Quartz lode No. 1

Occurrence, Inactive

Commodities and mineralogy

Main commodities Cu
Other commodities Ag; Mo; Pb
Ore minerals chalcopyrite; galena; malachite
Gangue minerals quartz

Geographic location

Quadrangle map, 1:250,000-scale MM
Quadrangle map, 1:63,360-scale D-1
Latitude 63.961
Longitude -150.3704
Nearby scientific data Find additional scientific data near this location
Location and accuracy
The Quartz lode No. 1 occurrence is at an elevation of about 1500 feet on the west side of the canyon of Chitsia Creek. It is about 2 miles above the mouth of the canyon, near the center of section 18, T. 11 S., R. 14 W., Fairbanks Meridian. The location is probably accurate within 1500 feet.
The occurrence is number 73 of Bundtzen, Smith, and Tosdal (1976), 32 of MacKevett and Holloway (1977), 53 of Hawley and Associates (1978), and 82 of Bundtzen (1981), and corresponds to an unnamed vein in Cobb (1980 [OFR 80-363]).

Geologic setting

Geologic description

This deposit consists of a chalcopyrite- and galena-bearing quartz vein that cuts metarhyolite porphyry of the Upper Devonian and Mississippian Totatlanika Formation (Bundtzen, 1981). The vein is 2- to 3-feet thick, strikes about N 40 W, and dips 70 W. Rocks at the occurrence are coated with malachite. Grab samples assayed 0.58-1 percent copper, as much as 210 ppm lead, 51 ppm molybdenum, and 0.24 ounce of silver per ton. Bundtzen (1981) suggests that molybdenum is a characteristic trace element in deposits affiliated with the metarhyolite.
The age of the vein is uncertain. It may be as old as Devonian or Mississippian, the depositional age of the Totatlanika Formation, or as young as Eocene (see MM091).
Geologic map unit (-150.372730260166, 63.9605082954815)
Mineral deposit model Polymetallic vein (Cox and Singer, 1986; model 22c).
Mineral deposit model number 22c
Age of mineralization The age of the vein is uncertain. It may be as old as Devonian or Mississippian, the depositional age of the Totatlanika Formation, or as young as Eocene (see MM091).
Alteration of deposit Oxidation of copper mineral.

Production and reserves

Workings or exploration The vein was discovered, mapped, and sampled by Bundtzen, Smith, and Tosdal (1976). There are no significant workings.
Indication of production None

Additional comments

The occurrence is in Denali National Park and Preserve.

References