Unnamed (between Last Chance and Crevice Creeks)

Prospect, Inactive

Commodities and mineralogy

Main commodities Au; Cu
Other commodities Mo; U
Ore minerals limonite; pyrite
Gangue minerals quartz

Geographic location

Quadrangle map, 1:250,000-scale MM
Quadrangle map, 1:63,360-scale C-2
Latitude 63.5893
Longitude -150.7593
Nearby scientific data Find additional scientific data near this location
Location and accuracy This prospect is on the ridge between Last Chance and Crevice Creeks at an elevation of about 3800 feet. It is about 0.25 mile north of the center of section 25, T. 15 S., R. 16 W., Fairbanks Meridian. The location is accurate within 300 feet. The prospect corresponds to number 51 of Bundtzen, Smith, and Tosdal (1976), 228 of Hawley and Associates (1978), 64 of Bundtzen (1981), and 72 of Thornsberry, McKee,and Salisbury (1984, v. 2).

Geologic setting

Geologic description

The country rocks in the area of this prospect are quartz-mica schist and quartzite of the upper Paleozoic Birch Creek Schist (Bundtzen, 1981); float at the prospect site is mainly quartz-feldspar schist. The schist generally strikes NNE and dips moderately to the NW (Thornsberry, McKee, and Salisbury, 1984, fig. K-2). The deposit is a 30-foot-thick, quartz-rich vein that trends about N50E. The quartz contains pyrite and features boxwork limonite, possibly after another sulfide. Samples of the vein assayed up to 400 ppm copper, 0.01 ounce of gold per ton, 30 ppm molybdenum, and 12 ppm uranium (Bundtzen, 1981).
Geologic map unit (-150.761586325448, 63.5887979724378)
Mineral deposit model Low-sulfide gold?-quartz vein (Cox and Singer, 1986; model 36a?).
Mineral deposit model number 36a?
Age of mineralization The deposit is assumed to be Eocene (see record MM091).

Production and reserves

Workings or exploration One shallow pit.
Indication of production None

Additional comments

The prospect is in Denali National Park and Preserve. A possible extension of this vein on the west side of Moose Creek was uncovered during ground sluicing, but the cut had sloughed by 1921 (Davis, 1923, p. 123).

References