Sonny Fox

Mine, Inactive

Alternative names

Babcock & Downey
Lady Luck

Commodities and mineralogy

Main commodities Ag; Au; Cu
Other commodities Pb; Zn
Ore minerals arsenopyrite; chalcopyrite; galena; gold; native copper; native silver; pyrite; sphalerite
Gangue minerals calcite; quartz

Geographic location

Quadrangle map, 1:250,000-scale SV
Quadrangle map, 1:63,360-scale C-2
Latitude 59.54
Longitude -150.47
Nearby scientific data Find additional scientific data near this location
Location and accuracy The Sunny Fox mine was the principal gold producer in the Nuka Bay area. The mine is located on the west side of Babcock Creek at an elevation of 200 feet. Babcock Creek drains into Surprise Bay which is at the West Arm of Nuka Bay. This is Cobb's (1972, MF-397) location 28 and Richter's (1970) location 9. Cobb (1972, OFR 80-87) summarized the relevant references under the name Sonny Fox.

Geologic setting

Geologic description

The host rocks of the prospect are graywacke and slate of the Cretaceous Valdez Group (Richter, 1970). Most of the production on the property has come from the Lucky Lady Vein which averages about 2 feet thick. The vein strikes generally northeast and dips 60 SE. The vein is white quartz and in parts shows some banding. The most abundant sulfide mineral is arsenopyrite, with minor amounts of pyrite, chalcopyrite, sphalerite and galena (Richter, 1970). Free gold was also present, often in coarse particles visible to the naked eye (Pilgrim, 1933). Over 800 feet of drifts, tunnels, and stopes have been driven on this vein. The other vein on the property is lens shaped and contains the same sulfide assemblage as the Lucky Lady. The veins are thickest in the more massive graywacke units and trend to pinch out in the slate units.
Richter (1970) calculated there are at least 800 feet of workings at the mine site exclusive of raises, stopes and shafts. The mill was a No. 1 Denver Quartz Mill with a capacity of 7 tons per 22 hours. The concentrates ranged in grade from $128.00 per ton to over $530 per ton (at $20.67 per ounce gold) and were shipped to the Tacoma smelter (Pilgrim, 1933). The mine produced from 1926 to 1940 and production totaled $70,000 during that time (Richter,1970).
Geologic map unit (-150.472101626642, 59.5394207261177)
Mineral deposit model Low-sulfide, Au-quartz vein (Cox and Singer, 1986; model 36a)
Mineral deposit model number 36a
Age of mineralization Tertiary; Boden and others (1991) report other veins in the district are about 55 m.y. old.
Alteration of deposit Borden and others (1991) report carbonization, sulfidization, sericitization, and silicification of the wall rock adjacent to the veins.

Production and reserves

Workings or exploration Richter (1970) calculated there are at least 800 feet of workings at the mine site exclusive of raises, stopes and shafts. The mill was a No. 1 Denver Quartz Mill with a capacity of 7 tons per 22 hours. The concentrates ranged in grade from $128.00 per ton to over $530 per ton (at $20.67 per ounce gold) and were shipped to the Tacoma smelter (Pilgrim, 1933).
Indication of production Yes; small
Reserve estimates None.
Production notes The mine produced from 1926 to 1940 and production totaled $70,000 during that time (Richter,1970). The concentrates ranged in grade from $128.00 per ton to over $530 per ton and were shipped to the Tacoma smelter (at $20.67 per ounce gold, Pilgrim, 1933).

References

MRDS Number A010648

References

Pilgrim, E.R., 1933, Nuka Bay district, in Stewart, B. D., Making mining investigations and mine inspection in Alaska, biennium ending March 31, 1933: Alaska Territorial Department of Mines Annual Report 1933B, p. 26-51.
Reporters Jeff A. Huber (Anchorage)
Last report date 2/16/1999