Vermont Creek

Mine, Active?

Alternative names

Right Fork

Commodities and mineralogy

Main commodities Au
Ore minerals gold; pyrite

Geographic location

Quadrangle map, 1:250,000-scale WI
Quadrangle map, 1:63,360-scale C-1
Latitude 67.5146
Longitude -150.1387
Nearby scientific data Find additional scientific data near this location
Location and accuracy The mouth of Vermont Creek is at an elevation of about 1,800 feet on the Hammond River. The gold placers on Vermont Creek begin at the Hammon River, continue upstream for about a mile and then turn into the Right Fork. Placer gold is not known on Vermont Creek beyond the mouth of Right Fork. The coordinates are at the junction of Vermont Creek and Right Fork about 0.5 mile west-northwest of the center of section 13, T. 31 N., R. 12 W. The location is accurate.

Geologic setting

Geologic description

Gold was discovered on Vermont Creek in 1901 (Maddren, 1913). It quickly became apparent that the pay streaks on the first mile of Vermont Creek continued up Right Fork and the placers on the two creeks were continuous and often mined together. Especially so since little gold has been found on Vermont Creek beyond the mouth of Right Fork.
Placer gold has been mined in the modern stream channel of Right Fork and lower Vermont Creek and in deep buried channels on lower Vermont Creek (Maddren, 1913; Reed, 1938; Eden, 2000; Kurtak and others, 2002). Shallow auriferous gravels extend continuously along the lower 0.5 to 0.7 mile of Right Fork and then turn east for one or two claim lengths along Vermont Creek. The gravel is about 3 feet thick along Right Fork. and the pay streak is narrow due to the constriction of the valley. The shallow placers that continue from Right Fork into Vermont creek are covered by 6 to 8 feet of muck, and the auriferous gravel is up to 400 feet wide and 4 to 5 feet thick. The pay channel consists of coarse, poorly sorted and subangular gravel, lying on soft micaceous schist (Reed, 1938). The gold in Vermont Creek is on and in the top few inches of, the bedrock. The gold forms few small nuggets and is mostly fine. According to Reed (1938), the value of the ground in these shallow gravels was about $0.13 in gold per square foot of bedrock (gold at $35.00 per ounce). The gravel contains considerable pyrite. Much if not most of the rich shallow gravel was probably mined out by 1909 (Maddren, 1913; Reed, 1938).
On lower Vermont Creek beyond the mouth of Right Fork, the gravel deepens, and Maddren (1913) thought that its lower 0.5 mile of auriferous gravel could, at least in part, be continuous with bench deposits of the Hammond River. Reed (1938) indicated that the deep channel was about 0.2 mile long along the left limit of lower Vermont Creek. The gravels in these deposits are frozen and 30 to 90 feet deep. Reed (1938) noted that gravel on the dumps was fine and waterworn, with few boulders. The gold from the deep channels is rounded and mostly coarse; several nuggets of more than 10 ounces have been recovered. There are unconfirmed reports that the value of the ground in these deep gravels may have run as high a $5 in gold per square foot of bedrock (gold at $35,00 per ounce) (Reed, 1938).
The early mining of the shallow placers was largely by hand and hydraulic methods. In the early days, the deep ground on lower Vermont Creek was drift mined. In recent years, lower Vermont Creek has been mined with mechanical equipment.
Eden (2000) reports that a total of 9,145 ounces of gold were produced from Vermont Creek between 1904 and 1999. Kurtak and others (2002) estimate that 11,230 ounces of gold were produced between 1901 and 1983. According to Kurtak and others (2002) gold has been mined from Vermont and Right Fork for at least 39 of the years between 1901 and 1983. The most productive period of mining was from 1902 to 1909 when the production was more than 500 ounces year; it reaching 1,451 ounces in 1902. Yearly production was much lower until 1982 and 1983 when 500 ounces was produced each of those years. Mining is reported in 1983 (Bundtzen and others, 1984) and there was some mining in 1992 (Swainbank and others, 1993).
Geologic map unit (-150.141452253428, 67.5141763986114)
Mineral deposit model Placer Au (Cox and Singer, 1986; model 39a).
Mineral deposit model number 39a
Age of mineralization Quaternary.

Production and reserves

Workings or exploration Placer gold has been mined in the modern stream channel of Right Fork and lower Vermont Creek and in deep buried channels on lower Vermont Creek (Maddren, 1913; Reed, 1938; Eden, 2000; Kurtak and others, 2002). Shallow auriferous gravels extends continuously along the lower 0.5 to 0.7 mile of Right Fork and then turn east for one or two claim lengths along Vermont Creek. On lower Vermont Creek beyond the mouth of Right Fork, the gravels deepen. The early mining of the shallow placers was largely by hand and hydraulic methods. In the early days, the deep ground on lower Vermont Creek was drift mined. In recent years, lower Vermont Creek has been mined with mechanical equipment.
Indication of production Yes; medium
Reserve estimates There are apparently no published resource or reserve figures for Vermont Creek and Right Fork. Most of the shallow auriferous gravel has probably l been mined but small remnants of the shallow auriferous gravel may remain. Gold may also remain in the deep channels of lower Vermont Creek or extensions of them below the Hammond River (Kurtak and others, 2002).
Production notes Eden (2000) reports that a total of 9,145 ounces of gold were produced from Vermont Creek between 1904 and 1999. Kurtak and others (2002) estimate that 11,230 ounces of gold were produced between 1901 and 1983. According to Kurtak and others (2002) gold has been mined from Vermont and Right Fork for at least 39 of the years between 1901 and 1983. The most productive period of mining was from 1902 to 1909 when the production was more than 500 ounces year; it reaching 1,451 ounces in 1902. Yearly production was much lower until 1982 and 1983 when 500 ounces was produced each of those years. Mining is reported in 1983 (Bundtzen and others, 1984) and there was some mining in 1992 (Swainbank and others, 1993).

References

MRDS Number A011027

References

Kurtak, J.M., Klieforth, R.F., Clark, J.M., and Maclean, E.A., 2002, Mineral investigations in the Koyukuk mining district, northern Alaska: Final Report: U.S. Bureau of Land Management Technical Report 50, v. 1 and 2, 845 p.
Reporters J.M. Britton (Anchorage); D.J. Grybeck (Contractor, USGS)
Last report date 2/1/2011