Hudson

Mine, Inactive

Alternative names

Sunshine No. 2

Commodities and mineralogy

Main commodities Hg
Other commodities Au
Ore minerals cinnabar; gold

Geographic location

Quadrangle map, 1:250,000-scale LG
Quadrangle map, 1:63,360-scale C-4
Latitude 65.503
Longitude -148.504
Nearby scientific data Find additional scientific data near this location
Location and accuracy Cobb (1972, MF-413), loc. 4; SE1/4, sec. 23, T. 8 N., R. 5 W., of the Fairbanks Meridian. The mine is along Olive Creek, near the intersection with the Elliot Highway. Accuracy is within 1,000 feet. Olive Creek is a small stream flowing about due south into the North Fork of the Tolovana River, about two miles south of the town of Livengood. The Hudson tunnel is at the head of the west fork of Olive Creek.

Geologic setting

Geologic description

In 1917, Hudson found evenly distributed small specks and grains of cinnabar in highly altered granitic rock at what is now commonly called the Hudson prospect (Malone, 1962). Some of this material was reported to have run 20 to 30 pounds of mercury per ton (Malone, 1962). Mertie (1918, p. 274) reported that a small landslide exposed much-weathered granitic rock from which cinnabar was panned. In the main tunnel of the Hudson mine, the highly altered granitic rock is heavily impregnated with cinnabar (Reed, 1931). The cinnabar is evenly disseminated all through the rock in small red specks and grains. Reed (1931) reported that the rock was so altered that it resembled talc or soft, white, impure sandstone. The alteration and mineralization continues back in the Hudson mine tunnel as far as the winze, and from there on in, the cinnabar becomes rapidly leaner and the country rock becomes harder and darker (Reed, 1931, p. 3). The decomposed quartz feldspar porphyry contains crushed white feldspar phenocrysts in a light gray to white ground mass of quartz, talc and clay minerals. Many iron-stained streaks in the porphyry are caused by oxidation of arsenopyrite-bearing quartz veins, which also carry some gold (Joesting, 1942; ATDM Pamph. 1, p. 2).
The Sunshine no. 2 prospect is a few hundred feet above the Hudson prospect. It consists of a northwest-trending, crumbly, auriferous dike with internal limonite veinlets in contact with altered argillite (Foster, 1968). Foster (1968, p. 2) reported that soil samples contain anomalous concentrations of arsenic silver, bismuth, cobalt, copper, zinc, tin, molybdenum and tungsten.
Geologic map unit (-148.506506155757, 65.5025657617747)
Mineral deposit model Disseminated cinnabar associated with a granitic intrusive.
Alteration of deposit The decomposed quartz feldspar porphyry contains crushed white feldspar phenocrysts in a light gray to white ground mass of quartz, talc and clay minerals. Many iron-stained streaks in the porphyry are caused by oxidation of arsenopyrite-bearing quartz veins, which also carry some gold (Joesting, 1942; ATDM Pamph. 1, p. 2).

Production and reserves

Workings or exploration Explored by about 270 feet of adits and tunnels (Malone, 1962).
Indication of production Yes; small
Production notes The owner attempted to mill the ore as if it were gold-bearing quartz and thus lost much of the cinnabar. The ore was ground and fed into sluice boxes in an attempt to recover the cinnabar. Much of the cinnabar was probably so finely ground that the sluice boxes were ineffective in trapping the ore (Reed, 1931, p. 3).

References

MRDS Number A015403

References

Malone, Kevin, 1965, Mercury in Alaska, in Mercury potential of the United States: U.S. Bureau of Mines Information Circular 8252, p. 31-59.
Smith, P.S., 1917, The mining industry in the territory of Alaska during the calendar year 1916: U.S. Bureau of Mines Bulletin 153, 89 p.
Smith, S.S., 1917, The mining industry in the territory of Alaska during the calendar year 1915: U.S. Bureau of Mines Bulletin 142, 66 p.
Reporters C.J. Freeman, J.R. Guidetti Schaefer (Avalon Development Corporation)
Last report date 5/4/1999