (Harriman and Camden are differentiated paleontologically.) Thickness 0 to 50 feet; Flat Gap Limestone - Thick-bedded, coarse-grained limestone, gray with red and brown grains. Thickness 0 to 55 feet; Ross Formation - Siliceous limestone; gray and variegated shale; and medium-grained glauconitic limestone. Thickness 0 to 75 feet.
Devonian Formations, including Pegram Formation, Camden Formation, Harriman Formation, Flat Gap Limestone, and Ross Formation (Devonian)
Devonian Formations - Characterized by marked north-south facies variations and by very irregular distribution. Individual formations are not uniform in thickness and have been truncated by pre-Chattanooga erosion; includes Pegram Formation - Thick-bedded, gray limestone and gray sandstone. Thickness 0 to 30 feet; Camden Formation - Light-gray novaculitic chert and tripolitic clay; and minor siliceous limestone. Thickness 0 to about 100 feet; Harriman Formation - Light-gray novaculitic chert and tripolitic clay; and minor siliceous limestone. (Harriman and Camden are differentiated paleontologically.) Thickness 0 to 50 feet; Flat Gap Limestone - Thick-bedded, coarse-grained limestone, gray with red and brown grains. Thickness 0 to 13 feet; Ross Formation - Siliceous limestone; gray and variegated shale; and medium-grained glauconitic limestone. Thickness 0 to 75 feet.
Erwin Formation (Cambrian)
Erwin Formation - White, vitreous quartzite, massive, with interbeds of dark-green silty and sandy shale, minor siltstone, and very fine-grained sandstone. Thickness 1,000 to 1,500 feet.
Eutaw Formation (Cretaceous)
Eutaw Formation - Grayish-green sand, fine-grained, glauconitic, micaceous; interbedded with gray laminated clays which commonly contain carbonized or silicified wood. (Mapped with Coffee except in Hardin County and southeastern Decatur County.) Thickness 0 to 180 feet; thins northward
Eutaw Formation (Cretaceous)
Eutaw Formation - Grayish-green sand, fine-grained, glauconitic, micaceous; interbedded with gray laminated clays which commonly contain carbonized or silicified wood. Maximum preserved thickness 80 feet; absent to the north.
Fentress Formation (Pennsylvanian)
Fentress Formation - Mostly dark-gray to light-brown shale, with minor siltstone and sandstone. Wilder coal near middle. Laterally equivalent to entire Gizzard Group and all of Crab Orchard Mountains Group below Rockcastle Conglomerate. Thickness as much as 340 feet.
Grainger Formation (Mississippian)
Grainger Formation - Gray to green shale with siltstone and fine-grained glauconitic sandstone; in some areas quartz-pebble conglomerate. Thickness 500 to 1,000 feet.
Grainger Formation (Mississippian)
Grainger Formation - Gray to green shale with siltstone and fine-grained glauconitic sandstone; in some areas quartz-pebble conglomerate. Thickness about 1,200 feet.
Great Smoky Group, includes Unnamed Sandstone Unit, Anakeesta Formation, Thunderhead Sandstone, and Elkmont Sandstone (Precambrian)
Great Smoky Group - Characterized by very massive layers of coarse graywacke and arkose. The formations at right have been mapped only in region of the Great Smoky Mountains. Thickness 14,000 to about 25,000 feet; includes Unnamed Sandstone Unit - Gray, coarse sandstone and fine conglomerate, similar to Thunderhead Sandstone. Thickness about 4,500 feet; Anakeesta Formation - Dark-gray, bluish-gray, and black slate with dark-gray interbeds of fine-grained sandstone. Thickness 3,000 to 4,500 feet; Thunderhead Sandstone - Coarse, gray feldspathic sandstone, graywacke, and conglomerate; occurs in massive ledges; graded bedding and blue quartz characteristic. Thickness 5,500 to 6,300 feet; Elkmont Sandstone - Coarse to fine, gray feldspathic sandstone, graywacke, and fine conglomerate; generally finer grained beds in lower part; graded bedding typical. Thickness 1,000 to 8,000 feet.
Great Smoky Group, including Anakeesta Formation, Thunderhead Sandstone, and Elkmont Sandstone (Precambrian)
Great Smoky Group - Characterized by very massive layers of coarse graywacke and arkose. The formations have been mapped only in the region of the Great Smoky Mountains. Near Ducktown, in ascending order, the Copperhill, Hughes Gap, Hothouse, and Dean Formations are recognized. Thickness 14,000 to about 40,000 feet. Includes Anakeesta Formation - Dark-gray, bluish-gray, and black slate with dark-gray interbeds of fine-grained sandstone. Thickness 3,000 to 4,500 feet; Thunderhead Sandstone - Coarse, gray feldspathic sandstone, graywacke, and conglomerate; occurs in massive ledges; graded bedding and blue quartz characteristic. Thickness 5,500 to 6,300 feet; Elkmont Sandstone - Coarse to fine, gray feldspathic sandstone, graywacke, and fine conglomerate; generally finer grained beds in lower part; graded bedding typical. Thickness 1,000 to 8,000 feet
High-level alluvial deposits (Quaternary-Tertiary)
High-level Alluvial Deposits - Iron-stained gravel, sand, silt, and clay; variable in thickness but generally less then 60 feet thick.
High-Level Alluvial Deposits (Quaternary-Tertiary)
High-Level Alluvial Deposits - Iron-stained gravel, sand, silt, and clay; variable in thickness but generally less than 60 feet thick.
Jackson (?) Formation (Tertiary)
Jackson (?) Formation - Sand, with layers of gray clay, silt, and lignite. Exposed only in bluffs along Mississippi River; thickness at least 60 feet.
Jonesboro Limestone (Ordovician)
Jonesboro Limestone - Dark bluish-gray, ribboned (silt and dolomite) limestone; numerous interbeds of dark-gray dolomite; quartz sandstone at base. Erosional unconformity at top. Thickness about 2,000 feet.
Jonesboro Limestone, Newala Formation, Mascot Dolomite, Kingsport Formation, Longview Dolomite, and Chepultepec Dolomite (Ordovician)
Jonesboro Limestone - Dark bluish-gray, ribboned (silt and dolomite) limestone; numerous interbeds of dark-gray dolomite; quartz sandstone at base. Erosional unconformity at top. Thickness about 2,000 feet; Newala Formation inlcuding Mascot Dolomite - Light-gray, fine-grained, well-bedded cherty dolomite; mottled (red and green) dolomite characteristic; interbeds of bluish-gray limestone in upper part; chert-matrix quartz sandstone at base. Erosional unconformity at top. Thickness 350 to 800 feet; and Kingsport Formation - Gray, fine-grained, sparingly cherty dolomite with basal dense, gray limestone sequence. Thickness about 250 feet; Longview Dolomite - Siliceous, gray, fine-grained, medium-bedded dolomite; interbeds of gray limestone in upper part. Thickness about 300 feet; Chepultepec Dolomite - Light-gray, fine-grained, well-bedded dolomite, moderately cherty; fine-grained limestone locally in upper part; quartz sandstone beds at base. Thickness about 800 feet.
Knox Group, including Jonesboro Limestone, Newala Formation, Mascot Dolomite, Kingsport Formation, Longview Dolomite, Chepultepec Dolomite, Copper Ridge Dolomite, Conococheague Limestone (Ordovician to Cambrian)
Knox Group, including (Ojb) Jonesboro Limestone - Dark bluish-gray, ribboned (silt and dolomite) limestone; numerous interbeds of dark-gray dolomite; quartz sandstone at base. Erosional unconformity at top. Thickness about 2,000 feet; (On) Newala Formation; (Oma) Mascot Dolomite - Light-gray, fine-grained, well-bedded cherty dolomite; mottled (red and green) dolomite characteristic; interbeds of bluish-gray limestone in upper part; chert-matrix quartz sandstone at base. Erosional unconformity at top. Thickness 350 to 800 feet; (Ok) Kingsport Formation - Gray, fine-grained, sparingly cherty dolomite with basal dense, gray limestone sequence. Thickness about 250 feet; (Olv) Longview Dolomite - Siliceous, gray, fine-grained, medium-bedded dolomite; interbeds of gray limestone in upper part. Thickness about 300 feet; (Oc) Chepultepec Dolomite - Light-gray, fine-grained, well-bedded dolomite, moderately cherty; fine-grained limestone locally in upper part; quartz sandstone beds at base. Thickness about 800 feet; (Ccr) Copper Ridge Dolomite - Coarse, dark-gray, knotty dolomite, asphaltic in places; with much gray, medium-grained, well- bedded dolomite; abundant chert; cryptozoans typical. Thickness about 1,000 feet.; (Ccc) Conococheague Limestone - Well-bedded, ribboned (silt and dolomite), dark-gray limestone; interbeds of fine-grained, light- to dark-gray dolomite; sparingly cherty; cryptozoans typical. Thickness about 1,500 feet.
Lenoir Limestone (Ordovician)
Lenoir Limestone - Nodular, argillaceous, gray limestone; in places basal sedimentary breccia, conglomerate, quartz sand; Mosheim Limestone Member (dense, light- to medium-gray limestone) near base. Thickness 25 to 500 feet.
Lenoir Limestone (Ordovician)
Lenoir Limestone - Nodular, argillaceous, gray limestone; in places basal sedimentary breccia, conglomerate, quartz sand; Mosheim Limestone Member (dense, light- to medium-gray limestone) near base. Thickness 25 to 500 feet.
Longview Dolomite and Chepultepec Dolomite (Ordovician)
Longview Dolomite - Siliceous, gray, fine-grained, medium-bedded dolomite; interbeds of gray limestone in upper part. Thickness about 300 feet; and Chepultepec Dolomite - Light-gray, fine-grained, well-bedded dolomite, moderately cherty; fine-grained limestone locally in upper part; quartz sandstone beds at base. Thickness about 800 feet.
Mascot Dolomite (Ordovician)
Mascot Dolomite - Light-gray, fine-grained, well-bedded cherty dolomite; mottled (red and green) dolomite characteristic; interbeds of bluish-gray limestone in upper part; chert-matrix quartz sandstone at base. Erosional unconformity at top. Thickness 350 to 800 feet.
Mascot Dolomite (Ordovician)
Mascot Dolomite - Light-gray, fine-grained, well-bedded cherty dolomite; mottled (red and green) dolomite characteristic; interbeds of bluish-gray limestone in upper part; chert-matrix quartz sandstone at base. Erosional unconformity at top. Thickness 350 to 800 feet.
McNairy Sand (Cretaceous)
McNairy Sand - Predominantly sand, in places interbedded with silty light-gray clays. Fine-grained sand at base, locally contains heavy minerals. Thickness about 300 feet.
Middle and Lower Parts of Chickamauga Group, including Mocassin Formation, Bays Formation, Sevier Shale, Ottosee Shale, Holston Formation, Lenoir Limestone and Athens Shale (Ordovician)
Middle and Lower Parts of Chickamauga Group - A sequence of about 1,400 feet of limestone in the northeast, which thickens and becomes more clastic to the southeast and is divided into the formations shown at right. Maximum thickness about 8,000 feet. Includes Mocassin Formation - Maroon calcareous shale, siltstone, and limestone; thin metabentonite layers in upper part; mud cracks, ripple marks common. Thickness 800 to 1,000 feet; (Ob) Bays Formation - Maroon claystone and siltstone, commonly mottled greenish, evenly bedded; to northeast, light- gray to white, thick-bedded sandstone; metabentonite in upper part. Maximum thickness 1,000 feet. (Osv) Sevier Shale - Calcareous, bluish-gray shale, weathers yellowish-brown; with thin gray limestone layers; sandstone, siltstone, and locally conglomerate to the east. Thickness 2,000 to 7,000 feet; (Oo) - Ottosee Shale - Bluish-gray calcareous shale, weathers yellow; with reef lenses of coarsely crystalline reddish fossiliferous limestone ("marble"). Thickness about 1,000 feet; (Oh) - Holston Formation - Pink, gray, and red coarsely crystalline limestone (Holston Marble); in many areas upper part is sandy, crossbedded ferruginous limestone and brown to greenish calcareous shale. Thickness 200 to 600 feet; (Ol) Lenoir Limestone - Nodular, argillaceous, gray limestone; in places basal sedimentary breccia, conglomerate, quartz sand; Mosheim Limestone Member (dense, light- to medium-gray limestone) near base. Thickness 25 to 500 feet; (Oa) Athens Shale - Medium- to dark-gray, calcareous, graptolitic shale; calcareous gray sandstone, siltstone, and locally fine-pebble quartz conglomerate; nodules of shaly limestone near base. Maximum thickness 1,500 feet.
Middle and Lower parts of Chickamauga Group, including Moccassin Formation, Bays Formation, Sevier Shale, Ottosee Shale, Holston Formation, Lenoir Limestone, and Athens Shale (Ordovician)
Middle and Lower Parts of Chickamauga Group - A sequence of about 1,400 feet of limestone in the northwest part of Valley and Ridge, which thickens and becomes more clastic to the southeast and is divided into the formations shown at right. Maximum thickness about 7,000 feet. Includes Moccasin Formation - Maroon calcareous shale, siltstone, and limestone; thin metabentonite layers in upper part; mud cracks, ripple marks common. Thickness 800 to 1,000 feet;. (Ob) Bays Formation - Maroon, well-jointed claystone and siltstone, commonly mottled greenish, evenly bedded; light- gray sandstone beds and metabentonite in upper part. Maximum thickness 1,000 feet; (Osv) Sevier Shale - Calcareous, bluish-gray shale, weathers yellowish-brown; with thin, gray limestone layers; sandstone, siltstone, and locally conglomerate to the east. Thickness 2,000 to 7,000 feet; (Oo) Ottosee Shale - Bluish-gray calcareous shale, weathers yellow; with reef lenses of coarsely crystalline reddish fossiliferous limestone ("marble"). Thickness about 1,000 feet; (Oh) Holston Formation - Pink, gray, and red coarsely crystalline limestone (Holston Marble); in many areas upper part is sandy, crossbedded ferruginous limestone and brown to greenish calcareous shale. Thickness 200 to 600 feet; (Ol) Lenoir Limestone - Nodular, argillaceous, gray limestone; in places basal sedimentary breccia, conglomerate, quartz sand; Mosheim Limestone Member (dense, light- to medium-gray limestone) near base. Thickness 25 to 500 feet; (Oa) Athens Shale - Medium- to dark-gray, calcareous, graptolitic shale; calcareous gray sandstone, siltstone, and locally fine-pebble quartz conglomerate; nodules of shaly limestone near base. Maximum thickness 1,500 feet.
Midway Group including Porters Creek Clay and Clayton Formation (Tertiary)
Midway Group - includes Porters Creek Clay - Pale-brown to brownish-gray, massive, blocky clay; locally contains glauconitic sand. Thickness 130 to 170 feet. Also includes Clayton Formation- Glauconitic sand, argillaceous and locally fossiliferous; at base in Hardeman County is an impure fossiliferous limestone. Thickness 30 to 70 feet.
Mississippian, Silurian, Devonian, and Ordovician Formations - containing all or portions of the Newman, Fort Payne, Chattanooga, Rockwood, and Sequatchie formations. (Mississippian to Ordovician)
Mississippian, Silurian, Devonian, and Ordovician Formations - Structurally complex area containing all or portions of the Newman, Fort Payne, Chattanooga, Rockwood, and Sequatchie formations.
Newala Formation, including Mascot Dolomite and Kingsport Formation (Ordovician)
(On) Newala Formation, including (Oma) Mascot Dolomite - Light-gray, fine-grained, well-bedded cherty dolomite; mottled (red and green) dolomite characteristic; interbeds of bluish-gray limestone in upper part; chert-matrix quartz sandstone at base. Erosional unconformity at top. Thickness 350 to 800 feet; and (Ok) Kingsport Formation - Gray, fine-grained, sparingly cherty dolomite with basal dense, gray limestone sequence. Thickness about 250 feet.
Newala Formation, including Mascot Dolomite and Kingsport Formation (Ordovician)
Newala Formation includes Mascot Dolomite - Light-gray, fine-grained, well-bedded cherty dolomite; mottled (red and green) dolomite characteristic; interbeds of bluish-gray limestone in upper part; chert-matrix quartz sandstone at base. Erosional unconformity at top. Thickness 350 to 800 feet; and Kingsport Formation - Gray, fine-grained, sparingly cherty dolomite with basal dense, gray limestone sequence. Thickness about 250 feet.
Newman Limestone (Mississippian)
Newman Limestone - Gray limestone sequence near Cumberland Plateau and on Whiteoak Mountain. Shaly limestone, shale, siltstone, and sandstone on Chilhowee Mountain. Thickness about 700 feet.
Owl Creek Formation (Cretaceous)
Owl Creek Formation - Sandy clay, greenish gray, glauconitic, fossiliferous; merges northward into unfossiliferous clays and sands. Thickness 0 to about 40 feet.
Pennington Formation (Mississippian)
Pennington Formation - Highly variegated clay shale distinctive; contains siltstone beds and locally gray, fine-grained sandstone. Thickness 300 to 500 feet near Cumberland Plateau; maximum of about 1,250 feet to the east.
Pennington Formation (Mississippian)
Pennington Formation - Highly variegated clay shale, distinctive; contains siltstone and locally gray, fine-grained sandstone. Thickness 400 to 700 feet.
Pennington Formation (Mississippian)
Pennington Formation - Reddish and greenish shale and siltstone; fine-grained dolomite; dark-gray limestone; and thin-bedded sandstone. Persistent dolomite bed at base. Thickness 150 to 400 feet.
Rockwood Formation (Silurian)
Rockwood Formation - Brown to maroon shale, thin gray siltstone and sandstone, and thin lenticular layers of oolitic and fossiliferous red hematite. Thickness 200 to 800 feet.
Rockwood Formation (Silurian)
Rockwood Formation - Brown to maroon shale, thin gray siltstone and sandstone, and thin lenticular layers of oolitic and fossiliferous red hematite. Thickness 350 to 550 feet.
Rockwood Formation and Clinch Sandstone (Silurian)
Rockwood Formation - Brown to maroon shale, thin gray siltstone and sandstone, and thin lenticular layers of oolitic and fossiliferous red hematite. Thickness 350 to 550 feet; Clinch Sandstone - Clean, white, well-sorted sandstone; locally gray siltstone and shale. Average thickness about 600 feet.
Rome Formation (Cambrian)
Rome Formation - Variegated (red, green, yellow) shale and siltstone with beds of gray, fine-grained sandstone. Maximum exposed thickness 1,500 feet.
Rome Formation (Cambrian)
Rome Foundation - Variegated (red, green, yellow) shale and siltstone; gray, fine-grained sandstone in middle and west part of Valley and Ridge; abundant limestone and dolomite in east. Thickness about 2,000 feet.
Sardis Formation (Cretaceous)
Sardis Formation - Quartz sand and glauconite sand, argillaceous and locally fossiliferous. (Mapped with Kcc north of Beech River.) Maximum thickness 70 feet.
Sevier Shale (Ordovician)
Sevier Shale - Calcareous, bluish-gray shale, weathers yellowish-brown; with thin gray limestone layers; sandstone, siltstone, and locally conglomerate to the east. Thickness 2,000 to 7,000 feet.
Sevier Shale (Ordovician)
Sevier Shale - Calcareous, bluish-gray shale, weathers yellowish-brown; with thin, gray limestone layers; sandstone, siltstone, and locally conglomerate to the east. Thickness 2,000 to 7,000 feet.
Sneedville Limestone (Devonian to Silurian)
Sneedville Limestone - Gray silty limestone and dolomite, minor shale, and fine-grained, greenish-gray sandstone; fossils locally abundant. Thickness 100 to 300 feet.
St. Genevieve Limestone (Mississippian)
St. Genevieve Limestone - Gray limestone, slightly oolitic and cherty, with some green shale and fine-grained sandstone. Maximum preserved thickness 70 feet. (In Western Highland Rim area only.)
Tuscaloosa Formation (Cretaceous)
Tuscaloosa Formation - Poorly sorted, light-gray chert gravel in a matrix of silt and sand; locally interbedded with sand and clay lenses. Thickness 0 to 150 feet.
Tuscaloosa Formation (Cretaceous)
Tuscaloosa Formation - Poorly sorted, light-gray chert gravel in a matrix of silt and sand; locally interbedded with sand and clay lenses. Thickness 0 to 140 feet.
Unnamed (middle part of Knox Group), including Longview Dolomite and Chepultepec Dolomite (Ordovician)
(Olc) Unnamed (middle part of Knox Group) including (Olv) Longview Dolomite - Siliceous, gray, fine-grained, medium-bedded dolomite; interbeds of gray limestone in upper part. Thickness about 300 feet.; and (Oc) Chepultepec Dolomite - Light-gray, fine-grained, well-bedded dolomite, moderately cherty; fine-grained limestone locally in upper part; quartz sandstone beds at base. Average thickness about 800 feet.
Unnamed (upper part of Knox Group), including Newala Formation, Mascot Dolomite, Kingsport Formation, Longview Dolomite, and Chepultepec Dolomite (Ordovician)
(Onc) Unnamed (upper part of the Knox Group), including the (On) Newala Formation; (Oma) Mascot Dolomite - Light-gray, fine-grained, well-bedded cherty dolomite; mottled (red and green) dolomite characteristic; interbeds of bluish-gray limestone in upper part; chert-matrix quartz sandstone at base. Erosional unconformity at top. Thickness 350 to 800 feet; (Ok) Kingsport Formation - Gray, fine-grained, sparingly cherty dolomite with basal dense, gray limestone sequence. Thickness about 250 feet. and (Olc) Unnamed (middle part of the Knox Group), including (Olv) Longview Dolomite - Siliceous, gray, fine-grained, medium-bedded dolomite; interbeds of gray limestone in upper part. Thickness about 300 feet; (Oc) Chepultepec Dolomite - Light-gray, fine-grained, well-bedded dolomite, moderately cherty; fine-grained limestone locally in upper part; quartz sandstone beds at base. Average thickness about 800 feet.
Walden Creek Group, including Sandsuck Formation, Wilhite Formation, Shields Formation, and Licklog Formation (Cambrian)
Walden Creek Group - The formations, other than the Sandsuck, are applicable mainly in the region of the Great Smoky Mountains. Thickness about 8,000 feet, Includes Sandsuck Formation - Olive-green and gray, argillaceous, micaceous shale with coarse feldspathic sandstone and quartz- pebble conglomerate. Thickness about 2,000 feet; Wilhite Formation - Gray to green siltstone and slate with interbeds of pebble conglomerate, sandstone, and quartzite. Thickness about 4,000 feet; Shields Formation - Massive conglomerate, sandstone, argillaceous slate; conglomerate (pebbles of various rock types) characteristic. Thickness about 1,500 feet.; Licklog Formation - Feldspathic sandstone, greenish phyllite, and bluish-gray slate. Thickness about 1,500 feet.
Walden Creek Group, including Sandsuck Formation, Wilhite Formation, Shields Formation, and Licklog Formation (Precambrian)
The formations, other than the Sandsuck, have been mapped only in the region of the Great Smoky Mountains. Thickness about 8,000 feet. Includes Sandsuck Formation - Olive-green and gray, argillaceous, micaceous shale with coarse feldspathic sandstone and quartz- pebble conglomerate. Thickness about 2,000 feet; Wilhite Formation - Gray to green siltstone and slate with interbeds of pebble conglomerate, sandstone, and quartzite. Thickness about 4,000 feet; Shields Formation - Massive conglomerate, sandstone, argillaceous slate; conglomerate (pebbles of various rock types) characteristic. Thickness about 1,500 feet; Licklog Formation - Feldspathic sandstone, greenish phyllite, and bluish-gray slate. Thickness about 1,500 feet.
Texas
Admiral and Coleman Junction Formations, undivided (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Permian [Wolfcamp])
Admiral and Coleman Junction Formations, undivided
Admiral Formation (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Permian [Wolfcamp])
Admiral Formation
alkali flat deposits (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Holocene)
alkali flat deposits
alluvium (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Holocene)
alluvium
Alluvium in Rio Grande, subdivided into areas predominantly of sand (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Holocene)
Alluvium in Rio Grande, subdivided into areas predominantly of sand
Antlers Sand (Phanerozoic | Mesozoic | Cretaceous-Early)
Antlers Sand
barrier island deposits (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary)
barrier island deposits
barrier ridge and barrier flat deposts (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Holocene)
barrier ridge and barrier flat deposts
Beaumont Formation, areas predominantly sand (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene-Late)
Beaumont Formation, areas predominantly sand
Blackwater Draw Formation (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene)
Blackwater Draw Formation
Blaine Formation (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Permian [Guadalupe])
Blaine Formation
Blanco Formation (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Pliocene)
Blanco Formation
Blossom Sand (Phanerozoic | Mesozoic | Cretaceous-Late [Gulfian])
Blossom Sand
bolson deposits (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene Holocene)
bolson deposits
bolson deposits (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Pliocene)
bolson deposits
Bone Spring Formation (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Permian [Leonard])
Bone Spring Formation
Boracho and Finlay Limestones, undivided (Phanerozoic | Mesozoic | Cretaceous-Early)
Boracho and Finlay Limestones, undivided NOTE: This unit is represented within the map unit explanation of (Geol. Map of Texas, 1992, Bur. Econ. Geol.) but does not occur on the map and is NOT included in the spatial data.
Cadell Formation (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Eocene)
Cadell Formation
Campagrande Formation (Phanerozoic | Mesozoic | Cretaceous-Early)
Campagrande Formation
Catahoula Formation (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Oligocene)
Catahoula Formation
Catahoula Formation and Frio Clay, undivided (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Oligocene)
Catahoula Formation and Frio Clay, undivided
clay dune (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Holocene)
clay dune
Cloud Chief Formation (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Permian [Guadalupe])
Cloud Chief Formation
Coleman Junction Formation (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Permian [Wolfcamp])
Coleman Junction Formation
Cretaceous rocks, undivided (Phanerozoic | Mesozoic | Cretaceous-Late)
Cretaceous rocks, undivided
Cutoff Formation (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Permian [Leonard])
Cutoff Formation
Deweyville Formation (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene Holocene (?))
Deweyville Formation
Double Lakes Formation (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene [Early Wisconsinan])
Double Lakes Formation
Duff Formation (with Decie Member from Paisano caldera shown separately), Cottonwood Springs Basalt, Potato Hill Andesite, Sheep Canyon Basalt, Crossen Trachyte, and Pruett Formation, undivided (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Eocene-Late Oligocene-Early)
Duff Formation (with Decie Member from Paisano caldera shown separaetly), Cottonwood Springs Basalt, Potato Hill Andesite, Sheep Canyon Basalt, Crossen Trachyte, and Pruett Formation, undivided
dune sand sheet deposits (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Holocene)
dune sand sheet deposits
Eagle Ford Formation and Woodbine Formations, undivided (Phanerozoic | Mesozoic | Cretaceous-Late [Gulfian])
Eagle Ford Formation and Woodbine Formations, undivided
El Paso Formation and Bliss Sandstone, undivided (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic| Cambrian-Furongian(?) Ordovician-Early)
El Paso Formation and Bliss Sandstone, undivided
Escondido Formation (Phanerozoic | Mesozoic | Cretaceous-Late [Gulfian])
Escondido Formation
Espy Formation (Phanerozoic | Mesozoic | Cretaceous-Early)
Espy Formation
fill and spoil (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Holocene)
fill and spoil
Finlay Limestone (Phanerozoic | Mesozoic | Cretaceous-Early [Comanchean Albian])
Finlay Limestone
Gatuna Formation (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene-Middle(?))
Gatuna Formation
Glen Rose Limestone (Phanerozoic | Mesozoic | Cretaceous-Early)
Glen Rose Limestone
Helms Shale, Rancheria Formation, Las Cruces Limestone, Percha Shale, and Canutillo Formations, undivided (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Devonian Carboniferous Mississippian-Late [Chesteran])
Helms Shale, Rancheria Formation, Las Cruces Limestone, Percha Shale, and Canutillo Formations, undivided
Hensell Sand (Phanerozoic | Mesozoic | Cretaceous-Early [Comanchean)
Hensell Sand
high gravel deposits (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene)
high gravel deposits
Home Creek Limestone and Colony Creek Shale, undivided (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Carboniferous Pennsylvanian [Missouri])
Home Creek Limestone and Colony Creek Shale, undivided
Hueco Limestone (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Permian [Wolfcamp])
Hueco Limestone
Infiernito caldera volcanic rocks including Capote Mountain Tuff, Tsh2 of Shely Group, Buckshot Ignimbrite, and Tm1 of Morita Ranch Formation (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Eocene-Late)
Infiernito caldera volcanic rocks including Capote Mountain Tuff, Tsh2 of Shely Group, Buckshot Ignimbrite, and Tm1 of Morita Ranch Formation
in Rio Grande delta area, clay veneer over meanderbelt sand (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary)
in Rio Grande delta area, clay veneer over meanderbelt sand
Kiamichi Formation (Phanerozoic | Mesozoic | Cretaceous-Early [Comanchean])
Kiamichi Formation
Kincaid Formation (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Paleocene)
Kincaid Formation
Leona Formation (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene)
Leona Formation
Lingos Formation (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene-Middle(?) Pleistocene-Late(?) Holocene)
Lingos Formation
Lissie Formation (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene-Middle)
Lissie Formation
Malone Formation (Phanerozoic | Mesozoic | Jurassic-Late)
Malone Formation
Manning Formation (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Eocene)
Manning Formation
Montoya Dolomite (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Ordovician-Middle Ordovician-Late)
Montoya Dolomite
Munn Formation (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Permian [Guadalupe])
Munn Formation
Nacatoch Sand (Phanerozoic | Mesozoic | Cretaceous-Late [Gulfian])
Nacatoch Sand
Navarro and Taylor Groups, undivided (Phanerozoic | Mesozoic | Cretaceous-Late [Gulfian])
Navarro and Taylor Groups, undivided
Navarro Group and Marlbrook Marl, undivided (Phanerozoic | Mesozoic | Cretaceous-Late [Gulfian])
Navarro Group and Marlbrook Marl, undivided
Navarro Group, undivided (Phanerozoic | Mesozoic | Cretaceous-Late [Gulfian])
Navarro Group, undivided
Ogallala Formation (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Pliocene Miocene)
Ogallala Formation
older alluvial deposits (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene)
older alluvial deposits
Onion Creek Marl (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene)
Onion Creek Marl
Paluxy Sand (Phanerozoic | Mesozoic | Cretaceous-Early)
Paluxy Sand
Pecan Gap Chalk (Phanerozoic | Mesozoic | Cretaceous-Late [Gulfian])
Pecan Gap Chalk
pond deposits (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene)
pond deposits
Quaternary-Tertiary bolson deposits (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary Quaternary | Pliocene Pleistocene)
Quaternary-Tertiary bolson deposits
Queen City Sand (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Eocene)
Queen City Sand
Rita Blanca Formation (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Pliocene)
Rita Blanca Formation
Rustler Formation (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Permian [Ochoa])
Rustler Formation
sand deposits, undivided (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Holocene)
sand deposits, undivided
sand dune deposits (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Holocene)
sand dune deposits
sand sheet deposits (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Holocene)
sand sheet deposits
Santa Anna Branch Shale (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Permian [Wolfcamp])
Santa Anna Branch Shale
Santa Anna Branch Shale and Sedwick and Moran Formations, undivided (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Permian [Wolfcamp])
Santa Anna Branch Shale and Sedwick and Moran Formations, undivided
Seymour Formation (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene-Middle [Irvingtonian])
Seymour Formation
silt sheet (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Holocene)
silt sheet
Simsboro Formation (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Paleocene)
Simsboro Formation
Smithwick Formation (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Carboniferous Pennsylvanian-Middle [Atoka])
Smithwick Formation
Sparta Sand (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Eocene)
Sparta Sand
Strawn Group (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Carboniferous Pennsylvanian-Middle [Atoka Des Moines])
Strawn Group
Tahoka Formation (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene [Wisconsinan])
Tahoka Formation
Terrace deposits (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene Holocene)
Terrace deposits
Tule Formation (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene)
Tule Formation
unnamed Pennsylvanian rocks (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Carboniferous Pennsylvanian)
unnamed Pennsylvanian rocks
unnamed Pliocene deposits (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Pliocene)
unnamed Pliocene deposits
upper Cretaceous rocks, undivided (Phanerozoic | Mesozoic | Cretaceous-Late)
upper Cretaceous rocks, undivided
Waggoner Ranch Formation (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Permian [Leonard])
Waggoner Ranch Formation
Weches Formation (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Eocene)
Weches Formation
Whitsett Formation (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Eocene Oligocene)
Whitsett Formation
Wilberns Formation showing San Saba Member (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Cambrian-Furongian)
Wilberns Formation showing San Saba Member
Wilcox Group, undivided (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Paleocene Eocene)
Wilcox Group, undivided
Willis Formation (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Pliocene)
Willis Formation
Wolfe City Formation (Phanerozoic | Mesozoic | Cretaceous-Late [Gulfian])
Wolfe City Formation
Woodbine Formation (Phanerozoic | Mesozoic | Cretaceous-Late [Gulfian])
Woodbine Formation
Utah
Devonian sedimentary rocks in southewestern Utah (Devonian)
Middle Cambrian shale and carbonate rocks in Salt Lake City-Coalville-Randolph region (Middle Cambrian)
Ordovician sedimentary rocks in western Utah (Ordovician)
Permian (2) sedimentary rocks in central Utah (Permian)
Permian (2) sedimentary rocks in Salt Lake City-Coalville-Randolph region (Permian)
Quaternary Lake Bonneville deposits (Quaternary)
Triassic (1) sedimentary rocks in Salt central Utah (Early Triassic)
Triassic (1) sedimentary rocks in Salt Lake City-Coalville-Randolph region (Early Triassic)
Triassic (1) sedimentary rocks in Salt southwestern Utah (Early Triassic)
Triassic (1) sedimentary rocks in Salt Uinta Mountains-Uinta Basin region (Early Triassic)
Triassic (2) sedimentary rocks in central Utah (Middle to Late Triassic)
Triassic (2) sedimentary rocks in Uinta Mountains-Uinta Basin region (Late Triassic)
Triassic (2) sedimentary rocks in western Utah (Late Triassic)
Virginia
Alluvium (Quaternary)
Alluvium - Poorly sorted organic material, clay, sand, and rounded pebbles and cobbles
Bacons Castle Formation (Tertiary)
Bacons Castle Formation - Poorly sorted sand and laminated sand; clay and silt.
Bacons Castle Formation (Tertiary)
Bacons Castle Formation - Gravel grading upward into sand and sandy clayey silt
Bluefield Formation (Mississippian)
Bluefield Formation - Calcareous shale and limestone.
Brallier Formation (Devonian)
Brallier Formation - Micaceous shale, siltstone, and sandstone.
Charles City Formation (Quaternary)
Charles City Formation - Interbedded sand, silt, clay and minor gravel; at altitudes to 70-80 ft. (top of unit).
Chattanooga Shale and Wildcat Valley Sandstone (Devonian-Mississippian)
Chattanooga Shale and Wildcat Valley Sandstone - Black, fissile shale and siltstone; calcareous sandstone
Chepultepec and Copper Ridge Formations (Cambrian-Ordovician)
Chepultepec and Copper Ridge Formations - Dolomite, minor limestone, chert, and calcareous sandstone.
Chesapeake Group (Tertiary)
Chesapeake Group - Fine- to coarse-grained sand, silt, clay; variably shelly and diatomaceous
Chilhowee Group (Cambrian)
Chilhowee Group - Appalachian Plateaus and Valley and Ridge: Quartzite, conglomerate, feldspathic sandstone, phyllite, and minor ferruginous sandstone and volcanic rocks. Blue Ridge Anticlinorium: Conglomerate, quartzite, metasiltstone, and phyllite.
Chuckatuck Formation (Quaternary)
Chuckatuck Formation - Interbedded gravel, sand, silt, clay, and minor peat; at altitudes to 50-60 ft. (top of unit).
Conasauga Shale (Cambrian)
Conasauga Shale - Shale with minor limestone and sandstone.
Conococheague Formation (Cambrian)
Conococheague Formation - Limestone, dolomite, and calcareous sandstone.
Conococheague Formation (Cambrian-Ordovician)
Conococheague Formation - Limestone, dolomite, and calcareous sandstone.
Hancock, Rose Hill, and Clinch Formations (Silurian)
Hancock, Rose Hill, and Clinch Formations - Limestone and dolomite; dusky-red and green shale and sandstone; and sandstone, shale and conglomerate.
Joynes Neck Sand (Quaternary)
Joynes Neck Sand - Fine- to coarse-grained sand coarsening downward to gravel and sand, at altitudes to 26 ft. (top of unit).
Juniata, Oswego, Martinsburg (Reedsville and Dolly Ridge), and Eggleston Formations (Ordovician)
Juniata, Oswego, Martinsburg (Reedsville and Dolly Ridge), and Eggleston Formations - Dusky-red shale and mudstone and sandstone; graywacke; shale and sandstone; and limestone.
Juniata, Reedsville, Trenton, and Eggleston Formations (Ordovician)
Juniata, Reedsville, Trenton, and Eggleston Formations - Dusky-red shale and mudstone and sandstone; shale and limestone. Note: one area in southeastern Bland County has landslides with intact stratigraphic units.
Keefer, Rose Hill, and Tuscarora Formations (Silurian)
Keefer, Rose Hill, and Tuscarora Formations - Quartzarenite, dusky-red shale, and sandstone, Some landslides with intact stratigraphic units in Craig County area..
Kent Island Formation (Quaternary)
Kent Island Formation - Medium- to coarse-grained sand and sandy gravel grading upward into poorly- to well-sorted fine- to medium-grained sand, in part clayey and silty, at altitudes from sea level to about 20 ft. (top of unit).
Knox Group (Cambrian-Ordovician)
Knox Group - dolostone, limestone, sandstone. Includes the Mascot Dolomite, Kingsport Dolomite, Chepultepec Dolomite, Copper Ridge Dolomite. (Includes: Ob, Omk, Occo, Cco, Occc.)
Lower Ordovician and Upper Cambrian Formations Undivided (Cambrian-Ordovician)
Lower Ordovician and Upper Cambrian Formations Undivided - Includes Pinesburg Station Dolomite, Rockdale Run Formation, Beekmantown Formation, Stonehenge Limestone and Conococheague Formation.
Lower Tertiary Deposits (Tertiary)
Lower Tertiary Deposits - Glauconitic quartz sand and clay-silt, shelly in part, minor sandy limestone and limey sand; may include the following formations: Brightseat, Aquia, Marlboro, Nanjemay, and Piney Point (Pamunkey Group); and Old Church.
Maccrady Shale (Mississippian)
Maccrady Shale - Dusky-red and green shale and mudstone; and evaporite deposits.
Millboro Shale, Huntersville Chert, and Rocky Gap Sandstone (Devonian)
Millboro Shale, Huntersville Chert, and Rocky Gap Sandstone - Black, fissile shale; chert; and calcareous sandstone
Miocene Sand and Gravel (Tertiary)
Miocene Sand and Gravel - Sandy gravel, sand, silt, and clay.
Mississippian Formations Undivided (Mississippian)
Mississippian Formations Undivided - Includes Pennington Group, Bluefield Formation, Greenbrier Limestone, Maccrady Shale and Price Formation; Includes Newman Limestone, Fort Payne Chert, and Grainger Formation in western Lee County
Moccasin or Bays Formation through Blackford Formation (Ordovician)
Moccasin or Bays Formation through Blackford Formation - Dusky-red shale and mudstone; sandstone; limestone, in part cherty; and calcareous shale.
Moorings Unit of Oaks and Coch (1973) (Tertiary)
Moorings Unit of Oaks and Coch (1973) - Sand, silt, and clay; at altitudes from 100-130 ft. (top of unit).
Nassawadox Formation: Butlers Bluff Member (Quaternary)
Nassawadox Formation: Butlers Bluff Member - Fine- to coarse-grained pebbly sand and sandy gravel, at altitudes to 40 ft. (top of unit).
Nassawadox Formation: Occohannock Member (Quaternary)
Nassawadox Formation: Occohannock Member - Muddy fine- to medium-grained sand, at altitudes to 30 ft. (top of unit).
Nolichucky and Maryville Formations, Rogersville Shale, and Rutledge Formation (Cambrian)
Nolichucky and Maryville Formations, Rogersville Shale, and Rutledge Formation - Calcareous shale, limestone, and dolomite.
Norton Formation (Pennsylvanian)
Norton Formation - Shale, siltstone, sandstone, and coal.
Omar Formation - Accomack Member: (Quaternary)
Omar Formation - Accomack Member: sand, gravel, silt, clay, and peat; at altitudes to 50 ft.
Pliocene Sand and Gravel (Tertiary)
Pliocene Sand and Gravel - Sandy gravel, gravelly sand, poorly to well-sorted sands, and thin- to medium-beds of clay and silt, at altitudes from 170-320 ft. (top of unit).
Potomac Formation (Cretaceous)
Potomac Formation - Pebbly, poorly sorted quartzo-feldspathic sand interbedded with sandy clay and silt; minor organic-rich clay and silt
Quaternary and Tertiary Deposits (Tertiary-Quaternary)
Quaternary and Tertiary Deposits - Tabb through Windsor Formations and alluvial/tidal prism deposits.
Rome Formation (Cambrian)
Rome Formation - Dusky-red and green shale and siltstone, dolomite, and limestone.
Sequatchie Formation, Reedsville Shale, Trenton Limestone, Eggleston Formation (Ordovician)
Sequatchie Formation, Reedsville Shale, Trenton Limestone, Eggleston Formation - Shale, siltstone, limestone, and sandstone.
Shirley Formation (Quaternary)
Shirley Formation - Interbedded gravel, sand, silt, clay, and peat; at altitudes to 35-45 ft. (top of unit).
Swamp Deposits (Quaternary)
Swamp Deposits - Peat, mud, and sand.
Tabb Formation (Quaternary)
Tabb Formation - Undifferentiated. Includes the Poquoson Member (Qtp), Lynnhaven Member ( Qtl) and Sedgefield Member (Qts).
Tabb Formation: Lynnhaven and Poquoson Members (Quaternary)
Tabb Formation: Lynnhaven and Poquoson Members - Undifferentiated Qtl, Qts.
Tabb Formation; Lynnhaven Member (Quaternary)
Tabb Formation; Lynnhaven Member - Pebbly and cobbly sand grading upward into muddy, fine sand and silt, at altitudes to 15-18 ft. (top of unit).
Tabb Formation; Sedgefield Member (Quaternary)
Tabb Formation; Sedgefield Member - Pebbly to bouldery, clayey sand and shelly sand, at altitudes to 30 ft. (top of unit).
Tabb Formtaion; Poquoson Member (Quaternary)
Tabb Formtaion; Poquoson Member - Pebbly sand grading upward into muddy, fine-grained sand and sandy silt, at altitudes to 11 ft. (top of unit).
Terrace Deposits (Tertiary)
Terrace Deposits - Poorly sorted clay, sand, and rounded pebbles and cobbles, deeply weathered
Wachapreague Formation (Quaternary)
Wachapreague Formation - Coarsening-upward sequence from lower muddy fine-grained sand to upper medium- to coarse-grained gravelly sand, at altitudes from sea level to about 15 ft. (top of unit).
Waynesboro Formation (Cambrian)
Waynesboro Formation - Dolomite, dusky-red and green shale, limestone, and sandstone.
Waynesboro Formation and Tomstown Dolomite (Cambrian)
Waynesboro Formation and Tomstown Dolomite - Waynesboro Formation: Dolomite, dusky-red and green shale, limestone, and sandstone. Tomstown Dolomite: Dolomite, in part cherty.
Windsor Formation (Tertiary-Quaternary)
Windsor Formation - Interbedded gravel, sand, silt, and clay; at altitudes to 85-95 ft. (top of unit).
Vermont
Bascom Formation, and undifferentiated Luke Hill, Naylor Ledge and Hastings Creek Limestones (Ordovician)
Bascom Formation, and undifferentiated Luke Hill, Naylor Ledge and Hastings Creek Limestones - Interbedded dolomite, limestone or marble, calcareous sandstone, quartzite and limestone breccia; irregular dolomitic layers, thin sandy laminae, and slaty or phyllitic partings characterize limestone and marble of lower, middle, and upper parts of the Bascom, respectively; south of West Rutland it includes some of the Chipman formation. The combined Luke Hill, Naylor Ledge, and Hastings Creek, east of Philipsburg thrust, are stratigraphically equivalent to the Bascom.
Brezee Formation (Cambrian)
Brezee Formation - Dark gray to black phyllite with beds of blue-gray marble, dark gray dolomite, sandy dolomite, and dolomitic sandstone, in upper part; beds of massive quartzite as much as 20 ft thick occur locally and in places contain pebbles of blue quartz. Phyllites are locally highly albitic.
Forestdale Marble (Cambrian)
Forestdale Marble - Buff to rusty-weathered white, buff, and pink and white mottled dolomite containing local interbeds of dolomitic sandstone, gray-green phyllitic quartzite, and crossbedded sandy dolomite.
Hathaway Formation (Ordovician)
Hathaway Formation - Gray to black argillite and bedded radiolarian chert, with included blocks and fragments of chert, limestone, dolomite, sandstone and graywacke.
Middlebury and Chazy Limestone; Undifferentiated Youngman and Carman Formations (Ordovician)
Middlebury and Chazy Limestone, Undifferentiated Youngman and Carman Formations - Dark blue-gray, somewhat nodular and granular limestone with buff dolomite and shaly interbeds a fraction of an inch thick and 2 to 4 inches apart. The Middlebury, which is east of Champlain and Orwell thrusts, and the Youngman, which is east of Highgate Springs thrust, are, due partly to deformation, more slaty in appearance than the Chazy, which is west of the major thrusts. The Carman is a quartz sandstone with shaly partings that underlies the Youngman. The Chazy contains 3 members.
Parker Slate (Cambrian)
Parker Slate - Gray to black micaceous shale and slate, includes dolomite, sandstone, and quartzite lenses; chiefly on west limb of St. Albans synclinorium.
Rugg Brook Formation (Cambrian)
Rugg Brook Formation - Sandy gray dolomite, dolomite conglomerate, and interbeds of gray-weathered sandstone, in St. Albans and Middlebury synclinoria.
Sweetsburg Formation, Skeels Corners Slate and Mill River Conglomerate Members Undifferentiated (Cambrian)
Sweetsburg Formation, Skeels Corners Slate and Mill River Conglomerate Members Undifferentiated - Black slate; local dolomite, sandstone, dolomite conglomerate, limestone bioherm, limestone, and calcareous shale. The Mill River is a basal limestone conglomerate.
Washington
Eocene volcanic rocks (Eocene )
Predominantly andesite flows and breccia; includes interbedded sedimentary rocks south of Startup in Snohomish and King Counties.
Lower Tertiary volcanic rocks, undivided (Eocene)
Predominantly andesite flows and flow breccia; includes basalt flows, minor rhyolitic rocks, and some sedimentary rocks.
Mesozoic volcanic rocks, undivided (Jurassic)
Includes latite, andesite and basalt flows, tuff, and agglomerate. Interbedded sedimentary rocks in Orient area of Stevens County.
Middle and lower Eocene volcanic rocks (Eocene)
Dark-gray, course- to fine-grained, strongly chloritized basalt flows and breccia; includes pillow lava, deeply altered palagonite beds, amygdoidal and vesicular flows, and, locally, sedimentary rocks. Comprises outer volcanic belt in Olympic Peninsula, where manganese ore is associated with some submarine lavas.
Miocene-Pliocene nonmarine rocks (Miocene-Pliocene)
Tuffaceous and pumiceous andesitic sandstone and siltstone with interbedded conglomerate and claystone. Conglomerate beds chiefly andesitic, but also quartzitic, granitic, and basaltic; includes basalt flows locally.
Miocene volcanic rocks (Middle Miocene)
Dark-gray to black, dense aphanitic basalt flows; commonly columnar jointed, less commonly irregularly and platy jointed; some flows vesicular, grading to scoriaceous; includes minor pillow lava, palagonite beds, and interbedded soil profiles and sedimentary beds; contains diatomite beds locally. Maximum thickness in south-central Washington may be in excess of 10,000 feet; much thinner in western Washington, where flows are mostly associated with marine sedimentary rocks. Includes acidic and intermediate volcanic rocks in northern Cascade Mountains.
Oligocene-Miocene volcanic rocks (Miocene)
Andesite flow breccia, andesite flows, and minor tuff beds; includes some basalt flows and flow breccia. Commonly more massive and less altered than similar-appearing Eocene-Oligocene volcanic rocks. Clastic flows and flows of black glass, and course to fine-grained clastic and pyroclastic rocks in the Republic and Curlew areas of Ferry County.
Oligocene nonmarine rocks (Oligocene)
Andesite conglomerate, tuff beds, and mudflow material. Includes some interbedded andesite flows in Columbia River Gorge. Lake sediments with Oligocene flora in Republic area in Ferry County. Massive tuffaceous sandstone and siltstone with beds of coal and high-alumina clay in Castle Rock-Toledo coal district in Cowlitz and Lewis Counties; include local interbedded basalt flows and some marine and late Eocene rocks.
Oligocene volcanic rocks (Oligocene)
Andesite and rhyodacite flows, tuff, and tuffaceous sandstones of northern Lincoln County and southwestern Stevens County.
Precambrian conglomerate (Late-Proterozoic)
Gray-brown, coarse, poorly sorted pebbles and cobbles of limestone, dolomite, reddish-brown quartzite, black slate or phyllite, and rarely granitic rocks in a gray sandy phyllite matrix; northeastern Pend Oreille County and southwestern Stevens County. Rocks become finer grained and more schistose and the unit becomes thicker toward the southwest, where there is included an isolated subunit which may be a tillite, consisting of cobbles, boulders, and blocks of argillite and carbonate rocks in a fine silty matrix.
Precambrian (?) phyllite (Cambrian-Precambrian boundary)
Mostly phyllite with interbedded carbonate rocks, quartzite, and gritstone; some tufflike beds and conglomerate at the base. Rocks confined to northeastern Pend Oreille County and central Stevens County.
Precambrian rocks, undivided (Proterozoic)
Predominantly phyllite with some schist, limestone, dolomite, quartzite, and volcanic rocks; northeastern Pend Oreille County. Mainly quartzite sandstone in upper part, dark-gray argillite with sandstone and limestone in middle part, and sandstone with argillite in lower part; southeastern Pend Oreille County. Banded slate with quartzite and dolomite; southwestern Stevens County. Quartzite, siliceous argillite, and argilliceous quartzite grading into argillite and quartz-mica schists form south ot north; southeastern Stevens County. Quartzite, argillite, quartz-feldspar gneiss, and other metamorphic rocks in northeastern Whitman and southeastern Spokane Counties are partly if not all extenstions of the Belt strata.
Tertiary-Cretaceous basic intrusive rocks (Cretaceous-Jurassic)
Diorite and gabbro in western Snohomish County.
Tertiary nonmarine rocks, undivided (Tertiary; mostly Eocene)
Sandstone, shale, conglomerate, agglomerate, and tuff; includes some lava flows. Massive conglomerate, sandstone, siltstone, and ferruginous shale in northwestern Whatcom County.
Triassic sedimentary rocks, undivided (Triassic with Permian where impossible to differentiate)
Predominantly limestone, marble, and dolomite near Riverside in Okanogan County. Conglomerate, shale, graywacke, gritstone, and limestone on San Juan Island. Siltstone with greenstone locally on Orcas Island. Graywacke conglomerate, cherty greenstone, and limestone in northern Ferry County.
Upper Eocene volcanic rocks (Late Eocene to Oligocene)
Predominantly basalt flows and flow breccia; includes some pyroclastic and andesite rocks. Chiefly in western Washington.
Upper Eocene volcanic rocks (Late Eocene)
Predominantly andesite flows and breccia; includes some basalt flows. Contains basaltic conglomerate, pyroclastic rocks, tuff beds, and sandstone in Chehalis-Centralia coal district, Lewis County.
Upper Eocene volcanic rocks (Late Eocene)
Andesite and basalt flows and associated breccia in central Lewis County. Pyroclastic rocks, mudflows, flow breccia, and volcanic-rich sedimentary rocks in King and Pierce Counties.
Upper Eocene volcanic rocks (Late-Middle Eocene)
Rhyolite flows and some interbedded tuff beds in Cle Elum area, Kittitas County.
Upper Tertiary volcanic rocks, undivided (Miocene-Oligocene)
Mostly massive andesite flows, flow breccia, and pyroclastic material; includes some basalt flows and sedimentary rocks.
Wisconsin
Oronto Group; Nonesuch Shale (Middle Proterozoic)
Oronto Group; Nonesuch Shale- Gray, green, and brown lithic siltstone, shale, and sandstone. Copper sulfides and native copper occur locally near base
West Virginia
Brallier Formation (Devonian)
Brallier Formation - predominantly olive-gray to dark, thickly laminated marine shale, with considerable siltstone and thin sandstone lenses; mainly nonfossiliferous.
Brallier Formation and Harrell Shale, undivided (Devonian)
Brallier Formation and Harrell Shale, undivided - Brallier Formation : predominantly olive-gray to dark, thickly laminated marine shale, with considerable siltstone and thin sandstone lenses; mainly nonfossiliferous. Harrell Shale: dark gray to black thinly laminated to fissile shale. Calcareous shale and limestone lenses near the base (Tully).
Conemaugh Group (Pennsylvanian)
Conemaugh Group - cyclic sequences of red and gray shale, siltstone, and sandstone, with thin limestones and coals. Mostly non-marine. May be divided into Casselman and Glenshaw Formations. Extends from the base of the Pittsburgh coal to the top of the Upper Freeport coal. Includes the Elk Lick, Bakerstown, and Mahoning coals, and the Ames and Brush Creek Limestones.
Greenbrier Group (Mississippian)
Greenbrier Group - marine limestone and marine and non-marine red and gray shale, and minor sandstone beds in numerous formational units.
Martinsburg Formation (Ordovician)
Martinsburg Formation - predominantly gray to dark shale, yellowish in the upper portion. Contains scattered thin limestone and sandstone interbeds, particularly in the lower portion. The upper portion constitutes the Reedsville Shale.
Tonoloway, Wills Creek, and Williamsport Formations (Silurian)
Tonoloway, Wills Creek, and Williamsport Formations - includes the thin-bedded platy argillaceous limestones of the Tonoloway, the thin-bedded shale with fossiliferous limestones of the Wills Creek, the Bloomsburg red clastic facies, and the greenish-brown to white Williamsport Sandstone. The Wills Creek contains anhydrite and rock salt, the latter supplying brine from deep wells along the Ohio River.
Wyoming
Aspen Shale (Phanerozoic | Mesozoic | Cretaceous-Early)
ASPEN SHALE--Light- to dark-gray siliceous tuffaceous shale and siltstone, thin bentonite beds, and quartzitic sandstone.
Basalt flows and intrusive igneous rocks (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Quaternary | Pleistocene)
BASALT FLOWS AND INTRUSIVE IGNEOUS ROCKS. Yellowstone area--Includes Osprey, Madison River, Swan Lake Flat, and Falls River Basalts, basalts of Mariposa Lake, Undine Falls Basalt, and gravels, sands, silts, and basalts of The Narrows. In and adjacent to Absaroka and Washakie Ranges--Includes basalt of Lava Mountain (age about 0.5 Ma).
Bighorn Dolomite, Gallatin Limestone, and Gros Ventre Formation (TB), Bighorn Dolomite, Snowy Range Formation, Pilgrim Limestone, Park Shale, Meagher Limestone, Wolsey Shale, and Flathead Sandstone (Y), Bighorn Dolomite, Gallatin Limestone, Gros Ventre Formation, and Flathead Sandstone (N), or Whitewood Dolomite, and WInnipeg and Deadwood Formations (NE) (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Cambrian-Middle Cambrian-Furongian(?) Ordovician-Early(?) Ordovician-Middle(?) Ordovician-Late)
BIGHORN DOLOMITE, GALLATIN LIMESTONE, and GROS VENTRE FORMATION. BIGHORN DOLOMITE (Thrust Belt)--Gray massive cliff-forming siliceous dolomite and locally dolomitic limestone. GALLATIN LIMESTONE--Gray and tan limestone. GROS VENTRE FORMATION--Greenish-gray micaceous shale. BIGHORN DOLOMITE, SNOWY RANGE FORMATION, PILGRIM LIMESTONE, PARK SHALE, MEAGHER LIMESTONE, WOLSEY SHALE, AND FLATHEAD SANDSTONE (Yellowstone). BIGHORN DOLOMITE--Light-gray massive siliceous dolomite. SNOWY RANGE FORMATION (Gallatin Group)--Medium-gray limestone and underlying greenish-gray shale. PILGRIM LIMESTONE (Gallatin Group)--Blue-gray and yellow mottled hard limestone. PARK SHALE--Green micaceous soft shale. Upper part may be Late Cambrian. MEAGHER LIMESTONE--Blue-gray and yellow mottled hard limestone. WOLSEY SHALE--Green micaceous soft shale. FLATHEAD SANDSTONE--Dull-red quartzitic sandstone. BIGHORN DOLOMITE, GALLATIN LIMESTONE, GROS VENTRE FORMATION, AND FLATHEAD SANDSTONE (north Wyoming). BIGHORN DOLOMITE--Gray massive cliff-forming siliceous dolomite and locally dolomitic limestone. GALLATIN LIMESTONE--Blue-gray and yellow mottled hard dense limestone. GROS VENTRE FORMATION--Soft green micaceous shale (Upper and Middle Cambrian Park Shale Member), underlain by blue-gray and yellow mottled hard dense limestone (Middle Cambrian Death Canyon Limestone Member), and soft green micaceous shale (Middle Cambrian Wolsey Shale Member). FLATHEAD SANDSTONE--Dull-red quartzitic sandstone. WHITEWOOD DOLOMITE, AND WINNIPEG AND DEADWOOD FORMATIONS (northeast Wyoming). WHITEWOOD DOLOMITE--Buff massive fossiliferous dolomite. WINNIPEG FORMATION--Pink to yellow siltstone and shale. DEADWOOD FORMATION--Red and brown quartzitic sandstone.
Chugwater Formation (N, NE), or Chugwater Formation or Group (S) (Phanerozoic | Mesozoic | Triassic-Early Triassic-Middle(?) Triassic-Late)
CHUGWATER FORMATION (north, northeast Wyoming)--Red siltstone and shale. Alcova Limestone Member in upper middle part in north Wyoming. Thin gypsum partings near base in north and northeast Wyoming. [None mapped in the NE]; CHUGWATER FORMATION OR GROUP (south Wyomingt)--Red shale and siltstone containing thin gypsum partings near base. Group includes Popo Agie Formation (red shale and red, yellow, and purple siltstone; lenses of lime-pellet conglomerate), Crow Mountain Sandstone (red and gray, thick bedded), Alcova Limestone, and Red Peak Formation (red siltstone and shale). Chugwater Formation includes as members all the units listed above. Includes overlying Jelm Formation in Shirley and Seminoe Mountains and at northern end of Laramie Basin. JELM FORMATION--Red sandstone.
Cody Shale (Phanerozoic | Mesozoic | Cretaceous-Late (78-83 Ma))
CODY SHALE (AGE 78 TO 83 Ma) northern Yellowstone area--Gray to brown shale and siltstone; north and south Wyoming--Dull-gray shale, gray siltstone, and fine-grained gray sandstone.
Colter Formation (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Miocene)
COLTER FORMATION--Dull-green and gray tuff, volcanic conglomerate, and sandstone.
Guernsey Formation (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Devonian-Late Carboniferous Mississippian-Early)
GUERNSEY FORMATION--Blue-gray massive cherty limestone and dolomite. Locally includes unnamed dolomite and sandstone of Devonian and Cambrian(?) age.
Madison Limestone, Darby Formation, Bighorn Dolomite, Gallatin Limestone, Gros Ventre Formation, and Flathead Sandstone (N), Madison Limestone and Cambrian rocks (S), Minnekahta Limestone, Opeche Shale, Minnelusa Formation, Pahasapa and Englewood Limestones, Whitewood Dolomite, Winnipeg and Deadwood Formations (NE), or Paleozoic, undifferentiated (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Cambrian Ordovician(?) Silurian(?) Devonian(?) Carboniferous(?) Permian)
MADISON LIMESTONE, DARBY FORMATION, BIGHORN DOLOMITE, GALLATIN LIMESTONE, GROS VENTRE FORMATION, AND FLATHEAD SANDSTONE (north Wyoming). MADISON LIMESTONE OR GROUP--Group includes Mission Canyon Limestone (blue-gray massive limestone and dolomite), underlain by Lodgepole Limestone (gray cherty limestone and dolomite). DARBY FORMATION--Yellow and greenish-gray shale and dolomitic siltstone underlain by fetid brown dolomite and limestone. BIGHORN DOLOMITE--Gray massive cliff-forming siliceous dolomite and locally dolomitic limestone. GALLATIN LIMESTONE--Blue-gray and yellow mottled hard dense limestone. GROS VENTRE FORMATION--Soft green micaceous shale (Upper and Middle Cambrian Park Shale Member), underlain by blue-gray and yellow mottled hard dense limestone (Middle Cambrian Death Canyon Limestone Member), and soft green micaceous shale (Middle Cambrian Wolsey Shale Member). FLATHEAD SANDSTONE--Dull-red quartzitic sandstone. MADISON LIMESTONE AND CAMBRIAN ROCKS (south Wyoming). MADISON LIMESTONE--Includes Mission Canyon Limestone (blue-gray massive limestone and dolomite), underlain by Lodgepole Limestone (gray cherty limestone and dolomite). CAMBRIAN ROCKS--On south flank of Granite Mountains, blue-gray and yellow mottled hard dense limestone interbedded with soft green micaceous shale; dull-red quartzitic sandstone at bae. On and south of Rawlins uplift, glauconitic quartzitic sandstone. MINNEKAHTA LIMESTONE, OPECHE SHALE, MINNELUSA FORMATION, PAHASAPA AND ENGLEWOOD LIMESTONES, WHITEWOOD DOLOMITE, AND WINNIPEG AND DEADWOOD FORMATIONS--Various combinations (northeast Wyoming). MINNEKAHTA LIMESTONE--Gray slabby hard limestone. Locally is a member of the Goose Egg Formation. OPECHE SHALE--Red soft sandy shale. Locally is a member of the Goose Egg Formation. MINNELUSA FORMATION--Buff and red limy sandstone; some thin limestone beds, solution breccias, and gypsum. PAHASAPA LIMESTONE--Gray massive dolomititc limestone. ENGLEWOOD LIMESTONE--Pink slabby dolomitic limestone. WHITEWOOD DOLOMITE--Buff massive fossiliferous dolomite. WINNIPEG FORMATION--Pink to yellow siltstone and shale. DEADWOOD FORMATION--Red and brown quartzitic sandstone. PALEOZOIC ROCKS, undifferentiated (Thrust Belt).
Madison Limestone, Darby or Three Forks, Jefferson, and Beartooth Butte Formations, and Bighorn Dolomite (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Ordovician-Middle Ordovician-Late(?) Silurian(?) Devonian(?) Carboniferous Mississippian-Early(?) Mississippian-Middle(?) Mississippian-Late)
MADISON LIMESTONE, DARBY or THREE FORKS, JEFFERSON, AND BEARTOOTH BUTTE FORMATION. MADISON GROUP--Group includes Mission Canyon Limestone (blue-gray massive limestone and dolomite), underlain by Lodgepole Limestone (gray cherty limestone and dolomite). DARBY FORMATION--Yellow and greenish-gray shale and dolomitic siltstone underlain by fetid brown dolomite and limestone. THREE FORKS FORMATION--Yellow and greenish-gray shale and dolomitic siltstone. JEFFERSON FORMATION--Fetid brown dolomite and limestone. BEARTOOTH BUTTE FORMATION--Red sandstone, limy siltstone, and limestone. Occurs only in the Beartooth Mountains.
Phosphoria Formation (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Permian)
PHOSPHORIA FORMATION AND RELATED ROCKS--Thrust Belt: Upper part is dark- to light-gray chert and shale with black shale and phosphorite at top; lower part is black shale, phosphorite, and cherty dolomite; north Wyoming: Brown sandstone and dolomite, cherty phosphatic and glauconitic dolomite, phosphatic sandstone and dolomite, and greenish-gray to black shale. Intertonguing equivalents of parts of Phosphoria are Park City Formation (primarily cherty dolomite, limestone, and phosphatic gray shale) and Shedhorn Sandstone.
Steele Shale (Phanerozoic | Mesozoic | Cretaceous-Late)
STEELE SHALE (AGE ABOUT 78 TO 82 Ma)--Gray soft marine shale containing numerous bentonite beds and thin lenticular sandstone.
Steele Shale and Niobrara Formations (Phanerozoic | Mesozoic | Cretaceous-Late)
STEELE SHALE (Ks) AND NIOBRARA FORMATIONS (Kn). STEELE SHALE (AGE ABOUT 78 TO 82 Ma)--Gray soft marine shale containing numerous bentonite beds and thin lenticular sandstone. NIOBRARA FORMATION (AGE ABOUT 83 Ma)--Light-colored limestone and gray to yellow speckled limy shale.
Stump Formation, Preuss Sandstone or Redbeds, and Twin Creek Limestone (Phanerozoic | Mesozoic | Jurassic-Middle Jurassic-Late)
STUMP FORMATION, PREUSS SANDSTONE or REDBEDS, and TWIN CREEK LIMESTONE. STUMP FORMATION--Glauconitic siltstone, sandstone, and limestone. PREUSS SANDSTONE OR REDBEDS--Purple, maroon, and reddish-gray sandy siltstone and claystone; contains salt and gypsum in thick beds in some subsurface sections. TWIN CREEK LIMESTONE--Greenish-gray shaly limestone and limy siltstone. Includes Gypsum Spring Member.
Three Forks and Jefferson Formations and Bighorn Dolomite (Y) or Three Forks, Jefferson, and Beartooth Butte Formations and Bighorn Dolomite (N) (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Ordovician-Middle Ordovician-Late(?) Silurian(?) Devonian-Early(?) Devonian-Middle(?) Devonian-Late)
THREE FORKS, JEFFERSON, AND BEARTOOTH BUTTE FORMATIONS AND BIGHORN DOLOMITE (Yellowstone). THREE FORKS FORMATION--Pink, yellow, and green dolomitic siltstone and shale. JEFFERSON FORMATION--Massive siliceous dolomite. BEARTOOTH BUTTE FORMATION--Red sandstone, limy siltstone, and limestone. Occurs only in the Beartooth Mountains. BIGHORN DOLOMITE--Light-gray massive siliceous dolomite. THREE FORKS, JEFFERSON, AND BEARTOOTH BUTTE FORMATIONS AND BIGHORN DOLOMITE (north Wyoming). THREE FORKS FORMATION--Yellow and greenish-gray shale and dolomitic siltstone. JEFFERSON FORMATION--Fetid brown dolomite and limestone. BEARTOOTH BUTTE FORMATION--Red sandstone, limy siltstone, and limestone. Occurs only in the Beartooth Mountains. BIGHORN DOLOMITE--Gray massive cliff-forming siliceous dolomite and locally dolomitic limestone.
Wagon Bed Formation (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Eocene (45-49 Ma))
WAGON BED FORMATION (AGE ABOUT 45 TO 49 Ma)--Southwest and central Wyoming--Green and gray tuffaceous claystone, sandstone, and conglomerate; some uranium-phosphate marlstone and variegated bentonitic claystone. Locally contains oil shale between Wind River and Bighorn Basins; Central Wyoming (west side of Laramie Mountains)--Dull-green siliceous bentonitic claystone and tuff; giant granite boulder conglomerate in tuffaceous matrix.
Wasatch Formation (SW) (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Paleocene Eocene)
WASATCH FORMATION La Barge and Chappo Members--Red, gray, and brown mudstone and conglomerate and yellow sandstone. La Barge Member tongues out to north at about T. 35 N. Lower part of Chappo is Paleocene.
Wind River Formation (Phanerozoic | Cenozoic | Tertiary | Eocene)
WIND RIVER FORMATION Northwest Wyoming (Jackson Hole)--Variegated red and white claystone and siltstone; largely nontuffaceous except near the top; lenticular coal unit in middle. At base locally includes equivalent of Indian Meadows Formation; Central Wyoming--Variegated claystone and sandstone; lenticular conglomerate. Age of tuff at top 49 Ma.

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