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Hawthorn Group, Arcadia Formation, Tampa Member

Hawthorn Group, Arcadia Formation, Tampa Member - The Tampa Member consists predominantly of limestone with subordinate dolostone, sand and clay (Scott, 1988). The lithology of the Tampa Member is very similar to that of the subsurface limestone part of the Arcadia Formation except that the Tampa Member contains noticeably less phosphate (Scott, 1988). The limestone in the Tampa is white to yellowish gray, fossiliferous and variably sandy and clayey mudstone, wackestone and packstone with minor to no phosphate grains. Sand and clay beds are like those in the undifferentiated Arcadia Formation. Mollusks and corals are common in the Tampa Member as molds and casts, silicified pseudomorphs and original shell material. The Tampa Member and the lower part of the Arcadia Formation form the upper part of the Floridan aquifer system (FAS) in parts of southern Florida (Miller, 1986; Scott, 1991).
StateFlorida
NameHawthorn Group, Arcadia Formation, Tampa Member
Geologic ageOligocene/Miocene
Original map labelThat
Primary rock typelimestone
Secondary rock typemudstone
Other rock typessand; clay or mud
Lithologic constituents
Major
Sedimentary > Carbonate > Limestone (Bed)The Tampa Member consists predominantly of limestone with subordinate dolostone, sand and clay (Scott, 1988). The lithology of the Tampa Member is very similar to that of the subsurface limestone part of the Arcadia Formation except that the Tampa Member contains noticeably less phosphate (Scott, 1988). The limestone in the Tampa is white to yellowish gray, fossiliferous and variably sandy and clayey mudstone, wackestone and packstone with minor to no phosphate grains. Sand and clay beds are like those in the undifferentiated Arcadia Formation. Mollusks and corals are common in the Tampa Member as molds and casts, silicified pseudomorphs and original shell material. The Tampa Member and the lower part of the Arcadia Formation form the upper part of the Floridan aquifer system (FAS) in parts of southern Florida (Miller, 1986; Scott, 1991).
Minor
Unconsolidated > Fine-detrital > Clay (Bed)The Tampa Member consists predominantly of limestone with subordinate dolostone, sand and clay (Scott, 1988). The lithology of the Tampa Member is very similar to that of the subsurface limestone part of the Arcadia Formation except that the Tampa Member contains noticeably less phosphate (Scott, 1988). The limestone in the Tampa is white to yellowish gray, fossiliferous and variably sandy and clayey mudstone, wackestone and packstone with minor to no phosphate grains. Sand and clay beds are like those in the undifferentiated Arcadia Formation.
Unconsolidated > CoralMollusks and corals are common in the Tampa Member as molds and casts, silicified pseudomorphs and original shell material.
Unconsolidated > Coarse-detrital > Sand (Bed)The Tampa Member consists predominantly of limestone with subordinate dolostone, sand and clay (Scott, 1988). The lithology of the Tampa Member is very similar to that of the subsurface limestone part of the Arcadia Formation except that the Tampa Member contains noticeably less phosphate (Scott, 1988). The limestone in the Tampa is white to yellowish gray, fossiliferous and variably sandy and clayey mudstone, wackestone and packstone with minor to no phosphate grains. Sand and clay beds are like those in the undifferentiated Arcadia Formation.
Sedimentary > Carbonate > Dolostone (Bed)The Tampa Member consists predominantly of limestone with subordinate dolostone, sand and clay (Scott, 1988). The lithology of the Tampa Member is very similar to that of the subsurface limestone part of the Arcadia Formation except that the Tampa Member contains noticeably less phosphate (Scott, 1988). The limestone in the Tampa is white to yellowish gray, fossiliferous and variably sandy and clayey mudstone, wackestone and packstone with minor to no phosphate grains. Sand and clay beds are like those in the undifferentiated Arcadia Formation. Mollusks and corals are common in the Tampa Member as molds and casts, silicified pseudomorphs and original shell material. The Tampa Member and the lower part of the Arcadia Formation form the upper part of the Floridan aquifer system (FAS) in parts of southern Florida (Miller, 1986; Scott, 1991).
Sedimentary > Clastic > Mudstone > Claystone (Bed)The limestone in the Tampa is white to yellowish gray, fossiliferous and variably sandy and clayey mudstone, wackestone and packstone with minor to no phosphate grains.
Map references
Scott, T. M., Campbell, K. M., Rupert, F. R., Arthur, J. D., Missimer, T. M., Lloyd, J. M., Yon, J. W., and Duncan, J. G., 2001, Geologic Map of the State of Florida, Florida Geological Survey & Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Map Series 146.
Unit references
Scott, T. M., Campbell, K. M., Rupert, F. R., Arthur, J. D., Missimer, T. M., Lloyd, J. M., Yon, J. W., and Duncan, J. G., 2001, Geologic Map of the State of Florida, Florida Geological Survey & Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Map Series 146.
Scott, Thomas M. P.G. #99, Text to Accompany the Geologic Map of Florida, Open-file Report 80, Florida Geological Survey, 2001.
Miller, J. A., 1986, Hydrogeologic framework of the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and parts of Georgia, Alabama and South Carolina: United States Geological Survey Professional Paper 1403-B, 91 p. plus maps.
Scott, T. M., 1988, The lithostratigraphy of the Hawthorn Group (Miocene) of Florida: Florida Geological Survey Bulletin 59, 148 p.
Scott, T. M., 1991, A Geological overview of Florida: in Scott, T.M., Lloyd, J. M., and Maddox, G. (eds.), Florida's Ground Water Quality Monitoring Program- Hydrogeological Framework: Florida Geological Survey Special Publication 32, p. 5-14.
Geographic coverageHillsborough - Pasco - Pinellas - Polk

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