Reynolds

Prospect, Inactive

Alternative names

Butte Creek Copper Group

Commodities and mineralogy

Main commodities Cu
Ore minerals bornite; chalcocite; malachite
Gangue minerals calcite; specularite

Geographic location

Quadrangle map, 1:250,000-scale NB
Quadrangle map, 1:63,360-scale A-1
Latitude 62.1828
Longitude -141.4276
Nearby scientific data Find additional scientific data near this location
Location and accuracy This prospect is 2,000 feet west of upper Reynolds Creek, a south tributary to the East Fork, Snag Creek. It is at an elevation of about 5,300 feet, 5,000 feet northeast of peak 6827. The site is 0.2 mile east of the center of section 25, T. 5 N., R. 21 E. of the Copper River Meridian. This is locality 2 of Richter and others (1973) and locality 48 of Richter and others (1975). Cobb and Richter (1980) included this prospect under the name 'Reynolds'. It is located to within a few hundred feet.

Geologic setting

Geologic description

Small veins of bornite, chalcocite, specularite, malachite, and calcite cut amygdaloidal basalt of the Triassic, Nikolai Greenstone (Moffit, 1943). The deposits were explored by several open cuts. A chip sample across 5 feet of iron-stained greenstone contained 50 parts per million (ppm) boron, 150 ppm copper, 70 ppm nickel, and 200 ppm vanadium (Matson and Richter, 1971 [OFR 71-202]). Copper mineralization is locally common in Nikolai Greenstone and is thought to have accompanied regional deformation and low-grade metamorphism in the Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous (MacKevett and others, 1997).
Geologic map unit (-141.429740359604, 62.1824723117417)
Mineral deposit model Basaltic copper (Cox and Singer, 1986; model 23)
Mineral deposit model number 23
Age of mineralization Cretaceous? Copper mineralization is locally common in Nikolai Greenstone and is thought to have accompanied regional deformation and low-grade metamorphism in the Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous (MacKevett and others, 1997).
Alteration of deposit Low-grade metamorphic assemblages including quartz, calcite, epidote, zeolites, and some native copper replace basalt or fill amygdules (Richter and others, 1973).

Production and reserves

Workings or exploration The deposits were explored by several open cuts.
Indication of production None

Additional comments

The prospect is in the Wrangell-St. Elias National Preserve.

References