Geologic units in Hudson county, New Jersey

Passaic Formation Mudstone facies (Lower Jurassic and Upper Triassic) at surface, covers 27 % of this area

Sandy mudstone (JTrpms) is reddish-brown to brownish-red, massive, silty to sandy mudstone and siltstone, which are bioturbated, ripple cross-laminated and interbedded with lenticular sandstone. To southwest where similar lithologic units also occur, they have not been mapped separately, but have been included in undivided unit JTrp.

Diabase (Early Jurassic) at surface, covers 22 % of this area

Fine-grained to aphanitic dikes; medium- to coarsegrained, subophitic discordant stock-like intrusions of dark-greenish-gray to black diabase; and plugs of dark gray, concordant to discordant sheetlike, medium- to coarse-grained, quartz-rich to albite-rich granophyre (map unit Jg). The chilled margins of diabase masses are aphanitic to very fine grained. Diabase is dense, hard, and sparsely fractured. It is composed mostly of plagioclase (An50-70), clinopyroxene (mostly augite) and magnetiteñilmenite. Accessory minerals include apatite, quartz, alkali feldspar, hornblende, titantite, and zirocon. Olivine is rare. Within about 200 m (655 ft) above and 150 m (490 ft) below the large diabase sheets, red mudstones are typically metamorphosed into indurated, bluish-gray hornfels commonly with clots or crystals of tourmaline or cordierite, whereas argillitic siltstone is metamorphosed into brittle, black, very fine grained hornfels, Sheetlike intrusions are as much as 360 to 400 m (1,180-1,310 ft) thick. Dikes range in thickness from 3 to 15 m (10-50 ft) and several kilometers (miles) long. Thickness of the stocklike bodies is unknown.

Stockton Formation (Upper Triassic) at surface, covers 16 % of this area

(Kmmel, 1897) - Light-gray, light-grayishbrown, yellowish- to pinkish-gray, or violet-gray to reddish-brown, medium- to coarse-grained arkosic sandstone and reddish- to purplish-brown mudstone, silty mudstone, argillaceous siltstone, and shale. Mudstone, siltstone and shale beds thicker and more numerous in central Newark basin west of Round Valley Reservoir. Sandstones mostly planar-bedded, with scoured bases containing pebble lags and mudstone rip-ups. Unit is coarser near Newark basin border fault, where poorly exposed, reddish-brown to pinkish-white, medium- to coarse-grained, feldspathic pebbly sandstone and conglomerate (Trss) and pebble to cobble quartzite conglomerate (Trscq). Maximum thickness of formation about 1,240 m (4,070 ft).

Lockatong Formation (Upper Triassic) at surface, covers 9 % of this area

(Kmmel, 1897) - Cyclically-deposited sequences consisting of light- to dark-gray, greenish-gray, and black, dolomitic or analcime-bearing silty argillite, laminated mudstone, silty to calcareous, argillaceous, very-fine-grained pyritic sandstone and siltstone, and minor silty limestone (Trl). Grayish-red, grayish-purple, and dark-brownish-red sequences (Trlr) common in upper half. Two types of cycles are recognized: detrital and chemical. Detrital cycles average 5.2 m (17 ft) thick and consist of basal, argillaceous, very fine grained sandstone to coarse siltstone; medial, dark-gray to black, laminated siltstone, silty mudstone, or silty limestone; and upper, light- to dark-gray, silty to dolomitic or analcime-rich mudstone, argillitic siltstone, or very-fine-grained sandstone. Chemical cycles are similar to detrital cycles, but thinner, averaging 3.2 m (10.5 ft). Cycles in northern Newark basin are thinner and have arkosic sandstone in lower and upper parts. Upper part of formation in northern basin composed mostly of light-gray to light-pinkish-gray or light-brown, coarse- to fine-grained, thick- to massive-bedded arkosic sandstone (Trla). Thermally metamorphosed into hornfels where intruded by diabase (Jd). Interfingers laterally and gradationally with quartz sandstone and conglomerate (Trls) and quartzite conglomerate (Trlcq) near Triassic border fault in southwestern area of map. Maximum thickness of Lockatong Formation about 1,070 m (3,510 ft).

Lockatong Formation Arkosic Sandstone facies (Upper Triassic) at surface, covers 8 % of this area

Cycles in northern Newark basin are thinner and have arkosic sandstone in lower and upper parts. Upper part of formation in northern basin composed mostly of light-gray to light-pinkish-gray or light-brown, coarse- to fine-grained, thick- to massive-bedded arkosic sandstone (Trla). Thermally metamorphosed into hornfels where intruded by diabase (Jd).

Manhattan Schist (Lower Cambrian and (or) Late Proterozoic) at surface, covers 7 % of this area

(Hall, in press) - Medium-dark gray, medium- to coarse-grained schist and gneiss composed of biotite, muscovite, quartz, and plagioclase, and local accessory minerals sillimanite, kyanite, tourmaline, and garnet. Contains some interlayered amphibolite. Unit is not exposed in the map area, but is present in boring logs.

Passaic Formation Sandstone and Siltstone facies (Lower Jurassic and Upper Triassic) at surface, covers 5 % of this area

Sandstone (JTrps) is interbedded grayish-red to brownish-red, medium- to fine-grained, medium- to thick-bedded sandstone and brownish-to-purplish-red coarse-grained siltstone; unit is planar to ripple cross-laminated, fissile, locally calcareous, containing desiccation cracks and root casts. Upward-fining cycles are 1.8 to 4.6 m (6-15 ft) thick. Sandstone beds are coarser and thicker near conglomerate units (JTrpcq, JTrpcl). Maximum thickness about 1,100 m (3,610 ft).

Serpentinite (Cambrian and Late Proterozoic) at surface, covers 3 % of this area

Light-yellowish-green to dark-green, fine-grained, massive serpentinite containing locally abundant magnetite where fresh. Contains a variety of serpentine minerals and alteration products where sheared or weathered. Exposed only along the Hudson waterfront in Hoboken but present elsewhere in boring logs.

Passaic Formation (Lower Jurassic and Upper Triassic) at surface, covers 2 % of this area

(Olsen, 1980) - Reddish-brown to brownish-purple and grayish-red siltstone and shale (JTrp) maximum thickness 3,600 m (11,810 ft). At places contains mapped sandy mudstone (JTrpms), sandstone (JTrps), conglomeratic sandstone (JTrpsc) and conglomerate containing clasts of quartzite (JTrpcq), or limestone (JTrpcl). Formation coarsens up section and to the southwest. Quartzite conglomerate unit (JTrpcq) is reddish-brown pebble conglomerate, pebbly sandstone, and sandstone, in upward-fining sequences 1 to 2 m (3-6 ft) thick. Clasts are subangular to subrounded, quartz and quartzite in sandstone matrix. Sandstone is medium to coarse grained, feldspathic (up to 20 percent feldspar), and locally contains pebble and cobble layers. Conglomerate thickness exceeds 850 m (2,790 ft). Limestone conglomerate unit (JTrpcl) is medium-bedded to massive, pebble to boulder conglomerate. Clasts are subangular dolomitic limestone in matrix of brownish- to purplish-red sandstone to mudstone; matrix weathers light-gray to white near faults. Maximum thickness unknown. Conglomeratic sandstone (JTrpsc) is brownish-red pebble conglomerate, medium- to coarse-grained, feldspathic sandstone and micaceous siltstone; unit is planar to low-angle trough cross laminated, burrowed, and contains local pebble layers. Unit forms upward-fining sequences 0.5 to 2.5 m (1.6-8 ft) thick. Conglomeratic sandstone thickness exceeds 800 m (2,625 ft). Sandstone (JTrps) is interbedded grayish-red to brownish-red, medium- to fine-grained, medium- to thick-bedded sandstone and brownish-to purplish-red coarse-grained siltstone; unit is planar to ripple cross-laminated, fissile, locally calcareous, containing desiccation cracks and root casts. Upward-fining cycles are 1.8 to 4.6 m (6-15 ft) thick. Sandstone beds are coarser and thicker near conglomerate units (JTrpcq, JTrpcl). Maximum thickness about 1,100 m (3,610 ft). Sandy mudstone (JTrpms) is reddish-brown to brownish-red, massive, silty to sandy mudstone and siltstone, which are bioturbated, ripple cross-laminated and interbedded with lenticular sandstone. To southwest where similar lithologic units also occur, they have not been mapped separately, but have been included in undivided unit JTrp. Rhythmic cycles 2 to 7 m (7-23 ft) of thick gray-bed sequences (Trpg), termed Van Houten cycles by Olsen (1985), contain basal thin-bedded to finely laminated shale to siltstone, which grade upward through laminated to microlaminated, locally calcareous mudstone to siltstone and finally into massive silty mudstone. Lowest part of cycle has some desiccation features and local fossils; middle part has highest organic content and the most fossils; highest part contains mudcracks, burrows, and root casts. Gray-bed cycles are abundant in lower half of Passaic Formation and less common in upper half. Rocks of the Passaic Formation have been locally thermally metamorphosed to hornfels where in contact with the Orange Mountain Basalt, diabase dikes, and sheetlike intrusions. Total thickness of formation ranges from 3500 to 3600 m (11480-11810 ft).

Passaic Formation gray bed (Lower Jurassic and Upper Triassic) at surface, covers 0.4 % of this area

Rhythmic cycles 2 to 7 m (7-23 ft) of thick gray-bed sequences (Trpg), termed Van Houten cycles by Olsen (1985), contain basal thin-bedded to finely laminated shale to siltstone, which grade upward through laminated to micro-laminated, locally calcareous mudstone to siltstone and finally into massive silty mudstone. Lowest part of cycle has some desiccation features and local fossils; middle part has highest organic content and the most fossils; highest part contains mudcracks, burrows, and root casts. Gray-bed cycles are abundant in lower half of Passaic Formation and less common in upper half.