Puyallup

Mine, Active

Alternative names

Hope
Ready Bullion
Lucky Jack

Commodities and mineralogy

Main commodities Ag; Au
Other commodities Cu; Pb; Te; Zn
Ore minerals galena; gold; pyrite; sphalerite; unidentified telluride
Gangue minerals quartz

Geographic location

Quadrangle map, 1:250,000-scale CR
Quadrangle map, 1:63,360-scale B-3
Latitude 55.49743
Longitude -132.69961
Nearby scientific data Find additional scientific data near this location
Location and accuracy The Puyallup Mine is a well known property that is named on the USGS 1:63,360-scale topographic map. It is about 0.1 mile east of the center of section 31, T. 73 S., R. 84 E. The mine has considerable workings; the coordinates are at the portal of the main adit. The workings are shown on figure 2 of Herreid and Rose (1966).

Geologic setting

Geologic description

The rocks in the vicinity of the Puyallup Mine are graywacke, conglomerate, andesite, and slate of the Descon Formation of Silurian and Ordovician age; they generally strike northwest and dip 20-40SW (Eberlein and others, 1983; Brew, 1996). The deposit consists of auriferous sulfide-bearing quartz veins (Brooks, 1902; Wright and Wright, 1908; Roehm, 1936 [PE 119-4]; Herreid and Rose, 1966; Maas and others, 1991, 1995). The main vein is generally 7 to 8 inches wide but locally widens to 3 feet; it trends about N25W and dips about 35NE.(Herreid and Rose, 1966). The quartz is banded and the vein commonly follows a light-gray porphyritic dike. The quartz contains sparse free gold, pyrite, galena, and a little sphalerite; tellurides are reported. There are several smaller, similar veins.
The deposit was discovered prior to 1902 and developed by several open cuts, a short shaft, 5 adits (including one 1,135 feet long and another 220 feet long), several stopes, and at least 2,865 feet of other underground workings (Brooks, 1902). In 1990, the underground workings were either unsafe or caved (Maas and others, 1991). The property has recently been acquired by Red Diamond Mining Company and is active as of March, 2004 (Barnett and Clough, 2000; http://www.reddiamondmining.com/).
A mill was in operation before 1905 (Wright and Wright, 1905) that processed ore from both the Puyallup and Crackerjack (CR101) mines. Brooks (1902) reports a shipment of 14 tons of ore (in 1901?) that returned $159 per ton (probably mainly in gold at $20.67 per ounce). Bureau of Mines production records cited by Maas and others (1991) indicate that the peak production was from 1900 to 1916 with an estimated total recovery of 10,466 ounces of gold. The average grade of the ore was 0.840 ounce of gold per ton and 0.668 ounce of silver per ton. This production probably included ore from both the Puyallup and Crackerjack (CR101) mines. Roehm (1936 [PE 119-4]) records considerable activity from 1933 to 1938 (after the price of gold rose to $35 per ounce), but only about $3,100 of gold was produced. Maas and others (1995) indicate that it is difficult to determine the production from the Puyallup Mine; they can only substantiate recovery of about 650 ounces of gold and 473 ounces of silver from 815 tons of ore mined between 1915 and 1946. However, they also note that there was considerable production before 1915.
Geologic map unit (-132.701256637116, 55.4970730859614)
Mineral deposit model Gold-quartz vein (Cox and Singer, 1986; model 36a).
Mineral deposit model number 36a
Age of mineralization Unknown, other than that the veins cut Silurian or Ordovician rocks.
Alteration of deposit None specifically noted (but see the nearby Crackerjack Mine (CR101) for details of the alteration of the dikes near the veins).

Production and reserves

Workings or exploration The deposit was discovered prior to 1902 and developed by several open cuts, a short shaft, 5 adits (including one 1,135 feet long and another 220 feet long), several stopes, and at least 2,865 feet of other underground workings (Brooks, 1902). In 1990, the underground workings were either unsafe or caved (Maas and others, 1991). The property has recently been acquired by Red Diamond Mining Company and is active as of March, 2004 (Barnett and Clough, 2000; http://www.reddiamondmining.com/).
Indication of production Yes; small
Reserve estimates Probably none.
Production notes A mill was in operation before 1905 (Wright and Wright, 1905) that processed ore from both the Puyallup and Crackerjack (CR101) mines. Brooks (1902) records a shipment of 14 tons of ore (in 1901?) that returned $159 per ton (probably mainly in gold at $20.67 per ounce). Bureau of Mines production records cited by Maas and others (1991) indicate that the peak production was from 1900 to 1916 with an estimated total production of 10,466 ounces of gold; the average grade was 0.840 ounce of gold per ton and 0.668 ounce of silver per ton. This production probably included ore from both the Puyallup and Crackerjack (CR101) mines. Roehm (1936 [PE 119-4]) records considerable activity from 1933 to 1938 (after the price of gold rose to $35 per ounce), but only about $3,100 of gold was produced. Maas and others (1995) indicate that the production specifically from the Puyallup Mine is difficult to determine; they can only substantiate recovery of about 650 ounces of gold and 473 ounces of silver from 815 tons of ore mined between 1915 and 1946. However, they also note that there was considerable production before 1915.

References

MRDS Number A010133

References

Barnett, John, and Clough, Al, 2000, CJ Gold prospect, Prince of Wales Island, Alaska (abs.): Alaska Miners Convention, Oct. 30- Nov. 4, Anchorage, Abstracts, p. 19-20.
Smith, S.S., 1917, The mining industry in the Territory of Alaska during the calendar year 1915: U.S. Bureau of Mines Bulletin 142, 65 p.
Reporters D.J. Grybeck (Applied Geology)
Last report date 5/1/2004