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Mineral Resources On-Line Spatial Data

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Mineral Resources Data System

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Frequently anticipated questions:


What does this data set describe?

Title: Mineral Resources Data System
Abstract:
Mineral resource occurrence data covering the world, most thoroughly within the U.S. This database contains the records previously provided in the Mineral Resource Data System (MRDS) of USGS and the Mineral Availability System/Mineral Industry Locator System (MAS/MILS) originated in the U.S. Bureau of Mines, which is now part of USGS.

The MRDS is a large and complex relational database developed over several decades by hundreds of researchers and reporters. This product is a digest in which the fields chosen are those most likely to contain valid information.
  1. How should this data set be cited?

    U.S. Geological Survey, 2005, Mineral Resources Data System: U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia.

    Online Links:

  2. What geographic area does the data set cover?

    West_Bounding_Coordinate: 179.54917
    East_Bounding_Coordinate: -178.8167
    North_Bounding_Coordinate: 80.0
    South_Bounding_Coordinate: -76.6667

  3. What does it look like?

  4. Does the data set describe conditions during a particular time period?

    Calendar_Date: 27-Jan-2012
    Currentness_Reference:
    Date when information was extracted from the main database for this digest.

  5. What is the general form of this data set?

    Geospatial_Data_Presentation_Form: map

  6. How does the data set represent geographic features?

    1. How are geographic features stored in the data set?

      This is a Point data set. It contains the following vector data types (SDTS terminology):

      • Entity point (304328)

    2. What coordinate system is used to represent geographic features?

      Horizontal positions are specified in geographic coordinates, that is, latitude and longitude. Latitudes are given to the nearest 0.0001. Longitudes are given to the nearest 0.0001. Latitude and longitude values are specified in decimal degrees.

      The horizontal datum used is World Geodetic System 1984.
      The ellipsoid used is WGS 84.
      The semi-major axis of the ellipsoid used is 6378137.
      The flattening of the ellipsoid used is 1/298.257.

  7. How does the data set describe geographic features?

    mrds.dbf
    Mineral resource records (Source: USGS)

    DEP_ID
    Deposit identification number.

    A unique 12-digit system generated sequence number which references records of information pertaining to a mineral property. Textual values of no more than 12 characters.

    MRDS_ID
    MRDS identification number.

    Identification number used to refer to this entry in the Mineral Resources Data System, if the record appeared in that database. Textual values of no more than 7 characters.

    ValueDefinition
    (no value)Information not available for this record. 149235 records have no value for MRDS_ID.

    MAS_ID
    MAS/MILS identification number.

    Identification number for this site as it appeared in the Mineral Availability System/Mineral Industry Locator System database,. Textual values of no more than 10 characters.

    ValueDefinition
    (no value)Information not available for this record. 110652 records have no value for MAS_ID.

    SITE_NAME
    Name of the site, deposit, or operation.

    Current (preferred) form of the name of the site, deposit, or operation to which the record refers. Textual values of no more than 70 characters.

    LATITUDE
    Latitude.

    Geographic latitude of the site, WGS84 if needed). Real numbers stored in double precision.

    ValueDefinition
    (no value)Information not available for this record. 4033 records have no value for LATITUDE.

    Range of values
    Minimum:-76.6667
    Maximum:80

    LONGITUDE
    Longitude.

    Geographic longitude of the site, WGS84 if needed). Real numbers stored in double precision.

    ValueDefinition
    (no value)Information not available for this record. 4033 records have no value for LONGITUDE.

    Range of values
    Minimum:-178.8167
    Maximum:179.54917

    REGION
    Geographic region.

    Code indicating the geographic region. Textual values of no more than 2 characters.

    ValueDefinition
    (no value)Information not available for this record. 58555 records have no value for REGION.

    COUNTRY
    Country name.

    Name of the country in which the site is located. Textual values of no more than 20 characters.

    ValueDefinition
    (no value)Information not available for this record. 58555 records have no value for COUNTRY.

    STATE
    State name.

    Name of the state or province in which the site is located. Textual values of no more than 32 characters.

    ValueDefinition
    (no value)Information not available for this record. 58762 records have no value for STATE.

    COUNTY
    County name.

    Name of the county in which the site is located. Textual values of no more than 96 characters.

    ValueDefinition
    (no value)Information not available for this record. 65215 records have no value for COUNTY.

    DISTRICT
    Mining district.

    The most recent name of the mining district, subdistrict, or area. Textual values of no more than 96 characters.

    ValueDefinition
    (no value)Information not available for this record. 254769 records have no value for DISTRICT.

    ADMIN
    Administrative area.

    Administrative unit area name. The area type is given in the LAND_STAT field. Textual values of no more than 160 characters.

    ValueDefinition
    (no value)Information not available for this record. 299777 records have no value for ADMIN.

    LAND_STAT
    Administrative area type.

    Type of geographic area named in ADMIN. Textual values of no more than 35 characters.

    ValueDefinition
    (no value)Information not available for this record. 114367 records have no value for LAND_STAT.

    COM_TYPE
    Commodity type.

    Type of commodities present: metallic (M), non-metallic (N), or both (B). Textual values of no more than 1 characters.

    ValueDefinition
    (no value)Information not available for this record. 34 records have no value for COM_TYPE.

    COM_MAJOR
    Major commodities.

    Major commodities present, a comma-separated list. Commodity qualifiers follow each commodity, delimited by a hyphen. Textual values of no more than 128 characters.

    ValueDefinition
    (no value)Information not available for this record. 22335 records have no value for COM_MAJOR.

    COM_MINOR
    Minor commodities.

    Minor commodities present, a comma-separated list. Commodity qualifiers follow each commodity, delimited by a hyphen. Textual values of no more than 128 characters.

    ValueDefinition
    (no value)Information not available for this record. 285184 records have no value for COM_MINOR.

    COM_TRACE
    Trace commodities.

    Trace commodities present, a comma-separated list. Commodity qualifiers follow each commodity, delimited by a hyphen. Textual values of no more than 128 characters.

    ValueDefinition
    (no value)Information not available for this record. 239278 records have no value for COM_TRACE.

    OPER_TYPE
    Operation type.

    Type of operation existing or proposed at the site. Textual values of no more than 30 characters.

    ValueDefinition
    SurfaceOpen-pit or open-cast mine in which the overburden is completely removed and the sides of the mine are typically terraced away from the center. The overburden and ore are usually transported out of the pit in trucks. Includes quarry operations which are often open at the front as well, and strip mines which are open at both ends.
    UndergroundThe opening to the mine is small relative to the size of the workings. The opening is usually called a shaft or adit. The ore is transported out of the mine in cars, buckets, on conveyor belts, etc.
    Surface-UndergroundBoth surface and underground operations are present
    PlacerA stream-sediment or beach-sand mine.
    OffshoreUnderwater mining operation such as for Mn nodules.
    WellThe product is extracted through a borehole. Water, oil, and gas are the most common products, but includes solution-mining or in-situ leaching in which liquid solvent is circulated underground to extract the material.
    Processing PlantNo ore extraction at the site, only a mill, smelter, etc.
    LeachOre or concentrate is placed on an impervious pad, and a solvent is percolated or forced through the heap. The desired mineral or solute is dissolved into the leachate, from which it is more easily refined.
    Brine OperationThe product, usually a type of salt, produced from a well or open pan.
    GeothermalEnergy extracted from heat stored in the earth.
    UnknownUnknown or undetermined by evaluator

    DEP_TYPE
    Deposit type.

    General type of deposit or resource present at the site. Textual values of no more than 40 characters.

    ValueDefinition
    (no value)Information not available for this record. 269516 records have no value for DEP_TYPE.

    PROD_SIZE
    Production size. A single character value.

    A broad characterization of the magnitude of production at the site. The precise meanings of this field have changed over time and are lost to history; it is clear in retrospect that two different categorizations were used, a three-fold set based on magnitude (Small, Medium, Large) and a simple indicator (Yes or No), with some records showing U for unknown. Modern specialists would prefer that such a categorization take into account the type of deposit and commodity at the site, but there is no evidence that approach was taken in assigning values to this field.

    ValueDefinition
    (no value)Information not available for this record. 194976 records have no value for PROD_SIZE.
    YYes, production has occurred
    NNo, production has not occurred
    SSmall ammount of material produced (we do not know what criteria are used to make this determination)
    MMedium ammount of material produced (we do not know what criteria are used to make this determination)
    LLarge ammount of material produced (we do not know what criteria are used to make this determination)
    UProduction statistics were not known to the reporters

    DEV_STAT
    Development status.

    Status of development of the resource or operation. Textual values of no more than 25 characters.

    ValueDefinition
    OccurrenceOre mineralization in outcrop, shallow pit or pits, or isolated drill hole. Grade, tonnage, and extent of mineralization essentially unknown. No production has taken place and there has been no or little activity since discovery with the possible exception of routine claim maintenance.
    ProspectA deposit that has gone beyond the occurrence stage. That is subsequent work such as surface trenching, adits, or shafts, drill holes, extensive geophysics, geochemistry, and/or geologic mapping has been carried out. Enough work has been done to at least estimate grade and tonnage. The deposits may or may not have undergone feasibility studies that would lead to a decision on going into production.
    ProducerA mine in production at the time the data was entered. An intermittent producer that produces on demand or seasonally with variable lengths of inactivity is considered a producer.
    Past ProducerA mine formerly operating that has closed, where the equipment or structures may have been removed or abandoned.
    PlantA processing plant (smelter, refiner, beneficiation, etc.) that may or may not be currently producing at the time of data entry. A plant will have no geological information associated with it.
    UnknownAt the time of data entry, either the development status was unknown or the data source this record came from did not specify this value.

    ORE
    Ore minerals or materials.

    Name of the ore mineral or material found in this deposit. Textual values of no more than 255 characters.

    ValueDefinition
    (no value)Information not available for this record. 236479 records have no value for ORE.

    GANGUE
    Gangue minerals or materials.

    Name of the gangue mineral or material found in this deposit. Textual values of no more than 255 characters.

    ValueDefinition
    (no value)Information not available for this record. 272740 records have no value for GANGUE.

    OTHER_MATL
    Other minerals or materials.

    Name of other minerals or materials found in this deposit. Textual values of no more than 255 characters.

    ValueDefinition
    (no value)Information not available for this record. 294207 records have no value for OTHER_MATL.

    OREBODY_FM
    Ore body form.

    Form and shape of the ore body. Textual values of no more than 255 characters.

    ValueDefinition
    (no value)Information not available for this record. 264927 records have no value for OREBODY_FM.

    WORK_TYPE
    Workings type.

    General type of workings at the site. Textual values of no more than 64 characters.

    ValueDefinition
    (no value)Information not available for this record. 238249 records have no value for WORK_TYPE.

    MODEL
    Mineral deposit model.

    Mineral deposit models that characterize the site. Multiple models are delimited by braces, with a model number for each. Textual values of no more than 80 characters.

    ValueDefinition
    (no value)Information not available for this record. 292387 records have no value for MODEL.

    ALTERATION
    Alteration processes.

    Geochemical alteration, if any, believed to have been important in forming or modifying the ore materials of a deposit. Textual values of no more than 255 characters.

    ValueDefinition
    (no value)Information not available for this record. 289757 records have no value for ALTERATION.

    CONC_PROC
    Concentration processes.

    Geological processes that are believed to have occurred to concentrate ore materials in the deposit. Textual values of no more than 255 characters.

    ValueDefinition
    (no value)Information not available for this record. 293637 records have no value for CONC_PROC.

    PREV_NAME
    Previous names.

    Names by which the site or operation has bee known in the past. Textual values of no more than 255 characters.

    ValueDefinition
    (no value)Information not available for this record. 241287 records have no value for PREV_NAME.

    ORE_CTRL
    Ore controls.

    Geologic features, typically structural, that exert control over the form, extent, or character of the deposit. Textual values of no more than 255 characters.

    ValueDefinition
    (no value)Information not available for this record. 279810 records have no value for ORE_CTRL.

    REPORTER
    Reporter.

    Names of the persons primarily responsible for entering information about the site. Textual values of no more than 224 characters.

    ValueDefinition
    (no value)Information not available for this record. 36 records have no value for REPORTER.

    HROCK_UNIT
    Host rock unit name.

    Lithologic and stratigraphic information regarding the host rocks for the ore deposit. Textual values of no more than 255 characters.

    ValueDefinition
    (no value)Information not available for this record. 268180 records have no value for HROCK_UNIT.

    HROCK_CODE
    Host rock type code.

    Integer number(s) indicating the type of host rocks. Textual values of no more than 40 characters. (Source: Rock names, their hierarchical relationships, and definitions appear to be derived from Bruce Johnson's simplified classification of lithology for geologic map units, "LithClass 6". However the numerical codes given here are not part of that work.)

    ValueDefinition
    (no value)Information not available for this record. 236050 records have no value for HROCK_CODE.
    1Unconsolidated Deposit

    Dominantly unsorted and unstratified drift, generally unconsolidated, deposited directly by and underneath a glacier without subsequent reworking by meltwater
    2Unconsolidated Deposit > Alluvium

    A general term for clay, silt, sand, gravel or similar unconsolidated detrital material, deposited during comparatively recent geologic time by a stream or other body of running water, as a sorted or semi-sorted sediment.
    3Unconsolidated Deposit > Beach Sand

    A loose aggregate of unlithified mineral or rock particles of sand size forming a beach (the relatively thick and temporary accumulation of loose water-borne material that is in active transit along, or deposited on, the shore zone between the limits of low water and high water)
    4Unconsolidated Deposit > Dune Sand

    A type of blown sand that has been piled up by the wind into a sand dune, usually consisting of rounded mineral grains, commonly quartz, having diameters ranging from 0.1 to 1 mm
    5Unconsolidated Deposit > Loess

    A widespread, homogeneous, commonly nonstratified, porous, friable, slightly coherent, usually highly calcareous, fine-grained blanket deposit, consisting predominantly of silt with subordinate grain sizes ranging from clay to fine sand.
    6Unconsolidated Deposit > Volcanic Ash

    A fine pyroclastic material (under 2.0 mm in diameter). The term usually refers to the unconsolidated material
    7Unconsolidated Deposit > Colluvium

    A general term applied to any loose, heterogeneous, and incoherent mass of soil material and/or rock fragments deposited by rainwash, sheetwash, or slow, continuous downslope creep, usually collecting at the base of gentle slopes or hillsides.
    8Unconsolidated Deposit > Till

    Dominantly unsorted and unstratified drift, generally unconsolidated, deposited directly by and underneath a glacier without subsequent reworking by meltwater
    9Unconsolidated Deposit > Glacial Sediment

    Stratified glacial drift deposited by, or reworked by running water, or deposited in standing water
    10Unconsolidated Deposit > Peat

    An unconsolidated deposit of semicarbonized plant remains in a water saturated environment, such as a bog or fen, and of persistently high moisture content (at least 75 percent).
    11Unconsolidated Deposit > Coral

    A hard calcareous substance consisting of the continuous skeleton secreted by coral polyps for their support and habitation and found in single specimens growing plant-like on the sea bottom or in extensive, solidified accumulations (coral reefs).
    12Unconsolidated Deposit > Clay, Mud

    A loose, earthy, extremely fine-grained, natural sediment composed primarily of clay-size or colloidal particles and characterized by high plasticity and by a considerable content of clay minerals.
    13Unconsolidated Deposit > Silt

    A loose aggregate of unlithified mineral or rock particles of silt size (1/256 to 1/16 mm); an unconsolidated deposit consisting essentially of fine-grained clastic particles.
    14Unconsolidated Deposit > Sand

    A loose aggregate of unlithified mineral or rock particles of sand size (1/16 to 2 mm); an unconsolidated deposit consisting essentially of medium-grained clastic particles.
    15Unconsolidated Deposit > Gravel

    A loose accumulation of rock fragments composed predominantly of more or less rounded pebbles and small stones.
    16Unconsolidated Deposit > Sand And Gravel

    A loose aggregate of unlithified mineral or rock particles of sand size (1/16 to 2 mm); an unconsolidated deposit consisting essentially of medium-grained clastic particles, plus a loose accumulation of rock fragments composed predominantly of more or less rounded pebbles and small stones.
    17Unconsolidated Deposit > Brine

    Saline waters containing high amounts of Na, Ca, K, Cl, and other soluble elements.
    18Unconsolidated Deposit > Seafloor

    The surface of the rock or sediments at the bottom of the sea.
    19Sedimentary Rock

    A rock resulting from the consolidation of loose sediment that has accumulated in layers
    20Sedimentary Rock > Clastic Sedimentary Rock

    A composed principally of broken fragments that are derived from preexisting rocks or minerals and that have been transported some distance from their place of origin.
    21Sedimentary Rock > Clastic Sedimentary Rock > Mudstone

    A general term that includes claystone, siltstone, shale, and argillite, and that should be used only when the amounts of clay-sized and silt-sized particles are not known or specified, or cannot be precisely identified.
    22Sedimentary Rock > Clastic Sedimentary Rock > Mudstone > Claystone

    An indurated rock having more than 67 percent clay-sized minerals.
    23Sedimentary Rock > Clastic Sedimentary Rock > Mudstone > Bentonite

    A soft, plastic, porous, light-colored rock composed essentially of clay minerals of the montmorillonite (smectite) group plus colloidal silica, and produced by devitrification and accompanying chemical alteration of a glassy igneous material, usually a tuff or volcanic ash
    24Sedimentary Rock > Clastic Sedimentary Rock > Shale

    A laminated, indurated rock having more than 67 percent clay-sized minerals.
    25Sedimentary Rock > Clastic Sedimentary Rock > Shale > Black Shale

    A dark, thinly laminated carbonaceous shale, exceptionally rich in organic matter (5 percent or more carbon content) and sulfide (esp. iron sulfide, usually pyrite), and often containing unusual concentrations of certain trace elements (U, V, Cu, Ni).
    26Sedimentary Rock > Clastic Sedimentary Rock > Shale > Oil Shale

    A kerogen-bearing, finely laminated brown or black sedimentary rock that will yield liquid or gaseous hydrocarbon on distillation.
    27Sedimentary Rock > Clastic Sedimentary Rock > Argillite

    A compact rock derived either from mudstone or shale, that has undergone a somewhat higher degree of induration than mudstone or shale but is less clearly laminated than shale and without its fissility, and that lacks the cleavage distinctive of slate.
    28Sedimentary Rock > Clastic Sedimentary Rock > Siltstone

    An indurated silt having the texture and composition of shale but lacking its fine lamination or fissility; a massive mudstone in which silt-sized particles predominate over clay-sized particles.
    29Sedimentary Rock > Clastic Sedimentary Rock > Sandstone

    A medium-grained clastic sedimentary rock composed of abundant sand-sized fragments, which may have a finer-grained matrix (silt or clay), and which is more or less indurated by a cementing material
    30Sedimentary Rock > Clastic Sedimentary Rock > Orthoquartzite

    A clastic sedimentary rock that is made up almost exclusively of quartz sand (with or without chert), that is relatively free of or lacks a fine-grained matrix; a quartzite of sedimentary origin, or a "pure quartz sandstone".
    31Sedimentary Rock > Clastic Sedimentary Rock > Calcarenite

    A clastic sedimentary rock that is made up predominantly of recycled carbonate particles of sand size; a consolidated calcareous sand
    32Sedimentary Rock > Clastic Sedimentary Rock > Arkose

    A feldspar-rich sandstone, commonly coarse-grained and pink or reddish, that is typically composed of angular to subangular grains that may be either poorly or moderately well sorted. Quartz is usually the dominant mineral, with feldspars constituting at least 25 percent.
    33Sedimentary Rock > Clastic Sedimentary Rock > Wacke

    A "dirty" sandstone that consists of a mixed variety of unsorted or poorly sorted mineral and rock fragments and of an abundant matrix of clay and fine silt; specif. an impure sandstone containing more than 10 percent argillaceous matrix.
    34Sedimentary Rock > Clastic Sedimentary Rock > Graywacke

    a dark gray, firmly indurated, coarse-grained sandstone that consists of poorly sorted angular to subangular grains of quartz and feldspar, with a variety of dark rock and mineral fragments embedded in a compact clayey matrix having the general composition of slate and containing an abundance of very fine-grained illite, sericite, and chloritic minerals.
    35Sedimentary Rock > Clastic Sedimentary Rock > Conglomerate

    A coarse-grained clastic sedimentary rock, composed of rounded to subangular fragments larger than 2 mm in diameter typically containing fine-grained particles in the interstices, and commonly cemented by calcium carbonate, iron oxide, silica, or hardened clay
    36Sedimentary Rock > Clastic Sedimentary Rock > Sedimentary Breccia

    A breccia (coarse-grained clastic rock composed of angular broken rock fragments held together by a mineral cement or a fine-grained matrix) formed by sedimentary processes
    37Sedimentary Rock > Clastic Sedimentary Rock > Olistostrome

    A sedimentary deposit consisting of a chaotic mass of intimately mixed heterogeneous materials (such as blocks and muds) that accumulated as a semi-fluid body by submarine gravity sliding or slumping of unconsolidated sediments.
    38Sedimentary Rock > Clastic Sedimentary Rock > Lake Sediments

    Sediments laid on the floor of a lake, usually coarse grainde near shore and rapidly changing to fine-grained clay and limesone in deeper water.
    39Sedimentary Rock > Carbonate

    A sedimentary rock composed of more than 50 percent by weight carbonate minerals
    40Sedimentary Rock > Carbonate > Limestone

    A sedimentary rock consisting chiefly (more than 50 percent by weight or by areal percentages under the microscope) of calcium carbonate, primarily in the form of the mineral calcite.
    41Sedimentary Rock > Carbonate > Dolomite

    A carbonate sedimentary rock of which more than 50 percent by weight or by areal percentages under the microscope consists of the mineral dolomite
    42Sedimentary Rock > Mixed Clastic/Carbonate Rock

    An undivided mixture of clastic and carbonate sedimentary rocks.
    43Sedimentary Rock > Mixed Clastic/Volcanic Rock

    An undivided mixture of clastic and carbonate sedimentary rocks.
    44Sedimentary Rock > Phosphorite

    A sedimentary rock with a high enough content of phosphate minerals to be of economic interest.
    45Sedimentary Rock > Chemical Sediment

    A sedimentary rock composed primarily of material formed directly by precipitation from solution or colloidal suspension or by the deposition of insoluble precipitates
    46Sedimentary Rock > Chemical Sediment > Evaporite

    A nonclastic sedimentary rock composed primarily of minerals produced from a saline solution as a result of extensive or total evaporation of the solvent.
    47Sedimentary Rock > Chemical Sediment > Salt

    An evapotite primarily composed of sodium chloride.
    48Sedimentary Rock > Chemical Sediment > Chert

    A hard, extremely dense or compact, dull to semivitreous, microcrystalline or cryptocrystalline sedimentary rock, consisting dominantly of interlocking crystals of quartz less than 30 cm in diameter.
    49Sedimentary Rock > Chemical Sediment > Iron Formation

    A chemical sedimentary rock, typically thin-bedded and/or finely laminated, containing at least 15 percent iron of sedimentary origin, and commonly but not necessarily containing layers of chert
    50Sedimentary Rock > Chemical Sediment > Exhalite

    A chemical sedimentary rock, usually containing oxide, carbonate, or sulfide as anions, and iron, magnesium, base metals, and gold as cations, formed by the issuance of volcanically derived fluids onto the sea floor or into the sea
    51Sedimentary Rock > Coal

    A readily combustible rock containing more than 50 percent by weight and more than 70 percent by volume carbonaceous material, formed by compaction and induration of variously altered plant remains
    52Sedimentary Rock > Diatomite

    A light-colored,soft, friable, siliceous sedimentary rockconsisting chiefly of opaline frustules of the diatom.
    53Volcanic Rock (Aphanitic)

    A generally finely crystalline or glassy igneous rock resulting from volcanic action at or near the Earth's surface, either ejected explosively or extruded as a lava. The term includes near-surface intrusions that form a part of the volcanic structure.
    54Volcanic Rock (Aphanitic) > Glassy Rock

    Extrusive rock having a texture which is similar to that of glass or quartz and developed as a result of rapid cooling of the lava without distinct crystallization.
    55Volcanic Rock (Aphanitic) > Glassy Rock > Obsidian

    A black or dark-colored volcanic glass, usually of rhyolite composition, characterized by conchoidal fracture
    56Volcanic Rock (Aphanitic) > Glassy Rock > Vitrophyre

    Any porphyritic igneous rock having a glassy groundmass.
    57Volcanic Rock (Aphanitic) > Glassy Rock > Pumice

    A light-colored vesicular glassy rock commonly having the composition of rhyolite.
    58Volcanic Rock (Aphanitic) > Pyroclastic Rock

    Clastic rock material formed by volcanic explosion or aerial expulsion from a volcanic vent.
    59Volcanic Rock (Aphanitic) > Pyroclastic Rock > Tuff

    Consolidated or cemented volcanic ash.
    60Volcanic Rock (Aphanitic) > Pyroclastic Rock > Tuff > Welded Tuff

    A glass-rich pyroclastic rock that has been indurated by the welding together of its glass shards under the combined action of the heat retained by particles, the weight of the overlying material, and hot gasses.
    61Volcanic Rock (Aphanitic) > Pyroclastic Rock > Tuff > Ash-Flow Tuff

    A tuff deposited by an ash flow or gaseous cloud; a type of ignimbrite. It is a consolidated, but not necessarily welded deposit.
    62Volcanic Rock (Aphanitic) > Pyroclastic Rock > Ignimbrite

    The deposit of a pyroclastic flow.
    63Volcanic Rock (Aphanitic) > Pyroclastic Rock > Volcanic Breccia (Agglomerate)

    A pyroclastic rock that consists of angular volcanic fragments that are larger than 64 mm in diameter and that may or may not have a matrix
    64Volcanic Rock (Aphanitic) > Felsic Volcanic Rock

    A light-colored, fine-grained or aphanitic extrusive or hypabyssal rock, with or without phenocrysts and composed chiefly of quartz and feldspar.
    65Volcanic Rock (Aphanitic) > Felsic Volcanic Rock > Alkali Rhyolite

    A volcanic rock defined in the QAPF diagram as having Q/(Q+A+P) between 20 and 60 and P/(P+A) less than 10.
    66Volcanic Rock (Aphanitic) > Felsic Volcanic Rock > Rhyolite

    A volcanic rock defined in the QAPF diagram as having Q/(Q+A+P) between 20 and 60 and P/(P+A) between 10 and 35.
    67Volcanic Rock (Aphanitic) > Felsic Volcanic Rock > Rhyodacite

    A volcanic rock defined in the QAPF diagram as having Q/(Q+A+P) between 20 and 60 and P/(P+A) between 35 and 65.
    68Volcanic Rock (Aphanitic) > Felsic Volcanic Rock > Dacite

    A volcanic rock defined in the QAPF diagram as having Q/(Q+A+P) between 20 and 60 and P/(P+A) greater than 65.
    69Volcanic Rock (Aphanitic) > Felsic Volcanic Rock > Alkali Trachyte

    A volcanic rock defined in the QAPF diagram as having Q/(Q+A+P) less than 20 or F/(F+A+P) less than 10, and P/(P+A) less than 10.
    70Volcanic Rock (Aphanitic) > Felsic Volcanic Rock > Trachyte

    A volcanic rock defined in the QAPF diagram as having Q/(Q+A+P) less than 20 or F/(F+A+P) less than 10, and P/(P+A) between 10 and 35.
    71Volcanic Rock (Aphanitic) > Felsic Volcanic Rock > Quartz Latite

    A volcanic rock defined in the QAPF diagram as having Q/(Q+A+P) between 5 and 20 and P/(P+A) between 35 and 65.
    72Volcanic Rock (Aphanitic) > Felsic Volcanic Rock > Latite

    A volcanic rock defined in the QAPF diagram as having Q/(Q+A+P) less than 5 or F/(F+A+P) less than 10, and P/(P+A) between 35 and 65.
    73Volcanic Rock (Aphanitic) > Intermediate Volcanic Rock

    A solidified body of volcanic rock having approximately equal light- and dark-colored minerals in its mode
    74Volcanic Rock (Aphanitic) > Intermediate Volcanic Rock > Trachyandesite

    A volcanic rock defined modally by Q/(Q+A+P) less than 20 or F/(F+A+P) less than 10, P/(A+P) between 65 and 90, and M less than 35.
    75Volcanic Rock (Aphanitic) > Intermediate Volcanic Rock > Andesite

    A volcanic rock defined modally by Q/(Q+A+P) less than 20 or F/(F+A+P) less than 10, P/(A+P) greater than 90, and M less than 35
    76Volcanic Rock (Aphanitic) > Mafic Volcanic Rock

    A solidified body of volcanic rock having abundant dark-colored minerals in its mode
    77Volcanic Rock (Aphanitic) > Mafic Volcanic Rock > Trachybasalt

    A volcanic rock defined modally by Q/(Q+A+P) less than 20 or F/(F+A+P) less than 10, P/(A+P) between 65 and 90, and M greater than 35.
    78Volcanic Rock (Aphanitic) > Mafic Volcanic Rock > Basalt

    A volcanic rock defined modally by Q/(Q+A+P) less than 20 or F/(F+A+P) less than 10, P/(A+P) greater than 90, and M greater than 35.
    79Volcanic Rock (Aphanitic) > Mafic Volcanic Rock > Basalt > Tholeiite

    A silica-oversaturated basalt, characterized by the presence of low-calcium pyroxenes in addition to clinopyroxene and calcic plagioclase. Olivine may be present in the mode, but neither olivine nor nepheline appear in the norm.
    80Volcanic Rock (Aphanitic) > Mafic Volcanic Rock > Basalt > Hawaiite

    A basalt in which the normative and modal feldspar is andesine, and with soda:potash ratio greater than 2:1. It generally, but not always, lacks normative quartz, and commonly contains normative and modal olivine.
    81Volcanic Rock (Aphanitic) > Mafic Volcanic Rock > Basalt > Alkaline Basalt

    A basalt with nepheline and/or acmite in the CIPW norm.
    82Volcanic Rock (Aphanitic) > Alkalic Volcanic Rock

    A volcanic rock that contains more sodium and/or potassium than is required to form feldspar with the available silica.
    83Volcanic Rock (Aphanitic) > Alkalic Volcanic Rock > Phonolite

    A volcanic rock defined in the QAPF diagram as having F/(F+A+P) between 10 an 60, and P/(P+A) less than 10.
    84Volcanic Rock (Aphanitic) > Alkalic Volcanic Rock > Tephrite (Basanite)

    A volcanic rock defined in the QAPF diagram as having F/(F+A+P) between 10 an 60, and P/(P+A) greater than 90.
    85Volcanic Rock (Aphanitic) > Komatiite (Ultramafite)

    A volcanic rock with color index (M) greater than or equal to 90
    86Volcanic Rock (Aphanitic) > Volcanic Carbonatite

    A rock of apparent volcanic origin composed of at least 50 percent carbonate minerals
    87Plutonic Rock

    A rock formed at considerable depth by crystallization of magma and/or by chemical alteration. It is characteristically medium- to coarse-grained, of granitoid texture.
    88Plutonic Rock > Aplite

    A light-colored igneous rock characterized by a fine-grained allotriomorphic-granular (i.e. aplitic) texture.
    89Plutonic Rock > Porphyry

    An igneous rock of any composition that contains conspicuous phenocrysts in a fine-grained groundmass
    90Plutonic Rock > Porphyry > Lamprophyre

    A group of porphyritic igneous rocks in which mafic minerals form the phenocrysts; feldspars, if present, are restricted to the groundmass
    91Plutonic Rock > Pegmatite

    An exceptionally coarse-grained igneous rock, with interlocking crystals, usually found as irregular dikes, lenses, or veins, esp. at the margins of batholiths
    92Plutonic Rock > Granitoid

    A general term for all phaneritic igneous rocks dominated by quartz and feldspars
    93Plutonic Rock > Granitoid > Alkali-Granite (Alaskite)

    A plutonic rock defined in the QAPF diagram as having Q between 20 and 60 and P/(A+P) less than 10
    94Plutonic Rock > Granitoid > Granite

    A plutonic rock defined in the QAPF diagram as having Q between 20 and 60 and P/(A+P) between 10 and 65
    95Plutonic Rock > Granitoid > Granite > Peraluminous Granite

    A granite with aluminum oxide greater than sodium oxide + potassium oxide + calcium oxide; typical accessories include: muscovite, biotite, corundum, topaz, garnet
    96Plutonic Rock > Granitoid > Granite > Metaluminous Granite

    A granite with aluminum oxide greater than sodium oxide + potassium oxide, but with aluminum oxide less than sodium oxide + potassium oxide + calcium oxide; typical accessories include: hornblende, epidote, melilite, or biotite + pyroxene
    97Plutonic Rock > Granitoid > Granite > Subaluminous Granite

    A granite with aluminum oxide approximately equal to sodium oxide + potassium oxide; typical accessories include: olivine, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene
    98Plutonic Rock > Granitoid > Granite > Peralkaline Granite

    A granite with aluminum oxide less than sodium oxide + potassium oxide; typical accessories include: soda pyroxene and soda amphibole[
    99Plutonic Rock > Granitoid > Granodiorite

    A plutonic rock defined in the QAPF diagram as having Q between 20 and 60 and P/(A+P) between 65 and 90
    100Plutonic Rock > Granitoid > Tonalite

    A plutonic rock defined in the QAPF diagram as having Q between 20 and 60 and P/(A+P) greater than 90
    101Plutonic Rock > Granitoid > Tonalite > Trondhjemite

    A tonalite with color index (M) less than 15; composed essentially of sodic plagioclase, quartz, sparse biotite, and little or no alkali feldspar
    102Plutonic Rock > Granitoid > Alkali Syenite

    A plutonic rock defined in the QAPF diagram as having Q/(Q+A+P) less than 20 or F/(F+A+P) less than 10, and P/(P+A) less than 10
    103Plutonic Rock > Granitoid > Quartz Syenite

    A plutonic rock defined in the QAPF diagram as having Q between 5 and 20 and P/(A+P) between 10 and 35
    104Plutonic Rock > Granitoid > Syenite

    A plutonic rock defined in the QAPF diagram as having Q between 5 and 20 and P/(A+P) between 35 and 65
    105Plutonic Rock > Granitoid > Quartz Monzonite

    A plutonic rock defined in the QAPF diagram as having Q between 5 and 20 and P/(A+P) between 65 and 90, and plagioclase more sodic than An50
    106Plutonic Rock > Granitoid > Monzonite

    A plutonic rock defined in the QAPF diagram as having Q less than 5 or F/(F+A+P) less than 10, and P/(A+P) between 35 and 65
    107Plutonic Rock > Mafic Intrusive Rock

    An igneous rock composed chiefly of one or more dark ferromagnesian minerals. An exception is made for anorthosite, which occurs in association with mafic rocks.
    108Plutonic Rock > Mafic Intrusive Rock > Quartz Monzodiorite

    A plutonic rock defined in the QAPF diagram as having Q between 5 and 20 and P/(A+P) between 65 and 90, and plagioclase more sodic than An50
    109Plutonic Rock > Mafic Intrusive Rock > Quartz Monzogabbro

    A plutonic rock defined in the QAPF diagram as having Q between 5 and 20 and P/(A+P) between 65 and 90, and plagioclase more calcic than An50
    110Plutonic Rock > Mafic Intrusive Rock > Monzodiorite

    A plutonic rock defined in the QAPF diagram as having Q less than 5 or F/(F+A+P) less than 10, and P/(A+P) between 65 and 90, and plagioclase more sodic than An50
    111Plutonic Rock > Mafic Intrusive Rock > Monzogabbro

    A plutonic rock defined in the QAPF diagram as having Q less than 5 or F/(F+A+P) less than 10, and P/(A+P) between 65 and 90, and plagioclase more calcic than An50
    112Plutonic Rock > Mafic Intrusive Rock > Quartz Diorite

    A plutonic rock defined in the QAPF diagram as having Q between 5 and 20, P/(A+P) greater than 90, and plagioclase more sodic than An50
    113Plutonic Rock > Mafic Intrusive Rock > Quartz Gabbro

    A plutonic rock defined in the QAPF diagram as having Q between 5 and 20, P/(A+P) greater than 90, and plagioclase more calcic than An50
    114Plutonic Rock > Mafic Intrusive Rock > Diorite

    A plutonic rock defined in the QAPF diagram as having Q between 0 and 5 or F/(F+A+P) less than 10, P/(A+P) greater than 90 and plagioclase more sodic than An50
    115Plutonic Rock > Mafic Intrusive Rock > Diorite > Diabase

    A plutonic rock whose main components are labradorite and pyroxene and which is characterized by ophitic texture
    116Plutonic Rock > Mafic Intrusive Rock > Gabbro

    A plutonic rock defined in the QAPF diagram as having Q between 0 and 5 or F/(F+A+P) less than 10, P/(A+P) greater than 90 and plagioclase more calcic than An50
    117Plutonic Rock > Mafic Intrusive Rock > Gabbro > Norite

    A plutonic rock satisfying the definition of gabbro, in which pl/(pl+px+ol) is between 10 and 90 and opx/(opx+cpx) is greater than 95.
    118Plutonic Rock > Mafic Intrusive Rock > Gabbro > Troctolite

    A plutonic rock satisfying the definition of gabbro, in which pl/(pl+px+ol) is between 10 and 90 and px/(pl+px+ol) is less than 5.
    119Plutonic Rock > Mafic Intrusive Rock > Anorthosite

    A plutonic rock defined in the QAPF diagram as having Q between 0 and 5, P/(A+P) greater than 90, and M less than 10. A group of monomineralogic plutonic igneous rocks composed almost entirely of plagioclase feldspar.
    120Plutonic Rock > Alkalic Intrusive Rock

    A plutonic rock that contains more sodium and/or potassium than is required to form feldspar with the available silica
    121Plutonic Rock > Alkalic Intrusive Rock > Nepheline Syenite

    A plutonic rock defined in the QAPF diagram as having F/(F+A+P) between 10 and 60, and P/(P+A) less than 50; composed essentially of alkali feldspar and nepheline
    122Plutonic Rock > Ultramafic Intrusive Rock

    A general name for plutonic rock with color index (M) greater than or equal to 90
    123Plutonic Rock > Ultramafic Intrusive Rock > Peridotite

    A plutonic rock with M equal to or greater than 90 and ol/(ol+opx+cpx) greater than 40
    124Plutonic Rock > Ultramafic Intrusive Rock > Peridotite > Dunite

    A plutonic rock with M equal to or greater than 90 and ol/(ol+opx+cpx) greater than 90
    125Plutonic Rock > Ultramafic Intrusive Rock > Peridotite > Harzburgite

    A plutonic rock with M equal or greater than 90, ol/(ol+opx+cpx) greater than 40, and cpx/(ol+opx+cpx) less than 5.
    126Plutonic Rock > Ultramafic Intrusive Rock > Peridotite > Wherlite

    A plutonic rock with M equal or greater than 90, ol/(ol+opx+cpx) greater than 40, and opx/(ol+opx+cpx) less than 5.
    127Plutonic Rock > Ultramafic Intrusive Rock > Peridotite > Lherzolite

    A plutonic rock with M equal or greater than 90, ol/(ol+opx+cpx) greater than 40, and opx roughly equal to cpx.
    128Plutonic Rock > Ultramafic Intrusive Rock > Peridotite > Kimberlite

    A porphyritic alkalic peridotite containing abundant phenocrysts of olivine and phlogopite, and possibly geikielite and chromian pyrope, in a fine-grained groundmass of calcite and second-generation olivine and phlogopite.
    129Plutonic Rock > Ultramafic Intrusive Rock > Pyroxenite

    A plutonic rock with M equal to or greater than 90 and pyroxene/(ol+pyroxene) greater than 90.
    130Plutonic Rock > Ultramafic Intrusive Rock > Pyroxenite > Clinopyroxenite

    A plutonic rock with M equal to or greater than 90 and cpx/(ol+opx+cpx) greater than 90.
    131Plutonic Rock > Ultramafic Intrusive Rock > Pyroxenite > Orthopyroxenite

    A plutonic rock with M equal to or greater than 90 and opx/(ol+opx+cpx) greater than 90.
    132Plutonic Rock > Ultramafic Intrusive Rock > Hornblendite

    A plutonic rock with M equal to or greater than 90 and hbl/(hbl+px+ol) greater than 90.
    133Plutonic Rock > Intrusive Carbonatite

    A plutonic rock composed of at least 50% carbonate minerals.
    134Metamorphic Rock

    A rock derived from pre-existing rocks by mineralogical, chemical, and/or structural changes, essentially in the solid state, in response to marked changes in temperature, pressure, shearing stress, and chemical environment, generally at depth in the earth's crust.
    135Metamorphic Rock > Hornfels

    A fine-grained rock composed of a mosaic of equidimensional grains without preferred orientation and typically formed by contact metamorphism.
    136Metamorphic Rock > Metasedimentary Rock

    A sedimentary rock that shows evidence of having been subjected to metamorphism
    137Metamorphic Rock > Metasedimentary Rock > Meta-Argillite

    An argillite that has been metamorphosed.
    138Metamorphic Rock > Metasedimentary Rock > Slate

    A compact, fine-grained metamorphic rock that possesses slaty cleavage and hence can be split into slabs and thin plates
    139Metamorphic Rock > Metasedimentary Rock > Quartzite

    A granoblastic metamorphic rock consisting mainly of quartz and formed by recrystallization of sandstone or chert by either regional or thermal metamorphism.
    140Metamorphic Rock > Metasedimentary Rock > Marble

    A metamorphic rock consisting predominantly of fine- to coarse-grained recrystallized calcite and/or dolomite, usually with a granoblastic, saccharoidal texture
    141Metamorphic Rock > Metavolcanic Rock

    A volcanic rock that shows evidence of having been subjected to metamorphism.
    142Metamorphic Rock > Metavolcanic Rock > Felsic Metamorphic Rock

    A metavolcanic rock having abundant light-colored minerals, typically quartz and feldspar
    143Metamorphic Rock > Metavolcanic Rock > Felsic Metamorphic Rock > Meta-Rhyolite

    A low-grade, felsic metavolcanic rock with preserved evidence of its original rhyolitic character
    144Metamorphic Rock > Metavolcanic Rock > Felsic Metamorphic Rock > Keratophyre

    All salic extrusive and hypabyssal rocks characterized by the presence of albite or albite-oligoclase and chlorite, epidote, and calcite, generally of secondary order.
    145Metamorphic Rock > Metavolcanic Rock > Mafic Metamorphic Rock

    A metavolcanic rock having abundant dark-colored minerals, typically feldspar, amphibole, and/or pyroxene
    146Metamorphic Rock > Metavolcanic Rock > Mafic Metamorphic Rock > Meta-Basalt

    A low-grade, mafic metavolcanic rock with preserved evidence of its original basaltic character
    147Metamorphic Rock > Metavolcanic Rock > Mafic Metamorphic Rock > Spilite

    An altered basalt, characteristically amygdaloidal or vesicular, in which the feldspar has been albitized and is typically accompanied by chlorite, calcite, epidote, chalcedony, prehnite, or other low-temperature hydrous crystallization products characteristic of a greenstone.
    148Metamorphic Rock > Metavolcanic Rock > Mafic Metamorphic Rock > Greenstone

    A field term applied to any compact, dark-green, altered or metamorphosed basic igneous rock (e.g. spilite, basalt, gabbro, diabase) that owes its color to the presence of chlorite, actinolite, or epidote.
    149Metamorphic Rock > Phyllite

    A metamorphosed rock, intermediate in grade between slate and mica schist. Minute crystals of graphite, sericite, or chlorite impart a silky sheen to the surfaces of cleavage (or schistosity).
    150Metamorphic Rock > Schist

    A strongly foliated crystalline rock, formed by dynamic metamorphism, that can be readily split into thin flakes or slabs due to the well developed parallelism of more than 50 percent of the minerals present, particularly those of the lamellar or elongate prismatic habit, e.g. mica and hornblende.
    151Metamorphic Rock > Schist > Greenschist

    A schistose metamorphic rock whose green color is due to the presence of chlorite, epidote, or actinolite; a common product of low-grade regional metamorphism of pelitic or basic igneous rocks
    152Metamorphic Rock > Schist > Blueschist

    A schistose metamorphic rock with a blue color owing to the presence of sodic amphibole, glaucophane, or crossite, and commonly mottled bluish-gray lawsonite; characteristic of metamorphism in areas of unusually low thermal gradient, such as subduction zones
    153Metamorphic Rock > Schist > Mica Schist

    A schist whose essential constituents are mica and quartz, and whose schistosity is mainly due to the parallel arrangement of mica flakes.
    154Metamorphic Rock > Schist > Pelitic Schist

    A schistose metamorphic rock derived by metamorphism of an argillaceous or a fine-grained alluminous sediment.
    155Metamorphic Rock > Schist > Quartz-Feldspar Schist

    A schist whose essential constituents are quartz and feldspar and having lesser amounts of mica and/or hornblende
    156Metamorphic Rock > Schist > Calc-Silicate Schist

    A metamorphosed calcareous rock, commonly derived from argillaceous limestone or calcareous mudstone, containing calcium-bearing silicates such as diopside and wollastonite, with a schistose structure produced by parallelism of platy minerals
    157Metamorphic Rock > Schist > Amphibole Schist

    A schist whose essential constituent is amphibole with lesseramounts of feldspar, quartz, and/or mica
    158Metamorphic Rock > Granofels

    A medium- to coarse-grained granoblastic metamorphic rock with little or no foliation or lineation.
    159Metamorphic Rock > Gneiss

    A foliated rock formed by regional metamorphism, in which bands or lenticles of granular minerals alternate with bands or lenticles in which minerals having flaky or elongate prismatic habits predominate. Generally less than 50 percent of the minerals show preferred orientation.
    160Metamorphic Rock > Gneiss > Felsic Gneiss

    A gneissic rock dominated by light-colored minerals, commonly quartz and feldspar
    161Metamorphic Rock > Gneiss > Felsic Gneiss > Granitic Gneiss

    A gneissic rock with a general granitoid composition
    162Metamorphic Rock > Gneiss > Felsic Gneiss > Biotite Gneiss

    A granitic gneiss in which the dominant mafic mineral is biotite
    163Metamorphic Rock > Gneiss > Mafic Gneiss

    A gneissic rock dominated by dark-colored minerals, commonly biotite and hornblende
    164Metamorphic Rock > Gneiss > Orthogneiss

    A gneissic rock formed from an igneous parent
    165Metamorphic Rock > Gneiss > Paragneiss

    A gneissic rock formed from a sedimentary parent
    166Metamorphic Rock > Gneiss > Migmatite

    A composite "mixed rock" composed of igneous or igneous-appearing and metamorphic portions
    167Metamorphic Rock > Amphibolite

    A crystalloblastic rock consisting mainly of amphibole and plagioclase with little or no quartz.
    168Metamorphic Rock > Granulite

    A metamorphic rock consisting of even-sized, interlocking mineral grains less than 10 percent of which have any obvious preferred orientation.
    169Metamorphic Rock > Eclogite

    A granular rock composed essentially of garnet (almandine-pyrope) and sodic pyroxene (omphacite).
    170Metamorphic Rock > Greisen

    A pneumatolytically altered granitic rock composed largely of quartz, mica, and topaz.
    171Metamorphic Rock > Skarn (Tactite)

    A rock of complex mineralogic composition formed by contact metamorphism and metasomatism of carbonate rocks. It is typically coarse-grained and rich in garnet, iron-rich pyroxene, epidote, wollastonite, and scapolite.
    172Metamorphic Rock > Serpentinite

    A rock consisting almost wholly of serpentine-group minerals derived from the hydration of ferromagnesian silicate minerals such as olivine and pyroxene.
    173Tectonite

    A rock whose fabric reflects the history of its deformation.
    174Tectonite > Tectonic Melange

    A melange produced by tectonic processes.
    175Tectonite > Cataclasite

    A fine-grained, cohesive cataclastic rock, normally lacking a penetrative foliation or microfabric, formed during fault movement.
    176Tectonite > Phyllonite

    A rock that macroscopically resembles phyllite but that is formed by mechanical degradation (mylonitization) of initially coarser rocks.
    177Tectonite > Mylonite

    A compact, chert-like rock without cleavage, but with a streaky or banded structure, produced by the extreme granulation and shearing of rocks that have been pulverized and rolled during overthrusting or intense dynamic metamorphism.
    178Tectonite > Flaser Gneiss

    A dynamically metamorphosed rock in which lenses or layers of original or relatively unaltered granular materials are surrounded by a matrix of highly sheared and crushed material, giving the appearance of a crude flow structure
    179Tectonite > Augen Gneiss

    Gneissic rock containing augen (large lenticular mineral grains or mineral aggregates having the shape of an eye in cross section)

    AROCK_UNIT
    Associated rock unit name.

    Lithologic and stratigraphic information regarding the rocks for the ore deposit that are not specifically identified as host ro. Textual values of no more than 255 characters.

    ValueDefinition
    (no value)Information not available for this record. 291593 records have no value for AROCK_UNIT.

    AROCK_CODE
    Associated rock type code.

    A comma-separated list of integer numbers indicating the types of associated rocks. Each list has no more than 40 characters.

    Values are the same as HROCK_CODE

    ValueDefinition
    (no value)Information not available for this record. 278263 records have no value for AROCK_CODE.

    STRUCTURE
    Structural characteristics.

    Description of geological structures at or near the deposit. Textual values of no more than 255 characters.

    ValueDefinition
    (no value)Information not available for this record. 280348 records have no value for STRUCTURE.

    TECTONIC
    Tectonic setting.

    Description of tectonic setting within which the deposit is found, includes regional geologic structure. Textual values of no more than 255 characters.

    ValueDefinition
    (no value)Information not available for this record. 285058 records have no value for TECTONIC.

    REF
    References.

    Bibliographic references providing information supporting the database record. Braces delimit multiple references. Textual values of no more than 32768 characters.

    ValueDefinition
    (no value)Information not available for this record. 25211 records have no value for REF.


Who produced the data set?

  1. Who are the originators of the data set? (may include formal authors, digital compilers, and editors)

  2. Who also contributed to the data set?

    Hundreds of people have contributed to the development of MRDS and MAS/MILS over several decades. The present digest owes much of its coherence to Bill Ferguson, Bruce Lipin, and Paul Schruben of USGS.

  3. To whom should users address questions about the data?

    Peter N. Schweitzer
    USGS ER GD
    12201 Sunrise Valley Drive
    Reston, VA 20192-0002
    USA

    703-648-6533 (voice)
    703-648-6252 (FAX)
    pschweitzer@usgs.gov


Why was the data set created?

This digest of the complex mineral resources database is intended for use as reference material supporting mineral resource and environmental assessments on local to regional scale worldwide.


How was the data set created?

  1. From what previous works were the data drawn?

    DDS-20 (source 1 of 3)
    George T. Mason, Jr., and Arndt, Raymond E., 1996, Mineral Resources Data System (MRDS): U.S. Geological Survey Digital Data Series DDS-20, U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, VA.

    Type_of_Source_Media: CD-ROM
    Source_Contribution: Previous publication of the MRDS data

    DDS-52 (source 2 of 3)
    McFaul, Edward J., Mason, George T., Ferguson, William B., and Lipin, Bruce R., 2000, U.S. Geological Survey mineral databases; MRDS and MAS/MILS: U.S. Geological Survey Digital Data Series DDS-52, U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia.

    Online Links:

    Other_Citation_Details: ISBN: 0607940212
    Type_of_Source_Media: CD-ROM
    Source_Contribution: Previously published versions of MRDS and MAS/MILS

    Internal RDBMS (source 3 of 3)
    U.S. Geological Survey, 2005, Mineral Resource Data System.

    Other_Citation_Details: relational database for internal development and refinement
    Source_Contribution:
    This version of the database is the source for the current digest.

  2. How were the data generated, processed, and modified?

    Date: 1996 (process 1 of 2)
    Conversion of MRDS and MAS/MILS for use as a combined minerals database within the Oracle relational database management system proceeded under the general supervision of Bruce Lipin of USGS.

    Review of many database fields resulted in significant simplification, harmonization among records within these databases and between the databases, and elimination of duplicate records.

    The resulting relational database is currently maintained by William Ferguson under the supervision of Paul Schruben.

    Person who carried out this activity:

    Paul G Schruben
    USGS ER GD
    12201 Sunrise Valley Drive
    Reston, VA 20192-0002
    USA

    703-648-6142 (voice)
    703-648-6383 (FAX)
    pschrube@usgs.gov

    Data sources used in this process:
    • DDS-52

    Data sources produced in this process:

    • Internal RDBMS

    Date: 2005 (process 2 of 2)
    This description refers to PHP scripts that are downloadable as part of http://mrdata.usgs.gov/mrds/metadata/scripts.zip

    Select fields and tables from the Oracle RDBMS are extracted using the script pull.php to produce local copies of the tables containing only those fields needed to produce the current digest.

    The script combine.php draws data from these local tables to create a single monolithic table with one row per mineral resource record.

    At this writing a number of corrections are made to the data given for the form of orebodies. These changes include the elimination of the useless value "SEE DEPOSIT DESCRIPTION COMMENTS", the elimination of empty parentheses from most records, replacement of the abbreviation 'IRREG' with the more common complete value 'IRREGULAR', and especially a complex analysis of most values originating in the MAS/MILS database. These changes are described by the script orebody-fix.php.

    Additional modifications are made to the geographic locations of about 4300 records whose coordinates are given in the source database as the South Pole. These coordinates are replaced with NULL values in the current database. The data selection software in the current distribution web site allows some of these records to be retrieved because some of the records contained additional information linking them to specific geographic areas. These changes are carried out by the script place-fix.php.

    Information about host rocks and associated rocks was subject to additional correction using the SQL statements in fix-rock.php.

    This table is used to create the GIS shapefiles and other formats available for download.

    Person who carried out this activity:

    Peter N Schweitzer
    U.S. Geological Survey, ER
    Geologist
    Mail Stop 954
    12201 Sunrise Valley Drive
    Reston, VA 20192
    USA

    703-648-6533 (voice)
    703-648-6252 (FAX)
    pschweitzer@usgs.gov

    Data sources used in this process:
    • Internal RDBMS

  3. What similar or related data should the user be aware of?


How reliable are the data; what problems remain in the data set?

  1. How well have the observations been checked?

    Collected over many decades, this information is highly variable in quality. Currency of individual records is variable as well, so it is likely that some information will be found to be out of date. This is a subject of continuing refinement by the USGS and its cooperators.

  2. How accurate are the geographic locations?

    Positional information is highly variable. In the best cases this information was provided by plotting the location on a 7.5 minute topographic map, however many records were located on the basis of published reports containing imprecise or scant information on the specific geographic location. Approximately 4000 records have no reliable geographic coordinates, although about 114 of those have other locational information systematic enough to warrant placement within the controlled vocabulary used to select data for analysis on the web.

  3. How accurate are the heights or depths?

  4. Where are the gaps in the data? What is missing?

    The database is generally sparse; many records have no information for a given field. A few fields required for proper processing are complete throughout. The number of records lacking data in each field is shown in the list below with the percent of records lacking data for that field:

    Field       Missing values
    Label      Number   Percent
    -----------------------------------
    DEP_ID          0       0.0
    MRDS_ID    149235      49.0
    MAS_ID     110652      36.4
    SITE_NAME       0       0.0
    LATITUDE     4033       1.3
    LONGITUDE    4033       1.3
    REGION      58555      19.2
    COUNTRY     58555      19.2
    STATE       58762      19.3
    COUNTY      65215      21.4
    DISTRICT   254769      83.7
    ADMIN      299777      98.5
    LAND_STAT  114367      37.6
    COM_TYPE       34       0.0
    COM_MAJOR   22335       7.3
    COM_MINOR  285184      93.7
    COM_TRACE  239278      78.6
    OPER_TYPE       0       0.0
    DEP_TYPE   269516      88.6
    PROD_SIZE  194976      64.1
    DEV_STAT        0       0.0
    ORE        236479      77.7
    GANGUE     272740      89.6
    OTHER_MATL 294207      96.7
    OREBODY_FM 264927      87.1
    WORK_TYPE  238249      78.3
    MODEL      292387      96.1
    ALTERATION 289757      95.2
    CONC_PROC  293637      96.5
    PREV_NAME  241287      79.3
    ORE_CTRL   279810      91.9
    REPORTER       36       0.0
    HROCK_UNIT 268180      88.1
    HROCK_CODE 236050      77.6
    AROCK_UNIT 291593      95.8
    AROCK_CODE 278263      91.4
    STRUCTURE  280348      92.1
    TECTONIC   285058      93.7
    REF         25211       8.3
    

  5. How consistent are the relationships among the observations, including topology?

    Collected and reported by numerous diverse people, the descriptions provided are not highly consistent in structure or terminology. Recent revision of the MRDS database has begun to address this issue, and the present database digest contains fields chosen for their general consistency, though much work remains to be done.


How can someone get a copy of the data set?

Are there legal restrictions on access or use of the data?

Access_Constraints: none
Use_Constraints: none

  1. Who distributes the data set? (Distributor 1 of 1)

    Peter N Schweitzer
    U.S. Geological Survey, ER
    Geologist
    Mail Stop 954
    12201 Sunrise Valley Drive
    Reston, VA 20192
    USA

    703-648-6533 (voice)
    703-648-6252 (FAX)
    pschweitzer@usgs.gov

  2. What's the catalog number I need to order this data set?

    USGS MRDS

  3. What legal disclaimers am I supposed to read?

    This dataset was prepared by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, make any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed in this report, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. Any views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof.

  4. How can I download or order the data?


Who wrote the metadata?

Dates:
Last modified: 22-May-2014
Metadata author:
Peter N Schweitzer
USGS Eastern Mineral and Environmental Resources Science Center
Geologist
12201 Sunrise Valley Drive
Reston, VA 20192-0002
USA

703-648-6533 (voice)
703-648-6252 (FAX)
pschweitzer@usgs.gov

Metadata standard:
Content Standard for Digital Geospatial Metadata (FGDC-STD-001-1998)


This page is <http://mrdata.usgs.gov/metadata/mrds.faq.html>

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Page Last Modified: Thursday, 22-May-2014 12:08:15 MDT

Generated by mp version 2.9.26 on Thu May 22 12:08:15 2014