Louise

Prospect, Probably inactive

Commodities and mineralogy

Main commodities Cu
Ore minerals chalcopyrite; magnetite; pyrite; pyrrhotite

Geographic location

Quadrangle map, 1:250,000-scale SD
Quadrangle map, 1:63,360-scale B-4
Latitude 57.32798
Longitude -133.08655
Nearby scientific data Find additional scientific data near this location
Location and accuracy This prospect is about 1.3 miles south-southeast of the middle of the narrows between the head of Port Houghton and the Salt Chuck east of it. It is about 1.1 mile west of hill 2015 and 0.5 mile southeast of the center of section 29, T. 52 S., R. 77 E. The location is accurate.

Geologic setting

Geologic description

The Louise prospect was found considerably before 1925 (Wright and Wright, 1906; Buddington, 1925); there has probably been no work since, although it has been claimed several times (Still and others, 2002). The workings consist of three open cuts and two short adits. The main adit has 248 feet of drift and crosscuts; it was mapped by Still and others (2002, Figure 26).
The deposit occurs in undifferentiated garnet-quartz-biotite gneiss and amphibolite of Cretaceous to Permian age (Gehrels and Berg, 1992; Still and others, 2002.) The mineralization consists of lenses and disseminations of pyrrhotite and chalcopyrite, with some pyrite and magnetite. The best mineralization is associated with a secondary fault zone that strikes N20W and dips 66W, but the sulfides are also disseminated through the gneiss. The richest sample collected by Still and others (2002) contained 4,899 parts per million copper, but Buddington (1925) reports a sample with 1.34 percent copper.
Geologic map unit (-133.088258606782, 57.3276407210627)
Mineral deposit model Chalcopyrite in gneiss and amphibolite.
Age of mineralization In gneiss and amphibolite of Cretaceous to Permian age.

Production and reserves

Workings or exploration The workings consist of three open cuts and two short adits. The main adit has 248 feet of drift and crosscut.
Indication of production None

References