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Geologic units containing schist

Earth material > Metamorphic rock
Schist
A strongly foliated crystalline rock, formed by dynamic metamorphism, that can be readily split into thin flakes or slabs due to the well developed parallelism of more than 50% of the minerals present, particularly those of the lamellar or elongate prismatic habit, e.g. mica and hornblende.
Subtopics:
Greenschist
Blueschist
Mica schist
Pelitic schist
Quartz-feldspar schist
Calc-silicate schist
Amphibole schist

Alabama - Arizona - California - Colorado - Connecticut - Georgia - Idaho - Massachusetts - Maryland - Maine - Michigan - Minnesota - North Carolina - New Hampshire - New Jersey - Nevada - New York - Oregon - Pennsylvania - Rhode Island - South Carolina - South Dakota - Tennessee - Texas - Utah - Virginia - Vermont - Washington - Wisconsin - West Virginia
Alabama
Beaverdam Amphibolite (Precambrian to Paleozoic)
Beaverdam Amphibolite - dark-green to dark-gray hornblende amphibolite, extensively sheared and folded, and locally retrograded to actinolite-tremolite-chlorite schist. Includes all amphibolite associated with the Wedowee Group.
Dadeville Complex; Waresville Schist (Precambrian to Paleozoic)
Waresville Schist - banded amphibolite interlayered with chlorite schist, chlorite amphibolite, chlorite-actinolite schist, chlorite +/- magnetite quartzite, and actinolite quartzite; may include small ultramafic pods.
Dadeville Complex; Waverly Gneiss (Precambrian to Paleozoic)
Waverly Gneiss - feldspathic biotite-hornblende gneiss with thin layers of amphibolite, calc-silicate rock, garnet quartzite, and muscovite schist; locally rich in manganese.
Hatchet Creek Group; Hanover Schist (Precambrian to Paleozoic)
Hanover Schist - coarse to fine-grained feldspathic biotite-sericite-quartz-muscovite schist, commonly containing staurolite, garnet, and locally sillimanite in northeastern outcrop areas includes zones of aluminous graphite schist, hornblende quartzite, garnet quartzite, and rare amphibolite. Schist commonly retrograded to sericite-garnet-quartz schist. Numerous granitic pegmatites.
Higgins Ferry Group; Roscoelite-graphite-quartz schist and graphitic quartzite (Precambrian to Paleozoic)
Higgins Ferry Group; Roscoelite-graphite-quartz schist and graphitic quartzite
Jacksons Gap Group; Jacksons Gap Group undifferentiated in part (Precambrian to Paleozoic)
Jacksons Gap Group undivided - principally graphitic sericite (muscovite)-quartz schist; includes sericite-quartz phyllonite; sericite phyllonite, blastomylonite, porphyroclastic blastomylonite schist, and mylonite quartzite occur principally along margins in south and form most of unit northeast of Jacksons Gap, Tallapoosa County.
Jacksons Gap Group; Tallassee Metaquartzite (Precambrian to Paleozoic)
Jacksons Gap Group; Tallassee Metaquartzite - medium to fine-grained, massive to thin-bedded quartzite and metaconglomerate and thin beds of graphitic quartz schist, locally contains small garnets.
Ketchepedrakee Amphibolite (Precambrian to Paleozoic)
Ketchepedrakee Amphibolite - dark-green to black fine to coarse-grained, layered to massive amphibolite mixed with zones of chlorite actinolite schist, includes all amphibolite associated with the Poe Bridge Mountain Group.
Mad Indian Group (Precambrian to Paleozoic)
Mad Indian Group - fine-grained feldspathic biotite gneiss; medium to coarse-grained muscovite-biotite-garnet schist; locally kyanite and sillimanite. Many of the schists have been retrograded to chlorite-garnet-quartz-sericite schist. Both mi and migr extensively cut by feldspathic dikes and pegmatites.
Mad Indian Group; Irregular zones of sericite-quartz schist (Precambrian to Paleozoic)
Mad Indian Group; Irregular zones of sericite-quartz schist - irregular zones of sericite-quartz schist (+/- garnet) containing finely disseminated graphite, possibly infolded Wedowee Group equivalents. Both mi and migr extensively cut by feldspathic dikes and pegmatites.
Moffits Mill Schist (Precambrian to Paleozoic)
Moffits Mill Schist - interlayered biotite-epidote-muscovite-quartz schist, metagraywacke, and quartzite.
Mylonitic and Cataclastic Rocks in the Brevard, Towaliga, and Goat Rock Fault Zones (Precambrian to Paleozoic)
Mylonitic and Cataclastic Rocks in the Brevard, Towaliga, and Goat Rock Fault Zones - blastomylonite, mylonite gneiss, locally includes mylonite schist and mylonite quartzite in Towaliga fault zone.
Mylonitic and Cataclastic Rocks in the Brevard, Towaliga, and Goat Rock Fault Zones (Precambrian to Paleozoic)
Mylonitic and Cataclastic Rocks in the Brevard, Towaliga, and Goat Rock Fault Zones - mylonite and blastomylonite; contains minor ultramylonite, mylonite schist, and mylonite gneiss.
Pine Mountain Group; Manchester Schist (Precambrian to Paleozoic)
Manchester Schist - interlayered muscovite-quartz schist and quartzite, locally contains garnet, sillimanite and graphite; commonly intensely shared.
Poe Bridge Mountain Group; Roscoelite-graphite quartz schist and graphitic quartzite (Precambrian to Paleozoic)
Poe Bridge Mountain Group; Roscoelite-graphite quartz schist and graphitic quartzite. Rocks in the area of Turkey Heaven Mountain in Cleburne and Randolph Counties that are here assigned to the Poe Bridge Mountain Group also have been interpreted as part of the Wedowee Group.
Talladega Group; Jemison Chert and Chulafinnee Schist undifferentiated (Silurian?-Devonian)
Jemison Chert and Chulafinnee Schist undifferentiated - grayish-white to yellowish-orange massive, thick-bedded, fine-grained, locally argillaceous, locally fossiliferous metachert and light to dark-greenish-gray fine to medium-grained fissile quartz-sericite-chlorite phyllite and schist which locally includes thin chlorite phyllite and quartzose phyllite beds.
Wedowee Group; Cornhouse Schist (Precambrian to Paleozoic)
Cornhouse Schist - medium to coarse-grained multiply foliated +/- plagioclase +/- garnet-biotite-muscovite-quartz schist interlayed with chlorite-biotite-garnet schist, typically mylonitic.
Wedowee Group; Hackneyville Schist (Precambrian to Paleozoic)
Hackneyville Schist - medium to coarse-grained quartz-plagioclase +/- almandine +/- kyanite +/- biotite-muscovite schist, graphite-muscovite-quartz schist, and quartzite containing biotite. Large porphyroblasts of muscovite, andalusite and/or chiastrolite common. Rocks in the areas between Goodwater in Coosa County and Millerville in Clay County that are here assigned to the Hackneyville Schist also have been interpreted as part of the Higgins Ferry Group.
Wedowee Group; Wedowee Group undifferentiated (Precambrian to Paleozoic)
Wedowee Group undifferentiated - Wedowee Group undifferentiated includes the Cragford Phyllite and Cutnose Gneiss. Cragford Phyllite -- interbedded fine-grained graphite-chlorite-sericite schist and phyllite, garnet-sericite schist and phyllite, graphite-quartz-sericite phyllite, locally feldspathic biotite gneiss, calc-silicate rock, and quartzite. Cutnose Gneiss -- cyclically interbedded fine-grained quartz-biotite feldspathic gneiss, graphite-chlorite-sericite schist, locally thin interbeds of graphite-quartz-sericite phyllite, and quartzite. Rocks in the area northeast of Clanton in Chilton and Coosa Counties that are here assigned to the Wedowee Group also have been interpreted as part of the Higgins Ferry Group.
Arizona
Cretaceous to Late Jurassic sedimentary rocks with minor volcanic rocks (Late Jurassic to Cretaceous)
Sandstone and conglomerate, rarely forms prominent outcrops; massive conglomerate is typical near base of unit and locally in upper part. These deposits are nonmarine except in southeastern Arizona, where prominent gray marine limestone (Mural Limestone) forms the middle of the Bisbee Group. Sandstones are typically medium-bedded, drab brown, lithic-feldspathic arenites. Includes Bisbee Group (largely Early Cretaceous) and related rocks, Temporal, Bathtub, and Sand Wells formations, rocks of Gu Achi, McCoy Mountains Formation, and Upper Cretaceous Fort Crittenden Formation and equivalent rocks. (80-160 Ma)
Early Proterozoic granitic rocks (Early Proterozoic)
Wide variety of granitic rocks, including granite, granodiorite, tonalite, quartz diorite, diorite, and gabbro. These rocks commonly are characterized by steep, northeast-striking foliation. (1600-1800 Ma)
Early Proterozoic metamorphic rocks (Early Proterozoic)
Undivided metasedimentary, metavolcanic, and gneissic rocks. (1600-1800 Ma)
Early Proterozoic metasedimentary rocks (Early Proterozoic)
Metasedimentary rocks, mostly derived from sandstone and shale, with minor conglomerate and carbonate rock. Includes quartz-rich, mostly nonvolcanic Pinal Schist in southeastern Arizona and variably volcanic-lithic sedimentary rocks in the Yavapai and Tonto Basin supergroups in central Arizona. (1600-1800 Ma)
Early Proterozoic metavolcanic rocks (Early Proterozoic)
Weakly to strongly metamorphosed volcanic rocks. Protoliths include basalt, andesite, dacite, and rhyolite deposited as lava or tuff, related sedimentary rock, and shallow intrusive rock. These rocks, widely exposed in several belts in central Arizona, include metavolcanic rocks in the Yavapai and Tonto Basin supergroups. (1650 to 1800 Ma)
Jurassic sedimentary and volcanic rocks (Jurassic)
Sandstone and conglomerate derived from volcanic rocks with associated intermediate-composition lava flows, breccias, and tuffs. In southern Arizona this unit includes rocks of the Artesa sequence, Pitoikam Formation, Mulberry Wash volcanics, Rudolfo Red Beds, Recreation Red Beds, and Gardner Canyon Formation. In western Arizona it includes the Harquar Formation, rocks of Slumgullion, and related(?) unnamed units in the Kofa and Middle Mountains. This unit is characterized by maroon, brown, and purplish-gray volcanic-lithic sandstone and siltstone, with subordinate to abundant conglomerate, quartz-rich sandstone and sparse limestone. (150-170 Ma)
Jurassic to Cambrian metamorphosed sedimentary rocks (Cambrian to Jurassic)
Highly faulted and folded rocks of units Jv, J_, and Pz, deformed and metamorphosed in Jurassic, Cretaceous and Tertiary time. This unit is restricted to west-central Arizona. (160-540 Ma)
Jurassic volcanic rocks (Jurassic)
Massive quartz-feldspar porphyry, generally interpreted as thick, welded rhyolitic tuffs, with locally abundant lava, and sandstone and conglomerate derived from volcanic rocks. Rare eolian quartzite units are interbedded in southern Arizona. Includes Ali Molina Formation, Mount Wrightson Formation, part of the Canelo Hills Volcanics, Cobre Ridge tuff, Black Rock volcanics, Planet Volcanics, and equivalent rocks. (160-200 Ma)
Middle Proterozoic sedimentary rocks (Middle Proterozoic)
Red-brown shale and sandstone, buff to orange quartzite, limestone, basalt, black shale, and sparse conglomerate. This unit includes the Grand Canyon Supergroup, Apache Group, and Troy Quartzite. These rocks were deposited in shallow marine, coastal nonmarine, and fluvial settings. (700-1300)
Paleozoic sedimentary rocks (Paleozoic)
Undivided Paleozoic limestone, dolostone, quartzite, shale, and related sedimentary rocks. (248-544 Ma)
Tertiary to Early Proterozoic gneissic rocks (Early Proterozoic to Tertiary)
Gneissic rocks with complex histories, typically with well developed, light-colored granitoid layers and dark-colored biotite- and amphibole-rich layers. Protoliths are of Tertiary to Proterozoic age. This unit includes variably mylonitic gneisses in metamorphic core complexes that have been exhumed from middle crustal levels by large-displacement middle Tertiary normal faults, and gneiss exposed at scattered locations near the Colorado River in southwestern Arizona. These rocks are interpreted to record Proterozoic, Mesozoic, and Tertiary metamorphism and deformation. (15-1800 Ma)
California
Carboniferous marine rocks, unit 1 (Western Mojave Desert) (Late Proterozoic to Pennsylvanian)
Shale, sandstone, conglomerate, limestone, dolomite, chert, hornfels, marble, quartzite; in part pyroclastic rocks
Franciscan Complex, unit 1 (Coast Ranges) (Jurassic to Cretaceous)
Franciscan complex: Cretaceous and Jurassic sandstone with smaller amounts of shale, chert, limestone, and conglomerate. Includes Franciscan melange, except where separated--see KJfm.
Franciscan Complex, unit 2 (Southern California) (late Early to early Late Cretaceous)
Franciscan complex: Cretaceous and Jurassic sandstone with smaller amounts of shale, chert, limestone, and conglomerate. Includes Franciscan melange, except where separated--see KJfm.
Jurassic marine rocks, unit 4 (Peninsular Ranges and Western Transverse Ranges) (Paleozoic(?) to Late Jurassic)
Shale, sandstone, minor conglomerate, chert, slate, limestone; minor pyroclastic rocks
Mesozoic granitic rocks , unit 2 (Peninsular Ranges) (Middle Jurassic to Late Cretaceous)
Mesozoic granite, quartz monzonite, granodiorite, and quartz diorite
Mesozoic volcanic rocks, unit 1 (Coast Ranges) (Jurassic to Cretaceous)
Undivided Mesozoic volcanic and metavolcanic rocks. Andesite and rhyolite flow rocks, greenstone, volcanic breccia and other pyroclastic rocks; in part strongly metamorphosed. Includes volcanic rocks of Franciscan Complex: basaltic pillow lava, diabase, greenstone, and minor pyroclastic rocks
Paleozoic marine rocks, undivided, unit 1 (Mojave Desert and Death Valley area) (Late Proterozoic to Jurassic)
Undivided Paleozoic metasedimentary rocks. Includes slate, sandstone, shale, chert, conglomerate, limestone, dolomite, marble, phyllite, schist, hornfels, and quartzite
Paleozoic marine rocks, undivided, unit 3 (Eastern Sierra Nevada) (Late Proterozoic(?) to Mesozoic(?))
Undivided Paleozoic metasedimentary rocks. Includes slate, sandstone, shale, chert, conglomerate, limestone, dolomite, marble, phyllite, schist, hornfels, and quartzite
Paleozoic marine rocks, undivided, unit 4 (Western Sierra Nevada) (Ordovician to Triassic)
Undivided Paleozoic metasedimentary rocks. Includes slate, sandstone, shale, chert, conglomerate, limestone, dolomite, marble, phyllite, schist, hornfels, and quartzite
Paleozoic marine rocks, undivided, unit 9 (Western Klamath Mountains) (Devonian to Jurassic)
Undivided Paleozoic metasedimentary rocks. Includes slate, sandstone, shale, chert, conglomerate, limestone, dolomite, marble, phyllite, schist, hornfels, and quartzite
Precambrian rocks, undivided, unit 2 (Mojave Desert and Transverse Ranges) (Early Proterozoic to Miocene)
Conglomerate, shale, sandstone, limestone, dolomite, marble, gneiss, hornfels, and quartzite; may be Paleozoic in part
pre-Cenozoic metasedimentary and metavolcanic rocks undivided (Early Proterozoic to Cretaceous)
Undivided pre-Cenozoic metasedimentary and metavolcanic rocks of great variety. Mostly slate, quartzite, hornfels, chert, phyllite, mylonite, schist, gneiss, and minor marble.
Schist of various types and ages, unit 10 (Halloran Complex) (Precambrian)
Schists of various types; mostly Paleozoic or Mesozoic age; some Precambrian.
Schist of various types and ages, unit 11 (Benton Range) (Late Proterozoic(?) to Paleozoic(?))
Schists of various types; mostly Paleozoic or Mesozoic age; some Precambrian.
Schist of various types and ages, unit 5 (Slate Range) (Mesozoic)
Schists of various types; mostly Paleozoic or Mesozoic age; some Precambrian.
Schist of various types and ages, unit 6 (Santa Cruz Mountains) (Paleozoic or Mesozoic)
Schists of various types; mostly Paleozoic or Mesozoic age; some Precambrian.
Schist of various types and ages, unit 7 (Klamath Mountains) (Devonian)
Schists of various types; mostly Paleozoic or Mesozoic age; some Precambrian.
Schist of various types and ages, unit 9 (Cargo Muchacho Mountains) (Jurassic(?))
Schists of various types; mostly Paleozoic or Mesozoic age; some Precambrian.
Tertiary-Cretaceous Coastal Belt Rocks (Late Cretaceous to Pliocene)
Sandstone, shale and minor conglomerate in coastal belt of northwestern California; included by some in Franciscan Complex. Previously considered Cretaceous, but now known to contain early Tertiary microfossils in places.
Colorado
Biotitic gneiss, schist, and migmatite (Proterozoic | Paleoproterozoic)
Locally contains minor hornblende gneiss, calc-silicate rock, quartzite, and marble. Derived principally from sedimentary rocks
Quartzite, conglomerate, and interlayered mica schist (Proterozoic | Paleoproterozoic)
Quartzite, conglomerate, and interlayered mica schist
Red Creek Quartzite (Archean)
Metaquartzite, amphibolite, and mica schist. Present only in small area at Utah border in Uinta Mountains
Connecticut
Allingtown Metavolcanics plus Maltby Lakes Metavolcanics (Middle? Ordovician)
Allingtown Metavolcanics plus Maltby Lakes Metavolcanics - Allingtown Metavolcanics - Green, fine-grained, massive greenstone, composed of epidote, actinolite, albite, and chlorite, commonly with abundant megacrysts of saussurite, interlayered with minor green phyllite, generally containing quartz and sericite. Dark amphibole in western outcrops. Maltby Lakes Metavolcanics - Green to gray-green, fine-grained, massive to well-foliated and layered greenstone, greenschist, and schist; also dark amphibolite to west and southwest.
Basal member [of The Straits Schist] (Silurian)
Basal member [of The Straits Schist] ( = Russell Mountain Formation of Massachusetts) - Distinguished by presence of layers of amphibolite, marble, calc-silicate rock, and quartzite within more uniform schist like that on either side. Minor, unevenly distributed mineralization in W, Bi, Cu, Ni, and other metals.
Beardsley Member [of Harrison (Prospect) Gneiss] (Middle? Ordovician)
Beardsley (hornblendic) Member [of Harrison (Prospect) Gneiss] - Medium- to dark-gray, medium-grained, well-layered and lineated gneiss, composed of plagioclase, quartz, microcline, hornblende, biotite, and epidote. Microcline may occur as megacrysts 1 to 3 cm across. Minor layers of garnetiferous schist and rarely of calc-silicate rock or marble. Pumpkin Ground and Beardsley Members of Harrison Gneiss, formerly considered conformable metavolcanic members, are here recognized as juxtaposed metaplutonic units and are renamed the Beardsley and Pumpkin Ground orthogneisses. Isotopic dating yields crystallization ages of 428+/-2 Ma (Early Silurian) for the Pumpkin Ground and 446+/-2 Ma (Late Ordovician) for the Beardsley. Age of the Beardsley based on analysis of seven zircon and two sphene fractions. The Harrison Gneiss as described by Rodgers (1985) has no stratigraphic significance and cannot be correlated regionally (Sevigny and Hanson, 1993).
Black Hill Member [of Quinebaug Formation] (Middle Ordovician or older)
Black Hill Member [of Quinebaug Formation] - Gray, medium- to fine-grained, well-layered schist and granofels, composed of oligoclase, quartz, and biotite, commonly with hornblende or muscovite, and locally with calcite, garnet, or epidote.
Brimfield Schist (Upper? and Middle Ordovician)
Brimfield Schist (includes Hamilton Resevoir Formation) - Gray, rusty-weathering, medium- to coarse-grained, interlayered schist and gneiss, composed of oligoclase, quartz, K-feldspar, and biotite, and commonly garnet, sillimanite, graphite, and pyrrhotite. K-feldspar partly as augen 1 to 3 cm across. Minor layers and lenses of hornblende- and pyroxene-bearing gneiss, amphibolite, and calc-silicate rock.
Brimfield Schist (uncertain) (Upper? and Middle Ordovician)
Brimfield Schist (uncertain) (includes Hamilton Resevoir Formation) - Gray, rusty-weathering, medium- to coarse-grained, interlayered schist and gneiss, composed of oligoclase, quartz, K-feldspar, and biotite, and commonly garnet, sillimanite, graphite, and pyrrhotite. K-feldspar partly as augen 1 to 3 cm across. Minor layers and lenses of hornblende- and pyroxene-bearing gneiss, amphibolite, and calc-silicate rock.
Brookfield Gneiss (Middle? Ordovician)
Brookfield (dioritic and granodioritic) Gneiss (including Newtown Gneiss of Crowley, 1968) - Dark and light, commonly speckled or banded, medium- to coarse-grained, massive to poorly foliated gneiss, composed of plagioclase, biotite, and hornblende, generally with quartz and K-feldspar, the latter commonly as megacrysts 1 to 3 cm across (also plagioclase megacrysts in darker rocks), locally associated with amphibolite or hornblende schist.
Carringtons Pond Member [of Trap Falls Formation] (Middle or Lower Ordovician)
Carringtons Pond Member [of Trap Falls Formation] - Interlayered medium- to dark-gray, rusty-weathering, medium-grained schist and light-gray, fine- to medium-grained gneiss, composed of quartz, sodic plagioclase, biotite, muscovite, and garnet; schist locally contains sillimanite or kyanite; gneiss locally contains K-feldspar; amphibolite layers common.
Cobble Mountain Formation (Middle Ordovician)
Cobble Mountain Formation - Gray to silver (not rusty), medium- to coarse-grained, generally layered schist and granofels, composed of quartz, oligoclase, muscovite, biotite, and garnet, and locally kyanite and staurolite or sillimanite. Some amphibolite layers.
Collins Hill Formation (Upper? and Middle Ordovician)
Collins Hill Formation ( = Partridge Formation of New Hampshire) - Gray, rusty-weathering, medium- to coarse-grained, poorly layered schist, composed of quartz, oligoclase, muscovite, biotite, and garnet, and commonly staurolite, kyanite, or sillimanite, generally graphitic, interlayered with fine-grained two-mica gneiss, especially to the west, and with calc-silicate and amphibolite layers, also rare quartz-spessartine (coticule) layers.
Erving Formation (Devonian)
Erving Formation - Gray, medium-grained, well-foliated and generally well layered granofels and schist, composed of quartz, plagioclase, and biotite, also muscovite in schist, and accessory garnet and kyanite.
Everett Schist (Cambrian?)
Everett Schist - Grayish to greenish (some rusty-weathering), fine- to medium-grained, foliated but poorly layered schist or phyllite, composed of quartz, albite or oligoclase, muscovite, garnet, staurolite or chloritoid, and generally chlorite. Local layers are dark-gray to silvery schist or phyllite.
Gneiss (metavolcanic) member [of Brimfield Schist] (Upper? and Middle Ordovician)
Gneiss (metavolcanic) member [of Brimfield Schist] - Medium-gray, medium-grained, layered gneiss and schist, composed of oligoclase, quartz, and biotite; some gneiss and most schist layers contain garnet and sillimanite; some gneiss layers contain garnet, hornblende or pyroxene or grade into amphibolite or calc-silicate rock. Probably includes metavolcanic rocks.
Gneiss of Highlands massifs (Proterozoic Y; may contain some older rocks)
Gneiss of Highlands massifs, (including Fordham Gneiss) - Mixture of rock types described below, where not separately mapped.
Golden Hill Schist (Lower? Ordovician)
Golden Hill Schist (may be equivalent to part of Trap Falls Formation) - Gray to silvery, medium- to coarse-grained, generally layered schist and granofels, composed of quartz, muscovite, biotite, plagioclase, and garnet.
Golden Hill Schist (Lower? Ordovician)
Golden Hill Schist (may be equivalent to part of Trap Falls Formation) - Gray to silvery, medium- to coarse-grained, generally layered schist and granofels, composed of quartz, muscovite, biotite, plagioclase, and garnet.
Hawley Formation (Middle Ordovician)
Hawley Formation (carbonaceous schist facies) - Gray, rusty-weathering, fine- to medium-grained, generally layered schist and granofels, composed of quartz, oligoclase, and biotite; some muscovite and graphite, rare garnet and kyanite or sillimanite. Layers of quartz-spessartine rock (coticule) common.
Hebron Gneiss (Silurian and Ordovician)
Hebron Gneiss - Interlayered dark-gray, medium- to coarse-grained schist, composed of andesine, quartz, biotite, and local K-feldspar, and greenish-gray, fine- to medium-grained calc-silicate rock, composed of labradorite, quartz, biotite, actinolite, hornblende, and diopside, and locally scapolite. Local lenses of graphitic two-mica schist.
Hoosac Schist (Cambrian?)
Hoosac Schist - Light- to medium-gray, rusty-weathering, fine- to medium-grained schist and poorly layered schistose gneiss, composed of quartz, biotite, plagioclase, muscovite, and generally garnet and sillimanite or kyanite.
Littleton Formation (Devonian)
Littleton Formation - Gray to silvery, generally non-rusty, medium-grained, massive to well-layered alternating schist and micaceous quartzite, composed of quartz, muscovite, biotite, garnet, and oligoclase, also staurolite, graphite, and ilmenite, and in certain areas kyanite or sillimanite in schist.
Littleton Formation (uncertain) (Devonian)
Littleton Formation (uncertain)- Gray to silvery, generally non-rusty, medium-grained, massive to well-layered alternating schist and micaceous quartzite, composed of quartz, muscovite, biotite, garnet, and oligoclase, also staurolite, graphite, and ilmenite, and in certain areas kyanite or sillimanite in schist.
Lower member [of Bigelow Brook Formation] (Silurian or Ordovician or both)
Lower member [of Bigelow Brook Formation] - Chiefly gray, medium-grained, well-layered granofels, composed of quartz, oligoclase, and biotite, commonly with garnet and sillimanite, interlayered with thinly fissile sillimanitic, graphitic, pyrrhotite schist.
Lower part [of Maltby Lakes Metavolcanics] (Middle? Ordovician)
Lower part [of Maltby Lakes Metavolcanics] - Gray-green to green, fine-grained, generally well foliated greenschist, greenstone, and schist or phyllite, composed of albite and chlorite, plus quartz and sericite or epidote and actinolite. Mixed metavolcanics and metasedimentary rocks.
Lower slice of Canaan Mountain Schist (Cambrian?)
Lower slice of Canaan Mountain Schist - Dark-gray, rusty-weathering, coarse-grained, well-foliated and moderately well layered schist composed of quartz, plagioclase, biotite, muscovite, and generally garnet and sillimanite (or minor staurolite). Amphibolite layers rather rare.
Maltby Lakes Metavolcanics (Middle? Ordovician)
Maltby Lakes Metavolcanics - Green to gray-green, fine-grained, massive to well-foliated and layered greenstone, greenschist, and schist; also dark amphibolite to west and southwest.
Metavolcanic member [of Collins Hill Formation] (Upper? and Middle Ordovician)
Metavolcanic member [of Collins Hill Formation] - Ranges from mafic to felsic, from dark layered amphibolite and hornblende schist, locally with garnet or epidote, to light-gray (in places purplish), laminated gneiss, composed of quartz, oligoclase, and biotite, in which some layers contain garnet (generally manganiferous) and hornblende or cummingtonite.
Middle member [of Bigelow Brook Formation] (Silurian or perhaps Ordovician)
Middle member [of Bigelow Brook Formation] - Greenish-gray, medium-grained calc-silicate rock, composed of plagioclase, quartz, and diopside (locally hornblende and scapolite), interbedded with schist and granofels composed of plagioclase, quartz, biotite, and commonly garnet and sillimanite.
Mount Pisgah Member of Littleton Formation (Devonian)
Mount Pisgah Member of Littleton Formation - Gray, medium-grained, well-layered (locally graded) granofels or micaceous quartzite with some schist, composed of quartz, oligoclase, biotite, garnet, and sillimanite.
Ordovician? granitic gneiss (Middle Ordovician?)
Ordovician? granitic gneiss (including local terms Ansonia, Mine Hill, "Tyler Lake," "Siscowit") - White, light-gray, buff, or pink, generally foliated granitic gneiss, composed of sodic plagioclase, quartz, microcline, muscovite, and biotite, and locally garnet or sillimanite. Commonly contains numerous inclusions or layers of mica schist and gneiss.
Oronoque Schist (Lower? Ordovician)
Oronoque Schist - Gray to silver, medium- to fine-grained, well-layered to laminated schist and granofels, composed of quartz, oligoclase, or albite, muscovite or sericite, biotite, or chlorite, and in western belt local garnet, staurolite, and kyanite. Small lenses of amphibolite or greenstone.
Pumpkin Ground Member [of Harrison (Prospect) Gneiss] (Middle? Ordovician)
Pumpkin Ground (porphyritic) Member [of Harrison (Prospect) Gneiss] - Medium- to light-gray, medium- to coarse-grained, well-layered and foliated gneiss, composed of oligoclase, microcline, quartz, and biotite; some layers have numerous microcline megacrysts 1 to 5 cm across; others have hornblende. Minor layers of garnetiferous schist and gneiss. Pumpkin Ground and Beardsley Members of Harrison Gneiss, formerly considered conformable metavolcanic members, are here recognized as juxtaposed metaplutonic units and are renamed the Beardsley and Pumpkin Ground orthogneisses. Isotopic dating yields ages of 428+/-2 Ma (Early Silurian) for the Pumpkin Ground and 446+/-2 Ma (Late Ordovician) for the Beardsley, accepted by authors as crystallization ages. Pumpkin Ground intrudes the Trap Falls Formation. The Harrison Gneiss as described by Rodgers (1985) has no stratigraphic significance and cannot be correlated regionally (Sevigny and Hanson, 1993).
Ratlum Mountain Schist (Lower? Ordovician)
Ratlum Mountain Schist - Gray, medium-grained, interlayered schist and granofels, composed of quartz, oligoclase, muscovite (in the schist), biotite, and garnet, also staurolite and kyanite in the schist. Numerous layers and lenses of amphibolite; also some of quartz-spessartine (coticule) and calc-silicate rock.
Ratlum Mountain Schist (Lower Ordovician)
Ratlum Mountain Schist - Gray, medium-grained, interlayered schist and granofels, composed of quartz, oligoclase, muscovite (in the schist), biotite, and garnet, also staurolite and kyanite in the schist. Numerous layers and lenses of amphibolite; also some of quartz-spessartine (coticule) and calc-silicate rock.
Ratlum Mountain Schist plus Amphibolite unit [in Ratlum Mountain Schist] (Lower Ordovician)
Ratlum Mountain Schist plus Amphibolite unit [in Ratlum Mountain Schist] - Ratlum Mountain Schist - Gray, medium-grained, interlayered schist and granofels, composed of quartz, oligoclase, muscovite (in the schist), biotite, and garnet, also staurolite and kyanite in the schist. Numerous layers and lenses of amphibolite; also some of quartz-spessartine (coticule) and calc-silicate rock. Amphibolite unit [in Ratlum Mountain Schist] (Lower? Ordovician) - Black or mottled, generally massive amphibolite and hornblende gneiss, composed of hornblende and andesine, commonly with minor quartz and magnetite, and locally with garnet, biotite, and epidote.
Rowe Schist (Lower Ordovician or Cambrian or both)
Rowe Schist - Light-gray to silvery, fine- to medium-grained, generally poorly layered schist, composed of quartz, muscovite, biotite, oligoclase, and generally garnet, staurolite, and kyanite or sillimanite. Layers of granofels common; also some layers of amphibolite, quartz-spessartine rock (coticule), and calc-silicate rock.
Rowe Schist (Lower Ordovician or Cambrian or both)
Rowe Schist - Light-gray to silvery, fine- to medium-grained, generally poorly layered schist, composed of quartz, muscovite, biotite, oligoclase, and generally garnet, staurolite, and kyanite or sillimanite. Layers of granofels common; also some layers of amphibolite, quartz-spessartine rock (coticule), and calc-silicate rock.
Rusty mica schist and gneiss (Proterozoic Y; may contain some older rocks)
Rusty mica schist and gneiss (equivalent in part to Washington Gneiss of Massachusetts) - Dark-gray, rusty-weathering, well-foliated and well- to poorly layered schist and gneiss composed of quartz, plagioclase, biotite, muscovite, sillimanite, and locally garnet; some layers of feldspathic quartzite and garnetiferous amphibolite.
Schist and granulite member [of Trap Falls Formation] (Middle or Lower Ordovician)
Schist and granulite member [of Trap Falls Formation] - Interlayered gray to silvery, medium- to coarse-grained schist and fine-grained granofels, composed of quartz, sodic plagioclase, biotite, and muscovite; garnet common in schist.
Scotland Schist (Devonian or Silurian or both)
Scotland Schist - Gray to silvery, locally rusty, fine- to medium-grained schist, composed of quartz, muscovite, biotite, staurolite, and oligoclase, locally with kyanite or sillimanite; interlayered, especially below and to the west, with quartz-oligoclase-biotite schist and granofels and locally with quartzite.
Scranton Mountain Member [of Taine Mountain Formation] (Lower? Ordovician)
Scranton Mountain Member [of Taine Mountain Formation] - Gray, rusty-weathering, medium-grained schist, composed of quartz, muscovite, biotite, plagioclase, garnet, and generally kyanite. The Taine Mountain Formation of Stanley (1964) is here adopted in the Collinsville and Bristol quads, CT. Includes three pinstriped units, the Wildcat, Scranton Mountain, and Whigville Members of Stanley (1964), also adopted. Correlates with the Savoy Schist of Emerson (1898), Missisquoi Schist or Group of Richardson (1919, 1924), in MA; and the Moretown Formation of Cady (1956) in MA and VT. Age is Middle Ordovician (Simpson, 1990).
Shelton Member [of Trap Falls Formation] (Middle or Lower Ordovician)
Shelton (white gneiss) Member [of Trap Falls Formation] - White, light-gray, or buff, fine- to medium-grained, generally well foliated granitic gneiss, composed of sodic plagioclase, quartz, microcline, muscovite, and garnet (in tiny almost ubiquitous grains), also commonly minor biotite; generally interlayered with mica schist, biotite gneiss, and calc-silicate rock. Thought to be metavolcanic equivalent of unit Og. Shelton Member of Trap Falls Formation (Rodgers, 1985) is here referred to as Shelton muscovite granite. On the basis of field and laboratory studies, Ansonia, Beardsley, Pumpkin Ground, and Shelton gneisses, previously considered stratigraphic units, are reinterpreted as plutonic. Shelton is a foliated, medium-grained, garnet-bearing muscovite leucogranite with a conspicuous white color and abundant garnets. Age of crystallization determined from U-Pb garnet analysis is 380+/-3 Ma (Middle Devonian). Southeast margin of the Shelton is in contact with the Trap Falls Formation (Sevigny and Hanson, 1993).
Southbridge Formation (Silurian or Ordovician or both)
Southbridge Formation - Dark- to light-gray, locally rusty, fine- to medium-grained interlayered granofels and schist, composed of quartz, plagioclase, and biotite, with muscovite in schist, and amphibole, calc-silicate minerals, K-feldspar in certain layers; also locally mappable units and thinner layers of calc-silicate rock, amphibolite, and sillimanite-garnet and sillimanite-graphite-pyrrhotite schist.
Southbridge Formation (Silurian or Ordovician or both)
Southbridge Formation - Dark- to light-gray, locally rusty, fine- to medium-grained interlayered granofels and schist, composed of quartz, plagioclase, and biotite, with muscovite in schist, and amphibole, calc-silicate minerals, K-feldspar in certain layers; also locally mappable units and thinner layers of calc-silicate rock, amphibolite, and sillimanite-garnet and sillimanite-graphite-pyrrhotite schist.
Southington Mountain Member [of The Straits Schist] (Devonian or Silurian or both)
Southington Mountain Member [of The Straits Schist] - Gray to silvery, non-rusty, medium-grained, well-layered alternating schist and granofels, composed of quartz, oligoclase, muscovite, biotite, and garnet, commonly with staurolite and kyanite (or sillimanite); schist commonly graphitic. Metamorphosed strata named Southington Mountain Schist by Fritts (1963) is traceable into southern Bristol quad., and is here revised as Southington Mountain Member of The Straits Schist. Consists of alternating bands of quartz-feldspar granulite and of graphitic, muscovite-biotite schist. Unit is characterized by distinct, widespread, graded bedding and locally abundant staurolite. Unit may correlate with the Goshen Formation of the Heath quad, MA-VT, of Middle Silurian to Early Devonian age (Simpson, 1990).
Stockbridge Marble (Lower Ordovician and Cambrian)
Stockbridge Marble (including Inwood Marble) - White to gray, massive to layered marble, generally dolomitic but containing calcite marble in upper part, locally interlayered with schist or phyllite and with calcareous siltstone or sandstone.
Sweetheart Mountain Member [of Collinsville Formation] (Middle Ordovician)
Sweetheart Mountain Member [of Collinsville Formation] - Gray and silvery (not rusty), medium- to coarse-grained, poorly layered schist, composed of quartz, oligoclase, biotite, muscovite, and garnet, and in places kyanite or sillimanite. Amphibolite layers common; also layers of quartz-spessartine rock (coticule). In the Bristol quad., CT, Collinsville Formation is revised to include a basal unnamed hornblende gneiss member (was upper part of Stanley's (1964) Bristol Member), a middle unnamed metaquartzite member, and the upper Sweetheart Mountain Member. Bristol Member of Stanley (1964) is raised in rank to Bristol Gneiss in the report area. Collinsville unconformably underlies The Straits Schist. Inferred age is Middle Ordovician (Simpson, 1990).
Tatnic Hill Formation (Upper? and Middle Ordovician)
Tatnic Hill Formation - Medium- to dark-gray, medium-grained gneiss or schist composed of quartz, andesine, biotite, garnet, and sillimanite, locally kyanite, muscovite, or K-feldspar, interlayered with locally mappable units and thinner layers of rusty-weathering graphitic pyrrhotitic two-mica schist, amphibolite, and calc-silicate rock.
The Straits Schist (Devonian or Silurian or both)
The Straits Schist ( = Goshen Formation of Massachusetts) - Silvery to gray, non-rusty, coarse- to very coarse grained, generally poorly layered schist, composed of quartz, muscovite, biotite, oligoclase, garnet, and commonly with staurolite and kyanite or sillimanite; graphitic almost throughout. Distinctive sequence of metamorphic strata overlying the Collinsville Formation in the Bristol quad., is here correlated with the Straits Schist of Fritts (1963) in the Southington quad. Consists mainly of rusty-weathering, medium- to coarse-grained, commonly crenulated, garnet-bearing, graphitic, muscovite-rich, plagioclase-quartz schist with graded bedding. Unit is called The Straits Schist following the original usage of Rodgers and others (1959). In the southern part of the Bristol quad., unit includes the Southington Mountain Member (here reduced in rank) in its upper part. Age of The Straits is inferred to be Silurian or Devonian. Unit is tentatively correlated with the Goshen Formation based on lithologic similarities and a possible unconformity at the base (Simpson, 1990).
Trap Falls Formation (Middle or Lower Ordovician)
Trap Falls Formation (may be equivalent in part to Golden Hill Schist) - Gray to silvery, partly rusty weathering, medium-grained generally well layered schist, composed of quartz, sodic plagioclase, biotite, muscovite, and garnet, locally with sillimanite or kyanite, interlayered with two-mica gneiss and granulite and with amphibolite.
Trap Falls Formation plus Ordovician? granitic gneiss (Middle or Lower Ordovician)
Trap Falls Formation plus Ordovician? granitic gneiss - Trap Falls Formation (may be equivalent in part to Golden Hill Schist) - Gray to silvery, partly rusty weathering, medium-grained generally well layered schist, composed of quartz, sodic plagioclase, biotite, muscovite, and garnet, locally with sillimanite or kyanite, interlayered with two-mica gneiss and granulite and with amphibolite. Ordovician? granitic gneiss (including local terms Ansonia, Mine Hill, "Tyler Lake," "Siscowit") - White, light-gray, buff, or pink, generally foliated granitic gneiss, composed of sodic plagioclase, quartz, microcline, muscovite, and biotite, and locally garnet or sillimanite. Commonly contains numerous inclusions or layers of mica schist and gneiss.
Unit b [of Stockbridge Marble] (Upper and Middle? Cambrian)
Unit b [of Stockbridge Marble] - White, pink, cream, and light-gray, generally well bedded dolomitic marble interlayered with phyllite and schist and with siltstone, sandstone, or quartzite, commonly dolomitic.
Upper member [of Bigelow Brook Formation] (Silurian and perhaps Ordovician)
Upper member [of Bigelow Brook Formation] - Chiefly gray, rusty-weathering, medium-grained, generally well layered and locally fissile schist, composed of plagioclase, quartz, biotite, garnet, and sillimanite, locally with K-feldspar or cordierite, fissile layers commonly with graphite and pyrrhotite, interlayered with quartzose granofels with less biotite but with calc-silicate minerals.
Upper slice of Canaan Mountain Schist (Cambrian?)
Upper slice of Canaan Mountain Schist - Dark-gray to silvery, generally rusty weathering, medium- to coarse-grained, well-foliated, massive to well-layered schist and schistose gneiss, composed of quartz, plagioclase, biotite, muscovite, and generally garnet and sillimanite; also layers of amphibolite.
Walloomsac Schist (Middle Ordovician)
Walloomsac Schist - Black to dark-or silvery-gray, rarely layered schist or phyllite, composed of quartz, albite, and commonly garnet and staurolite or sillimanite (locally strongly retrograded to chlorite and muscovite). Locally feldspathic or calcareous near the base.
Waterbury Gneiss (Proterozoic Z or Cambrian or both)
Waterbury Gneiss - Medium- to dark-gray, fine- to medium-grained, generally irregularly foliated and lenticular rather than regularly layered schist and schistose gneiss, composed of biotite, quartz, oligoclase, kyanite (or sillimanite), and garnet, also locally microcline, irregularly mixed with granitoid gneiss, composed of oligoclase or andesine, quartz, biotite, and commonly microcline and muscovite.
Wepawaug Schist (Devonian or Silurian or both)
Wepawaug Schist - Medium- to dark-gray, medium- to fine-grained, well-layered schist or phyllite and metasiltstone, composed of quartz, muscovite or sericite, plagioclase, biotite, and in appropriate metamorphic zones chlorite, garnet, staurolite, and kyanite. Schist or phyllite generally graphic.
Yantic Member [of Tatnic Hill Formation] (Upper? and Middle Ordovician)
Yantic Member [of Tatnic Hill Formation] - Medium- to dark-gray, fine- to medium-grained schist, composed of quartz, oligoclase, biotite, and muscovite, some layers with garnet, staurolite, and kyanite or garnet and sillimanite, local epidote, or K-feldspar; some layers of rusty-weathering graphitic, pyrrhotitic, two-mica schist.
Georgia
Aluminous Schist (Precambrian-Paleozoic)
Aluminous Schist
Amphibolite/ Biotitic Gneiss/ Quartz Sericite Schist (Precambrian-Paleozoic)
Amphibolite/ Biotitic Gneiss/ Quartz Sericite Schist
Amphibolite/ Metagraywacke/ Mica Schist (Precambrian-Paleozoic)
Amphibolite/ Metagraywacke/ Mica Schist
Amphibolitic Schist/ Amphibolite-Metagraywacke/ Mica Schist (Precambrian-Paleozoic)
Amphibolitic Schist/ Amphibolite-Metagraywacke/ Mica Schist
Epidote Quartzite/ Amphibolite/ Sericite Schist/ Biotite Granite Gneiss (Precambrian-Paleozoic)
Epidote Quartzite/ Amphibolite/ Sericite Schist/ Biotite Granite Gneiss
Graphite Schist (Precambrian-Paleozoic)
Graphite Schist
Quartz Sericite Schist/ Biotitic Gneiss (Precambrian-Paleozoic)
Quartz Sericite Schist/ Biotitic Gneiss
Sericite Schist (Precambrian-Paleozoic)
Sericite Schist
Sericite Schist/ Amphibolite (Precambrian-Paleozoic)
Sericite Schist/ Amphibolite
Sericite Schist/ Amphibolite/ Granite gneiss (Precambrian-Paleozoic)
Sericite Schist/ Amphibolite/ Granite gneiss
Sericite Schist/ Micaceous Quartzite/ Sericite Phyllite (Precambrian-Paleozoic)
Sericite Schist/ Micaceous Quartzite/ Sericite Phyllite
Sillimanite Schist (Precambrian-Paleozoic)
Sillimanite Schist
Sillimanite Schist/ Amphibolite (Precambrian-Paleozoic)
Sillimanite Schist/ Amphibolite
Sillimanite Schist/ Gneiss (Precambrian-Paleozoic)
Sillimanite Schist/ Gneiss
Sillimanite Schist/ Gneiss/ Amphibolite (Precambrian-Paleozoic)
Sillimanite Schist/ Gneiss/ Amphibolite
Undifferentiated Metavolcanics/ Sericite phyllite/ Meta-argillite/ Quartz mica schist (Precambrian-Paleozoic)
Undifferentiated Metavolcanics/ Sericite phyllite/ Meta-argillite/ Quartz mica schist
Idaho
Diorite, gabbro, and granite; Jurassic to Triassic plutons; western Idaho, Blue Mountains island-arc complex (Jurassic to Triassic)
Lower Mesozoic intrusions; localized near the Snake Canyon of western Idaho.
Garnet-sillimanite-biotite schist; Middle Proterozoic Prichard Formation, northern Belt province (Early Middle Proterozoic)
Precambrian high-grade metamorphic rock; metasediment; kyanite-sillimanite-garnet-mica coarse-grained schist and gneiss; minor quartzite
Limestone, slate; Upper Triassic greenschist-facies metamorphic rocks; western Idaho, Blue Mountains island-arc complex; (Late Triassic)
Upper Triassic shale overlying reefal limestone and dolomite in west-central Idaho.
Metamorphosed granitoid plutonic rocks and metasedimentary rocks, undivided; Cretaceous orthogneiss in Middle Proterozoic metasedimentary host rocks; west-central Idaho (Cretaceous to Middle Proterozoic)
Highly metamorphosed rock of central Idaho; age and origin of rock questionable.
Metasedimentary and meta-igneous rocks; Triassic to Mississippian greenschist-facies dismembered ophiolite, western Idaho, Blue Mountains island-arc complex (Triassic to Mississippian)
Jurassic marine wacke, volcanic, or carbonate metasediments of western Idaho.
Quartzite, marble, Calc-silicate rock, schist, and meta-conglomerate; Ordovician to Middle Proterozoic metasedimentary rocks; central Idaho, Pioneer Mountains metamorphic core complex (Ordovician to Middle Proterozoic)
Ordovician to Middle Proterozoic metasedimentary rocks, undivided
Quartzite, siltite, argillite, and mica schist; Middle Proterozoic Lemhi Group; southern Belt province (Middle Proterozoic)
Intermediate Precambrian sediments, feldspathic quartzite and siltstone of southern Idaho.
Quartzite, siltstone, conglomerate, and metavolcanic rocks; Late and Middle Proterozoic, undivided; Atlanta batholith roof pendants (Late and Middle Proterozoic, undivided)
Precambrian, high-grade metamorphic rock
Schist, quartzite, marble, skarn, and mafic gneiss; Jurassic to Mississippian amphibolite-facies rocks; southwestern Idaho, western accreted island-arc complex (Jurassic to Mississippian)
Metamorphic complex of probable Paleozoic units of southwestern Idaho.
Massachusetts
Blackstone Group (Proterozoic Z)
Blackstone Group - Undivided - Quartzite, schist, phyllite, marble, and metavolcanic rocks.
Boylston Schist (Silurian or Ordovician)
Boylston Schist - Carbonaceous phyllite and schist, locally sulfidic; quartzite; calc-silicate beds.
Calc-silicate granofels and gneiss (Proterozoic Y)
Calc-silicate granofels and gneiss - Including calcitic or dolomitic chondrodite-diopside marble, coarse hornblende-plagioclase-diopside and diopside rock, locally containing beds of lustrous muscovite-kyanite sillimanite-garnet schist.
Canaan Mountain Formation (Lower Ordovician and Proterozoic Z)
Canaan Mountain Formation - Rusty-weathering, coarse garnet schist and feldspathic schist.
Clough Quartzite (Upper Silurian)
Clough Quartzite - Quartz-pebble conglomerate, quartzite, and minor mica schist and calc-silicate rocks. Fossils at Bernardston are similar to those at Croyden Mountain, New Hampshire which indicate late Llandoverian age. Parts of the Littleton and Partridge Formations, and Clough Quartzite in MA are here reassigned to the Rangeley Formation [here geographically extended to MA]. The four mapped areas of Clough Quartzite in the Amherst area west of the Connecticut Valley border fault are now interpreted as conglomerate lenses in the Rangeley. Clough is considered the key stratigraphic unit in Bronson Hill anticlinorium because 1) it is dominated by distinctive, readily recognizable rock types, 2) where present, it is base of Silurian-Devonian sequence, resting with detectable unconformity on older rocks, and 3) it contains late Llandoverian fossils at several localities in western NH and adjacent VT, and at Bernardston, MA. Consists mostly of quartz-pebble conglomerate in which pebbles are typically deformed; other lithologies are quartz grit or white to pink, well-bedded quartzite. Locally contains some mica schist beds. On the MA State bedrock geologic map (Zen and others, 1983), thickness is locally exaggerated because at many localities, the unit was only a few meters or less thick and could not be shown at a scale of 1:250,000. Maximum thickness is 200 m on west limb of Northfield syncline. Unconformably overlies Fourmile Gneiss in Pelham dome and in Kempfield anticline, or Ammonoosuc Volcanics over most gneiss domes. Partridge Formation occurs along Clough-Ammonoosuc contact as lenses in many areas (Hatch and others, 1988).
Cobble Mountain Formation (Middle Ordovician)
Cobble Mountain Formation - Light-brown, fine- to medium-grained pelitic schist and granofels locally graded in beds less than 15 cm thick. Local amphibolite. Rare calc-silicate rock, feldspar gneiss, coticule and cummingtonite schist.
Cobble Mountain Formation (Middle Ordovician)
Cobble Mountain Formation - Nonrusty-weathering coarse-grained aluminous schist.
Cobble Mountain Formation (Middle Ordovician)
Cobble Mountain Formation - Nonrusty-weathering silvery-gray schist, similar to schist in Ocb.
Cobble Mountain Formation (Middle Ordovician)
Cobble Mountain Formation - Red rusty-weathering schist containing thin beds of white quartz-plagioclase granofels and vitreous quartzite. Local amphibolite and thin anthophyllite amphibolite.
Collinsville Formation (Middle Ordovician or older)
Collinsville Formation - Brown to rusty-brown schist containing coticule and locally massive amphibolite at base.
Dalton Formation (Lower Cambrian and Proterozoic Z)
Dalton Formation - Tan to orangish-tan quartz and gneiss cobble and pebble conglomerate, rusty feldspathic schist, and lustrous greenish-gray muscovite quartz schist.
Dalton Formation (Lower Cambrian and Proterozoic Z)
Dalton Formation - Black to dark-gray carbonaceous quartz schist.
Dalton Formation (Lower Cambrian and Proterozoic Z)
Dalton Formation - Orangish-gray, gray, and light-greenish-gray muscovite-quartz schist and interlayered feldspathic quartzite and quartz conglomerate; minor beds of rusty albitic schist.
Dry Hill Gneiss (Proterozoic Z)
Dry Hill Gneiss - Biotite-tourmaline schist and quartzite.
Erving Formation (Lower Devonian)
Erving Formation - Granofels and schist where mapped separately.
Everett Formation (Lower Cambrian and Proterozoic Z)
Everett Formation - Light-green and greenish-gray chlorite-muscovite-albite or chloritoid-rich phyllite. Predominantly dark-gray chloritoid-rich schist in Lenox Mountain.
Fitch Formation (Upper Silurian)
Fitch Formation - Calc-silicate granofels, biotite granofels, minor sulfidic schist and marble. Correlated with the fossiliferous Fitch Formation of western New Hampshire. Although the text and figures of this report show the Fitch as Silurian, a footnote [added just before this report went to press] cites a change in age from Silurian to Early Devonian based on conodonts found at the Bernardston, MA, locality, as reported in Elbert and others (1988). In Bronson Hill anticlinorium in MA, Fitch occurs as lenses between Clough Quartzite and Littleton Formation. Most common rock types in MA are gray, massive to weakly bedded, quartz-labradorite-biotite granulite containing a moderate amount of some combination of calc-silicate minerals (calcic amphibole, zoisite or clinozoisite, diopside, sphene, and microcline); commonly interbedded with biotite-free granulite that contains same calc-silicate minerals. One small exposure consists of nearly pure calcite marble. Larger lenses of Fitch consist of varieties of schist, similar to Partridge Formation. Best exposures are in low hills west of village of Orange, northeast of junction of MA Hwys 2A and 78. As shown on MA State bedrock geologic map, Fitch everywhere overlies Clough Quartzite and is never in contact with Partridge. Fossils dating the Fitch as Pridolian (Harris and others, 1983) are all from Littleton, NH, area [however, see mention of footnote, above] (Hatch and others, 1988).
Fitch Formation (Upper Silurian)
Fitch Formation - Sulfidic calc-silicate and minor sulfidic schist. Although the text and figures of this report show the Fitch as Silurian, a footnote [added just before this report went to press] cites a change in age from Silurian to Early Devonian based on conodonts found at the Bernardston, MA, locality, as reported in Elbert and others (1988). In Bronson Hill anticlinorium in MA, Fitch occurs as lenses between Clough Quartzite and Littleton Formation. Most common rock types in MA are gray, massive to weakly bedded, quartz-labradorite-biotite granulite containing a moderate amount of some combination of calc-silicate minerals (calcic amphibole, zoisite or clinozoisite, diopside, sphene, and microcline); commonly interbedded with biotite-free granulite that contains same calc-silicate minerals. One small exposure consists of nearly pure calcite marble. Larger lenses of Fitch consist of varieties of schist, similar to Partridge Formation. Best exposures are in low hills west of village of Orange, northeast of junction of MA Hwys 2A and 78. As shown on MA State bedrock geologic map, Fitch everywhere overlies Clough Quartzite and is never in contact with Partridge. Fossils dating the Fitch as Pridolian (Harris and others, 1983) are all from Littleton, NH, area [however, see mention of footnote, above]. [Papers presented as chapters in U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1366 are intended as explanations and (or) revisions to MA State bedrock geologic map of Zen and others (1983) at scale of 1:250,000.] (Hatch and others, 1988).
Gile Mountain Formation (Lower Devonian)
Gile Mountain Formation - Gray, slightly rusty, poorly bedded phyllite and schist containing 20 cm to 2 m beds of light-gray, fine-grained quartzite, local punky-brown weathering calcareous granofels or quartzose marble, and pods and stringers of vein quartz.
Gile Mountain Formation (Lower Devonian)
Gile Mountain Formation - Like Dgm but having a higher percentage of quartzite.
Goshen Formation (Lower Devonian)
Goshen Formation - Similar to Dg but having scattered beds of calcareous granofels.
Goshen Formation (Lower Devonian)
Goshen Formation - Poorly bedded Dg schist containing beds, 0.5 to 2.5 m thick, of punky-weathering calcareous pale green granofels with calc-silicate granofels rims.
Goshen Formation (Lower Devonian)
Goshen Formation - Dg containing beds of punky-weathering calcareous granofels more than 15 cm thick near the contact with the Waits River Formation.
Goshen Formation (Lower Devonian)
Goshen Formation - Poorly bedded carbonaceous schist and quartz schist.
Goshen Formation (Lower Devonian)
Goshen Formation - Well-bedded micaceous quartzite or quartz schist grading upward into light- to dark-gray, carbonaceous aluminous schist in beds 5 to 15 cm thick.
Goshen Formation (Lower Devonian)
Goshen Formation - Light gray-brown micaceous quartzite and quartz-mica-garnet schist in beds as much as 6 m thick. Calc-silicate granofels and rare punky-weathering calcareous granofels.
Granite, gneiss, and schist, undivided (Proterozoic Z)
Granite, gneiss, and schist, undivided - Plutonic and metamorphic rocks of probable Proterozoic Z age. May include plutonic and volcanic rocks of Paleozoic or younger age.
Gray, well-layered biotite-plagioclase-quartz gneiss (Proterozoic Y)
Gray, well-layered biotite-plagioclase-quartz gneiss - Containing beds of amphibolite, aluminous schist, quartzite, and calc-silicate gneiss.
Hawley Formation (Middle Ordovician)
Hawley Formation - Black, fine-grained, splintery, rusty-weathering schist and thin dark quartzite; interlayered amphibolite commonly has plagioclase megacrysts. As used here the Hawley includes amphibolite, sulfidic rusty schists, abundant coticules, silvery schists, quartzites and quartz conglomerates, and quartz, feldspar, biotite granulites. The quartzites and quartz conglomerates occur at two positions in rocks here assigned to the Hawley. Those occurring near the top have been mapped previously as Russell Mountain Formation or as Shaw Mountain Formation. The Hawley overlies the Ordovician Barnard Gneiss and underlies Silurian and Devonian "calciferous schists" that include the westernmost Goshen Formation in MA and Northfield Formation in southern VT, the central Waits River Formation and the eastern Gile Mountain Formation. Authors believe that the Goshen, Northfield, and Waits River are facies equivalents, while the Gile Mountain is slightly younger. Map symbol indicates that Hawley is Ordovician and Silurian. 40Ar/3Ar hornblende release spectrum date of 433+/-3 Ma obtained by Spear and Harrison (1989) (Trzcienski and others, 1992).
Hawley Formation (Middle Ordovician)
Hawley Formation - Interbedded amphibolite, greenstone, feldspathic schist and granofels. Coarse plagioclase in some amphibolite near top; local coarse hornblende blades or sprays. Sparse coticule (Emerson, 1917, p. 43). As used here the Hawley includes amphibolite, sulfidic rusty schists, abundant coticules, silvery schists, quartzites and quartz conglomerates, and quartz, feldspar, biotite granulites. The quartzites and quartz conglomerates occur at two positions in rocks here assigned to the Hawley. Those occurring near the top have been mapped previously as Russell Mountain Formation or as Shaw Mountain Formation. The Hawley overlies the Ordovician Barnard Gneiss and underlies Silurian and Devonian "calciferous schists" that include the westernmost Goshen Formation in MA and Northfield Formation in southern VT, the central Waits River Formation and the eastern Gile Mountain Formation. Authors believe that the Goshen, Northfield, and Waits River are facies equivalents, while the Gile Mountain is slightly younger. Map symbol indicates that Hawley is Ordovician and Silurian. 40Ar/3Ar hornblende release spectrum date of 433+/-3 Ma obtained by Spear and Harrison (1989) (Trzcienski and others, 1992).
Hawley Formation (Middle Ordovician)
Hawley Formation - Medium-gray plagioclase-hornblende-chlorite schist containing megacrysts of plagioclase and angular fragments of feldspar granofels, epidote-plagioclase granofels, and dark-gray amphibolite. As used here the Hawley includes amphibolite, sulfidic rusty schists, abundant coticules, silvery schists, quartzites and quartz conglomerates, and quartz, feldspar, biotite granulites. The quartzites and quartz conglomerates occur at two positions in rocks here assigned to the Hawley. Those occurring near the top have been mapped previously as Russell Mountain Formation or as Shaw Mountain Formation. The Hawley overlies the Ordovician Barnard Gneiss and underlies Silurian and Devonian "calciferous schists" that include the westernmost Goshen Formation in MA and Northfield Formation in southern VT, the central Waits River Formation and the eastern Gile Mountain Formation. Authors believe that the Goshen, Northfield, and Waits River are facies equivalents, while the Gile Mountain is slightly younger. Map symbol indicates that Hawley is Ordovician and Silurian. 40Ar/3Ar hornblende release spectrum date of 433+/-3 Ma obtained by Spear and Harrison (1989) (Trzcienski and others, 1992).
Hoosac Formation (Lower Cambrian and Proterozoic Z)
Hoosac Formation - Rusty-brown to dark-gray, albite-spotted muscovite-biotite schist or gneiss, with interlayered black garnet-biotite-albite-quartz schist near base; interfingers with Dalton Formation.
Hoosac Formation (Lower Cambrian and Proterozoic Z)
Hoosac Formation - Light-gray, albite-biotite granofels and schist, pseudoconglomerate and blue quartz pebble conglomerate.
Hoosac Formation (Lower Cambrian and Proterozoic Z)
Hoosac Formation - Green to gray-green chlorite-sericite-quartz phyllite; interbeds of chloritoid- or albite-rich schist and minor quartzite, locally rich in garnet and kyanite.
Hoosac Formation (Lower Cambrian and Proterozoic Z)
Hoosac Formation - Light-gray to tan, albite-muscovite-calcite spangled schist.
Hoosac Formation (Lower Cambrian and Proterozoic Z)
Hoosac Formation - Lustrous greenish-gray schist characterized by 1-1.5 cm garnets; resembles Gassetts Schist of Vermont.
Hoosac Formation (Lower Cambrian and Proterozoic Z)
Hoosac Formation - Aluminous rusty-weathering kyanite schist with distinctive quartz lenses and minor thin beds of calc-silicate rocks.
Hoosac Formation (Lower Cambrian and Proterozoic Z)
Hoosac Formation - Undifferentiated Hoosac Formation.
Intimately interfolded Littleton and Partridge Formations (Lower Devonian and Middle Ordovician)
Intimately interfolded Littleton and Partridge Formations - In areas of poor exposure and incomplete mapping.
Kittery Formation (Silurian or Ordovician)
Kittery Formation - Quartzite, partly calcareous; phyllite, schist.
Littleton Formation (Lower Devonian)
Littleton Formation - Black to gray aluminous mica schist, quartzose schist, and aluminous phyllite.
Moretown Formation (Middle Ordovician or older)
Moretown Formation - Light gray schist; some granofels. More schistose than Om.
Moretown Formation (Middle Ordovician or older)
Moretown Formation - Light-greenish-gray to buff, fine-grained, pinstriped granofels and schist.
Moretown Formation (Middle Ordovician or older)
Moretown Formation - Nubble garnet schist, pinstriped granofels, and fine-grained amphibolite in equal parts.
Mount Mineral Formation (Proterozoic Z)
Mount Mineral Formation (Probably correlates with Poplar Mountain Gneiss but is more aluminous) - Aluminous schist, amphibolite, and quartzite, undifferentiated; locally rich in garnet and kyanite, and with relict sillimanite and orthoclase from pre-Middle Ordovician metamorphism.
Nashoba Formation (Ordovician or Proterozoic Z)
Nashoba Formation - Sillimanite schist and gneiss, partly sulfidic, amphibolite, biotite gneiss, calc-silicate gneiss and marble. Nashoba Formation occurs in Nashoba zone of eastern MA. Consists of interlayered sillimanite-bearing, partly sulfidic schist and gneiss, calc-silicate gneiss, and subordinate quartzite and marble. Protoliths were probably volcanogenic sediments interlayered with limy marine sediments. Bell and Alvord (1976) divided Nashoba into 10 members on basis of lithology. Amphibolite is most abundant near presumed base, namely in Boxford Member. Skehan and Abu-Moustafa (1976) divided Nashoba into 30 members based on section in Wachusett-Marlborough tunnel. Although Bell and Alvord's and Skehan and Moustafa's sections contain similar lithologies, Bell and Alvord's is much thicker, and Boxford Member is not readily identified in Skehan and Abu-Moustafa's. Subdivision of Nashoba is conjectural south of Marlborough and Shrewsbury. On MA State bedrock map (Zen and others, 1983) only Boxford Member is separated out from the rest of the Nashoba because this unit was the only member clearly recognized in several area. A definite sequence of members probably does not exist anywhere in the Nashoba because of lenticularity of assemblages and repeated rock types, both of which could be accounted for by either sedimentary or tectonic processes. Although Castle (1965) considered Fish Brook to be either a premetamorphic intrusive rock or a core gneiss of intrusive or sedimentary ancestry, Bell and Alvord (1976) considered it to be volcanic or volcaniclastic in origin. Zircons in Fish Brook are certainly volcanic in origin and yield a date of 730 +/-26 Ma (Olszewski, 1980). If the rock were a core gneiss, that date would apply only to the Fish Brook and not to surrounding rocks; but, Bell and Alvord (1976) believe Fish Brook to be part of the Marlboro Formation-Nashoba Formation sequence and therefore the date does apply to the sequence. In addition, a 1500 Ma date for Shawsheen Gneiss [reference not given] helps bracket age of Marlboro-Nashoba sequence. An upper limit for the sequence was established from the 430 +/-5 Ma age of intruding Sharpers Pond Diorite and 450 +/-23 Ma age of the intruding Andover Granite (Zartman and Naylor, 1984). Although age on MA State bedrock map is shown as Proterozoic Z or Ordovician (due to uncertainty regarding actual rocks sampled by Olszewski and a strong belief that rocks of Nashoba zone correlated with Ordovician rocks to the west), author now feels that rocks of Nashoba zone (except for Tadmuck Brook Schist) are all Proterozoic, but that they are unlike the Proterozoic rocks of neighboring Milford-Dedham zone. [no formal age change made in this report] (Goldsmith, 1991).
Partridge Formation (Middle Ordovician)
Partridge Formation (includes Brimfield Schist of Emerson, 1917) - Layered felsic gneiss and schist.
Partridge Formation (Middle Ordovician)
Partridge Formation (includes Brimfield Schist of Emerson, 1917) - Sulfidic schist and abundant calc-silicate.
Partridge Formation (Middle Ordovician)
Partridge Formation (includes Brimfield Schist of Emerson, 1917) - Biotite gneiss of volcanic derivation, minor amphibolite and sulfidic schist.
Paxton Formation (Silurian)
Paxton Formation - Bigelow Brook Member - Biotite granofels, sulfidic schist, and minor calc-silicate granofels. The Paxton, here of group rank, includes strata formerly mapped in CT as the Hebron Formation and in MA as the Paxton Formation. It conformably overlies the Oakdale Formation and structurally and conformably underlies the Brimfield Group. It is undivided in central MA; in northeast CT and adjacent MA it is divided into the Dudley and Southbridge Formations. Age is Late Proterozoic(?) based on the intrusion of 440 m.y. Hedgehog Hill gneiss into the overlying Brimfield Group and an age of 1188 m.y. for detrital zircons from the Paxton (Pease, 1989).
Paxton Formation (Silurian)
Paxton Formation - Rusty-weathering sulfidic quartzite and sulfidic schist. The Paxton, here of group rank, includes strata formerly mapped in CT as the Hebron Formation and in MA as the Paxton Formation. It conformably overlies the Oakdale Formation and structurally and conformably underlies the Brimfield Group. It is undivided in central MA; in northeast CT and adjacent MA it is divided into the Dudley and Southbridge Formations. Age is Late Proterozoic(?) based on the intrusion of 440 m.y. Hedgehog Hill gneiss into the overlying Brimfield Group and an age of 1188 m.y. for detrital zircons from the Paxton (Pease, 1989).
Paxton Formation (Silurian)
Paxton Formation - Sulfidic magnesian biotite and magnesian cordierite schist and sillimanite quartzite. The Paxton, here of group rank, includes strata formerly mapped in CT as the Hebron Formation and in MA as the Paxton Formation. It conformably overlies the Oakdale Formation and structurally and conformably underlies the Brimfield Group. It is undivided in central MA; in northeast CT and adjacent MA it is divided into the Dudley and Southbridge Formations. Age is Late Proterozoic(?) based on the intrusion of 440 m.y. Hedgehog Hill gneiss into the overlying Brimfield Group and an age of 1188 m.y. for detrital zircons from the Paxton (Pease, 1989).
Paxton Formation (Silurian)
Paxton Formation - Undifferentiated biotite granofels, calc-silicate granofels, and sulfidic schist. The Paxton, here of group rank, includes strata formerly mapped in CT as the Hebron Formation and in MA as the Paxton Formation. It conformably overlies the Oakdale Formation and structurally and conformably underlies the Brimfield Group. It is undivided in central MA; in northeast CT and adjacent MA it is divided into the Dudley and Southbridge Formations. Age is Late Proterozoic(?) based on the intrusion of 440 m.y. Hedgehog Hill gneiss into the overlying Brimfield Group and an age of 1188 m.y. for detrital zircons from the Paxton (Pease, 1989).
Reubens Hill Formation (Silurian or Ordovician)
Reubens Hill Formation - Amphibolite, hornblende-chlorite schist, and feldspathic schist. Includes metamorphosed diorite.
Rowe Schist (Lower Ordovician and Cambrian)
Rowe Schist - Gray to black, fine-grained , slightly rusty, moderately carbonaceous schist; minor fine- to medium-grained dark-gray to white quartzite. Minor lenses of rock identical to OCAr.
Rowe Schist (Lower Ordovician and Cambrian)
Rowe Schist - Light-green to light-bluish-gray schist having thin granular quartz lenses and lamellae. Kyanite and staurolite typical at higher grades.
Tadmuck Brook Schist (Silurian?, Ordovician, or Proterozoic Z)
Tadmuck Brook Schist - Andalusite phyllite and sillimanite schist, partly sulfidic; local quartzite in upper part.
Tatnic Hill Formation (Ordovician or Proterozoic Z)
Tatnic Hill Formation - Sulfidic sillimanite schist, sillimanite schist and gneiss, biotite gneiss; minor amphibolite, calc-silicate gneiss and marble.
Undifferentiated Poplar Mountain and Dry Hill Gneisses (Proterozoic Z)
Undifferentiated Poplar Mountain and Dry Hill Gneisses .
Vaughn Hills Quartzite (Silurian or Ordovician)
Vaughn Hills Quartzite - Quartzite, phyllite, conglomerate, and chlorite schist.
Waits River Formation (Lower Devonian)
Waits River Formation - Interbedded medium- to dark-gray, moderately rusty weathering, highly contorted, unbedded schist and punky-weathering calcareous granofels or quartzose marble, and pods and stringers of vein quartz.
Waits River Formation (Lower Devonian)
Waits River Formation - Dw containing thick (1 m) beds of calcareous granofels. Mapped only in Colrain quadrangle; included in Dw elsewhere.
Walloomsac Formation (Middle Ordovician)
Walloomsac Formation - Dark-gray, graphitic quartz phyllite and schist containing minor lenses of limestone.
Westboro Formation (Proterozoic Z)
Westboro Formation - Quartzite, schist, calc-silicate quartzite, and amphibolite. Consists of quartzite and argillite in Saugus and Lynnfield areas. Westboro Formation consists primarily of orthoquartzite and subordinate mica schist, calc-silicate rock, amphibolite, and quartzitic biotite gneiss and schist. Westboro as portrayed by Nelson (1974), Bell and Alvord (1976), and Hepburn and DiNitto (1978) are correlative [with varying certainty]. West and south of Boston, disconnected masses of quartzite and associated rocks are shown on State bedrock map by Zen and others (1983) as Westboro although not continuous with belts mapped by Nelson (1974) or Hepburn and DiNitto (1978). Includes isolated quartzite masses mapped by Castle (1964) in Reading area. On State bedrock map, arbitrarily includes thin quartzite mapped as Burlington Formation by Bell and Alvord (1976) because the units are similar and to reduce number of small units on State map. Rocks mapped as Rice Gneiss by Nelson (1974) were included in unnamed metamorphosed mafic and felsic volcanic unit on State bedrock map, but author now feels it should be either a part of Westboro, or a separate unit below it. Westboro in Framingham area and to the northeast is overlain by unnamed assemblage of metamorphosed mafic and felsic volcanic rocks. South of town of Westborough, Westboro is truncated by Bloody Bluff-Lake Char fault system. Intruded by Proterozoic Z batholithic rocks. Equivalent to Plainfield Formation of eastern CT because it lies in same strike belt, and is probably equivalent to Quinnville Quartzite and unnamed mica schist and phyllite of Blackstone Group. Contact between Westboro and Blackstone is arbitrary on State bedrock map on basis of proximity of isolated exposures of the two units to their respective type areas. No area of continuous exposure exists between Westboro and Blackstone (Goldsmith, 1991).
Maryland
Georgetown Mafic Complex (Late Precambrian (?) - Early Paleozoic )
Georgetown Mafic Complex - Poorly exposed complex of tonalite, dark quartz diorite, gabbro, amphibolite, and undifferentiated basic rocks.
Ijamsville Formation and Marburg Schist (Late Precambrian (?))
Ijamsville Formation - Blue, green, or purple phyllite and phyllitic slate, with interbedded metasiltstone and metagraywacke; flattened pumiceous blebs occur locally; and Marburg Schist - Bluish-gray to silvery-green, fine-grained, muscovite-chlorite-albite-quartz schist; intensely cleaved and closely folded; contains interbedded quartzites.
Metarhyolite and Aasociated Pyroclastic Sediments (Late Precambrian)
Metarhyolite and Assoicated Pyroclastic Sediments - Metarhyolite - Dense, blue, cryptocrystalline, with white feldspar phenocrysts and glassy quartz; red porphyritic metarhyolite at contact with Catoctin Metabasalt; and Pyroclastic sediments - tuff breccia, blue slaty tuff, white tuffaceous sericitic schist, and banded green slate.
Ultramafic and Gabbroic Rocks (Early Paleozoic (?))
Ultramafic and Gabbroic Rocks - Mixed metagabbro, serpentinite, metapyroxenite, and actinolite-, chlorite-, and epidote-bearing schists.
Wissahickon Formation; Boulder Gneiss (Late Precambrian (?))
Wissahickon Formation; Boulder Gneiss - (Formerly mapped as Sykesville and Laurel Formations.) Thick-bedded to massive, pebble- and boulder-bearing, arenaceous to pelitic metamorphic rock; typically a medium-grained, garnet-oligoclase-mica-quartz gneiss; locally an intensely foliated gneiss or schist; apparent thickness 15,000 feet.
Wissahickon Formation; Metagraywacke (Late Precambrian (?))
Wissahickon Formation; Metagraywacke - (Formerly mapped as Peters Creek Formation.) Rhythmically interbedded chlorite-muscovite meta-graywacke and fine-grained chlorite-muscovite schist; graded bedding locally preserved; thickness probably 2,000 to 3,000 feet.
Wissahickon Formation (Undivided) (Late Precambrian (?))
Wissahickon Formation (Undivided) - Muscovite-chlorite-albite schist, muscovite-chlorite schist, chloritoid schist, and quartzite; intensely folded and cleaved.
Maine
Devonian Carrabassett Formation (Devonian)
Devonian Carrabassett Formation
Devonian Hildreths Formation (Devonian)
Devonian Hildreths Formation
Devonian Littleton Formation (Devonian)
Devonian Littleton Formation
Devonian - Precambrian Z Appleton Ridge Formation (Devonian - Precambrian Z)
Devonian - Precambrian Z Appleton Ridge Formation
Devonian - Precambrian Z Gonic Formation (Devonian - Precambrian Z)
Devonian - Precambrian Z Gonic Formation
Devonian Seboomook Formation Day Mountain member (Devonian)
Devonian Seboomook Formation Day Mountain member
Devonian Seboomook Formation Mount Blue member (Devonian)
Devonian Seboomook Formation Mount Blue member
Devonian Seboomook Formation Temple Stream member (Silurian-Devonian)
Devonian Seboomook Formation Temple Stream member
Ordovician - Cambrian Megunticook Formation (Ordovician - Cambrian)
Ordovician - Cambrian Megunticook Formation
Ordovician - Precambrian Z Cape Elizabeth Formation (Ordovician - Precambrian Z)
Ordovician - Precambrian Z Cape Elizabeth Formation
Penobscot Formation (Ordovician - Cambrian)
Penobscot Formation
Silurian - Ordovician Vassalboro formation (Silurian - Ordovician)
Silurian - Ordovician Vassalboro formation
Silurian - Precambrian Z Berwick Formation (Silurian - Precambrian Z)
Silurian - Precambrian Z Berwick Formation
Silurian - Precambrian Z Eliot Formation (Silurian - Precambrian Z)
Silurian - Precambrian Z Eliot Formation
Silurian Sangerville Formation (Silurian)
Silurian Sangerville Formation
Silurian Sangerville Formation limestone member (Silurian)
Silurian Sangerville Formation limestone member
Silurian Sangerville Formation Patch Mountain member (Silurian)
Silurian Sangerville Formation Patch Mountain member
Silurian Waterville Formation (Silurian)
Silurian Waterville Formation
Silurian Waterville Formation limestone member (Silurian)
Silurian Waterville Formation limestone member
Michigan
Dickinson Group, undivided (Late Archean) (Late Archean)
Dickinson Group, undivided (Late Archean) - Metavolcanic and metasedimentary rocks in Dickinson County, Mich. From youngest to oldest, consists of Six-Mile Lake Amphibolite, Solberg Schist, and East Branch Arkose.
Metabasalt (Late Archean) (Late Archean)
Metabasalt (Late Archean) - Derived from mafic to intermediate pyroclastic rocks and massive to pillowed lava flows. Unit mapped as Ramsey Formation by Prinz (1981) south of Gogebic Range; mapped as Mona Schist and Kitchi Schist in northern complex of Marquette District.
Minnesota
Felsic to intermediate volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks, mica schist, phyllite, and granitoid rocks (Late Archean)
Felsic to intermediate volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks, mica schist, phyllite, and granitoid rocks - Variably and cataclastically deformed. Unit forms aeromagnetic "quiet zone" and probably contains some rocks of Paleoproterozoic age.
Granite-rich migmatite (Late Archean)
Granite-rich migmatite - Granitic gneiss, paragneiss, schist, and migmatite in the Vermillion Granitic Complex, and other parts of extreme northern Minnesota. Grades into granitoid rocks.
Little Falls Formation; Quartz-rich slate, argillite, and schist in the northwestward extent of the unit and coarse-grained megacrystic garnet-staurolite-schist in the southwestward extent (Early Proterozoic)
Little Falls Formation; Quartz-rich slate, argillite, and schist in the northwestward extent of the unit and coarse-grained megacrystic garnet-staurolite-schist in the southwestward extent - Unit as an uncertain stratigraphic position relative to other Paleoproterozoic stratified units but is apparently younger than the Mille Lacs and North Range Groups.
Mille Lacs Group and related rocks of the Penokean fold-and-thrust belt; Graphitic schist, slate, and silicate iron-formation metamorphosed to the lower greenschist facies and related conditions (Early Proterozoic)
Mille Lacs Group and related rocks of the Penokean fold-and-thrust belt; Graphitic schist, slate, and silicate iron-formation metamorphosed to the lower greenschist facies and related conditions - Includes substantial quantities of mafic to intermediate igneous rocks
Mille Lacs Group and related rocks of the Penokean fold-and-thrust belt; Metagraywacke, metasiltstone, and a variety of schistose rocks metamorphosed to the amphibolite facies (Early Proterozoic)
Mille Lacs Group and related rocks of the Penokean fold-and-thrust belt; Metagraywacke, metasiltstone, and a variety of schistose rocks metamorphosed to the amphibolite facies
Mille Lacs Group and related rocks of the Penokean fold-and-thrust belt; Quartzite at Dam Lake (Early Proterozoic)
Mille Lacs Group and related rocks of the Penokean fold-and-thrust belt; Quartzite at Dam Lake - Quartz arenite and sericitic quartz schist; includes a substantial component of mafic volcanic rock fragments
Mille Lacs Group and related rocks of the Penokean fold-and-thrust bets; Graphitic schist, phyllite and slate interbedded on a fine scale (Early Proterozoic)
Mille Lacs Group and related rocks of the Penokean fold-and-thrust belt; Graphitic schist, phyllite and slate interbedded on a fine scale
Paragneiss, schist, and amphibolite (Late Archean)
Paragneiss, schist, and amphibolite - Amphibolite-facies equivalent of units Amv and Ams; locally includes abundant intrusions of unit Agr.
Unnamed schistose, volcanic, and hypabyssal rocks of mafic composition and volcanic, volcaniclastic, and intrusive rocks of felsic composition (Early Proterozoic)
Unnamed schistose, volcanic, and hypabyssal rocks of mafic composition and volcanic, volcaniclastic, and intrusive rocks of felsic composition - May be correlative with rocks of the Wisconsin magmatic terranes.
North Carolina
Alligator Back Formation; Gneiss (Late Proterozoic)
Gneiss - finely laminated to thin layered; locally contains massive gneiss and micaceous granule conglomerate; includes schist, phyllite, and amphibolite.
Amphibolite (Cambrian/Late Proterozoic)
Amphibolite - metamorphosed mafic extrusive and intrusive rock; includes hornblende gneiss, thin layers of mica schist, calc-silicate rock, and, rarely, marble. Also includes small masses of metadiorite and metagabbro.
Amphibolite (Cambrian/Late Proterozoic)
Amphibolite - metamorphosed mafic extrusive and intrusive rock; includes hornblende gneiss, thin layers of mica schist, and small nonlayered masses of metadiorite and metagabbro.
Amphibolite and Biotite Gneiss (Cambrian/Late Proterozoic)
Amphibolite and Biotite Gneiss - interlayered; minor layers and lenses of hornblende gneiss, metagabbro, mica schist, and granitic rock.
Banded Gneiss (Cambrian/Late Proterozoic)
Banded Gneiss - interlayered with calc-silicate rock, metaconglomerate, amphibolite, sillimanite-mica schist, and granitic rock.
Battleground Formation (Late Proterozoic)
Battleground Formation - quartz-sericite schist with metavolcanic rock, quartz-pebble metaconglomerate, kyanite-sillimanite quartzite, and garnet-quartz rock.
Blacksburg Formation (Cambrian/Late Proterozoic)
Blacksburg Formation - sericite schist, locally with graphite, phyllite with sericite quartzite, banded marble, amphibolite, and minor calc-silicate rock.
Blowing Rock Gneiss (Middle Proterozoic)
Blowing Rock Gneiss (1000 my) - unconformity; abundant white potassic feldspar megacrysts in finely banded biotite schist, locally calcareous; interlayered with quartz-feldspar schist, calcareous biotite schist, phyllite, black slate, calcareous quartzite, sulfidic greenstone, and siliceous tuff.
Coweeta Group (Late Proterozoic)
Coweeta Group - quartz dioritic gneiss, feldspar-quartz-biotite gneiss, metasandstone and quartzite, alumino-silicate schist, garnetiferous biotite gneiss, and minor amphibolite. Quartz dioritic gneiss predominant.
Felsic Mica Gneiss (Cambrian/Late Proterozoic)
Felsic Mica Gneiss - interlayered with biotite and hornblende gneiss and schist.
Fine-grained Biotite Gneiss (Cambrian/Late Proterozoic)
Fine-grained Biotite Gneiss - massive to strongly foliated; minor layers of amphibolite and muscovite schist.
Fine-grained Biotite Gneiss (Cambrian/Late Proterozoic)
Fine-grained Biotite Gneiss - strongly foliated; minor layers of amphibolite and muscovite schist.
Injected Gneiss (Cambrian/Late Proterozoic)
Injected Gneiss - biotite gneiss and schist intruded by numerous sills and dikes of granite, pegmatite, and aplite; minor hornblende gneiss.
Metagraywacke, Amphibolite, and Kyanite Schist (Cambrian/Late Proterozoic)
Metagraywacke, Amphibolite, and Kyanite Schist - metagraywacke (biotite gneiss) interlayered and gradational with amphibolite and kyanite schist; minor ultramafic and granitic rock.
Mica Schist (Cambrian/Late Proterozoic)
Mica Schist - contains garnet, staurolite, kyanite, or sillimanite; includes lenses and layers of quartz schist, micaceous quartzite, biotite gneiss, amphibolite, and phyllite.
Mineral Bluff Formation (Late Proterozoic)
Mineral Bluff Formation - quartz-chlorite-sericite schist and phyllite with thin quartzite layers and minor interbedded graphitic schist, garnet-mica schist, staurolite schist, cross-biotite schist, and dark slate.
Murphy Marble, Andrews Formation, and Nottely Quartzite, undivided (Late Proterozoic)
Murphy Marble, Andrews Formation, and Nottely Quartzite, undivided - Murphy Marble: calcareous to dolomitic; Andrews Formation: calcareous cross-biotite schist; Nottely Quartzite: meta-orthoquartzite with slate.
Ocoee Supergroup, Great Smokey Group; Anakeesta Formation (Late Proterozoic)
Anakeesta Formation - slate to schist, dark gray, graphitic and sulfidic; includes interbedded argillaceous, feldspathic metagraywacke.
Ocoee Supergroup, Great Smokey Group; Copperhill Formation (Late Proterozoic)
Copperhill Formation - metagraywacke, massive, graded bedding common; includes dark-gray slate, mica schist, and nodular calc-silicate rock.
Ocoee Supergroup; Great Smokey Group, undivided (Late Proterozoic)
Great Smokey Group, undivided - thick metasedimentary sequence of massive to graded beds of metagraywacke and metasiltstone with interbedded graphitic and sulfidic slate and schist.
Ocoee Supergroup, Great Smokey Group; Wehutty Formation (Late Proterozoic)
Wehutty Formation - slate to schist, dark gray, graphitic and sulfidic; includes mica schist, metagraywacke, and metaconglomerate.
Ocoee Supergroup, Snowbird Group, undivided (Late Proterozoic)
Snowbird Group, undivided - feldspathic metasiltstone, metasandstone, and phyllite. Basal schist contains lenses of quartz-pebble conglomerate.
Ocoee Supergroup, Snowbird Group; Wading Branch Formation (Late Proterozoic)
Wading Branch Formation - sandy slate to coarse-grained pebbly metagraywacke with local graded bedding. Basal quartz-sericite schist or phyllite.
Phyllite and Schist (Cambrian/Late Proterozoic)
Phyllite and Schist - minor biotite and pyrite; includes phyllonite, sheared fine-grained metasediment and metavolcanic rock.
Phyllite and Schist (Cambrian/Late Proterozoic)
Phyllite and Schist - includes phyllonite and interlayered biotite gneiss.
Phyllite and Schist (Cambrian/Late Proterozoic)
Phyllite and Schist - minor biotite, pyrite, and sillimanite; includes minor quartzite.
Phyllite and Schist (Cambrian/Late Proterozoic)
Phyllite and Schist - locally laminated and pyritic; includes phyllonite, sheared fine-grained metasediment, and metavolcanic rock. In Lilesville granite aureole, includes hornfels.
Phyllite and Schist (Cambrian/Late Proterozoic)
Phyllite and Schist - minor biotite and pyrite; includes phyllonite, sheared fine-grained metasediment and metavolcanic rock.
Quartzite (Cambrian/Late Proterozoic)
Quartzite - interlayered with quartz-muscovite schist, contains muscovite, andalusite, kyanite, or sillimanite.
Rocks of Brevard Fault Zone (Uncertain, possibly Permian or Devonian)
Rocks of Brevard Fault Zone - "fish scale" schist and phyllonite, graphitic; interlayered with feldspathic metasandstone, marble lenses.
New Hampshire
Ammonoosuc Volcanics, White quartz-kyanite rock and silicate iron-formation (Middle - Upper Ordovician)
Ammonoosuc Volcanics, White quartz-kyanite rock and silicate iron-formation.
Clough Quartzite (Lower Silurian (upper Llandoverian))
Clough Quartzite - Orthoquartzite, quartz metaconglomerate, muscovite schist, minor polymictic metaconglomerate. Disconformable below Fitch Formation and unconformable on Ordovician formations. Equivalent, in part, to member C of Rangeley Formation of Maine. Fossiliferous.
Fitch and Clough Formations, undivided (Silurian)
Fitch and Clough Formations, undivided.
Fitch Formation (Upper Silurian; Pridolian and Ludlovian) (Upper Silurian - (Pridolian and Ludlovian))
Fitch Formation - Metamorphosed limestone, calcareous sandstone, siltstone, and dark pelitic schist; lower contact is disconformable on the Clough Quartzite. Fossiliferous.
Gile Mountain Formation, undivided (Lower Devonian)
Gile Mountain Formation, undivided - Gray to tan metawacke and schist or phyllite; gradational into Meetinghouse Slate Member but more thickly bedded and less pelitic than the member. Includes minor metavolcanic lentils.
Hurricane Mountain Formation (Upper Cambrian?)
Hurricane Mountain Formation - Rusty-weathered, dark siliceous scaly slate or schist of flaser structure, polymictic fragments from a few mm to (in Maine) several hundred meters. A melange consisting of metasedimentary, felsic/mafic metavolcanics, and ultramafic rocks..
Madrid and Smalls Falls Formations, undivided (Silurian)
Madrid and Smalls Falls Formations, undivided.
Madrid Formation (Upper Silurian? )
Madrid Formation - Massive to weakly foliated, purple biotite-feldspar granofels, layered calc-silicate, and dark pelitic-sulfidic schist containing calc-silicate pods in upper member; an eastern facies equivalent to the upper part of the Fitch Formation. Locally mapped as the Warner Formation of Nielson (1981) in southern New Hampshire.
Merrimack Group, Eliot Formation (Ordovician? - Silurian?)
Merrimack Group, Eliot Formation - Gray to green phyllite, calcareous quartzite, quartz-mica schist, and well-bedded calc-silicate.
Partridge Formation, undivided (Middle - Upper Ordovician)
Partridge Formation, undivided - Black, rusty-weathering sulfidic-graphitic slate or schist and sparse to abundant metagraywacke. Lies stratigraphically between upper and lower parts of the Ammonoosuc Volcanics.
Partridge Formation, White quartz-kyanite rock (Middle - Upper Ordovician)
Partridge Formation, White quartz-kyanite rock.
Perry Mountain and Rangeley Formations, undivided (Silurian)
Perry Mountain and Rangeley Formations, undivided.
Quimby Formation (Upper Ordovician?)
Quimby Formation - Black graphitic-sulfidic rusty-weathering schist and thickly bedded metagraywacke.
Rangeley Formation, undivided (Lower Silurian (Llandoverian))
Rangeley Formation, undivided.
Rye Complex (Ordovician? - Late Proterozoic?)
Rye Complex - Light-colored to gray schists and gneisses, quartzites, and amphibolites. Variably migmatized and mylonized. Contact with Kittery Formation on west is the Portsmouth Fault.
Smalls Falls Formation, undivided (Upper to Middle Silurian (Ludlovian and Wenlockian))
Smalls Falls Formation, undivided -Very rusty weathering, thinly bedded sulfidic-graphitic schist and pyrrhotitic calc-silicate granofels. Eastern facies equivalent to lower part of the Fitch Formation. Locally mapped as Francestown Formation of Nielson (1981) in southern New Hampshire.
New Jersey
Gneiss granofels and Migmatite (Middle Proterozoic)
Gneiss granofels and Migmatite - Gneiss and granofels range in composition from felsic to intermediate to mafic; intermediate compositions predominate. Contains a wide variety of rock types including graphitic schist and marble. Many rocks were injected by a granitoid that has blue quartz and augen of potassic feldspar and are arteritic migmatites. One body of gneiss contains a 1 m by 0.5 m (3 by 2 ft) phacoid of gabbro that is interpreted to be an olistolith. Unit probably represents a sequence of meta-sedimentary and metavolcanic rocks that have been heavily injected and migmatized by felsic magma.
Manhattan Schist (Lower Cambrian and (or) Late Proterozoic)
Manhattan Schist (Hall, in press) - Medium-dark gray, medium- to coarse-grained schist and gneiss composed of biotite, muscovite, quartz, and plagioclase, and local accessory minerals sillimanite, kyanite, tourmaline, and garnet. Contains some interlayered amphibolite. Unit is not exposed in the map area, but is present in boring logs.
Wissahickon Formation (Lower Cambrian and Late Proterozoic)
Wissahickon Formation - Fine- to medium-grained biotite-quartz-plagioclase schist and gneiss that contains thin amphibolite layers. Schist and gneiss in alternating layers suggest a turbidite sequence of shale and graywacke. The rocks are at high metamorphic grade, and, in places, the more pelitic parts have partly melted forming veins of migmatite. Some exposures show evidence of polymetamorphism as micaceous minerals occur both within the schistosity and as static porphyroblasts.
Nevada
Conglomerate, limestone, meta-andesite, phyllite, and shale (Devonian to Mississippian)
CONGLOMERATE, LIMESTONE, META-ANDESITE, PHYLLITE, AND SHALE-Includes Grossman, Banner, Nelson, and Mountain City Formation. Northern Elko County
Igneous and metamorphic complex (Paleozoic sedimentary rocks with Mesozoic intrusive rocks)
IGNEOUS AND METAMORPHIC COMPLEX-Pegmatitic granite and other granitic rocks complexly intermixed with metasedimentary rocks. Considered to be Mesozoic igneous complex intruding lower Paleozoic and possibly Precambrian Z sedimentary rocks. Grades into units shown on map as lower Paleozoic. Ruby Mountains and East Humboldt Range, Elko County
Metamorphic rocks (Early Proterozoic)
METAMORPHIC ROCKS-Gneiss and schist and lesser amounts of gneissic granite, pyroxenite, hornblendite, migmatite, pegmatite, and marble.
New York
Cheshire Quartzite and Dalton Formation (Cambrian)
Cheshire Quartzite and Dalton Formation
Dolomitic and calcitic marbles interlayered with significant amounts of calcsilicate rock (Middle Proterozoic)
Dolomitic and calcitic marbles interlayered with significant amounts of calcsilicate rock - metasedimentary amphibolite, pyroxene granulite, and various gneisses; includes interlayered diopsidic and tremolitic marble and quartzite, and talc-tremolite rock (mined in Balmat-Edwards belt, northwest Adirondacks).
Everett Schist (Cambrian?)
Everett Schist - minor meta-graywacke lenses. Includes Greylock Schist in Massachusetts.
Everett Schist (Cambrian?)
Everett Schist - locally with minor meta-graywacke lenses.
Inwood Marble (Early Cambrian - Lower Ordovician)
Inwood Marble - dolomite marble, calc-schist, granulite, and quartzite, overlain by calcite marble; grades into underlying patchy Lowerre Quartzite of Early Cambrian age.
Manhattan Formation (A Member) (Middle Ordovician)
Manhattan Formation (A member) - sillimanite-garnet-muscovite-biotite-quartz- plagioclase schists; calcite marble and calcsilicate rock at base.
Quartzite, quartz-biotite schist and graphitic schist (Middle Proterozoic)
Quartzite, quartz-biotite schist and graphitic schist - in part feldspathic, micaceous, garnetiferous, sillimanitic.
Quartzite, quartz schist and graphitic schist (Middle Proterozoic)
Quartzite, quartz schist and graphitic schist - in part feldspathic, micaceous, garnetiferous, sillimanitic.
Walloomsac Formation (Middle Ordovician)
Walloomsac Formation - phyllite, schist, metagraywacke.
Walloomsac Formation (Middle Ordovician)
Walloomsac Formation - slate, phyllite, schist, metagraywacke.
Oregon
Amphibolite of Briggs Creek (Mesozoic or Paleozoic) (Paleozoic or Mesozoic)
Informally called the "Briggs Creek amphibolite" by Garcia (1976) and by Coleman and others (1976). Consists of amphibolite, micaceous quartzite, quartz schist, and recrystallized manganiferous chert. Includes structurally complex amphibole schist and quartz-rich hornblende gneiss of unknown age exposed at and near Chetco Peak west of Cave Junction (Smith and others, 1982)
Condrey Mountain Schist (Triassic? and Paleozoic?) (Paleozoic(?) to Jurassic)
Consists of a variety of schistose rocks characterized by different proportions of muscovite, quartz, graphite, chlorite, actinolite, and epidote, rare thin layers of metachert, and clinozoisite-actinolite-albite-garnet metagabbro. Potassium-argon age on muscovite from unit is about 141 Ma (Lanphere and others, 1968) and on a whole rock sample is about 155 Ma (Suppe and Armstrong, 1972), indicating a Late Jurassic metamorphic age. Protolith is probably Triassic and Paleozoic in age
May Creek Schist (Paleozoic) (Paleozoic(?) to Jurassic)
Layered amphibolite, schist, gneiss, and quartzite. Protolith considered to be of Paleozoic age
Otter Point Formation of Dott (1971) and related rocks (Upper Jurassic) (Late Jurassic)
Highly sheared graywacke, mudstone, siltstone, and shale with lenses and pods of sheared greenstone, limestone, chert, blueschist, and serpentine. Identified as melange by some investigators
Sedimentary rocks of Dothan Formation and related rocks (Lower Cretaceous and Upper Jurassic) (Late Jurassic to Late Cretaceous)
Sandstone, conglomerate, graywacke, rhythmically banded chert lenses. Includes western Dothan and Otter Point Formations of M.C. Blake, Jr. and AS. Jayko (unpublished data, 1985) in Curry and southern Coos Counties
Sedimentary rocks, partly metamorphosed (Triassic and Paleozoic) (Paleozoic to Triassic)
Poorly bedded argillite, chert, phyllite, phyllitic quartzite, calc-phyllite, impure limestone, and marble. In places rocks are strongly foliated. Sparse fossils (Fusilina, corals, and crinoids) indicate that the unit includes rocks of Leonardian, Ochoan, and Late Triassic age (OR084). Includes Elkhorn Ridge Argillite (OR035), Mesozoic and Paleozoic sedimentary rocks of Brown and Thayer (OR008), and the Permian Coyote Butte Formation (OR085). In Baker County includes "sedimentary and volcanic rocks" (MzPza) of Brooks and others (OR039) and metamorphosed sedimentary and minor volcaniclastic rocks containing mineral assemblages indicative of quartz-albite-muscovite-chlorite subfacies and quartz-albite-epidote-biotite subfacies of the greenschist facies. In Jefferson and Wasco Counties north of Prineville, includes "phyllite and sedimentary rocks " of Swanson (OR031). Includes part of the Burnt River Schist (OR035; OR081) and volcaniclastic facies of several metavolcanic units of Permian and Late Triassic age. Not on State map (OR001) in area of La Grande 100K quadrangle, butmapped in OR291 as Elkhorn Ridge Argillite (Triassic Permian, Pennsylvannian, and Devonian?)
Pennsylvania
Antietam and Harpers Formations, undivided (Cambrian)
Antietam and Harpers Formations, undivided - Includes, in descending order, the Antietam (CAa) and Harpers (CAh) Formations. Antietam Formation - gray, buff-weathering quartzite. Harpers Formation - Dark-greenish-gray phyllite and schist containing thin quartzite layers; includes Montalto Member (CAhm) - gray quartztite
Antietam Formation (Cambrian)
Antietam Formation - Gray, buff-weathering quartzite and quartz schist.
Chickies Formation (Cambrian)
Chickies Formation - Light-gray, hard, massive, Scolithus-bearing quartzite and quartz schist; thin, interbedded dark slate at top; conglomerate (Hellam Member) at base.
Greenstone schist (Precambrian)
Greenstone schist - Fine to medium grained, light to medium green; includes probable metavolcanic rocks.
Harpers Formation (Cambrian)
Harpers Formation - Dark-greenish-gray phyllite and schist containing thin quartzite layers.
Harpers Formation (Cambrian)
Harpers Formation - Dark-greenish-gray phyllite and schist containing thin quartzite layers; includes Montalto Member (CAhm).
Lower (Middle?) Cambrian rocks, undivided (Cambrian)
Lower (Middle?) Cambrian rocks, undivided - Lower Cambrian of Berks County includes tectonic slices of many of the following rock units: Zooks Corner (CAzc), Ledger (CAl), Kinzers (CAk), Vintage (CAv), Antietam (CAa, CAah), and Harpers (CAh, CAah) Formations.
Octoraro Formation (Probably lower Paleozoic)
Octoraro Formation - Includes albite-chlorite schist, phyllite, some hornblende gneiss, and granitized members.
Peters Creek Schist (Probably lower Paleozoic)
Peters Creek Schist - Chlorite-sericite schist containing interbedded quartzite.
Setters Quartzite (Probably lower Paleozoic)
Setters Quartzite - Includes white feldspathic quartzite, gray mica gneiss, and mica schist.
Rhode Island
Harmony Group - Absalona Formation (Late Proterozoic? or older?)
Harmony Group - Absalona Formation - Gray, medium- to coarse-grained biotite granite gneiss characterized by alkali feldspar porphyroblasts. Consists of biotite, hornblende, quartz, microcline, microperthite, albite, epidote, garnet, and chlorite. Subordinate amounts of quartz-biotite schist, amphibolite, and quartzite occur as layers and isolated bodies.
Narragansett Bay Group - Rhode Island Formation (Pennsylvanian)
Narragansett Bay Group - Rhode Island Formation - In northern Rhode Island, consists of gray to black, fine- to coarse-grained quartz arenite, litharenite, shale, and conglomerate, with minor beds of anthracite and meta-anthracite. In southern Rhode Island, consists of meta-sandstone, meta-conglomerate, schist, carbonaceous schist, and graphite. Plant fossils are common.
South Carolina
Amphibolite and interlayered biotite gneiss, hornblende gneiss and minor mica schist (Cambrian or Neoproterozoic)
Amphibolite and interlayered gneiss, hornblende gneiss and minor mica schist
Battleground Formation, Metasedimentary rocks, undivided (Neoproterozoic)
Battleground Formation, Metasedimentary rocks, undivided: quartz-sericite schist/phyllite and interlayered quartzite, quartz-pebble conglomerate, high-alumina quartzite, and manganiferous schist
Biotite gneiss with interlayered marble, calcsilicate gneiss, sillimanite-muscovite schist, and garnet-quartz rock (undetermined)
Biotite gneiss having interlayered marble, calc-silicate rock, sillimanite-muscovite schist, and garnet-quartz rock
Biotite-plagioclase-quartz gneiss and biotite-muscovite schist (Cambrian or Neoproterozoic)
Biotite-plagioclase-quartz gneiss and biotite-muscovite schist: variably interlayered, containing subordinate layers of amphibolite and sillimanite-mica schist
Biotite quartz-plagioclase gneiss (Paleozoic or Neoproterozoic)
Biotite quartz-plagioclase gneiss: biotite quartz-plagioclase gneiss with minor interlayers of amphibolite gneiss and mica schist
Blacksburg Formation (Neoproterozoic)
Blacksburg Formation: metamorphosed sedimentary sequence of interlayered sericite schist and phyllite, sericite quartzite, marble, amphibolite and calc-silicate rock
Hammett Grove Meta-igneous Suite - ultramafic rocks (Paleozoic or Neoproterozoic)
Hammett Grove Meta-igneous Suite - ultramafic rocks: metamorphosed ultramafic rocks: hornblendite, pyroxenite, serpentinite and talc schist
Little River Sequence, metasedimentary rocks (Cambrian or Neoproterozoic)
Little River Sequence, metasedimentary rocks: white-mica schist and phyllite, metatuff, quartz-muscovite schist, and minor quartzite
Migmatite paragneiss and schist of Kiokee belt (Cambrian or Neoproterozoic)
Migmatite paragneiss and schist of Kiokee belt: migmatitic hornblende-biotite paragneiss having interlayered sillimanite schist and amphibolite
Phyllonite and phyllonitic schist (Late Paleozoic)
Phyllonite and phyllonitic schist
Quartz-sericite phyllite and schist (Cambrian to Neoproterozoic)
Quartz-sericite phyllite and schist
Sillimanite schist and sillimanite-mica schist (Cambrian or Neoproterozoic)
Sillimanite schist and sillimanite-mica schist: sillimanite-rich aluminous schist composed mainly of sillimanite, biotite, muscovite, and minor quartz
Tallulah Falls Formation, gneiss and schist (Neoproterozoic)
Tallulah Falls Formation, gneiss and schist: biotite-quartz-plagioclase gneiss interpreted to be metagraywacke, and interlayered biotite-muscovite schist, garnet-mica schist and amphibolite
South Dakota
Iron-Formation (Proterozoic | Paleoproterozoic)
Banded, dark-green, reddish-brown, and white iron-formation, ferruginous chert, and minor mica schist. Includes three or more ages of oxide-, carbonate-, silicate-, and sulifide-facies iron-formation and interbedded tuffaceous rocks. Thickness 20-500 ft (6-152 m).
Lower Metagraywacke (Proterozoic | Paleoproterozoic)
Light- to dark-gray, medium- to thick-bedded, quartz-mica schist containing calc-silicate lenses and ellipsoidal masses. Thickness up to 7,000 ft (2,133 m).
Metabasalt (Proterozoic | Paleoproterozoic)
Dark-green amphibolite, actinolite schist, and greenstone. Interflow units consists of graphitic schist, chert, and carbonate- and silicate-facies iron-formation. Thickness of individual flows 50-400 ft (244-1,524 m).
Metabasalt (Archean(?) Proterozoic | Paleoproterozoic)
Dark-green amphibolite and amphibolite schist. Thickness of individual flows 50-200 ft (15-61 m).
Metaconglomerate (Proterozoic | Paleoproterozoic)
Tan to light-gray, conglomeratic siliceous schist, feldspathic schist, and minor marble. Thickness locally over 6,000 ft (1,829 m).
Metaconglomerate and Metaquartzite (Proterozoic | Paleoproterozoic)
Light-gray to gray, conglomeratic and feldspathic schist, biotite schist, taconite, and phyllite. Individual conglomerate and fanglomerate tongues from 100-500 ft (30-152 m) thick. Total thickness over 10,000 ft (3,048 m).
Metagabbro (Proterozoic | Paleoproterozoic)
Dark-green sills of amphibolite, actinolite schist, greenstone, and serpentine. Thickness of sills variable, up to 1,000 ft (305 m).
Metagraywacke (Archean(?) Proterozoic | Paleoproterozoic)
Gray, siliceous mica schist and impure quartzite. Thickness undetermined.
Metagraywacke (Proterozoic | Paleoproterozoic)
Light- to dark-gray, silceous mica schist and impure quartzite. Differentiated where possible into three primary tongues or lenses. (Xgw1, Xgw2, and Xgw3) Thickness from 1,000 ft to over 5,000 ft (305-1,524 m).
Metagraywacke Unit 1 (Proterozoic | Paleoproterozoic)
Lower Xgw- Light- to dark-gray, silceous mica schist and impure quartzite.
Metagraywacke Unit 2 (Proterozoic | Paleoproterozoic)
Middle Xgw- Light- to dark-gray, silceous mica schist and impure quartzite.
Metagraywacke Unit 3 (Proterozoic | Paleoproterozoic)
Upper Xgw- Light- to dark-gray, silceous mica schist and impure quartzite.
Metamorphosed Black Shale (Proterozoic | Paleoproterozoic)
Dark-gray biotite schist, biotite-muscovite schist, pyritic biotite schist, and local massive chert beds. Thickness approximately 2000-4000 ft (610-1,219 m).
Metamorphosed Carbonaceous Shale (Proterozoic | Paleoproterozoic)
Dark-gray to gray, siliceous biotite phyllite and schist. Thickness greater than 2,500 ft (762m).
Metamorphosed Carbonaceous Shale (Proterozoic | Paleoproterozoic)
Dark-gray to gray, siliceous biotite phyllite, calcareous biotite phyllite, and schist. Minimum thickness 1,500 ft (457 m).
Metamorphosed Conglomerate (Proterozoic | Paleoproterozoic)
Gray to grayish-brown, conglomeratic biotite phyllite, siliceous biotite phyllite, mica schist, quartzite, and iron-formation. Thickness up to 2,000 ft (610 m).
Metamorphosed Shale (Proterozoic | Paleoproterozoic)
Gray to dark-gray phylite, slate, and mica schist. Estimated thickness at least 5,000 ft (1,524 m).
Metamorphosed Siltstone (Proterozoic | Paleoproterozoic)
Medium-gray to dark-greenish-gray phyllite, slate, and biotite schist containing minor chert and amphibolite. Locally intruded by thin metagabbro sills. Thickness 1,000-3,000 ft (305-914 m).
Metamorphosed Tuffaceous Shale (Proterozoic | Paleoproterozoic)
Light-gray to light-tan, muscovite schist and muscovite phylite. Thickness approximately 1,000-3,000 ft (305-914 m).
Metaquartzite (Proterozoic | Paleoproterozoic)
Light-tan quartzite, siliceous schist, and minor chert. Thickness 800-5,000 ft (244-1,524 m).
Older Metasedimentary Rocks (Archean )
Gray phyillite, mica schist, and biotite-plagioclase schist. Total thickness unknown; approximately 500 ft (152 m) exposed.
Upper Metagraywacke (Proterozoic | Paleoproterozoic)
Light- to dark-gray, quartz-mica-feldspar schist, quartz-mica schist, staurolite and garnet-rich schist, metaconglomerate, calc-silicate gneiss, and cummingtonite-quartz schist. Thickness up to 14,000 ft (4,267 m).
Tennessee
Cranberry Granite (Precambrian)
Cranberry Granite - Complex of intertonguing rock types including migmatite, granitic gneisses, monzonite, quartz diorite, greenstone, mica and hornblende schists, abundant granitic pegmatite.
Mount Rogers Group including Bakersville Gabbro, Beech Granite, Cranberry Granite, and Roan Gneiss (Precambrian)
Mount Rogers Group - Metavolcanics, typically purplish and reddish; massive lavas and tuffs, altered rhyolites and quartz latites; strongly foliated; interbedded arkose, shale, and conglomerate. Thickness 1,000 to 3,000 feet; Includes Bakersville Gabbro - Metagabbro, dark, porphyritic; contains diorite, basalt, anorthosite, and diabase; occurs as thin to massive dikes and lenticular masses; Beech Granite - Granite, porphyritic, light-gray to reddish; coarse potash feldspar crystals and clustered interstitial mafics (chloritized biotite and hornblende) give spotted appearance; includes Max Patch Granite; Cranberry Granite - Complex of intertonguing rock types including migmatite, granitic gneisses, monzonite, quartz diorite, greenstone, mica and hornblende schists, abundant granitic pegmatite; and Roan Gneiss - Layered hornblende and garnet gneiss and granitic migmatite with zones of mica schist and amphibolite, foliation commonly contorted; contains numerous granitic and gabbroic dikes.
Roan Gneiss (Precambrian)
Roan Gneiss - Layered hornblende and garnet gneiss and granitic migmatite with zones of mica schist and amphibolite, foliation commonly contorted; contains numerous granitic and gabbroic dikes.
Texas
Big Branch Gneiss (preCambrian-Proterozoic)
Big Branch Gneiss
Lost Creek Gneiss (preCambrian-Proterozoic)
Lost Creek Gneiss
Packsaddle Schist (preCambrian-Proterozoic [Llano])
Packsaddle Schist
Valley Spring Gneiss (preCambrian-Proterozoic)
Valley Spring Gneiss
Utah
Cambrian quartzite in northwestern Utah (Cambrian?)
Older Precambrian metamorphic rocks in Logan-Huntsville Allochthon (Proterozoic X)
Older Precambrian metamorphic rocks in southwestern Utah (Precambrian)
Older Precambrian metamorphic rocks in Uinta Mountains-Uinta Basin region (Proterozoic W)
Younger Precambrian metamorphic rocks in northwestern Utah (Proterozoic X)
Virginia
Alligator Back Formation - Actinolite schist (Proterozoic Z-Cambrian)
Alligator Back Formation - Actinolite schist
Alligator Back Formation - Banded marble (Proterozoic Z-Cambrian)
Alligator Back Formation - Banded marble
Alligator Back Formation - Feldspathic metagraywacke (Proterozoic Z-Cambrian)
Alligator Back Formation - Meta-argillite is feldspathic metagraywacke; graphitic mica schist, and quartzite.
Amphibolite, Amphibole Gneiss, and Schist (Proterozoic Y)
Amphibolite, amphibole gneiss, and schist.
Amphibolite and Amphibole-Bearing Gneiss and Schist (Proterozoic)
Amphibolite and amphibole-bearing gneiss and schist.
Annandale Group - Accotink Schist (Proterozoic Z-Cambrian)
Annandale Group - Accotink Schist.
Arvonia Formation - Kyanite quartzite and schist. (Ordovician)
Arvonia Formation - Kyanite quartzite and schist.
Arvonia Formation - Slate and porphyroblastic schist (Ordovician)
Arvonia Formation - Slate and porphyroblastic schist
Bassett Formation - Amphibolite. (Proterozoic Z-Cambrian)
Bassett Formation - Amphibolite.
Biotite Gneiss and Schist (Proterozoic)
Biotite gneiss and schist.
Buffards Formation (Ordovician)
Buffards Formation - Micaceous conglomerate, schist, and phyllite.
Candler Formation - Phyllite and schist (Cambrian)
Candler Formation - Phyllite in central Blue Ridge Anticlinorium; Phyllite, metasiltstone and quartz-mica schist in southwest Blue Ridge Anticlinorium
Gneiss and Schist (Proterozoic)
Gneiss and schist.
Hyco Formation (Proterozoic Z)
Hyco Formation - Lithic and crystal metatuff
Interlayered Mafic and Felsic Metavolcanic Rocks - Amphibolite, hornblende-biotite gneiss, and schist. (Cambrian)
Interlayered Mafic and Felsic Metavolcanic Rocks - Amphibolite, hornblende-biotite gneiss, and schist.
Interlayered Mafic and Felsic Metavolcanic Rocks - Foliated felsite (Cambrian)
Interlayered Mafic and Felsic Metavolcanic Rocks - Foliated felsite
Interlayered Mafic and Felsic Metavolcanic Rocks - Quartzofeldspathic biotite gneiss (Cambrian)
Interlayered Mafic and Felsic Metavolcanic Rocks - Quartzofeldspathic biotite gneiss
Kyanite Schist (Proterozoic)
Kyanite schist
Lynchburg Group; Metagraywacke (Proterozoic Z)
Lynchburg Group - Metagraywacke
Mather Gorge Formation -- Schist (Proterozoic Z-Cambrian)
Mather Gorge Formation - Schist.
Metagraywacke, Quartzose Schist, and Melange (Proterozoic Z-Cambrian)
Metagraywacke, Quartzose Schist, and Melange - Meta-argillite is metagraywacke; quartzose schist
Metasedimentary Rocks Undivided (Cambrian-Ordovician)
Metasedimentary rocks
Piney Branch Complex (Proterozoic Z-Cambrian)
Piney Branch Complex - Metamorphosed mafic and ultramafic rocks
Quantico Formation - Micaceous quartzite (Ordovician)
Quantico Formation - Micaceous quartzite
Quantico Formation - Slate and porphyroblastic schist (Ordovician)
Quantico Formation - Slate and porphyroblastic schist
Schist (Proterozoic)
Schist as exotic blocks within melange units
Swift Run Formation (Proterozoic Z)
Swift Run Formation - Phyllite, metasandstone, and metaconglomerate.
Ta River Metamorphic Suite (Cambrian)
Ta River Metamorphic Suite - Amphibolite gneiss
Ultramafic Rocks (Proterozoic Z-Cambrian)
Ultramafic rocks
Vermont
Albee Formation (Ordovician)
Albee Formation - Massive, gray, white-weathered quartzite and feldspathic quartzite interbedded with greenish-gray slate, phyllite, feldspthic phyllite and quartzose argillaceous phyllite. Micaceous quartzite, quartz-mica schist, mica schist and hornfels contining porphyroblasts of biotite, garnet, staurolite and sillimanite in the vicinity of granitic plutons. Soda-rhyolite tuff occurs locally. Micaceous quartzite characterized by thin, schistose "pinstripe" partings is common in many areas.
Cavendish Formation, Readsboro Member (Cambrian?)
Cavendish Formation, Readsboro Member - Quartz-muscovite schist containing biotite or chlorite and characterized by conspicuous porphyroblasts of sodic plagioclase; less commonly quartz-muscovite-paragonite schist containing chlorite, garnet, or chloritoid, or, in Chester dome, quartz-muscovite-paragonite schist containing garnet, staurolite, and locally kyanite (Gassetts schist). The Cavendish Formation is reinstated and considered part of the Mount Holly Complex in VT. Usage follows Thompson (1950), but is extended to include some rocks on Star Hill, including inner and outer cover rocks assigned by Downie (1982) to Hoosac and Pinney Hollow Formations. Formation is divided into four map units: calc-silicate rock and gneiss, marble, feldspathic schist or granofels, and the Gassetts Schist Member. The Cavendish correlates with the Wilcox Formation of the Mount Holly Complex in the Green Mountain massif, and therefore, is of Middle Proterozoic age (Ratcliffe, in press).
Clough Formation (Silurian)
Clough Formation - Quartzite, quartz-conglomerate, and mica schist; lenses of fossiliferous calcareous quartzite in upper part. (Southeastern Vermont).
Fitch Formation (Silurian)
Fitch Formation - Quartz-plagioclase-biotite granulite; actinolite-diopside granulite; impure limestone and dolomite; mica schist; the carbonate-rich beds are typically an inch or two thick and segmented so as to give the weathered outcrop a characteristic pitted appearance. (Southeastern Vermont).
Gile Mountain Formation, Hall Stream Member (Devonian)
Gile Mountain Formation, Hall Stream Member - Highly feldspathic grit, probably volcanic; feldspathic chlorite-ankerite schist and amphibolite; all northeast of Nulhegan River.
Hoosac Formation, Plymouth Member (Cambrian)
Hoosac Formation, Plymouth Member - Quartzite, schistose quartzite, dolomitic quartzite; carbonaceous phyllite; buff to dark gray dolomite with partings locally of carbonaceous phyllite; quartz-sericite-chlorite-albite schist; carbonaceous albite schist. (Southern and Central Vermont). Revised the Plymouth Member of the Hoosac Formation of Doll and others (1961) to the Plymouth Formation. Consists of a series of feldspathic and dolomitic quartzites, dolostones and black phyllites that overlie probable Middle Proterozoic gneisses. The Plymouth Formation can be divided into several informal members. The lower contact of the formation is below a sequence of dolomitic quartzites or thin bedded quartzite. Dark laminated silty phyllites laterally replace the more feldspathic quartzites and dark-gray schistose quartzites, massive vitreous quartzites, and dolomitic quartzites pass upward to the east into well bedded cream-weathered light-gray dolostone breccia; these lithologies make up the dolostone member of the Plymouth Formation. The upper member of the Plymouth Formation is a black graphitic and siliceous phyllite that contains 1 to 3 cm thick layers of dark-gray ferruginous quartzite, dolomitic quartzite, and ribbony beds of dolostone. The upper contact of the Plymouth Formation is placed at the first occurrence of light-silvery-green magnetite-muscovite-quartz knotted phyllites of the Pinney Hollow Formation (Ratcliffe, 1994).
Littleton Formation (Devonian)
Littleton Formation - Gray slate and phyllite containing interbeds of gray schistose quartzite 1/4 inch to 6 inches thick. West of Guildhall are lustrous, light to dark gray biotite-garnet phyllite and schist, some slate, and subordinate quartzite and impure quartzite. South of Bellows Falls gray phyllite passes eastward into gray mica schist containing porphyroblasts of biotite, garnet, and staurolite.
Missisquoi Formation, Moretown Member (Ordovician)
Missisquoi Formation, Moretown Member - Quartzite and quartz-plagioclase granulite, in layers 1/8 to several inches thick, separated by "pinstripe" partings that contain muscovite, chlorite, epidote, biotite, and locally garnet; also greenish quartz-sericite-chlorite phyllite and schist, and minor carbonaceous phyllite. Schist and phyllite commonly contain biotite and garnet porphyroblasts in southern Vermont.
Missisquoi Formation, Whetstone Hill Member (Ordovician)
Missisquoi Formation, Whetstone Hill Member - Carbonaceous black to light gray phyllite and schist containing porphyroblasts of biotite and garnet; beds of gray micaceous quartzite, fine-grained biotite gneiss and amphibolite.
Mount Holly Complex (Precambrian)
Mount Holly Complex - Mainly fine- to medium-grained biotitic gneiss, locally muscovitic, and in western areas chloritic; massive and granitoid in some localities, fine-grained or schistose and compositionally layered in others; also abundant amphibolite and hornblende gneiss, and minor beds of mica schist, quartzite, and calc-silicate granulite; includes numerous small bodies of pegmatite and gneissoid granitic rock. Includes a suite of metatonalites, metatrondhjemite, and possible metadacite with chemical characteristics of a calc-alkaline volcanic-plutonic suite. Mappable units are College Hill Granite Gneiss and 10 unnamed subdivisions including several varieties of gneiss as well as schist, amphibolite, and quartzite. U-Pb zircon upper intercept ages of 1.35 to 1.30 Ga have been determined and interpreted as age of crystallization (Ratcliffe and others, unpub. data). Cores of abraded zircon obtained from College Hill Granite Gneiss of Mount Holly Complex have a U-Pb upper intercept age of 1245 +/-14 Ma, interpreted as crystallization age for that granite (Aleinikoff and others, 1990). Dust collected by abrasion of zircons, thought to represent migmatitic overgrowth, has a Pb-Pb age of approx 1100 Ma. These data suggest that College Hill Granite Gneiss was intruded at 1245 Ma and migmatized at 1100 Ma. On north and south slopes of College Hill, College Hill Granite Gneiss grades outward into migmatitic biotite granite gneiss of Mount Holly Complex. College Hill is discordant to contacts and folds in paragneiss units of Mount Holly Complex. Dacitic metavolcanics are found within Washington Gneiss of Berkshire massif of MA (Ratcliffe and Zartman, 1968). They are interbedded with thick succession of rusty-weathering, quartz-pebble gneisses, calc-silicate rocks and garnet-sillimanite schist similar to, but much thicker than, the rusty-weathering gneiss and schist unit of Mount Holly Complex exposed in Green Mountains of VT. It is possible that the metadacitic and metatrondhjemitic suite of VT constitutes a lateral, south-to-north facies of the Washington Gneiss of MA (Ratcliffe, in press).
Northfield Formation (Devonian - Silurian)
Northfield Formation - Dark gray to black quartz-sericite slate or phyllite with fairly widely-spaced interbeds a few inches thick of siltstone and silty crystalline limestone like that of the Waits River Formation; calcareous slate north of Lamoille River; phyllite passes into gray quartz-sericite schist containing abundant porphyroblasts of biotite and garnet in southern Vermont.
Orfordville Formation, Post Pond Volcanics (Ordovician)
Orfordville Formation, Post Pond Volcanics - Greenstone, green chloritic schist interbedded with schistose felsite, quartz-feldspar-sericite schist; fine-grained chloritic, biotitic gneiss, all west of Ammonoosuc fault; mainly amphibolite east of the Ammonoosuc fault.
Orfordville Formation, Sunday Mountain Volcanics (Ordovician)
Orfordville Formation, Sunday Mountain Volcanics - Greenstone, chloritic schist, felsite, and quartz-feldspar-sericite schist.
Ottauquechee Formation (Cambrian)
Ottauquechee Formation - Black carbonaceous phyllite or schist containing interbeds of massive quartzite commonly criss-crossed by veins of white quartz; quartzite is dark gray and carbonaceous, light gray, or white; also includes light green quartz-sericite-chlorite phyllite or schist and sercitic quartzite; beds of phyllitic graywacke and feldspar granule conglomerate are north of Lamoille River. Schist contains abundant porphyroblasts of garnet and biotite from Ludlow south. The Ottauquechee contains two major units: A black phyllite and the Thatcher Brook Member. The black phyllite contains a previously unreported sub-unit of gray carbonate schist. The Thatcher Brook Member (named in an abstract by Armstrong and others, 1988) is a carbonaceous albitic schist with greenstones and ultramafics. These rocks have previously been included in the Ottauquechee but have never been differentiated from the black phyllite. Member is in fault contact with the silvery green schist of the Pinney Hollow Formation to the west. Age is Cambrian (Ratcliff, in press).
Pinnacle Formation (Cambrian)
Pinnacle Formation - Schistose graywacke, gray to buff, commonly striped, quartz-albite-sericite-biotite-chlorite rock predominates; quartz-cobble and boulder conglomerate is common, chiefly near base. (Northern and Central Vermont).
Pinney Hollow Formation (Cambrian)
Pinney Hollow Formation - Pale green quartz-sericite (muscovite-paragonite)-chlorite phyllite and schist with abundant magnetite, chloritoid phyllite and schist, quartz-sericite-albite-chlorite schist, and rare beds of carbonaceous and schistose quartzite; garnet porphyroblasts common south of Ottauquechee River. (Southern and Central Vermont).
Pinney Hollow Formation, carbonaceous phyllite and schist (Cambrian)
Pinney Hollow Formation, carbonaceous phyllite and schist. (Southern and Central Vermont).
Pinney Hollow Formation, Ottauquechee, and Stowe Formations, Undifferentiated (Ordovician)
Pinney Hollow Formation, Ottauquechee, and Stowe Formations, Undifferentiated - Includes quartz-muscovite-garnet-chlorite-biotite schist, rusty carbonaceous schist, amphibolite, and schistose quartzite. Schist locally contains porphyroblasts of staurolite and kyanite. On flanks of Chester and Athens domes.
Shaw Mountain Formation (Silurian)
Shaw Mountain Formation - Chiefly tan to brown weathered quartzose limestone and calcareous quartzite characterized by specks of limonite after ankerite; locally underlain by quartz conglomerate and overlain by blue fossiliferous crystalline limestone; greenstone and quartz-sericite schist.
Shaw Mountain Formation (Silurian)
Shaw Mountain Formation - Quartzite, quartz conglomerate, cummingtonite schist, amphibolite, and quartz-sericite schist with porphyroblasts of biotite and garnet.
Stowe Formation, carbonaceous schist and phyllite (Cambrian-Ordovician)
Stowe Formation, carbonaceous schist and phyllite - north of Lamoille River. Occurs in several small areas to the south, not shown on map.
Waits River Formation (Devonian)
Waits River Formation - Gray quartzose and micaceous crystalline limestone weathered to distinctive brown earthy crust; interbedded and intergradational with gray quartz-muscovite phyllite or schist. Where more metamorphosed the limestones contain actinolite, hornblende, zoisite, diopside, wollastonite, and garnet, and the phyllite and schist, biotite, garnet, and locally andalusite, kyanite or sillimanite.
Waits River formation, Standing Pond Volcanic Member (Devonian)
Waits River formation, Standing Pond Volcanic Member - Amphibolite, garnet amphibolite, coarse garnet schist with fasciculitic hornblende, and hornblende maculite; contains pillow lavas near St. Johnsbury and passes eastward into actinolitic greenstone and greenstone south of Windsor.
Washington
Cambrian phyllite (Cambrian)
Predominantly gray-green, banded phyllite, some sericite schist, abundant thin beds of quartzite, especially in lower part of unit, and limestone in upper part; northern Pend Oreille County. Much the same lithology but more conspicuous subunits of quartzite, limestone, and schist in northeastern Stevens County. Gray phyllite, greenish argillite, andalusite schist, minor inerbedded quartzite and siliceous dolomite, especially in lower part, and much gray limestone in upper part; north-central Stevens County. Limestone bed in lower part of unit contains Lower Cambrian fossils (Archaeocyathus).
Cambrian quartzite (Cambrian)
Gritstone with conglomerate in lower part and gray, white, and buff platy quartzite in upper part grading upward into phyllite; northern Pend Oreille County. Light-gray, platy, medium- to thick-bedded quartzite in upper part and darker impure quartzite with some interbedded argillite or phyllite in lower part; north-central Stevens County. White, gray, and reddish, medium- to thick-bedded quartzite in lower part and thin interbeds of quartzite and argillite in upper part, with very low Lower Cambrian fossils (Nevadia, Hyolthellus, and three genera of brachipods) near base of upper part; Addy district of central Stevens County. Thick argillite and thin quartzite units form an uppermost zone in southwestern Stevens County. Conspicuous phyllite units near base in north-central Lincoln County.
Carboniferous rocks (Late Devonian to Mississippian)
Thin-bedded graywacke, shale, argillite, slate, schist, volcanic breccia, gritstone, conglomerate, and limestone on northeast shore of Orcas Island. Limestone or dolomitic limestone, apparently interbedded with limy argillite and graywacke, forms belt of small separate outcrops between Springdale and Valley in southeastern Stevens County. Late Devonian to Early Pennsylvanian in age.
Lower Paleozoic rocks, undivided (Paleozoic; likely Ordovician)
Predominantly gneiss and schist in northern Ferry County. Quartzite, partly interbedded with dolomitic and calcitic marble, lime-silicate gneiss, and amphibolite; including in places forsterite marblean diopside marble, quartz-biotite-sillimanite schist and sillimanite-orthoclase gneiss in northeastern Ferry County. Quartzite with overlying limestone in southeastern Stevens County. Some upper Paleozoic and Precambrian rocks may be included.
Mesozoic granitic rocks, undivided (Mostly Cretaceous-Jurassic)
Granite, quartz monzonite, quartz diorite, granodiorite, and trondhjemite. Includes diorite in southeastern Washington; diorite and gabbro near Concunully in Okanogan County; gneiss, schist, and migmatites in areas of Chelan, Colville, and Okanogan batholiths. Includes high-grade metamorphic rocks of Precambrian age in Spokane area.
Precambrian conglomerate (Late-Proterozoic)
Gray-brown, coarse, poorly sorted pebbles and cobbles of limestone, dolomite, reddish-brown quartzite, black slate or phyllite, and rarely granitic rocks in a gray sandy phyllite matrix; northeastern Pend Oreille County and southwestern Stevens County. Rocks become finer grained and more schistose and the unit becomes thicker toward the southwest, where there is included an isolated subunit which may be a tillite, consisting of cobbles, boulders, and blocks of argillite and carbonate rocks in a fine silty matrix.
Precambrian rocks, undivided (Proterozoic)
Predominantly phyllite with some schist, limestone, dolomite, quartzite, and volcanic rocks; northeastern Pend Oreille County. Mainly quartzite sandstone in upper part, dark-gray argillite with sandstone and limestone in middle part, and sandstone with argillite in lower part; southeastern Pend Oreille County. Banded slate with quartzite and dolomite; southwestern Stevens County. Quartzite, siliceous argillite, and argilliceous quartzite grading into argillite and quartz-mica schists form south ot north; southeastern Stevens County. Quartzite, argillite, quartz-feldspar gneiss, and other metamorphic rocks in northeastern Whitman and southeastern Spokane Counties are partly if not all extenstions of the Belt strata.
Precambrian volcanic rocks (Late-Proterozoic)
Mostly homogenous schistose greenstone; in places massive, mottled, and containing conspicuous calcite and epidote. Tuffaceous chlorite schist in upper part in northern Pend Oreille County. Amphibolite and plagioclase amphibolite in Little Pend Oreille Lakes district. Massive to sheared or schistose greenstone with dark-green ovoid spots; agglomeratic and amygodaloidal in places; sheared pillows near Blue Creek, central Stevens County; minor intrusive phase and probable center of eruption west of Finch magnesite quarry; central to southwestern Stevens County.
Pre-Carboniferous crystalline complex (Devonian)
Metahornblendite, amphibolite, gneiss, metadiorite, meta-quartz diorite, and trondhjemite. As klippes along western slope of northern Cascade Mountains.
Pre-Tertiary metamorphic rocks, undivided (Probably Permian)
Schist, gneiss, marble, quartzite, amphibolite, greenstone, metaconglomerate, graywacke; includes metasedimentary, volcanic, and intrusive rocks. Some areas, as on San Juan Islands, show little if any metamorphism.
Pre-Tertiary sedimentary and metasedimentary rocks, undivided (Mostly Early Cretaceous to Middle Jurassic, possibly includes minor Eocene rocks)
Graywacke, argillite, phyllite, chert, talc, and graphite schist; some faulted-in blocks of serpentinite and greenstone. Includes minor limestone on San Juan Island.
Pre-Tertiary ultrabasic intrusive rocks (Late-Jurassic)
Peridotite and pyroxenite; generally altered partly or completely to serpentine. Includes serpentinite and saxonite on Sumas Mountain, Whatcom County.
Pre-Tertiary volcanic rocks, undivided (Probably mostly Jurassic)
Andesite and basalt flows, and greenstone; includes minor interbedded limestone, arkose, quartzite, and chert beds.
Pre-Upper Jurassic gneiss (Mostly Cretaceous)
Biotite, quartz diorite, trondhjemite, and hornblende gneisses, many of which are migmatitic; includes small granitic bodies locally. Small areas of mica schist, marble, amphibolite, and lime-silicate rocks in Entiat Mountains area of Chelan County.
Pre-Upper Jurassic metamorphic rocks of the low-grade zone (Jurassic)
Greenschist, phyllite, and slate; includes some limestone, quartzose phyllite, schistose metaconglomerate, breccia, and basic igneous rocks. Includes schist locally.
Pre-Upper Jurassic metamorphic rocks of the medium and high-grade zone (Early Jurassic-Triassic)
Schist, amphibolite, and minor lime-silicate rocks, marble, quartzite, and metaconglomerate.
Tertiary-Cretaceous granitic intrusive rocks (Early Tertiary-Late Cretaceous)
Granite, granodiorite, trondhjemite, and quartz diorite. Late Cretaceous and/or early Tertiary.
Upper Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous sedimentary and volcanic rocks (Late Cretaceous-Jurassic)
Sedimentary and volcanic rocks, undivided. Graywacke, argillite, siltstone, slate, volcanic rocks, phyllite, greenschist, and greenstone.
Upper Paleozoic rocks, undivided (Ordovician)
Mostly graywacke, interbedded quartzite and phyllite, greenstone and serpentine, and black shale with minor limestone. Some quartz-mica schist in Bald Knob area of Ferry County. Schist, gneiss, and amphibolite in other parts of Ferry County. Some rocks of lower Paleozoic age, possibly Precambrian, and Mesozoic may be included.
Wisconsin
Banded iron-formation and associated volcanogenic rocks (Late Archean )
Banded iron-formation and associated volcanogenic rocks - Magnetite-quartz iron-formation and associated talc schist in aluminous quartzofeldspathic schist (unit Wt)
Biotite schist (Early Proterozoic)
Biotite schist - Metamorphosed graywacke in poorly exposed areas in northwestern Wisconsin. Sample at one locality (near Blockhouse Lake, 10 km northeast of Park Falls, T. 40 N., R. 1 E.) has a U-Pb zircon age of 1852 +/- 6 Ma (Sims and others, 1985b)
Metabasalt (Late Archean) (Late Archean)
Metabasalt (Late Archean) - Derived from mafic to intermediate pyroclastic rocks and massive to pillowed lava flows. Unit mapped as Ramsey Formation by Prinz (1981) south of Gogebic Range; mapped as Mona Schist and Kitchi Schist in northern complex of Marquette District.
Tuff breccia schist and minor iron-formation (Late Archean)
Tuff breccia schist and minor iron-formation - Pink and gray, layered quartzofeldspathic schist of intermediate volcanic composition and associated thin iron-formation. Felsic gneiss at Arbutus Dam on Black River at Hatfield has U-Pb zircon age of about 2800 Ma (Sims and others, 1989)
West Virginia
Antietam Formation (Cambrian)
Antietam Formation (Chilhowee Group) - gray to white quartzite, sandstone and quartz-schist; thick-bedded, and resistant; contains Scolithus.
Catoctin Formation (Cambrian/Precambrian)
Catoctin Formation - predominantly a greenstone. Basic lava flows, schist and gneiss, containing chlorite, plagioclase, amphibolite, and epidote. Includes minor quantities of arkose and thin clastics. Western subsurface extension presently unknown.

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