Crackerjack

Mine, Active

Commodities and mineralogy

Main commodities Ag; Au
Other commodities As; Cu; Pb; Sb; Zn
Ore minerals chalcopyrite; galena; pyrite; sphalerite; tetrahedrite
Gangue minerals quartz

Geographic location

Quadrangle map, 1:250,000-scale CR
Quadrangle map, 1:63,360-scale B-3
Latitude 55.48956
Longitude -132.70226
Nearby scientific data Find additional scientific data near this location
Location and accuracy The main adit of the Crackerjack Mine, Adit No. 2, is at an elevation of about 800 feet, about 0.5 mile south of the Puyallup Mine, which is shown on the USGS 1:63,360-scale topographic map. The adit is on what is locally called Crackerjack Creek, near the middle of the south boundary of section 31, T. 73 S., R. 84 E. The property consists of ten claims and numerous workings that are shown on figure 2 of Herreid and Rose (1966) and on figure 18 of Mass and others (1995).

Geologic setting

Geologic description

The rocks in the vicinity of the Crackerjack Mine are mainly thin beds of interlayered black slate and black siltstone with subordinate argillite and graywacke, that are part of the Descon Formation of Silurian and Ordovician age (Herreid and Rose, 1966). The mineralization at the Crackerjack Mine consists of two parallel quartz veins about 100 feet apart that closely follow two porphyry dikes for over a mile (Wright and Wright, 1908; Roehm, 1938, PE 119-7; Herreid and Rose, 1966; Maas and others, 1991; Maas and others, 1995). The veins and dikes strike about N20-30W and dip 20-48SW. Different workers have variously called the dikes gray porphyritic diorite, green porphyry, greenstone, or dacite porphyry. Near the veins, the dikes are intensely altered to quartz, pyrite, calcite, chlorite, and epidote. The quartz veins are banded and vary from 1 to 5 feet wide. They contain free gold, and, in order of abundance: pyrite, chalcopyrite, galena, sphalerite, tetrahedrite, and an antimony or bismuth sulfosalt. The gold content of the ore is tied to the abundance of the sulfides. The ore occurs in shoots that Roehm (1938, PE 119-7) suggests rake gently to the west; they were formed along rolls or irregularities in shear zones along the veins.
The Crackerjack Mine was discovered prior to 1902 (Brooks, 1902). By 1938, there were 8 tunnels and numerous open cuts and trenches for about 6,000 feet along the west side of what is locally called Crackerjack Creek (Roehm, 1938; Herreid and Rose, 1966, figure 2). Most of the workings apparently were driven before 1909. Maas and others (1991; 1995, figure 18) mapped and sampled extensively in the workings; the gold content of their samples varied widely from almost nothing to several ounces per ton. Roehm's map (1938) shows the location of 176 samples across the veins; they contained from a trace to 14.14 ounces of gold per ton and a trace to 29.41 ounces of silver per ton. He also cites an old report that shows 185 channel samples that averaged $7.50 per ton in gold (at $20.67 per ounce). Apparently there has been no production since 1908 (Maas and others, 1995). A mill was in operation before 1905 at the nearby Puyallup Mine (CR103); that mill processed ore from both the Puyallup and Crackerjack mines (Wright and Wright, 1905). Bureau of Mines production records cited by Maas and others (1991) indicate that from 1900 to 1916, the two mines produced an estimated 10,466 ounces of gold; the average grade was 0.840 ounce of gold per ton and 0.668 ounce of silver per ton.
As of 2008, the Crackerjack mine and several nearby properties were being explored under an agreement between Full Metals Minerals and Altair Ventures Inc. (Altair Ventures, Inc., 2008; Full Metal Minerals, 2008). In 2007, they drilled 3 holes on the vein at the Crackerjack mine, two holes at the Hollis tunnel about 800 meters to the southeast and 2 holes at the Dawson Mine (CR099) about a mile to the south; the drilling totaled 1,105 meters. The drilling on the Crackerjack vein cut several intervals of mineralization including: 3.21 meters that contained 4.94 grams of gold per ton and 5.7 grams of silver per ton; 3.60 meters with 4.23 grams of gold per ton and 11.4 ounces of silver per ton; and 6.26 meters with 2.74 grams of gold per ton and 42.7 grams of silver per ton. The best intercept at the Hollis Tunnel was 2.05 meters that contained 9.56 ounces of gold per ton and 76.7 ounces of silver per ton. Additional drilling began in March, 2008.
Geologic map unit (-132.703906686432, 55.4892033129869)
Mineral deposit model Gold-quartz veins (Cox and Singer, 1986; model 36a).
Mineral deposit model number 36a
Age of mineralization Unknown, other than that the veins are in Silurian or Ordovician rocks.
Alteration of deposit The dikes that are associated with the gold-quartz veins are intensely altered to quartz, pyrite, calcite, chlorite, and epidote near the veins.

Production and reserves

Workings or exploration
The Crackerjack Mine was discovered prior to 1902 (Brooks, 1902). By 1938, there were 8 tunnels and numerous open cuts and trenches for about 6,000 feet along the west side of what is locally called Crackerjack Creek (Roehm, 1938, PE 119-7; Herreid and Rose, 1966, figure 2). Most of the workings apparently were driven before 1909. Apparently there has been no production since 1908 and little activity until recently, other than patenting the claims in 1926 (Maas and others, 1995). Maas and others (1991; 1995, figure 18) mapped and sampled extensively in the workings.
As of 2008, the Crackerjack mine and several nearby properties are being explored under an agreement between Full Metals Minerals and Altair Ventures Inc. (Altair Ventures, Inc., 2008; Full Metal Minerals, 2008). In 2007, they drilled 3 holes on the vein at the Crackerjack mine, two holes on the Hollis tunnel about 800 meters to the southeast and 3 holes on the Dawson Mine (CR099) about a mile to the south. Additional drilling began in March, 2008.
Indication of production Yes; small
Reserve estimates Probably none.
Production notes A mill was in operation before 1905 at the nearby Puyallup Mine (CR103); the mill processed ore from both the Puyallup and Crackerjack mines (Wright and Wright, 1905). Bureau of Mines production records cited by Maas and others (1991) indicate that from 1900 to 1916, the two mines produced an estimated 10,466 ounces of gold; the average grade was 0.840 ounce of gold per ton and 0.668 ounce of silver per ton. Apparently there has been no production since 1908 from the Crackerjack Mine.

References

MRDS Number A010076

References

Altair Ventures, Inc., 2008, CJ property, geology and drill results: http://www.altairventuresinc.com/projects/crackerjack/geology.aspx (as of May, 2008).
Barnett, John, and Clough, Al, 2000, CJ Gold prospect, Prince of Wales Island, Alaska (abs.): Alaska Miners Convention, Oct. 30- Nov. 4, Anchorage, Abstracts, p. 19-20.
Full Metal Minerals, 2008, CJ property: http://www.fullmetalminerals.com/s/CJ.asp (as of May 1, 2008).
Reporters D.J. Grybeck (Port Ludlow, WA)
Last report date 6/5/2008