Unnamed (Little Salt Creek)

Occurrence, Inactive

Commodities and mineralogy

Main commodities Asbestos
Ore minerals asbestos

Geographic location

Quadrangle map, 1:250,000-scale TN
Quadrangle map, 1:63,360-scale D-1
Latitude 65.77567
Longitude -150.4532
Nearby scientific data Find additional scientific data near this location
Location and accuracy This record represents a reported occurrence of asbestos on the divide between the Little Salt Creek and Dreamland Creek drainages (Saunders, 1957 [MR 48-5]). For this record, the site is at an elevation of about 2,550 feet, in the southwest quarter of section 15, T. 11 N., R. 14 W., of the Fairbanks Meridian. The location is accurate within about two miles.

Geologic setting

Geologic description

Chapman and others (1982) map the Salt Creek area as Rampart Group, Mississippian to Jurassic sedimentary and mafic volcanic rocks, along with abundant gabbro and sparse ultramafic rocks. The ridge on which the asbestos is reported is composed of Devonian or Carboniferous greenstone interbedded with thin beds of slate, chert, and limestone (Eakin, 1916; Saunders, 1957 [MR 48-5]).
Information about this asbestos occurrence was provided by Ira Weisner and Harry Havrilack, longtime residents of Rampart, to Saunders (1957 [MR 48-5]). Several years before Saunders' visit, two prospectors came up the Yukon River and stopped at Rampart to inquire about the asbestos. After the prospectors left, two men from Rampart (one named Ed Mayo) staked the ground, but the claims apparently were allowed to revert to public domain (Saunders, 1957 [MR 48-5]). Harry Havrilack reported that only a few pieces of float were found that consisted of serpentine containing small stringers of asbestos.
Geologic map unit (-150.455769253651, 65.7751998112742)
Mineral deposit model Serpentine-hosted asbestos (Cox and Singer, 1986; model 8d).
Mineral deposit model number 8d
Alteration of deposit Serpentinization of ultramafic rocks.

Production and reserves

Workings or exploration Information about this asbestos occurrence was provided by Ira Weisner and Harry Havrilack, longtime residents of Rampart, to Saunders (1957 [MR 48-5]). Several years before Saunders' visit, two prospectors came up the Yukon River and stopped at Rampart to inquire about the asbestos. After the prospectors left, two men from Rampart (one named Ed Mayo) staked the ground, but the claims apparently were allowed to revert to public domain (Saunders, 1957 [MR 48-5]). Harry Havrilack reported that only a few pieces of float were found that consisted of serpentine containing small stringers of asbestos.
Indication of production None

References