Geologic units in Canyon county, Idaho

Lake Bonneville deposits. (Pleistocene) at surface, covers 27 % of this area

Silt, clay, sand, and gravel deposited in and at margins of former Lake Bonneville (33-11 calibrated ka) and sand and gravel deposited in giant flood bars by outburst floods from the lake (17.4 calibrated ka). The 1,575-m (5,170 ft) Lake Bonneville shoreline was used to determine the maximum extent of the lake deposits. Flood deposits follow Bonneville flood path from near Downey and the Portneuf River westward along the Snake River to Lewiston. They include sand and silt deposited in slack-water areas to 740 m (2,430 ft) elevation in the Boise, Weiser, Payette, and Snake river drainages. (Quaternary Sediments).

Sediments and sedimentary rocks (Pleistocene and Pliocene). (Pleistocene and Pliocene) at surface, covers 26 % of this area

Older gravel, sand, and silt deposited in fans, streams, and lakes. Includes older terrace gravels and Tuana Gravel northwest of Twin Falls. (Quaternary to Eocene Continental Sediments and Sedimentary Rocks).

Basalt (Pleistocene and Pliocene). (Pleistocene and Pliocene) at surface, covers 20 % of this area

Flows and cinder cones of olivine tholeiite basalt in and near Snake River Plain. Largely Pleistocene (<2.6 Ma) but includes flows as old as 3 Ma. Covered with 1-3 m (3-10 ft) of loess. (Quaternary to Eocene Continental Volcanic and Intrusive Rocks).

Alluvial deposits. (Quaternary) at surface, covers 14 % of this area

Deposits in valleys consisting of gravel, sand, and silt. Includes younger terrace deposits. May contain some glacial deposits and colluvium in uplands. (Quaternary Sediments).

Sedimentary rocks associated with Basin and Range extension. (Quaternary, Pliocene, and Miocene) at surface, covers 9 % of this area

Fluvial, fan, and lacustrine deposits and intercalated volcanic rocks of the Basin and Range Province (~16-2 Ma); consolidated to weakly consolidated sandstone, siltstone, arkose, conglomerate, mudstone, tuffaceous sediment, basalt, basaltic tephra, and rhyolite tuff. Includes deposits of Lake Idaho (Idaho Group) in western Snake River Plain and Salt Lake Formation deposited in Basin and Range Province of east-central Idaho. (Quaternary to Eocene Continental Sediments and Sedimentary Rocks).

Sedimentary rocks associated with flood basalts. (Miocene) at surface, covers 5 % of this area

Fluvial and lacustrine deposits associated with Columbia River Basalt Group and equivalent basalts (17-8 Ma); consolidated to weakly consolidated sandstone, siltstone, arkose, conglomerate, claystone, and tuffaceous sediment; subordinate intercalated basalt and rhyolitic tuff. Includes Payette and Sucker Creek formations in southwestern Idaho, sediments associated with basalt of Weiser in western Idaho, and Latah Formation in northern Idaho. Includes sedimentary rocks of uncertain origin in southwest corner of Idaho. (Quaternary to Eocene Continental Sediments and Sedimentary Rocks).

Alluvial-fan deposits. (Quaternary) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Gravel and subordinate sand and silt deposited at mouths of canyons; largest fans are in Basin and Range Province in east-central and southeastern Idaho. (Quaternary Sediments).

Alluvial deposits (Holocene) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Sand, gravel, and silt forming flood plains and filling channels of present streams. In places includes talus and slope wash. Locally includes soils containing abundant organic material, and thin peat beds

Tuffaceous sedimentary rocks and tuff (Miocene to Pliocene) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Semiconsolidated to well-consolidated mostly lacustrine tuffaceous sandstone, siltstone, mudstone, concretionary claystone, conglomerate, pumicite, diatomite, air-fall and water-deposited vitric ash, palagonitic tuff and tuff breccia, and fluvial sandstone and conglomerate. Palagonitic tuff and breccia grade laterally into altered and unaltered basalt flows of unit Tob. In places includes layers of fluvial conglomerate and, in parts of the Deschutes-Umatilla Plateau, extensive deposits of fanglomerate composed mostly of Miocene basalt debris and silt. Also includes thin, welded and nonwelded ash-flow tuffs. Vertebrate and plant fossils indicate rocks of unit are mostly of Clarendonian and Hemphillian (late Miocene and Pliocene) age. Potassium-argon ages on interbedded basalt flows and ash-flow tuffs range from about 4 to 10 Ma. Includes the Drewsey Formation of Shotwell and others (1963); sedimentary parts of the Rattlesnake Formation of Brown and Thayer (1966); an interstratified ash-flow tuff has been radiometrically dated by potassium-argon methods at about 6.6 Ma (see Fiebelkorn and others, 1983); Bully Creek Formation of Kittleman and others (1967); Dalles Formation of Newcomb (1966, 1969); Shutler Formation of Hodge (1932), McKay beds of Hogenson (1964) and Newcomb (1966) (see also Shotwell, 1956); Kern Basin Formation of Corcoran and others (1962); Rome beds of Baldwin (1976); parts of the (now obsolete) Danforth Formation of Piper and others (1939), Idaho Group of Malde and Powers (1962), Thousand Creek Beds of Merriam (1910); the Madras (or Deschutes) Formation, the "Simtustus formation" of Smith (1984), and the Yonna Formation (Newcomb, 1958). In areas west of Cascade crest, includes the Sandy River Mudstone and the Troutdale Formation of Trimble (1963) and the lower Pliocene Helvetia Formation of Schlicker and Deacon (1967)