Double Anchor

Prospect, Inactive

Alternative names

Alaska State Mines Extension

Commodities and mineralogy

Main commodities Ag; Au; Cu; Pb; Zn
Other commodities Cu
Ore minerals chalcopyrite; galena; pyrite; sphalerite
Gangue minerals quartz

Geographic location

Quadrangle map, 1:250,000-scale BC
Quadrangle map, 1:63,360-scale A-1
Latitude 56.064
Longitude -130.258
Nearby scientific data Find additional scientific data near this location
Location and accuracy The Double Anchor prospect is in Section 16 at an elevation of about 4100 feet near the top of a south-facing mountainside overlooking Texas Lake, about 0.7 mile south of the lake (Berg and others, 1977, p. 79; Elliott and Koch, 1981, p. 11, loc. 30).

Geologic setting

Geologic description

The country rocks in the area near the Double Anchor prospect are pelitic metasedimentary and minor andesitic metavolcanic strata of the Jurassic or older Mesozoic Hazelton Group; the Triassic Texas Creek Granodiorite, which underlies and locally intrudes the Hazelton; and the Eocene Hyder Quartz Monzonite, which cuts both the Hazelton and Texas Creek rocks (Smith, 1977; Koch, 1996).
Buddington (1929, p. p. 98-99) describes the deposit as a subhorizontal shear zone in argillite and graywacke that contains seams and stringers of quartz and sulfides, including sphalerite, galena, pyrite, chalcopyrite, and sparse pyrrhotite. The largest orebody is about 2.5 feet thick and 30 feet long; most individual veins are less than an inch thick. Thick quartz veins nearby are only sparsely mineralized.
Berg and others (1977, p. 38-39) describe two quartz breccia zones. One is subhorizontal, up to about a foot thick, and exposed for about 700 feet along strike; the other dips steeply and is exposed for about 160 feet along strike. Both zones contain pyrite, galena, sphalerite, and chalcopyrite.
The weighted average of analyses of samples collected by the U.S. Bureau of Mines in 1972 (Berg and others, 1977, p. 79-84) across about a two-foot-width of the main (subhorizontal) orebody is 4.3 percent Pb, 1.0 percent Zn, and 3.5 oz Ag and 0.022 oz Au per ton.
Lead-isotope studies of galena from the Double Anchor prospect have yielded Jurassic and Eocene ages (Maas and others, 1995, p. 235, 244). The deposit is interpreted to be polygenetic, originating during Jurassic Hazelton island-arc volcanism (Alldrick, 1993), and then partly remobilized or reconstituted as fissure veins during Eocene emplacement of the Hyder Quartz Monzonite.
Geologic map unit (-130.259705475906, 56.0636894720707)
Mineral deposit model Polymetallic veins (Cox and Singer, 1986; model 22c).
Mineral deposit model number 22c
Age of mineralization Lead-isotope studies of galena from the Double Anchor prospect have yielded Jurassic and Eocene ages (Maas and others, 1995, p. 235, 244). The deposit is interpreted to be polygenetic, originating during Jurassic Hazelton island-arc volcanism (Alldrick, 1993), and then partly remobilized or reconstituted during Eocene emplacement of the Hyder Quartz Monzonite.
Alteration of deposit Local intense iron staining. The subhorizontal quartz breccia zone is oxidized.

Production and reserves

Workings or exploration
Prospect was explored, probably in the 1920s, by pits and short adits.
The weighted average of analyses of samples collected by the U.S. Bureau of Mines in 1972 (Berg and others, 1977, p. 79-84) across about a two-foot-width of the main (subhorizontal) orebody is 4.3 percent Pb, 1.0 percent Zn, and 3.5 oz Ag and 0.022 oz Au per ton.
Indication of production None

Additional comments

Four claims were recorded in 1923; property was restaked in 1958 as part of the Alaska State Mines Extension claim group of 19 lode and 2 placer claims. The claims were inactive in 1973 (Berg and others, 1977, p. 76).

References