Geologic units in Fremont county, Idaho

Additional scientific data in this geographic area

Basalt (Pleistocene and Pliocene). (Pleistocene and Pliocene) at surface, covers 38 % of this area

Flows and cinder cones of olivine tholeiite basalt in and near Snake River Plain. Largely Pleistocene (<2.6 Ma) but includes flows as old as 3 Ma. Covered with 1-3 m (3-10 ft) of loess. (Quaternary to Eocene Continental Volcanic and Intrusive Rocks).

Rhyolite (Pleistocene). (Pleistocene) at surface, covers 35 % of this area

Rhyolite tuffs, flows, and domes; includes Yellowstone Group (2.0-0.6 Ma) and isolated domes on Snake River Plain and north of Soda Springs (less than 2.0 Ma). (Quaternary to Eocene Continental Volcanic and Intrusive Rocks).

Glacial deposits. (Pleistocene) at surface, covers 10 % of this area

Till and outwash consisting of gravel, sand, silt, and clay. Formed by valley glaciers at higher elevations and by the Cordilleran ice sheet in northern Idaho. Includes deposits of several glacial episodes. Includes rock glacier deposits and some modern alluvium derived from reworked till and outwash. (Quaternary Sediments).

Alluvial deposits. (Quaternary) at surface, covers 5 % of this area

Deposits in valleys consisting of gravel, sand, and silt. Includes younger terrace deposits. May contain some glacial deposits and colluvium in uplands. (Quaternary Sediments).

Windblown sand deposits. (Quaternary) at surface, covers 4 % of this area

Fine- and medium-grained sand dunes in southern Idaho; includes Bruneau and St. Anthony dune fields. (Quaternary Sediments).

Alluvial-fan deposits. (Quaternary) at surface, covers 2 % of this area

Gravel and subordinate sand and silt deposited at mouths of canyons; largest fans are in Basin and Range Province in east-central and southeastern Idaho. (Quaternary Sediments).

Challis Volcanic Group. (Eocene) at surface, covers 2 % of this area

Dacite, andesite, and rhyolite tuffs and flows and subordinate basalt and latite flows; covers large area in south-central Idaho. Includes Absaroka Volcanic Group near Henrys Lake and scattered volcanic rocks in eastern and northern Idaho. (Eocene Challis Magmatic Complex and Related Sedimentary Rocks).

Metamorphic rocks. (Paleoproterozoic and Archean) at surface, covers 1 % of this area

Pend Oreille granodiorite gneiss near Priest River (~2650 Ma); schist, gneiss, and subordinate quartzite along North Fork Clearwater River; Kelly Creek granite gneiss northeast of Pierce (~2670 Ma); orthogneiss in Pioneer Mountains (~2600 Ma and 695 Ma); granite gneiss, granite, schist, and amphibolite of Green Creek complex in Albion Mountains (~2600 Ma); granite gneiss in Beaverhead Mountains east of Leadore (~2450 Ma); and marble, quartzite, schist, and amphibolite of uncertain age near Henrys Lake. (Mesoproterozoic to Archean Basement Rocks).

Sedimentary rocks (Permian to Mississippian). (Permian to Mississippian) at surface, covers 0.8 % of this area

Only shown in Henrys Lake area and in cross section. Consists of Ms and PlPs (PPAs). (Paleocene to Neoproterozoic Sedimentary and Igneous Rocks of the Cordilleran System).

Basalt (Pliocene and Miocene). (Pliocene and Miocene) at surface, covers 0.7 % of this area

Flows and cinder cones of olivine tholeiite basalt, and shallow basalt intrusives (~15-3 Ma); includes basalt in Owyhee County and southwest of Twin Falls, basalt of Weiser (basalt to andesite), basalt of Cuddy Mountain (alkali basalt and picro-basalt) north of Cambridge, basalt in Mount Bennett Hills north of Gooding, andesite at Square Mountain near Magic Reservoir, and Cub River diabase sill east of Preston. Includes gabbro at depth in cross section D-D’-D”. (Quaternary to Eocene Continental Volcanic and Intrusive Rocks).

Sedimentary rocks (Devonian to Cambrian). (Devonian to Cambrian) at surface, covers 0.6 % of this area

Only shown in Henrys Lake area and in cross section. Consists of OCs (OCAs) and DSOs. (Paleocene to Neoproterozoic Sedimentary and Igneous Rocks of the Cordilleran System).

Rhyolite (Pliocene and Miocene). (Pliocene and Miocene) at surface, covers 0.5 % of this area

Rhyolite tuffs and flows of Heise volcanic field (6.6-4.5 Ma; includes Blacktail Creek, Walcott, Conant Creek, and Kilgore tuffs), and rhyolite domes and flows of Magic Reservoir area (6.6-3 Ma). (Quaternary to Eocene Continental Volcanic and Intrusive Rocks).

Sedimentary rocks (Triassic). (Triassic) at surface, covers 0.1 % of this area

Red mudrock and fine-grained sandstone and marine limestone; includes Dinwoody, Woodside, Thaynes, and Ankareh formations in eastern Idaho thrust belt. (Paleocene to Neoproterozoic Sedimentary and Igneous Rocks of the Cordilleran System).

Rhyolite flows, tuff, and intrusive igneous rocks (Pleistocene) at surface, covers 0.1 % of this area

Includes Plateau Rhyolite (age about 0.07 Ma) and interlayered sediments, Mount Jackson Rhyolite (age 0.6 to about 1 Ma), Lewis Canyon Rhyolite (age about 0.9 Ma); and Lava Creek Tuff of Yellowstone Group (age 0.6 to about 1 Ma).

Plateau Rhyolite (Quaternary) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Central Plateau Member: Upper part: rhyolitic flows with abundant phenocrysts dominantly of quartz and sanidine, and lacking plagioclase. Lower part: light gray, dense, fine-grained to aphanitic rhyolitic ash-flow tuff, with angular to rounded phenocrysts of quartz, sanidine, pyroxene, and olivine that make up as much as 25 percent of rock volume.

Basalt flows and intrusive igneous rocks (Pleistocene) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Yellowstone area--Includes Osprey, Madison River, Swan Lake Flat, and Falls River Basalts, basalts of Mariposa Lake, Undine Falls Basalt, and gravels, sands, silts, and basalts of The Narrows. In and adjacent to Absaroka and Washakie Ranges--Includes basalt of Lava Mountain (age about 0.5 Ma).

Huckleberry Ridge Tuff (Tertiary) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Upper part: pinkish gray, gray, or brown welded or unwelded tuff that contains abundant phenocrysts of sanidine and quartz, and uncompacted pumice fragments at the top.

Absaroka Volcanics Supergroup (Tertiary) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Calc-alkalic andesite and dacite extrusive rock with lesser amounts of potassic, alkalic, and mafic lava; minor amounts of rhyodacitic ash-flow tuff associated with mafic lava; and dark gray, very fine-grained basalt or andesite intrusive breccia.

Madison Group: Mission Canyon and Lodgepole Formations; or Castle Reef and Allan Mountain Formations (Mississippian) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Mission Canyon Formation (Mmc): Gray, massive limestone with chert beds and nodules, and solution breccia zones. Shallow marine. Thickness as much as 520 m (1,706 ft). Lodgepole Formation (Ml): Woodhurst Member (upper part of formation): light gray, well-bedded limestone, typically with much dark chert, interbedded with thinner calcareous mudstone beds. Paine Member (middle part of formation):dark gray, thin-bedded, silty or fossiliferous limestone. Cottonwood Canyon Member (lower part of formation): black shale with basal conglomeratic lag deposit. Shallow marine. Thickness as much as 305 m (1000 ft). In Northwest Montana - Castle Reef Formation: Medium to light gray, thick-bedded limestone or dolomite. Sun River Member (upper part of formation): light gray dolomite with thick fossiliferous lenses. Shallow marine. Thickness as much as 300 m (984 ft). Allan Mountain Formation: Dark gray, thinly bedded limestone with thin mudstone and shale partings, and nodular chert. Shallow marine. Thickness as much as 200 m (656 ft).

Marble (Lower Proterozoic or Archean) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Marble

Quadrant and Amsden Formations (Pennsylvanian and Mississippian) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Quadrant Formation (PAq): Very light gray, yellowish or pinkish, well-sorted sandstone or quartzite, locally interbedded with subordinate limestone beds. Marine. Generally, thickness as much as 140 m (460 ft), but as much as 800 m (2,625 ft) in southwestern-most Montana. Amsden Formation (PAMa): Red shale, light gray limestone, and cherty and sandy limestone. Coastal plain or marine. Thickness as much as 180 m (590 ft).

Undivided surficial deposits (Pleistocene-Holocene) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Mostly alluvium, colluvium, and glacial and landslide deposits. Primarily in Yellowstone area and Bighorn Mountains.

Bighorn through Flathead Formation: Bighorn, Pilgrim, Park, Meagher, Wolsey, and Flathead Formations (Ordovician and Cambrian) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Bighorn Formation (Ob): Yellowish gray to very pale orange crystalline dolomite with local basal sandstone. Marine shelf. Thickness as much as 120 m (394 ft). Pilgrim Formation: Gray, commonly mottled limestone that may contain intraformational limestone conglomerate. Shallow marine. Thickness as much as 180 m (590 ft). Park Formation: Grayish green, fissile, micaceous shale with a few thin beds of calcareous sandstone and thin, gray limestone. Local arkose beds. Offshore marine. Thickness as much as 310 m (1,017 ft). Meagher Formation: Gray to bluish gray limestone and dolomitic limestone, locally mottled and with intraformational conglomerate beds. Shallow marine. Thickness as much as 300 m (984 ft). Wolsey Formation (CAw): Dark green and purplish gray fissile, micaceous shale, thin glauconitic limestone beds and thin, fine-grained sandstone beds. Shallow marine. Thickness as much as 145 m (476 ft). Flathead Formation (CAf): Pinkish gray to light gray sandstone or quartzite. Locally very glauconitic, pebbly, arkosic, or iron-stained. Marine shoreface. Thickness as much as 100 m (328 ft).

Amphibolite (Lower Proterozoic or Archean) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Amphibolite

Schist (Lower Proterozoic or Archean) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Schist

Quartzite (Lower Proterozoic or Archean) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Quartzite

Huckleberry Ridge Tuff of Yellowstone Group (Pliocene) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Lavender to gray-brown welded rhyolite tuff.

Alluvial fan deposit (Quaternary) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Variable deposits with fan-shaped morphology developed where slope gradient changes abruptly. Shown only where relatively extensive.

Quartzofeldspathic gneiss (Lower Proterozoic or Archean) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Quartzofeldspathic gneiss

Alluvium and Colluvium (Pleistocene-Holocene) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Clay, silt, sand, and gravel in flood plains, fans, terraces, and slopes.

Morrison Formation and Ellis Group (Jurassic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Morrison Formation (Jm): Green, gray, or red mudstone and marlstone with subordinate limestone and sandstone beds. Upper part Neocomian age in central Montana and contains carbonaceous black shale and coal. Fluvial, paludal, and lacustrine. Thickness as much as 180 m (590 ft). Ellis Group (Je) - Swift Formation (Jsw): Orangish brown, glauconitic, flaggy-bedded, commonly fossiliferous, fine-grained sandstone or sandy coquina with subordinate dark gray shale interbeds; chert pebbles common. In west-central and northwestern Montana, a dark gray, noncalcareous, micaceous shale forms the lower part of the formation, commonly with a basal chert-pebble conglomerate or conglomeratic sandstone as much as 3 m (10 ft) thick. Shallow marine. Thickness as much as 70 m (230 ft). Rierdon Formation (Jr): Gray, locally fossiliferous limestone that may contain floating grains of quartz sand, interbedded with greenish gray limy shale. Lagoonal and marine shelf. Thickness as much as 105 m (344 ft). Sawtooth Formation: Western Montana: dark gray, platy to shaly, dense limestone with local basal conglomerate. Central Montana: upper calcareous siltstone, middle dark gray shale with thin limestone interbeds, and lower fine-grained sandstone. Three local members Bowes, Firemoon, and Tampico, in descending order. Bowes Member: dark gray to medium gray, calcareous mudstone, limestone, and quartzose sandstone. Firemoon Member: dark to medium gray, limestone and calcareous mudstone. Tampico Member: very light gray, well-sorted quartz sandstone and siltstone, and chert-pebble conglomerate. Shallow marine. Thickness as much as 205 m (673 ft). Piper Formation (Jp): Upper part: red mudstone and gypsum; middle part: gray shale, limestone, and dolomite; lower part: red mudstone and gypsum. Marine and restricted coastal evaporite basins. Thickness as much as 75 m (246 ft).

Quartzofeldspathic gneiss (Archean) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Quartzofeldspathic gneiss

Schist and gneiss (Lower Proterozoic or Archean) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Schist and gneiss

Three Forks and Jefferson Formations (Mississippian and Devonian) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Three Forks Formation (MDt): Sappington Member (upper part of formation):yellowish orange and yellowish gray siltstone. Trident Member (middle part of formation): greenish gray and light olive gray, fossiliferous, calcareous shale that contains interbeds and nodules of fossiliferous, argillaceous limestone. Logan Gulch Member (lower part of formation): yellowish gray and grayish red, argillaceous limestone breccia and shale breccia that may include dolomitic siltstone. Marine to restricted marine with evaporite basins. Thickness as much as 185 m (607 ft). Jefferson Formation (Dj): Birdbear Member (upper part of formation): light to medium gray, sucrosic dolomite. Lower part of formation: grayish black, commonly petroliferous dolomite or limestone that may be interbedded with light gray quartzite. Marine. Thickness as much as 520 m (1,706 ft).