Alice and Bessie

Mine, Inactive

Alternative names

Parks

Commodities and mineralogy

Main commodities Hg
Other commodities Sb
Ore minerals cinnabar; pyrite; stibnite
Gangue minerals carbonate; clay; quartz

Geographic location

Quadrangle map, 1:250,000-scale SM
Quadrangle map, 1:63,360-scale D-4
Latitude 61.79336
Longitude -157.34056
Nearby scientific data Find additional scientific data near this location
Location and accuracy The Alice and Bessie or Parks Mine is on a productive group of claims near the north bank of the Kuskokwim River, about 0.4 mile east-southeast of the mouth of Parks Creek. The mine is at an elevation of about 250 feet in the SE1/4 sec. 25, T. 20 N., R. 45 W., of the Seward Meridian. The mine is locality 10 of Miller and others (1989). The location is accurate.

Geologic setting

Geologic description

At the Alice and Bessie (Parks) Mine, sandstone and shale of the Upper Cretaceous, Kuskokwim Group are cut by mafic sills and dikes, many of which have been hydrothermally altered (Smith, 1917, 1938; Webber and others, 1947; Cady and others, 1955; Sainsbury and MacKevett, 1965; Miller and others, 1989). The alteration minerals consists mainly of a mixture of clay (dickite), quartz, carbonate, and limonite.
The mineralization, which is mainly near the altered mafic dikes, consists of cinnabar, stibnite, and pyrite in a gangue of quartz, carbonate, and brown clay. Smith (1917) believed that the pyrite was of a different age than the cinnabar and stibnite. The deposit has been mined for about 320 feet along strike. Abundant cinnabar and native mercury can be panned in Parks Creek which flows across the alteration zone exposed at the mine.
The mineralization was staked in 1906 by E.W. Parks, who from 1906 to 1923 produced about 120 flasks of mercury (Cobb, 1972; Miller and others, 1989). Additional production probably occurred in 1936 to 1937 by W.E. Dunkle but the amount is unknown (Webber and others, 1947).
Geologic map unit (-157.342938957154, 61.7926701785131)
Mineral deposit model Silica-carbonate mercury (Cox and Singer, 1986; model 27c).
Mineral deposit model number 27c
Age of mineralization Undated; the nearby Fairview prospect (ARDF SM019) has a 40Ar/39Ar age of 72.6 Ma (Gray, Gent, and others, 1997).
Alteration of deposit Mafic dikes associated with the deposit have been largely altered to silica, carbonate minerals, and clay (dickite).

Production and reserves

Workings or exploration The property was staked in 1906. An adit about 200 feet long and surface trenching was done from 1906 to 1923 by E.W. Parks; the property was worked from 1936 to 1937 by W.E. Dunkle; and 1955 to 1956 by Robert Lyman and George Willis (Webber and others, 1947; Miller and others, 1989). In 1936, W.E. Dunkle extended the adit to 520 feet and found the best mineralization about 450 feet from the portal (Jasper, 1961). Work in 1942 by the U.S. Bureau of Mines (Webber and others, 1947) indicated the existence of three separate ore shoots on the property. George Willis and Robert leased the property in 1954 and eight additional claims were staked (Jasper, 1961). The U.S. Bureau of Mines again examined the mine in 1957 (Jasper, 1961). Cordero Mining Company from Nevada completed an underground drill program on the property in 1957, but did not publicly release their exploration results. The workings include a 525-feet adit, 46 feet of crosscut from it, 3 vertical shafts, and 19 trenches (Miller and others, 1989).
Indication of production Yes
Production notes The mineralization was staked in 1906 by E.W. Parks, who from 1906 to 1923 produced about 120 flasks of mercury (Cobb, 1972, [MF 368], 1976 [OFR 76-606]; Bundtzen and Conwell, 1982; Miller and others, 1989). Most of this mercury output was sold to placer gold miners in the Aniak and Iditarod mining districts (Jasper, 1961). Additional production probably occurred in 1936 to 1937 by W.E. Dunkle but there is no record of it (Webber and others, 1947).

References

MRDS Number A013437

References

Belkin, H.E., 1993, Fluid inclusion systematics of epithermal mercury-antimony mineralization, southwestern Alaska, USA [abs]: European Current Research on Fluid Inclusions Biennial Symposium, 12th, Warsaw and Cracow, Poland, June 13-18, 1993, Abstracts, p. 25-26.
Bundtzen, T.K., and Miller, M.L., 1997, Precious metals associated with Late Cretaceous-early Tertiary igneous rocks of southwestern Alaska, in Goldfarb, R.J., and Miller, L.D., eds., Mineral Deposits of Alaska: Economic Geology Monograph 9, p. 242-286.
Gray, J.E., Gent, C.A., Snee, L.W., and Wilson, F.H., 1997, Epithermal mercury-antimony and gold-bearing vein lodes of southwest Alaska, in Goldfarb, R.J., and Miller, L.D., eds., Mineral Deposits of Alaska: Economic Geology Monograph 9, p. 287-305.
Wells, J.T., and Ghiorso, M.S., 1988, Rock alteration, mercury transport, and metal deposition at Sulphur Bank, California: Economic Geology, vol. 83, p. 606-618.
White, D. E., and Robinson, C. E., 1962, Sulphur Bank, California, a major hot spring quicksilver deposit, in Engel, A.E.J., James, H.L., and Leonard, B.F., eds., Petrologic studies: A volume in honor of A.F. Buddington: Boulder, Colorado, Geological Society of America p. 397-428.
Reporters T.K. Bundtzen (Pacific Rim Geological Consulting, Inc.) and M.L. Miller (U.S. Geological Survey)
Last report date 4/30/2003