Ruby Creek

Mine, Undetermined

Commodities and mineralogy

Main commodities Au
Other commodities Ag
Ore minerals gold; silver

Geographic location

Quadrangle map, 1:250,000-scale CY
Quadrangle map, 1:63,360-scale A-3
Latitude 65.29
Longitude -143.16
Nearby scientific data Find additional scientific data near this location
Location and accuracy Ruby Creek is a northeast-flowing tributary of Fourth of July Creek (CY015). It is location 7 of Cobb (1972 [MF-390]). The deposit is located midway up Ruby Creek, about a mile from its head. The placer mining occurs just upstream of the confluence with an unnamed creek entering from the southeast, in section 4, T. 3 N., R. 28 E., of the Fairbanks Meridian. The location is accurate to within one mile.

Geologic setting

Geologic description

The bedrock of Ruby Creek is composed of Cretaceous to Tertiary conglomerate and other sedimentary rocks (Dover and Miyaoka, 1988). The placer gold is found in the 20 inches of gravel above bedrock; bedrock was 12 to 15 feet from the surface in 1912 (Prindle and Mertie, 1912).
The creek was first mined in the early 1900s. Mining was by open-cut methods because the bedrock was less than 15 feet below the surface. Values of $50 to $75 per 12-foot by 12-foot sluice box were reported in the early 1900s (1901-1910 dollars). Mining operations were frequently constrained by a lack of water. In 1926, production was 5 ounces of gold and one ounce of silver (National Park Service, 1990).
Geologic map unit (-143.162393186901, 65.2896676708208)
Mineral deposit model Placer Au (Cox and Singer, 1986; model 39a).
Mineral deposit model number 39a
Age of mineralization Quaternary.

Production and reserves

Workings or exploration The creek was first mined in the early 1900s, but more mining activity occurred in 1911. Mining was by open-cut methods because the bedrock was less than 15 feet below the surface. Mining operations were frequently constrained by a lack of water (National Park Service, 1990).
Indication of production Yes; small
Production notes In 1926, production was 5 ounces of gold and one ounce of silver (National Park Service, 1990). Values of $50 to $75 per 12-foot by 12-foot sluice box were reported in the early 1900s.

Additional comments

See also Fourth of July Creek (CY015). This site is within the Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve.

References