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Mt. Laurel Formation

Mt. Laurel Formation - Sand, quartz, massive to crudely bedded, typically coarsens upward, interbedded with thin clay beds. Glauconite and feldspar are minor sand constituents. Muscovite and biotite are abundant near the base. Lower part of formation is a fine- to medium-grained, clayey, dark-gray, glauconitic (maximum 25 percent) quartz sand. Typically weathers to white or light yellow and locally stained orange brown by iron oxides. Small pebbles scattered throughout, especially in the west-central area. Locally, has small, rounded siderite concretions in the interbedded clay-sand sequence. Granules and gravel are abundant in the upper 1.5 m (5 ft). Upper beds are light gray and weather light brown to reddish brown. The Mount Laurel is 10 m (33 ft) thick from the Roosevelt quadrangle to the Runnemede quadrangle in the central sheet. Thickness varies in the northern part of the map area due, in part, to extensive interfingering of this formation with the underlying Wenonah Formation. Weller (1907) and Kummel (1940) recognized only about 1.5 m (5 ft) of the Mount Laurel in the north. In this report those beds are assigned to the overlying Navesink Formation. The interbedded sequence, the major facies in the north, ranges to about 4.5 m (15 ft) thick. These interbeds have well-developed large burrows (Martino and Curran, 1990), mainly Ophiomorpha nodosa, and less commonly Rosselia socialis. The Mount Laurel is gradational into the underlying Wenonah Formation. A transition zone of 1.5 m (5 ft) is marked by an increase in clay, silt, and mica into the Wenonah, especially in the west-central area of the central sheet. The oyster Agerostrea falcata occurs in the lower part of the formation. Exogyra cancellata and Belemnitella americana are abundant in upper beds in the west-central area of the central sheet (New Egypt quadrangle). The Mount Laurel Formation is of late Campanian age based on the assignment of Zone CC 22b to the formation by Sugarman and others (1995) and the occurrence of Exogyra cancellata near Mullica Hill, Gloucester County.
StateNew Jersey
NameMt. Laurel Formation
Geologic ageUpper Cretaceous, upper Campanian
Original map labelKml
Primary rock typesand
Secondary rock typeclay or mud
Other rock typesgravel
Lithologic constituents
Major
Unconsolidated > Coarse-detrital > Sand (Bed)Sand, quartz, massive to crudely bedded, typically coarsens upward, interbedded with thin clay beds. Glauconite and feldspar are minor sand constituents. Muscovite and biotite are abundant near the base. Lower part of formation is a fine- to medium-grained, clayey, dark-gray, glauconitic (maximum 25 percent) quartz sand. Typically weathers to white or light yellow and locally stained orange brown by iron oxides.
Minor
Unconsolidated > Coarse-detrital > Gravel (Bed)Granules and gravel are abundant in the upper 1.5 m (5 ft).
Unconsolidated > Fine-detrital > Clay (Bed)interbedded with thin clay beds; locally, has small, rounded siderite concretions in the interbedded clay-sand sequence
Map references
Dalton, R. F., Herman, G. C., Monteverde, D. H., Pristas, R. S., Sugarman, P. J., Volkert, R. A., 1999, New Jersey Department Of Environmental Protection, Bedrock Geology and Topographic Base Maps of New Jersey: New Jersey Geological Survey CD Series CD 00-1; ARC/INFO (v. 7.1) export file: geology.e00, scale 1:100,000, unit description files: cslegend.pdf and nlegend.pdf, metadata: metast.pdf.
Unit references
Dalton, R. F., Herman, G. C., Monteverde, D. H., Pristas, R. S., Sugarman, P. J., Volkert, R. A., 1999, New Jersey Department Of Environmental Protection, Bedrock Geology and Topographic Base Maps of New Jersey: New Jersey Geological Survey CD Series CD 00-1; ARC/INFO (v. 7.1) export file: geology.e00, scale 1:100,000, unit description files: cslegend.pdf and nlegend.pdf, metadata: metast.pdf.
Owens, James P., Sugarman, Peter J., Sohl, Norman F., Parker, Ronald A., Houghton, Hugh F., Volkert, Richard A., Drake, Avery A., Jr., and Orndorff, Randall C., 1998, Bedrock Geologic Map of Central and Southern New Jersey: U.S. Geological Survey Miscellaneous Investigations Series Map I-2540-B, scale 1 to 100,000, 8 cross sections, 4 sheets, each size 58x41.
Weller, Stuart, 1907, A report on the Cretaceous paleontology of New Jersey based upon the stratigraphic studies of George N. Knapp: New Jersey Geological Survey Paleontology Service, v. 4, 1107 p.
Kmmel, H.B., 1940, The geology of New Jersey: New Jersey Department of Conservation, Geologic Series Bulletin 50, 203 p.
Martino, R.L., and Curran, H.A., 1990, Sedimentology, ichnology, and paleoenvironments of the Upper Cretaceous Wenonah and Mount Laurel Formations, New Jersey: Journal of Sedimentary Petrology, v. 60, no. 1, p. 125-144.
Sugarman, P.J., Miller, K.G., Bukry, David, and Feigenson, M.D., 1995, Uppermost Campanian-Maestrichtian strontium isotopic, biostratigraphic, and sequence stratigraphic framework of the New Jersey Coastal Plain: Geological Society of America Bulletin, v. 107, no. 1, p. 19-37.
Geographic coverageBurlington - Camden - Gloucester - Monmouth - Salem

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