Big Spruce Creek

Occurrence, Inactive

Alternative names

Spruce Creek

Commodities and mineralogy

Main commodities Au
Ore minerals gold

Geographic location

Quadrangle map, 1:250,000-scale CH
Quadrangle map, 1:63,360-scale C-5
Latitude 67.5905
Longitude -149.3008
Nearby scientific data Find additional scientific data near this location
Location and accuracy Big Spruce Creek (Spruce Creek on older maps) is a major south-flowing tributary, more than 12 miles long, to the Bettles River. There is an old report that two prospect shafts were sunk near the mouth of Spruce Creek and there was prospecting upstream. The site is plotted near the mouth of Spruce Creek about 0.5 mile north of the center of section 22, T. 32 N., R. 8 W. The location of the prospecting above the mouth of Big Spruce Creek is vague.

Geologic setting

Geologic description

Maddren (1910, 1913) reported limited prospecting in the 1900s on Big Spruce Creek. Reed (1938) reported that little or no gold was found in the 1930s in two shafts about 45 feet deep sunk along the west side of Big Spruce Creek near its mouth. Reed (1938) pointed out that Maddren (1913) incorrectly identified Spruce Creek as Mule Creek, which is the first south-flowing tributary to the Bettles River west of Spruce Creek, and that Mule Creek was unnamed.
Kurtak and others (2002) sampled along Spruce Creek and its tributaries as part of their study of the mineral resources of the Koyukuk mining district. None of their panned samples showed visible gold although analyses of their panned concentrates found minor amounts of gold. They found no signs of old or recent mining. Dillon (1987) reported an inactive claim about a mile upstream from the mouth of the creek.
Geologic map unit (-149.303551826878, 67.5900964198546)
Mineral deposit model Placer Au (Cox and Singer, 1986; model 39a).
Mineral deposit model number 39a
Age of mineralization Quaternary.

Production and reserves

Workings or exploration Maddren (1910, 1913) reported limited prospecting in the 1900s on Big Spruce Creek. Reed (1938) reported that little or no gold was found in the 1930s in two shafts about 45 feet deep sunk along the west side of Big Spruce Creek near its mouth. Kurtak and others (2002) sampled along Spruce Creek and its tributaries as part of their study of the mineral resources of the Koyukuk mining district. They found no signs of old or recent mining. Dillon (1987) reported an inactive claim about a mile upstream from the mouth of the creek.
Indication of production None
Reserve estimates None.
Production notes Possibly a small amount of gold was recovered during prospecting.

Additional comments

Reed (1938) pointed out that Maddren (1913) incorrectly identified Spruce Creek as Mule Creek (which is the first north tributary to the Bettles River west of Spruce Creek) and that Mule Creek was unnamed.
This prospect is on Doyon Ltd. selected lands; for more information, contact Doyon Ltd., Fairbanks, Alaska.
MAS No. 0020310029

References