Golden Fleece

Mine, Undetermined

Commodities and mineralogy

Main commodities Ag; Au; Cu
Ore minerals gold; pyrite; tetrahedrite
Gangue minerals quartz

Geographic location

Quadrangle map, 1:250,000-scale CR
Quadrangle map, 1:63,360-scale A-1
Latitude 55.1519
Longitude -132.0542
Nearby scientific data Find additional scientific data near this location
Location and accuracy This site marks the portals of the two main adits of the Golden Fleece Mine, about 0.2 mile north of the north end of James Lake. It is about 0.2 mile east-northeast of the center of section 31, T. 77 S., R. 89 E. Maas and others (1995) provide a detailed map of the underground workings.

Geologic setting

Geologic description

The Golden Fleece Mine was discovered in 1899,. By 1902, a 5-stamp mill was erected at the north end of James Lake, and the mine was developed by considerable underground workings (Brooks, 1902; Wright and Wright, 1908; Bufvers, 1967; Herreid, 1967; Maas and others, 1992, 1995). The mine was active from 1901 to 1905, and produced ore that contained about $40 to $60 in gold per ton (at $20.67 per ounce). Roppel (2005) recounts much of the early history of the mine and the many legal and financial problems that swirled around the actual mining. Bufvers (1967) indicated some mining in 1933 but the production was probably minor. Production records are not available. As mapped by Maas and others (1992, 1995), the underground workings included a lower adit 428 feet long, an upper adit 195 feet long, a raise 222 feet long that connects the two levels, and stopes that extend to the surface.
The deposit consists of auriferous quartz veins along two parallel faults that trend north-northwest to north and dip about 20-50E (Brooks, 1902; Wright and Wright, 1908; Maas and others, 1991, 1995). The faults are marked by quartz lenses inches to more than 8 feet thick that pinch and swell along the trend. The faults follow the contact between blue marble and white marble; the marble is silicified and cut by diabase dikes. Several large natural caverns also are along the faults. The quartz contains minor pyrite, chalcopyrite, tetrahedrite, and native gold. Maas and others (1991, 1995) collected 15 samples in the underground workings. Most assayed between 328 and 2,493 parts per billion gold, but several samples across 0.5 to 3 feet of a quartz-rich portion of an old stope contained 0.550 to 1.585 ounces of gold per ton.
The rocks in the Dolomi area are part of the Wales Group of Late Proterozoic and Cambrian age (Herreid, 1967). They are folded into a large dome centered over the eastern third of Paul Lake, and consist of several marble layers 200 to 1300 feet thick, interbedded with calcareous chlorite schist and marble.
Geologic map unit (-132.055870571946, 55.1515443822877)
Mineral deposit model Low-sulfide gold-quartz vein (Cox and Singer, 1986; model 36a).
Mineral deposit model number 36a
Age of mineralization The mineralization is younger than the Late Proterozoic or Cambrian host rocks.
Alteration of deposit Silicification of marble.

Production and reserves

Workings or exploration As mapped by Maas and others (1991, 1995), the underground workings included a lower adit 428 feet long, an upper adit 195 feet long, a raise 222 feet long, and several stopes that extend to the surface.
Indication of production Yes; small
Reserve estimates None.
Production notes The mine was most active from 1901 to 1905, and produced ore that contained about $40 to $60 in gold per ton (at $20.67 per ounce). Bufvers (1967) indicated some mining in 1933.

References

MRDS Number A010041; A010149

References

Roppel, Patricia, 2005, Striking it rich! Gold mining in southern Southeastern Alaska: Greenwich, Connecticut, Coachlamp Productions, 286 p.
Reporters D.J. Grybeck (Port Ludlow, WA)
Last report date 3/4/2008