Hattie

Mine, Active?

Commodities and mineralogy

Main commodities Au
Other commodities Cu; Pb; Zn
Ore minerals chalcopyrite; galena; pyrite; sphalerite
Gangue minerals quartz

Geographic location

Quadrangle map, 1:250,000-scale PE
Quadrangle map, 1:63,360-scale C-4
Latitude 56.532
Longitude -133.0477
Nearby scientific data Find additional scientific data near this location
Location and accuracy The adit of the Hattie Mine is about 0.1 mile east of the shoreline near the southwest end of Woewodski Island. It it about 0.3 mile east-southeast of the southeast tip of Butterworth Island, near the northwest corner of section 2, T. 61 S., R. 79 E. The location is accurate. Figure 22 of Still and others is a map of the underground workings of the Hattie Mine.

Geologic setting

Geologic description

The Hattie Mine dates to at least 1899 and by 1902, the Olympic Mining Company had driven several hundred feet of underground workings and had built a substantial camp and a mill building on the shore below the adit of the mine. Roppel (2005) documents much of the early history and personalities of the property and shows an early picture of the camp. Mill machinery was ordered and shipped to the property but never assembled at the Hattie. Shortly thereafter the underground work proved disappointing and the operations of the company and the new mill equipment moved north on Woewodski Island to the Helen S Mine (PE028). The Hattie camp burned in 1911 and there does not seem to have been any underground work on the property since. There is no documented production. However, there have been persistent rumors of at least a small test ore shipment in the early part of the century that was processed at the nearby Helen S mill with mixed results (Roehm, 1945). Since the 1970s, much of Woewodski Island has been covered by claims by a succession of companies: Cominco Exploration, Colony Pacific, Amselco, Kennecott Exploration, Westmin Resources, and currently (Feb 2008) the Bravo Venture Group. Many of the claims covered the Hattie property but other than geochemical sampling and routine sampling of the Hattie dump and underground workings for background, there has been no recent work on the Hattie itself. The underground workings were still accessible in the late 1990s when Still and others (2002) sampled them as part of a regional mineral assessment by the Bureau of Land Management. The workings consist of about 325 feet of drifts, a 65-foot raise, and a winze.
The rocks in the vicinity are mainly rusty-weathering, light-greenish gray calcareous metarhyolite that is part of the Triassic Hyd Group (Brew, 1997, Karl and others, 1999). The metarhyolite is intruded by Mesozoic epidote-hornblende gabbro and by fresh, medium-grained Cretaceous diorite.
Four brecciated quartz veins up to 10 feet thick cut sheared diorite in the mine workings (Still and others, 2002); they contain sparse to rare disseminated pyrite, and rare grains of chalcopyrite, galena, and sphalerite. Gold values are uncertain but probably low; the best assay from several samples collected by the USGS on the dump in the early 1980s was 0.05 ounce of gold per ton (Grybeck, Berg, and Karl, 1984). Roehm (1945) noted that the deposit had low silver and gold values. Of the 27 samples collected underground and from the dumps at the Hattie by Still and others (2002), the highest gold value was 134 parts per billion (ppb) gold and all the rest contained less than 37 ppb.
Geologic map unit (-133.049423054756, 56.5316541701064)
Mineral deposit model Au-quartz vein (Cox and Singer, 1986; model 36a).
Mineral deposit model number 36a
Age of mineralization Cretaceous or younger based on the age of the diorite host rock.

Production and reserves

Workings or exploration The Hattie Mine dates to at least 1899 and by 1902, the Olympic Mining Company had driven several hundred feet of underground workings and had built a substantial camp and a mill building on the shore below the adit of the mine. Roppel (2005) documents much of the early history and personalities of the property and shows an early picture of the camp. Mill machinery was ordered and shipped to the property but never assembled at the Hattie. Shortly thereafter the underground work proved disappointing and the operations of the company and the new mill equipment moved north on Woewodski Island to the Helen S Mine (PE028). The Hattie camp burned in 1911 and there does not seem to have been any underground work on the property since. Since the 1970s, much of Woewodski Island has been covered by claims by a succession of companies: Cominco Exploration, Colony Pacific, Amselco, Kennecott Exploration, Westmin Resources, and currently (Feb 2008) the Bravo Venture Group. Many of the claims covered the Hattie property but other than geochemical sampling and routine sampling of the Hattie dump and underground workings for background, there has been no recent work on the Hattie itself. The underground workings were still accessible in the late 1990s when Still and others (2002) sampled them as part of a regional mineral assessment by the Bureau of Land Management. The workings consist of about 325 feet of drifts, a 65-foot raise, and a winze.
Indication of production Yes; small
Reserve estimates None.
Production notes There is no documented production. However, there have been persistent rumors of at least a small test ore shipment in the early part of the century that was processed at the nearby Helen S mill with mixed results (Roehm, 1945).

References

MRDS Number A010331

References

Roppel, Patricia, 2005, Striking it rich! Gold mining in southern Southeastern Alaska: Greenwich, Connecticut, Coachlamp Productions, 286 p.
Still, J.C., Bittenbender, P.E., Bean, K.W., and Gensler, E.G., 2002, Mineral assessment of the Stikine area, central Southeast Alaska: U.S. Bureau of Land Management Technical Report 51, 560 p.
Reporters H. C. Berg (Fullerton, California); D.J. Grybeck (Port Ludlow, WA)
Last report date 3/4/2008