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Sandy Hook Member of the Red Bank Formation

Sandy Hook Member - Sand, quartz, fine-grained, clayey, very micaceous, massive, dark-gray, fossiliferous. Feldspar, muscovite, chlorite, and biotite are minor sand constituents. Well exposed at Poricy Brook in the Long Branch quadrangle. The Sandy Hook is much thinner than the overlying Shrewsbury Member and is a maximum of 10 m (33 ft) thick.
StateNew Jersey
NameSandy Hook Member of the Red Bank Formation
Geologic ageUpper Cretaceous, upper and middle Maastrichtian
Original map labelKrbsh
Commentspart of the Red Bank Formation which is described seperately, but not mapped: Red Bank Formation (Upper Cretaceous, upper and middle Maastrichtian) - Consists of two thick named lithofacies and one thin unnamed lithofacies. In the northernmost outcrop belt of the central sheet, Olsson (1963) named the upper thick facies the Shrewsbury Member and the lower thick facies the Sandy Hook Member. These lithofacies merge with an unnamed thin, dark-gray, very micaceous, quartz-glauconite sand to the southwest. This unnamed glauconite lithofacies was mapped in detail in the Roosevelt (Minard, 1964), Allentown (Owens and Minard, 1966), and New Egypt (Minard and Owens, 1962) quadrangles on the central sheet. The Red Bank, like the overlying Tinton, crops out only in the northern part of the central sheet from Sandy Hook, Monmouth County, to near New Egypt, Ocean County. The scale of the map permits showing only the thicker Sandy Hook and Shrewsbury Members. The contact with the underlying Navesink Formation is gradational over several feet. The Sandy Hook Member and the unnamed glauconite member near New Egypt have similar sand and clay mineral compositions. Smith (in Owens and others, 1977) determined that the Red Bank Formation is of late middle and late Maastrichtian age based primarily on the presence of the ammonite Sphenodiscus lobatus and the planktic foraminifera in the Sandy Hook Member from the Poricy Brook locality, Monmouth County. The concurrence of Rugoglobigerina scotti and Globotruncana contusa place this member well above the base of the Gansserina gansseri Subzone in the upper Maastrichtian. Sugarman and others (1995) assigned a late Maastrichtian CC26 Zone to the unit. Wolfe (1976) assigned pollen from the Sandy Hook Member to the Maastrichtian CA6/MA-1 Zone. Strontium-isotope age estimates for the Red Bank average 65.8 Ma (Sugarman and others, 1995).
Primary rock typesand
Secondary rock typeclay or mud
Other rock types
Lithologic constituents
Major
Unconsolidated > Coarse-detrital > Sand (Bed)Sand, quartz, fine-grained, clayey, very micaceous, massive, dark-gray, fossiliferous. Feldspar, muscovite, chlorite, and biotite are minor sand constituents.
Minor
Unconsolidated > Fine-detrital > Clay (Bed)clayey
Map references
Dalton, R. F., Herman, G. C., Monteverde, D. H., Pristas, R. S., Sugarman, P. J., Volkert, R. A., 1999, New Jersey Department Of Environmental Protection, Bedrock Geology and Topographic Base Maps of New Jersey: New Jersey Geological Survey CD Series CD 00-1; ARC/INFO (v. 7.1) export file: geology.e00, scale 1:100,000, unit description files: cslegend.pdf and nlegend.pdf, metadata: metast.pdf.
Unit references
Dalton, R. F., Herman, G. C., Monteverde, D. H., Pristas, R. S., Sugarman, P. J., Volkert, R. A., 1999, New Jersey Department Of Environmental Protection, Bedrock Geology and Topographic Base Maps of New Jersey: New Jersey Geological Survey CD Series CD 00-1; ARC/INFO (v. 7.1) export file: geology.e00, scale 1:100,000, unit description files: cslegend.pdf and nlegend.pdf, metadata: metast.pdf.
Owens, James P., Sugarman, Peter J., Sohl, Norman F., Parker, Ronald A., Houghton, Hugh F., Volkert, Richard A., Drake, Avery A., Jr., and Orndorff, Randall C., 1998, Bedrock Geologic Map of Central and Southern New Jersey: U.S. Geological Survey Miscellaneous Investigations Series Map I-2540-B, scale 1 to 100,000, 8 cross sections, 4 sheets, each size 58x41.
Olsson, R.K., 1963, Latest Cretaceous and the earliest Tertiary stratigraphy of New Jersey Coastal Plain: American Association of Petroleum Geologists Bulletin, v. 47, no. 4, p. 643-665.
Minard, J.P., 1964, Geology of the Roosevelt quadrangle, New Jersey: U.S. Geological Survey Geologic Quadrangle Map GQ-340, scale 1:24,000.
Owens, J.P., and Minard, J.P., 1966, Pre-Quaternary geology of the Allentown quadrangle, New Jersey: U.S. Geological Survey Geologic Quadrangle Map GQ-566, scale 1:24,000.
Minard, J.P., and Owens, J.P., 1962, Pre-Quaternary geology of the New Egypt quadrangle, New Jersey: U.S. Geological Survey Geologic Quadrangle Map GQ-161, scale 1:24,000.
Owens, J.P., Sohl, N.F., and Minard, J.P., 1977, A field guide to Cretaceous and lower Tertiary beds of the Raritan and Salisbury embayments, New Jersey, Delaware, and Maryland: Washington, D.C., American Association of Petroleum Geologists and Society of Economic Paleontologists and Mineralogists, 113 p.
Sugarman, P.J., Miller, K.G., Bukry, David, and Feigenson, M.D., 1995, Uppermost Campanian-Maestrichtian strontium isotopic, biostratigraphic, and sequence stratigraphic framework of the New Jersey Coastal Plain: Geological Society of America Bulletin, v. 107, no. 1, p. 19-37.
Wolfe, J.A., 1976, Stratigraphic distribution of some pollen types from the Campanian and lower Maestrichtian rocks (Upper Cretaceous) of the Middle Atlantic States: U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 977, 18 p.
Geographic coverageMonmouth

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