K & D

Mine, Probably inactive

Commodities and mineralogy

Main commodities As; Au; Pb; Sb; Zn
Ore minerals antimony; arsenopyrite; galena; gold; jamesonite; sphalerite; stibnite
Gangue minerals quartz

Geographic location

Quadrangle map, 1:250,000-scale SD
Quadrangle map, 1:63,360-scale B-5
Latitude 57.4847
Longitude -133.46108
Nearby scientific data Find additional scientific data near this location
Location and accuracy The K & D Mine is labeled on the USGS 1:63,360-scale topographic map. It is about 2.1 mile northeast of the mouth of Libby Creek and about 0.6 mile north-northeast of the center of section 1, T. 51 S., R. 74 E. The location is accurate.

Geologic setting

Geologic description

The K & D Mine was discovered in about 1936 by Herman Kloss and Jack Davis. By 1939, there was a 2-ton Gibson mill on the property and a 90-foot drift (Nelson, 1935; Williams, 1951 [PE 115-02]; Still and others, 2002). From 1939 to 1948, about 58 tons of ore was produced that contained 25 ounces of gold and 10 ounces of silver. The prospect consists of two short adits, the longest about 120 feet long with a 38 foot winze. The vein generally follows Libby Creek and Kloss noted that the vein could be followed upstream for nearly 2,000 feet in a series of small pits. Many companies looked at the property prior to 1980 (Herman Kloss, oral communication, 1979) and Aspen Exploration, Phillips Petroleum, and WGM, Inc. examined and sampled the property from the early 1980s to 1992. The property was active to at least 1994. Both Williams (1951 [PE 115-02]) and Still and others (2002, figure 25) provide maps of the surface and underground workings.
The deposit consists of a quartz vein 25 to 30 feet thick that strikes N 60 E and dips 45-50NW (Williams, 1951 [PE 115-02]; Still and others, 2002). The vein is conformable to the layering of the host rock, a graphitic, gray schist of Cretaceous to Permian age (Gehrels and Berg, 1992). The vein is fractured and the quartz occurs in parallel layers ('ribbons') 1 to 6 inches thick across the full width of the composite vein structure. The vein contains native antimony, stibnite, galena, sphalerite, arsenopyrite, jamesonite, and gold, mostly in small grains disseminated through the quartz. The native antimony is unusual because of its rarity; it occurs in masses up to 6 inches or more in diameter. A few samples collected by the Bureau of Mines in 1950 contained 1.95, 0.71, and 0.50 ounces of gold per ton; sample collected by Aspen Exploration and Phillips Petroleum in the early 1980s contained up to 5 ounces of gold per ton. In 1991 and 1992, samples collected by WGM, Inc. (1992), across the width of the vein contained up to 0.079 ounce of gold per ton, 0.63 ounce of silver per ton, 0.403 percent lead, and 0.208 percent zinc. Of the 16 samples collected by Still and others (2002), the richest contained 0.747 ounce of gold per ton, more than 50 parts per million silver, and 1.27 percent arsenic.
Geologic map unit (-133.462794051376, 57.4843500944315)
Mineral deposit model Polymetallic gold vein with native antimony.
Age of mineralization Quartz vein is younger than the Permian to Cretaceous host rock.

Production and reserves

Workings or exploration The K & D Mine was discovered in about 1936 by Herman Kloss and Jack Davis. By 1939, there was a 2-ton Gibson mill on the property and a 90-foot drift (Nelson, 1935; Williams, 1951[PE 115-02]; Still and others, 2002). From 1939 to 1948, about 58 tons of ore was produced that contained 25 ounces of gold and 10 ounces of silver. The prospect consists of two short adits, the longest about 120 feet long with a 38 foot winze. The vein generally follows Libby Creek and Kloss noted that the vein could be followed upstream for nearly 2,000 feet in a series of small pits. Many companies looked at the property prior to 1980 (Herman Kloss, oral communication, 1979) and Aspen Exploration, Phillips Petroleum, and WGM, Inc. examined and sampled the property from the early 1980s to 1992. The property was active to at least 1994. Both Williams (1951 [PE 115-02) and Still and others (2002, figure 25) provide maps of the surface and underground workings.
Indication of production Yes; small
Production notes From 1939 to 1948, about 58 tons of ore was produced that contained 25 ounces of gold and 10 ounces of silver.

References

MRDS Number A013359

References

Bittenbender, P.E., Still, J.C., McDonald, M.E., Jr., and Gensler, E.C., 2000, Mineral investigations in the Stikine area, central Southeast Alaska: Bureau of Land Management, Alaska Open-File Report 83, 265 p., 2 sheets, scale, 1:250,000.
Nelson, G.E., 1935, Report on the Kloss-Davis prospect, Hobart Bay, Frederick Sound, southeastern Alaska: Unpublished report, 7 p. (Copy in the files of the U.S. Bureau of Land Management minerals library, Juneau, Alaska.)
Still, J.C., Bittenbender, P.E., Bean, K.W., and Gensler, E.G., 2002 Mineral assessment of the Stikine area, central Southeast Alaska: U.S. Bureau of Land Management Technical Report 51, 560 p.
WGM, 1991, K & D prospect area, Hobart Bay, Alaska; Interim progress report: Unpublished report prepared for Goldbelt, Inc., 11 p. (Copy in the files of the U.S. Bureau of Land Management minerals library, Juneau, Alaska.)
WGM, 1992, K & D prospect area, Hobart Bay, Alaska; Progress report: Unpublished report prepared for Goldbelt, Inc., 15 p., 1 sheet, scale 1:6,000. (Copy in the files of the U.S. Bureau of Land Management minerals library, Juneau, Alaska.)
Reporters Donald Grybeck (U.S. Geological Survey)
Last report date 10/8/2004