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Ocala Limestone

Ocala Limestone - Dall and Harris (1892) referred to the limestones exposed near Ocala, Marion County, in central peninsular Florida as the Ocala Limestone. Puri (1953, 1957) elevated the Ocala Limestone to group status recognizing its component formations on the basis of foraminiferal faunas (biozones). Scott (1991) reduced the Ocala Group to formational status in accordance with the North American Stratigraphic Code (North American Commission on Stratigraphic Nomenclature, 1983). The Ocala Limestone consists of nearly pure limestones and occasional dolostones. It can be subdivided into lower and upper facies on the basis of lithology. The lower member is composed of a white to cream-colored, fine to medium grained, poorly to moderately indurated, very fossiliferous limestone (grainstone and packstone). The lower facies may not be present throughout the areal extent of the Ocala Limestone and may be partially to completely dolomitized in some regions (Miller, 1986). The upper facies is a white, poorly to well indurated, poorly sorted, very fossiliferous limestone (grainstone, packstone and wackestone). Silicified limestone (chert) is common in the upper facies. Fossils present in the Ocala Limestone include abundant large and smaller foraminifers, echinoids, bryozoans and mollusks. The large foraminifera Lepidocyclina sp. is abundant in the upper facies and extremely limited in the lower facies. The presence of these large foraminifers in the upper facies is quite distinctive. The Ocala Limestone is at or near the surface within the Ocala Karst District in the westcentral to northwestern peninsula and within the Dougherty Plain District in the north-central panhandle (Scott, in preparation). In these areas, the Ocala Limestone exhibits extensive karstification. These karst features often have tens of feet (meters) of relief, dramatically influencing the topography of the Ocala Karst District and the Dougherty Plain District (Scott, in preparation). Numerous disappearing streams and springs occur within these areas. The permeable, highly transmissive carbonates of the Ocala Limestone form an important part of the FAS. It is one of the most permeable rock units in the FAS (Miller, 1986).
StateFlorida
NameOcala Limestone
Geologic ageEocene
Original map labelTo
CommentsUpper Eocene - Priabonian Stage
Primary rock typelimestone
Secondary rock typedolostone (dolomite)
Other rock types
Lithologic constituents
Major
Sedimentary > Carbonate > Dolostone (Bed)The Ocala Limestone consists of nearly pure limestones and occasional dolostones. It can be subdivided into lower and upper facies on the basis of lithology. The lower member is composed of a white to cream-colored, fine to medium grained, poorly to moderately indurated, very fossiliferous limestone (grainstone and packstone). The lower facies may not be present throughout the areal extent of the Ocala Limestone and may be partially to completely dolomitized in some regions (Miller, 1986). The upper facies is a white, poorly to well indurated, poorly sorted, very fossiliferous limestone (grainstone, packstone and wackestone). Silicified limestone (chert) is common in the upper facies. Fossils present in the Ocala Limestone include abundant large and smaller foraminifers, echinoids, bryozoans and mollusks. The large foraminifera Lepidocyclina sp. is abundant in the upper facies and extremely limited in the lower facies. The presence of these large foraminifers in the upper facies is quite distinctive.
Sedimentary > Carbonate > Limestone (Bed)The Ocala Limestone consists of nearly pure limestones and occasional dolostones. It can be subdivided into lower and upper facies on the basis of lithology. The lower member is composed of a white to cream-colored, fine to medium grained, poorly to moderately indurated, very fossiliferous limestone (grainstone and packstone). The lower facies may not be present throughout the areal extent of the Ocala Limestone and may be partially to completely dolomitized in some regions (Miller, 1986). The upper facies is a white, poorly to well indurated, poorly sorted, very fossiliferous limestone (grainstone, packstone and wackestone). Silicified limestone (chert) is common in the upper facies. Fossils present in the Ocala Limestone include abundant large and smaller foraminifers, echinoids, bryozoans and mollusks. The large foraminifera Lepidocyclina sp. is abundant in the upper facies and extremely limited in the lower facies. The presence of these large foraminifers in the upper facies is quite distinctive.
Map references
Scott, T. M., Campbell, K. M., Rupert, F. R., Arthur, J. D., Missimer, T. M., Lloyd, J. M., Yon, J. W., and Duncan, J. G., 2001, Geologic Map of the State of Florida, Florida Geological Survey & Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Map Series 146.
Unit references
Scott, T. M., Campbell, K. M., Rupert, F. R., Arthur, J. D., Missimer, T. M., Lloyd, J. M., Yon, J. W., and Duncan, J. G., 2001, Geologic Map of the State of Florida, Florida Geological Survey & Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Map Series 146.
Scott, Thomas M. P.G. #99, Text to Accompany the Geologic Map of Florida, Open-file Report 80, Florida Geological Survey, 2001.
Puri, H.S., 1953, Contribution to the study of the Miocene of the Florida panhandle: Florida Geological Survey Bulletin 36, 345 p.
Miller, J. A., 1986, Hydrogeologic framework of the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and parts of Georgia, Alabama and South Carolina: United States Geological Survey Professional Paper 1403-B, 91 p. plus maps.
Scott, T. M., 1991, A Geological overview of Florida: in Scott, T.M., Lloyd, J. M., and Maddox, G. (eds.), Florida's Ground Water Quality Monitoring Program- Hydrogeological Framework: Florida Geological Survey Special Publication 32, p. 5-14.
Dall, W.H., and Harris, G.D., 1892, Correlation papers - Neocene: United States Geological Survey Bulletin 84, 349 p.
Puri, H.S., 1957, Stratigraphy and zonation of the Ocala Group: Florida Geological Survey Bulletin 38, 248 p.
North American Commission on Stratigraphic Nomenclature, 1983, North American Stratigraphic Code: American Association of Petroleum Geologists Bulletin, v. 67, no. 5, p. 841-875.
Scott, T. M., in preparation, Geomorphic map of Florida: Florida Geological Survey Map Series.
Geographic coverageCitrus - Dixie - Hernando - Holmes - Jackson - Lake - Levy - Madison - Marion - Polk - Putnam - Suwannee - Taylor - Union - Washington

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