Geologic units in Twin Falls county, Idaho

Additional scientific data in this geographic area

Basalt (Pliocene and Miocene). (Pliocene and Miocene) at surface, covers 43 % of this area

Flows and cinder cones of olivine tholeiite basalt, and shallow basalt intrusives (~15-3 Ma); includes basalt in Owyhee County and southwest of Twin Falls, basalt of Weiser (basalt to andesite), basalt of Cuddy Mountain (alkali basalt and picro-basalt) north of Cambridge, basalt in Mount Bennett Hills north of Gooding, andesite at Square Mountain near Magic Reservoir, and Cub River diabase sill east of Preston. Includes gabbro at depth in cross section D-D’-D”. (Quaternary to Eocene Continental Volcanic and Intrusive Rocks).

Rhyolite (Miocene). (Miocene) at surface, covers 36 % of this area

Rhyolite tuffs and flows (14-8 Ma); includes Juniper Mountain volcanic center, tuff of Little Jacks Creek, Cougar Point Tuff, tuffs in the Mt. Bennett Hills, and Arbon Valley Tuff Member of Starlight Formation. Volcanic sources include Owyhee-Humboldt (13.8-12.0 Ma), Bruneau-Jarbidge (12.5-11.3 Ma), Twin Falls (10.0-8.6 Ma), and Picabo (10.2 Ma) volcanic centers. (Quaternary to Eocene Continental Volcanic and Intrusive Rocks).

Basalt (Pleistocene and Pliocene). (Pleistocene and Pliocene) at surface, covers 9 % of this area

Flows and cinder cones of olivine tholeiite basalt in and near Snake River Plain. Largely Pleistocene (<2.6 Ma) but includes flows as old as 3 Ma. Covered with 1-3 m (3-10 ft) of loess. (Quaternary to Eocene Continental Volcanic and Intrusive Rocks).

Sedimentary rocks associated with Basin and Range extension. (Quaternary, Pliocene, and Miocene) at surface, covers 5 % of this area

Fluvial, fan, and lacustrine deposits and intercalated volcanic rocks of the Basin and Range Province (~16-2 Ma); consolidated to weakly consolidated sandstone, siltstone, arkose, conglomerate, mudstone, tuffaceous sediment, basalt, basaltic tephra, and rhyolite tuff. Includes deposits of Lake Idaho (Idaho Group) in western Snake River Plain and Salt Lake Formation deposited in Basin and Range Province of east-central Idaho. (Quaternary to Eocene Continental Sediments and Sedimentary Rocks).

Sediments and sedimentary rocks (Pleistocene and Pliocene). (Pleistocene and Pliocene) at surface, covers 3 % of this area

Older gravel, sand, and silt deposited in fans, streams, and lakes. Includes older terrace gravels and Tuana Gravel northwest of Twin Falls. (Quaternary to Eocene Continental Sediments and Sedimentary Rocks).

Alluvial deposits. (Quaternary) at surface, covers 3 % of this area

Deposits in valleys consisting of gravel, sand, and silt. Includes younger terrace deposits. May contain some glacial deposits and colluvium in uplands. (Quaternary Sediments).

Alluvial-fan deposits. (Quaternary) at surface, covers 0.7 % of this area

Gravel and subordinate sand and silt deposited at mouths of canyons; largest fans are in Basin and Range Province in east-central and southeastern Idaho. (Quaternary Sediments).

Sedimentary rocks (Permian and Pennsylvanian). (Permian and Pennsylvanian) at surface, covers 0.5 % of this area

Marine phosphorite, shale, and chert of Phosphoria Formation, fine-grained sandstone and mudrock of Wells, Quadrant, Amsden, and Shedhorn formations, and fine-grained sandstone, carbonaceous mudstone, and limestone of the Snaky Canyon Formation and Sun Valley and Oquirrh groups. Located in south-central and eastern Idaho. (Paleocene to Neoproterozoic Sedimentary and Igneous Rocks of the Cordilleran System).

Fluvial and lake sediment. (Quaternary) at surface, covers 0.4 % of this area

Largely fine-grained sediment, in part playa deposits of evaporative lakes; includes Snake River Group and Bruneau Formation in central Snake River Plain and glacial lake deposits in Bonners Ferry area of northern Idaho. Also includes travertine and tufa northeast of Bancroft and Lake Thatcher sediments in the Gem Valley south of Grace. (Quaternary Sediments).

Lake Bonneville deposits. (Pleistocene) at surface, covers 0.3 % of this area

Silt, clay, sand, and gravel deposited in and at margins of former Lake Bonneville (33-11 calibrated ka) and sand and gravel deposited in giant flood bars by outburst floods from the lake (17.4 calibrated ka). The 1,575-m (5,170 ft) Lake Bonneville shoreline was used to determine the maximum extent of the lake deposits. Flood deposits follow Bonneville flood path from near Downey and the Portneuf River westward along the Snake River to Lewiston. They include sand and silt deposited in slack-water areas to 740 m (2,430 ft) elevation in the Boise, Weiser, Payette, and Snake river drainages. (Quaternary Sediments).

Landslide deposits. (Quaternary) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Unsorted gravel, sand, and clay of landslide origin; includes rotational and translational blocks and earth flows. (Quaternary Sediments).

Younger silicic ash flow tuffs (Miocene) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Includes units mapped as the High Rock sequence on the Washoe North map; the Timber Mountain, Paintbrush, Crater Flat, and Belted Range Tuffs, and Indian Trail Formation (now abandoned) on the Nye South map; the Thirsty Canyon Tuff on the Nye South and Esmeralda maps; and other unnamed units. Locally it includes tuffaceous sedimentary rocks interstratified with tuffs. It is present in the northernmost part and southernmost parts of the State, and is not exposed in the central region. It corresponds to unit Tt3 on the 1978 State map, although a few rocks also mapped as Trt on the 1978 State map also are included. It is present in Clark, Churchill, Washoe, Nye, Lincoln, Lyon, Douglas, Carson, Esmeralda, Elko, Humboldt, Pershing, and Mineral Counties.

Alluvium, undifferentiated (Holocene and Pleistocene) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Unit is present in all counties. Some counties divided the alluvium into younger and older units, and some did not. For those that did not, or used other generalized terms for Quaternary rocks, the unit Qal has been used for the general undivided alluvium. Additionally, when polygons have been edited and changed to alluvium, Qal was used as the general value; hence it now is present in all counties. Qya-Younger alluvium: Map unit is used in Churchill, Elko, Esmeralda, Eureka, Humboldt, Lander, and Lincoln Counties where geologic information suggests better-defined younger versus older alluvium. It is mostly interchangeable with Qal, except that it implies some specifically younger Quaternary deposits.

Basalt (Miocene) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Basalt flows, plugs and dikes, some olivine basalt, and andesite and latitic rocks. This unit corresponds with unit Tb on the 1978 State map. It is present on the Washoe North, Washoe South, Lincoln, Clark, Elko, Eureka, Humboldt, Nye South, and Lander County maps.

Younger rhyolitic flows and shallow intrusive rocks (Miocene) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Rhyolitic flows, domes, plugs, breccias, quartz latite, rhyodacite, quartz porphyry dikes, and other shallow intrusive rocks. This unit includes rocks mapped as the Cañon Rhyolite on the Washoe North map, the Jarbidge Rhyolite and phenorhyolitic and phenodacitic flows and domes on the Elko County map, and other unnamed units. It has a distribution similar to Tt3, with exposures in the northern and southern parts of the State, but only crops out in a few places in the central region. It corresponds to unit Tr3 on the 1978 State map, and also includes a few rocks mapped as Trt on the 1978 State map. This unit is exposed in every county except White Pine.