Chititu Creek

Mine, Inactive

Alternative names

Rex Creek
White Creek
Blygh Gulch
Jolly Gulch
Dry Gulch

Commodities and mineralogy

Main commodities Au
Other commodities Ag; Cu; Pb; Sb
Ore minerals galena; gold; native copper; native silver; pyrite; stibnite

Geographic location

Quadrangle map, 1:250,000-scale MC
Quadrangle map, 1:63,360-scale B-5
Latitude 61.2962
Longitude -142.5785
Nearby scientific data Find additional scientific data near this location
Location and accuracy Chititu Creek is a south tributary to the Nizina River. MacKevett (1976) shows placer gold mining along 2.75 miles of Chititu Creek downstream from the mouth of White Creek; along 1.2 miles of Rex Creek upstream from the mouth of White Creek; and on White Creek and its tributaries Blygh Gulch, Jolly Gulch, and Dry Gulch. The site for this record is the junction of Chititu, Rex, and White Creeks. This is locality 39 of MacKevett (1976); the location is accurate. Cobb and MacKevett (19870) included this area under the name 'Chititu Cr.'.

Geologic setting

Geologic description

MacKevett (1976) shows placer gold mining along 2.75 miles of Chititu Creek downstream from the mouth of White Creek; along 1.2 miles of Rex Creek upstream from the mouth of White Creek; and on White Creek and its tributaries Blygh Gulch, Jolly Gulch, and Dry Gulch. Bench and stream placers were mined on Chititu Creek and its tributaries. The richest stream placers were reconcentrated from the benches. The gold is mostly on or near bedrock or in fractured bedrock below 8 to 16 feet of gravels of the active streams. The gold is mostly distributed across the entire width of the active flood plain although a well-defined pay streak was found on the lower part of the pay on Chititu Creek (Moffit and Capps, 1911). The gravels are diverse in lithology and contain boulders and blocks to 8 feet across. The gold was mostly fine. It was accompanied by abundant native copper, pyrite, galena, stibnite, and barite. Native silver was also recovered and included nuggets up to 7 pounds in weight, intergrown with quartz (Moffit and Capps, 1911). Native lead recovered with the gold was at least in part lead shot from firearms use in the area. Bedrock in this area is Cretaceous siliciclastic rocks intruded locally by felsic hypabyssal dikes. Glaciofluvial materials, all carrying some gold and up to a few hundred feet thick, form bench deposits along all the productive drainages (Moffit and Capps, 1911; MacKevett, 1974). Small-scale hydraulic operations and some dredging took place in this area. Some mining took place as recently as the 1970s. A large part of the recovered gold, over half of the estimated 143,500 ounces produced from the Nizina district, was probably reworked from the bench deposits.
Geologic map unit (-142.580545332153, 61.2957654775977)
Mineral deposit model Placer Cu-Au (Cox and Singer, 1986; model 39a)
Mineral deposit model number 39a
Age of mineralization Quaternary.

Production and reserves

Workings or exploration Small-scale hydraulic operations and some dredging took place in this area. Some mining took place as recently as the 1970s.
Indication of production Yes; medium
Production notes This area accounted for more than half of the estimated 143,000 ounces of gold recovered from the Nizina district (MacKevett, 1976).

Additional comments

The locality is in the Wrangell-Saint Elias National Park and Preserve.

References