Stewart River (above Mountain Creek)

Mine, Inactive

Commodities and mineralogy

Main commodities Au
Ore minerals gold

Geographic location

Quadrangle map, 1:250,000-scale NM
Quadrangle map, 1:63,360-scale D-1
Latitude 64.8013
Longitude -165.4691
Nearby scientific data Find additional scientific data near this location
Location and accuracy Gold occurs on the left limit (south side) of Stewart River above Mountain Creek and below Fred Creek. Mining was reported at two or three localities above Mountain Creek, so the location is approximate but probably within about 1,000 feet of the coordinates. This is locality 83 of Cobb (1972 [MF 463], 1978 [OFR 78-93]).

Geologic setting

Geologic description

Placer gold mining above Mountain Creek on Stewart River was reported in the early years of the Nome district. Smith (1909, p. 280) noted mining, almost certainly small scale, at 'two or three camps' along Stewart River above Mountain Creek.
Stewart River and its tributary Mountain Creek have floodplains of Holocene alluvium as much as about 0.2 mile wide that are developed on modified drift of the Nome River glaciation. The downstream limit of the slightly modified drift of the Stewart River glaciation is about 1 mile above the confluence of Mountain Creek and Stewart River (Bundtzen and others, 1994). Some placer gold could, therefore, have been derived by reworking slightly auriferous glacial drift derived ultimately from the Kigluaik Mountains and closer gold lodes, as in the Divide Creek area (NM057, NM058, NM111, NM118). Some gold was probably derived from Fred Creek, the next upstream southern tributary, which is known to be auriferous (NM064). Also, the divide between upper Mountain and upper Goldbottom Creeks has little relief, and gold in this area could have been derived from the major fault system that hosts the California lode in upper Goldbottom Creek (NM062). As mapped by Hummel (1962 [MF 242]) and one of the compilers (C.C. Hawley), this fault projects north into lower Fred Creek and the Stewart River valley; it could contain other lode gold deposits like the California lode.
Geologic map unit (-165.471723988324, 64.8005383561887)
Mineral deposit model Placer Au (Cox and Singer, 1986; model 39a).
Mineral deposit model number 39a
Age of mineralization In large part Holocene, with gold derived from reworking of Pleistocene drift or fed by Fred and Mountain Creeks.

Production and reserves

Workings or exploration Placer gold mining above Mountain Creek on Stewart River was reported in the early years of the Nome district. Smith (1909, p. 280) noted mining, almost certainly small scale, at 'two or three camps' along Stewart River above Mountain Creek.
Indication of production Yes; small

References