Bachelor Creek

Mine, Inactive

Commodities and mineralogy

Main commodities Au
Ore minerals gold

Geographic location

Quadrangle map, 1:250,000-scale CI
Quadrangle map, 1:63,360-scale B-5
Latitude 65.491
Longitude -146.059
Nearby scientific data Find additional scientific data near this location
Location and accuracy Bachelor Creek can be accessed via a 4-wheel drive road from the Steese Highway at mile marker 80.1. The 4-wheel drive road runs along the west side of the state highway maintenance station fence. Mining occurred along the east side of the creek at 65.4828 N, 146.0575 W.

Geologic setting

Geologic description

Traverses in the upper Bachelor Creek basin indicate that it is underlain, in part, by light gray or rusty-weathering felsic schists and quartzites and by abundant graphitic schist and quartzite. Sulfide minerals appear to be concentrated in stratiform layers, especially in the graphitic rocks. In some hand specimens, sulfides make up 15 to 20 percent of the rock. Pyrite is the most common sulfide, and chalcopyrite and arsenopyrite are present in many of the rocks. Pyrrhotite is common in the graphitic zones. Both felsic and graphitic schists contain elevated abundances of gold, copper and tungsten. The felsic schists and associated light-colored quartzites contain up to 240 ppb Au, 4300 ppm Cu, 2100 ppm As, 4 ppm Ag, 4.5 ppm Sb, 130 ppm Sb, 14 ppm Pb, 90 ppm Sn and 3100 ppm W. In these rocks gold correlates with copper, and to a lesser extent, with arsenic. High tungsten-tin values inversely correlate to gold-base metal values. Graphitic schists and quartzites are less well mineralized with concentrations of Au to 180 ppb, Cu to 1600 ppm and W to 110 ppm (T.E. Smith and others, 1987, p. 6-10 to 6-11).
Bedrock in the area is composed of both schist and granite porphyry. Bedrock schist is primarily quartz-mica, quartzitic, and carbonaceous. These Paleozoic and (or) Precambrian schists are cut by a 75 foot thick sill-like body of granite porphyry. The schistosity and sill strike N 60 E. Gravels are thin (7 to 8 feet thick) or absent and are thawed. Gravels are composed of schist, abundant vein quartz, and some granite porphyry clasts. The only gold occurrence reported is on a low, 20 foot thick gravel bench on the east side of the creek (Prindle, 1910, p. 208-209).
Gravel on a low bench east of the stream was sluiced in 1910 (Cobb, 1973, p. 123, [B 1374]). A man recently reported finding a 1.2 ounce gold nugget on Bachelor Creek (Lampright, 1996, p55).
Geologic map unit (-146.061474708754, 65.4906119112375)
Mineral deposit model Placer gold deposit (Cox and Singer, 1986; model 39a)
Mineral deposit model number 39a

Production and reserves

Workings or exploration Gravel on a low bench east of the stream was sluiced in 1910 (Cobb, 1973, p. 123, [B 1374]). A man recently reported finding a 1.2 ounce gold nugget on Bachelor Creek (Lampright, 1996, p. 55).
Indication of production Yes; small
Production notes Gravel on a low bench east of the stream was sluiced in 1910 (Cobb, 1973, p. 123, [B 1374]), however amount of production is unknown.

Additional comments

Gold reported on Preacher Creek in 1913 may have been on Loper or Bachelor Creek. Numerous claims staked on Preacher Creek in 1928 and 1976 to 1981. See also Loper Creek, ARDF no. CI035.

References

MRDS Number A012231

References

Lampright, R.L., 1996, Gold placer deposits near Fairbanks Alaska--An inventory of the gold placer mines, prospects, and deposits located within the Big Delta Charley River, Circle, Eagle, Fairbanks, and Livengood quadrangles: Nederland, Colorado, Iron Fire Publications, Anchorage, Alaska, 135 p.
Reporters C.J. Freeman, J.R. Guidetti Schaefer, A.S. Clements (Avalon Development Corporation)
Last report date 9/15/1998