St. Paul

Mine, Inactive

Alternative names

McCann, Thomas, Mickley, and Hagel

Commodities and mineralogy

Main commodities Au
Other commodities Sb
Ore minerals arsenopyrite; gold; pyrite; stibnite

Geographic location

Quadrangle map, 1:250,000-scale FB
Quadrangle map, 1:63,360-scale D-3
Latitude 64.868
Longitude -148.017
Nearby scientific data Find additional scientific data near this location
Location and accuracy The Saint (St.) Paul mine is located in the SE1/4 sec. 31, T. 1 N., R. 2 W., Fairbanks Meridian. This mine is on the west fork of Eva Creek, about 1.3 miles southeast of the top of Ester Dome. The coordinates given are for the mill and lower tunnel that are at an elevation of 1,150 feet. The upper tunnel and surface workings are at an elevation of about 1,500 feet. This is locality 15 of Cobb (1972 [MF 410]).

Geologic setting

Geologic description

An auriferous vein of massive, vitreous quartz, about 3 feet thick, strikes N. 40 E. and dips 38 NW. (Mertie, 1917, p. 409-410). The quartz and the schist country rock are decayed, shattered, and iron-stained. Stibnite and its alteration products are found along the footwall; the gold content is lower where stibnite is present. The mine and a mill with a capacity of 20 tons per day operated throughout 1917 (Chapin, 1919, p. 323). In 1918, 150 feet of tunnel was driven. However, none of the ore was milled; the the mill operated on ore from the Billy Sunday and Mohawk mines (FB064 and FB061, respectively) (Martin, 1920, p. 40). A little mining also took place in 1919 (Brooks and Martin, 1921, p. 81). By 1931, the lower tunnel near the mill was about 300 feet long and trended north-northeast (Hill, 1933, p. 129). Material on the dump consisted entirely of quartz-mica schist. The upper tunnel, caved by 1931, was about a quarter of a mile north of the lower tunnel, and was driven 250 feet on a vein that ranged in thickness from 3 to 4 feet. The vein above the tunnel has a dip of 45 W., but it steepens to 70 degrees in a winze below the tunnel. All the ore above the tunnel level for its full length had been stoped; it produced about 1,000 tons of ore with an average value of $30 in gold per ton (about 1.45 ounces of gold per ton). The dump from the upper tunnel is composed largely of iron-stained biotite schist with a considerable amount of clay gouge and quartz. There were also some large pieces of stibnite-arsenopyrite-quartz ore and a few pieces of high-grade gold quartz. A grab sample from crushed material on this dump that presumably came from the vein assayed 72 cents in gold per ton (about 0.03 ounce of gold per ton (Hill, 1933, p. 129). Glover (1950) reported that the gold is 806 fine.
Geologic map unit (-148.019429734684, 64.8675633791452)
Mineral deposit model Schist-hosted gold-quartz vein
Alteration of deposit The quartz and the schist country rock is decayed, shattered, and iron-stained and stibnite and its alteration products are found along the footwall of the vein (Mertie, 1917).

Production and reserves

Workings or exploration A mine and a mill with a capacity of 20 tons per day operated in 1917 (Chapin, 1919, p. 323). In 1918, 150 feet of tunnel was driven. None of the ore was milled and the operated on ore from the Billy Sunday and Mohawk mines (Martin, 1920, p. 40). A little mining also took place in 1919 (Brooks and Martin, 1921, p. 81). By 1931, the lower tunnel near the mill was about 300 feet long and trended north-northeast (Hill, 1933, p. 129). The upper tunnel, caved by 1931, was about a quarter of a mile north of the lower tunnel, and was driven 250 feet on a vein that ranged in thickness from 3 to 4 feet. In 1997, Silverado Gold Mines, Ltd., drilled and trenched the St. Paul zone (Swainbank and Clautice, 1998, p. 8).
Indication of production Yes; small
Reserve estimates In February, 2000, Silverado Gold Mines, Ltd., reported that the property contained a resource of 359,992 ounces of gold: 16,338 ounces proven, 81,354 ounces probable, and 262,300 ounces possible (Silverado Gold Mines, Ltd., Ester Dome project web site, February 17, 2000; http://www.silverado.com).
Production notes A mine operated thoughout 1917, and the ore was processed in a mill with a capacity of 20 tons per day (Chapin, 1919, p. 323). In 1918, one hundred fifty feet of tunnel was driven, but none of the ore was milled; the mill operated on ore from the Billy Sunday and Mohawk mines (FB064 and FB061, respectively) (Martin, 1920, p. 40). A little mining also took place in 1919 (Brooks and Martin, 1921, p. 81). By 1931, all the ore above the lower tunnel level, for its full length, had been stoped; it produced about 1,000 tons of ore with an average value of $30 in gold per ton (about 1.45 ounces of gold per ton) (Hill, 1933, p. 129).

References

MRDS Number A015273

References

Reporters J.R. Guidetti Schaefer and C.J. Freeman (Avalon Development Corporation)
Last report date 7/31/2001