Grouse Creek

Mine, Inactive

Commodities and mineralogy

Main commodities Sn
Ore minerals cassiterite
Gangue minerals hematite; magnetite; pyrite

Geographic location

Quadrangle map, 1:250,000-scale TE
Quadrangle map, 1:63,360-scale C-5
Latitude 65.629
Longitude -167.464
Nearby scientific data Find additional scientific data near this location
Location and accuracy Grouse Creek is the major west tributary to the Mint River which drains northward about 20 miles to Lopp Lagoon from headwaters in the York Mountains. The 5,000 foot-long segment from the mouth of Buck Creek (TE020) downstream to the mouth of East Fork has produced placer cassiterite. This part of Grouse Creek was included with locality 29 of Cobb and Sainsbury (1972). The historical references for this locality were summarized under the name 'Grouse Cr.' by Cobb (1975).

Geologic setting

Geologic description

Bedrock in the headwaters of Buck Creek (TE020), the major east tributary and the apparent source of placer cassiterite on Grouse Creek, is thermally metamorphosed thin-bedded metapelite, metasandstone, and minor impure metacarbonate rocks of unknown but probable Paleozoic age. These rocks makeup the relatively resistant upland of Potato Mountain that is interpreted to be underlain at depth by biotite granite (Hudson and Reed, 1997, p. 454). Significant lode tin deposits are present in the headwaters of Buck Creek and its tributaries (Mulligan, 1965). Alluvial gravels of the active Grouse Creek drainage have been mined by a small bucket-line dredge over about 5,000 feet of the stream channel from the mouth of Buck Creek downstream to the mouth of East Fork. USBM churn-drilling showed Grouse Creek gravels to be thin (2 to 9 feet) and some local unmined portions to have as much as 6.7 pounds of tin per cubic yard (Heide and Rutledge, 1949, p. 9). Most of the remaining unmined gravels contain a few hundredths to a few tenths pound tin per cubic yard. The downstream limit of pay seems to be at an elevation of 150 to 200 feet and Mulligan (1965, p. 14-15) has considered the possibility that a high sea level stand may have influenced tin distribution in this area. All the gravels are frozen except for those in proximity to the active stream.
Geologic map unit (-167.466748388858, 65.6282271111491)
Mineral deposit model Alluvial tin placer (Cox and Singer, 1986; model 39e)
Mineral deposit model number 39e
Age of mineralization Quaternary

Production and reserves

Workings or exploration Alluvial gravels of the active Grouse Creek drainage have been mined by a small bucket-line dredge over about 5,000 feet of the stream channel from the mouth of Buck Creek downstream to the mouth of East Fork. The USBM completed 22 churn-drill holes along 8 lines spread out over 6,000 feet of the drainage, from the mouth of Buck Creek downstream to below the mouth of East Fork.
Indication of production Yes
Reserve estimates Only local unmined areas containing tin grades greater than 1 pound per cubic yard were identified by USBM churn-drilling.
Production notes A portion of the 1,124 short tons of tin produced from the placers of the Potato Mountain area came from Grouse Creek.

References