Lake Creek

Mine, Undetermined

Commodities and mineralogy

Main commodities Au
Ore minerals gold

Geographic location

Quadrangle map, 1:250,000-scale CH
Quadrangle map, 1:63,360-scale B-5
Latitude 67.4956
Longitude -149.4524
Nearby scientific data Find additional scientific data near this location
Location and accuracy Lake Creek flows into the south side of Bob Johnson Lake (formerly Big Lake) about a mile and a half south of its north end. Lake Creek has been mined from about 300 feet to 3,200 feet upstream from its mouth. The coordinates are at the mine symbol on the the 1:63,360-scale topographic map, near the center of section 24, T. 31 N., R. 9 W.

Geologic setting

Geologic description

Gold was discovered on Lake Creek in 1915, followed by hand and drift mining near the mouth of the creek in 1916 (Reed, 1938; Kurtak and others, 2002). In the 1930s, shafts were sunk in upper Lake Creek near the divide with Wakeup Creek (CH025) and there was hydraulic and drift mining nearly every year to 1941 at various places along the creek. From 1949 to 1959 mining continued by hydraulic and sluicing methods on claims that extended the length of Lake Creek. Dillon (1987) reported mining from 1980 to 1986. Lake Creek produced gold in 23 of the years between 1921 and 1955, although never more than 99 ounces of gold a year; the total production during that period was 807 ounces of gold.
Gold was mined from placers along the modern channel of Lake Creek, from benches, and from a deep channel in the upper part of the creek. (Reed, 1938; Kurtak and others, 2002). When Reed visited the creek in 1937, the modern channel had been worked from about 300 feet to about 1,500 feet above its mouth. The channel was 10 to 20 feet wide and the gravel was 9 to 12 feet deep. The stream fill consisted of coarse-grained schist 'slide' rock mixed with fine sand and coarse waterworn gravel (Reed, 1938). The gold was coarse and the ground ran about $0.50 in gold per square foot of bedrock (with gold at $35 per ounce). Several benches were mined along Lake Creek. One bench deposit, exposed in a cut about 0.5 mile from the mouth of the creek, was 75 to 100 feet higher than the modern channel of Lake Creek. The gold was concentrated in a channel about a foot wide on bedrock. Beginning in 1930, shafts were sunk through 30-40 feet of overburden on a deep channel in upper Lake Creek near the divide to Wakeup Creek (CH025). The deep channel may be an extension of the high channel on Wakeup Creek on the other side of the divide. The overburden consisted of thick blue-gray mud and gravel. The gold was in the the bottom foot of the gravel and the ground had about 0.01 ounce of gold per square foot of bedrock.
Geologic map unit (-149.455144995918, 67.4951910879436)
Mineral deposit model Placer Au (Cox and Singer, 1986; model 39a).
Mineral deposit model number 39a
Age of mineralization Quaternary.

Production and reserves

Workings or exploration Gold was discovered on Lake Creek in 1915, followed by hand and drift mining near the mouth of the creek in 1916 (Reed, 1938; Kurtak and others, 2002). In the 1930s, shafts were sunk in upper Lake Creek near the divide to Wakeup Creek (CH025) and there was hydraulic and drift mining almost every year to 1941 at various places along the creek. From 1949 to 1959 mining continued by hydraulic and sluicing methods on claims that extended the length of Lake Creek. Dillon (1987) reported mining from 1980 to 1986.
Indication of production Yes; small
Reserve estimates Probably none.
Production notes Lake Creek produced gold in 23 of the years between 1921 and 1955, although never more than 99 ounces of gold a year; the total production during that period was 807 ounces of gold. There was mining from 1949 to 1959 and from 1980 to 1986 but there is no record of the amount of gold that was produced.

Additional comments

MAS No. 0020310005

References

MRDS Number A012126

References

Kurtak, J.M., Klieforth, R.F., Clark, J.M., and Maclean, E.A., 2002, Mineral investigations in the Koyukuk mining district, northern Alaska, 2 vols.: Bureau of Land Management, Alaska Technical Report 50, 845 p.
Reporters J.M. Britton (Anchorage, Alaska); D.J. Grybeck (Contractor, U.S. Geological Survey)
Last report date 4/18/2010