Geologic units in Hunterdon county, New Jersey

Passaic Formation (Lower Jurassic and Upper Triassic) at surface, covers 26 % of this area

(Olsen, 1980) - Reddish-brown to brownish-purple and grayish-red siltstone and shale (JTrp) maximum thickness 3,600 m (11,810 ft). At places contains mapped sandy mudstone (JTrpms), sandstone (JTrps), conglomeratic sandstone (JTrpsc) and conglomerate containing clasts of quartzite (JTrpcq), or limestone (JTrpcl). Formation coarsens up section and to the southwest. Quartzite conglomerate unit (JTrpcq) is reddish-brown pebble conglomerate, pebbly sandstone, and sandstone, in upward-fining sequences 1 to 2 m (3-6 ft) thick. Clasts are subangular to subrounded, quartz and quartzite in sandstone matrix. Sandstone is medium to coarse grained, feldspathic (up to 20 percent feldspar), and locally contains pebble and cobble layers. Conglomerate thickness exceeds 850 m (2,790 ft). Limestone conglomerate unit (JTrpcl) is medium-bedded to massive, pebble to boulder conglomerate. Clasts are subangular dolomitic limestone in matrix of brownish- to purplish-red sandstone to mudstone; matrix weathers light-gray to white near faults. Maximum thickness unknown. Conglomeratic sandstone (JTrpsc) is brownish-red pebble conglomerate, medium- to coarse-grained, feldspathic sandstone and micaceous siltstone; unit is planar to low-angle trough cross laminated, burrowed, and contains local pebble layers. Unit forms upward-fining sequences 0.5 to 2.5 m (1.6-8 ft) thick. Conglomeratic sandstone thickness exceeds 800 m (2,625 ft). Sandstone (JTrps) is interbedded grayish-red to brownish-red, medium- to fine-grained, medium- to thick-bedded sandstone and brownish-to purplish-red coarse-grained siltstone; unit is planar to ripple cross-laminated, fissile, locally calcareous, containing desiccation cracks and root casts. Upward-fining cycles are 1.8 to 4.6 m (6-15 ft) thick. Sandstone beds are coarser and thicker near conglomerate units (JTrpcq, JTrpcl). Maximum thickness about 1,100 m (3,610 ft). Sandy mudstone (JTrpms) is reddish-brown to brownish-red, massive, silty to sandy mudstone and siltstone, which are bioturbated, ripple cross-laminated and interbedded with lenticular sandstone. To southwest where similar lithologic units also occur, they have not been mapped separately, but have been included in undivided unit JTrp. Rhythmic cycles 2 to 7 m (7-23 ft) of thick gray-bed sequences (Trpg), termed Van Houten cycles by Olsen (1985), contain basal thin-bedded to finely laminated shale to siltstone, which grade upward through laminated to microlaminated, locally calcareous mudstone to siltstone and finally into massive silty mudstone. Lowest part of cycle has some desiccation features and local fossils; middle part has highest organic content and the most fossils; highest part contains mudcracks, burrows, and root casts. Gray-bed cycles are abundant in lower half of Passaic Formation and less common in upper half. Rocks of the Passaic Formation have been locally thermally metamorphosed to hornfels where in contact with the Orange Mountain Basalt, diabase dikes, and sheetlike intrusions. Total thickness of formation ranges from 3500 to 3600 m (11480-11810 ft).

Lockatong Formation (Upper Triassic) at surface, covers 11 % of this area

Predominantly cyclic lacustrine sequences of silty, dolomitic or analcime-bearing argillite; laminated mudstone; silty to calcareous, argillaceous very fine grained sandstone and pyritic siltstone; and minor silty limestone, mostly light- to dark-gray, greenishgray, and black. Grayish-red, grayish-purple, and dark-brownish-red sequences (Trlr) occur in some places, especially in upper half. Two types of cycles are recognized: freshwater-lake (detrital) and alkaline-lake (chemical) cycles. Freshwater-lake cycles average 5.2 m (17 ft) thick. They consist of basal, transgressive, fluvial to lake-margin deposits that are argillaceous, very fine grained sandstone to coarse siltstone with indistinct lamination, planar or cross lamination, or are disrupted by convolute bedding, desiccation cracks, root casts, soil-ped casts, and tubes. Medial lake-bottom deposits are laminated siltstones, silty mudstones, or silty limestones that are dark gray to black with calcite laminae and grains and lenses, or streaks of pyrite; fossils are common, including fish scales and articulated fish, conchostracans, plants, spores, and pollen. Upper regressive lake margin, playa lake, and mudflat deposits are light- to dark-gray silty mudstone to argillitic siltstone or very fine grained sandstone, mostly thick bedded to massive, with desiccation cracks, intraformational breccias, faint wavy laminations, burrows, euhedral pyrite grains, and dolomite or calcite specks. Alkaline-lake cycles are similar to freshwater-lake cycles, but are thinner, averaging 3 m (10 ft), have fewer fossils (mainly conchostracans), and commonly have red beds, extensive desiccation features, and abundant analcime and dolomite specks in the upper parts of cycles. Thickness near Byram is about 1,070 m (3,510 ft). The formation thins to the southeast and northeast; thickness near Princeton is less than 700 m (2,297 ft).

Passaic Formation (Lower Jurassic and Upper Triassic) at surface, covers 8 % of this area

Predominantly red beds consisting of argillaceous siltstone; silty mudstone; argillaceous, very fine grained sandstone; and shale; mostly reddish-brown to brownish-purple, and grayish-red. Red beds occur typically in 3- to 7-m (10- to 23-ft-)-thick, cyclic playa-lake-mudflat sequences and fining-upward fluvial sequences. Lamination is commonly indistinct due to burrowing, desiccation, and paleosol formation. Where layering is preserved, most bedforms are wavy parallel lamination and trough and climbing-ripple cross lamination. Calcite- or dolomite-filled vugs and flattened cavities, mostly 0.5 to 0.2 mm (0.02-0.08 in) across, occur mostly in the lower half. Sand-filled burrows, 2 to 5 mm (0.08-0.2 in) in diameter, are prevalent in the upper two-thirds of the unit. Desiccation cracks, intraformational breccias, and curled silt laminae are abundant in the lower half. Lake cycles, mostly 2 to 5 m (7-16 ft) thick, have a basal, greenish-gray, argillaceous siltstone; a medial, dark-gray to black, pyritic, carbonaceous, fossiliferous, and, in places, calcareous lake-bottom fissile mudstone or siltstone; and an upper thick-bedded, gray to reddish and purplish-gray argillaceous siltstone with desiccation cracks, intraformational breccias, burrows, and mineralized vugs. Thickness of the formation between Sourland Mountain and Sand Brook syncline is about 3,500 m (11,483 ft).

Hornblende Granite (Middle Proterozoic) at surface, covers 6 % of this area

Pinkish-gray- to medium-buff-weathering, pinkish-white or light-pinkish-gray, medium- to coarse-grained, gneissoid to indistinctly foliated granite and sparse granite gneiss composed principally of microcline microperthite, quartz, oligoclase, and hornblende. Some phases are quartz syenite or quartz monzonite. Includes small bodies of pegmatite and amphibolite not shown on map. U-Pb age approximately 1,090 Ma (Drake and others, 1991b).

Quartz-Oligoclase Gneiss (Middle Proterozoic) at surface, covers 5 % of this area

White-weathering, light-greenish-gray, medium- to coarse-grained, moderately layered to indistinctly foliated gneiss and lesser amounts of granofels composed of quartz, oligoclase or andesine, and, locally, biotite, hornblende and (or) clinopyroxene. Contains thin amphibolite layers.

Stockton Formation (Upper Triassic) at surface, covers 4 % of this area

Predominantly medium- to coarse-grained, light-gray, light-grayish-brown, or yellowish- to pinkish-gray arkosic sandstone and medium- to fine-grained, violet-gray to reddish-brown arkosic sandstone; with lesser, reddish to purplish-brown, silty mudstone, argillaceous siltstone, and shale. Some coarse-grained sandstone in lower part contains thick beds of conglomerate (Trsc) which have been mapped in the vicinity of Stockton. Sandstone, deposited in high-gradient stream channels, is mostly planar bedded with scoured bases containing pebble lags and mudstone rip-up clasts. Upper part of channel beds are burrowed. Large-scale trough crossbeds occur in some very coarse grained sandstone beds; smaller scale trough and climbing-ripple cross lamination occur in the upper part of channel sequences and in finer grained sandstone beds. Typical floodplain mudstones are irregularly thin bedded and extensively burrowed. Floodplain beds are thicker and more numerous in the central Newark basin, near the Delaware River. Thickness of the unit (including Trsc) near Stockton is about 1,240 m (4,068 ft).

Passaic Formation Quatzite-clast Conglomerate facies (Lower Jurassic and Upper Triassic) at surface, covers 4 % of this area

Quartzite conglomerate unit (JTrpcq) is reddish-brown pebble conglomerate, pebbly sandstone, and sandstone, in upward-fining sequences 1 to 2 m (3-6 ft) thick. Clasts are subangular to subrounded, quartz and quartzite in sandstone matrix. Sandstone is medium to coarse grained, feldspathic (up to 20 percent feldspar), and locally contains pebble and cobble layers. Conglomerate thickness exceeds 850 m (2,790 ft).

Diabase (Jurassic) at surface, covers 3 % of this area

Concordant to discordant, predominantly sheet-like intrusions of medium- to fine-grained diabase and dikes of fine-grained diabase; dark-greenish-gray to black; subophitic texture. Dense, hard, sparsely fractured rock composed mostly of plagioclase (An50-70), clinopyroxene (mostly augite), and magnetite-ilmenite. Orthopyroxene (En75-80) is locally abundant in the lower part of the sheets. Accessory minerals include apatite, quartz, alkali feldspar, hornblende, sphene, zircon, and rare olivine. Diabase in the map area was derived primarily from high-titanium, quartz-tholeiite magma. Sedimentary rocks within about 300 m (984 ft) above and 200 m (656 ft) below major diabase sheets are thermally metamorphosed. Red mudstone is typically altered to indurated, bluish-gray hornfels with clots or crystals of tourmaline or cordierite. Gray argillitic siltstone is typically altered to brittle, black, very fine grained hornfels. Sills are 365 to 400 m (1,197-1,312 ft) thick. Dikes range in thickness from 3 to 10 m (10-33 ft) and are many kilometers long.

Passaic Formation Conglomerate and Sandstone facies (Lower Jurassic and Upper Triassic) at surface, covers 2 % of this area

Conglomeratic sandstone (JTrpsc) is brownish-red pebble conglomerate, medium- to coarse-grained, feldspathic sandstone and micaceous siltstone; unit is planar to low-angle trough cross laminated, burrowed, and contains local pebble layers. Unit forms upward-fining sequences 0.5 to 2.5 m (1.6-8 ft) thick. Conglomeratic sandstone thickness exceeds 800 m (2,625 ft).

Allentown Dolomite (Lower Ordovician and Upper Cambrian) at surface, covers 2 % of this area

(Wherry, 1909) - Very thin to very thick bedded dolomite containing minor orthoquartzite and shale. Upper part is medium-light- to medium-dark-gray, fine- to medium-grained, locally coarse-grained, medium- to very thick bedded dolomite. Floating quartz sand grains and two sequences of medium-light- to very light gray, thin-bedded quartzite and discontinuous, dark-gray chert lenses occur directly below upper contact. Rhythmically bedded lower dolomite beds alternate between light and dark gray weathering, medium and very light gray, fine and medium grained, and thin and medium bedded, which are interbedded with shaly dolomite. Ripple marks, crossbeds, edgewise conglomerate, mud cracks, oolites, and algal stromatolites occur throughout unit, but more typically in lower part. Shaly dolomite increases downward toward lower conformable contact with the Leithsville Formation. Oldest beds contain trilobite fauna of early Late Cambrian age; younger beds contain latest Cambrian fauna (Howell, 1945; Howell and others, 1950). Thickness about 580 m (1,900 ft).

Passaic Formation gray bed (Lower Jurassic and Upper Triassic) at surface, covers 2 % of this area

Rhythmic cycles 2 to 7 m (7-23 ft) of thick gray-bed sequences (Trpg), termed Van Houten cycles by Olsen (1985), contain basal thin-bedded to finely laminated shale to siltstone, which grade upward through laminated to micro-laminated, locally calcareous mudstone to siltstone and finally into massive silty mudstone. Lowest part of cycle has some desiccation features and local fossils; middle part has highest organic content and the most fossils; highest part contains mudcracks, burrows, and root casts. Gray-bed cycles are abundant in lower half of Passaic Formation and less common in upper half.

Microperthite Alaskite (Middle Proterozoic) at surface, covers 2 % of this area

Pink- to buff-weathering, light-pinkish-gray or pinkish-white, medium- to coarse-grained, gneissoid to indistinctly foliated granite composed principally of microcline microperthite, quartz and oligoclase. Includes small bodies of amphibolite not shown on map.

Pyroxene Granite (Middle Proterozoic) at surface, covers 2 % of this area

Gray- to buff- or white-weathering, greenish-gray, medium- to coarse-grained, massive, gneissoid to indistinctly foliated granite containing mesoperthite to microantiperthite, quartz, oligoclase, and clinopyroxene. Common accessory minerals include titanite, magnetite, apatite, and trace amounts of pyrite. Some phases are monzonite, quartz monzodiorite, or granodiorite. Locally includes small bodies of amphibolite not shown on map.

Amphibolite (Middle Proterozoic) at surface, covers 2 % of this area

Gray- to grayish-black, medium-grained amphibolite composed of hornblende and andesine. Some phases contain biotite and (or) clinopyroxene. Ubiquitous and associated with almost all other Middle Proterozoic units. Some amphibolite is clearly metavolcanic in origin, some is metasedimentary, and some appears to be metagabbro.

Lockatong Formation red bed (Upper Triassic) at surface, covers 1 % of this area

Predominantly cyclic lacustrine sequences of silty, dolomitic or analcime-bearing argillite; laminated mudstone; silty to calcareous, argillaceous very fine grained sandstone and pyritic siltstone; and minor silty limestone, mostly light- to dark-gray, greenishgray, and black. Grayish-red, grayish-purple, and dark-brownish-red sequences (Trlr) occur in some places, especially in upper half. Two types of cycles are recognized: freshwater-lake (detrital) and alkaline-lake (chemical) cycles. Freshwater-lake cycles average 5.2 m (17 ft) thick. They consist of basal, transgressive, fluvial to lake-margin deposits that are argillaceous, very fine grained sandstone to coarse siltstone with indistinct lamination, planar or cross lamination, or are disrupted by convolute bedding, desiccation cracks, root casts, soil-ped casts, and tubes. Medial lake-bottom deposits are laminated siltstones, silty mudstones, or silty limestones that are dark gray to black with calcite laminae and grains and lenses, or streaks of pyrite; fossils are common, including fish scales and articulated fish, conchostracans, plants, spores, and pollen. Upper regressive lake margin, playa lake, and mudflat deposits are light- to dark-gray silty mudstone to argillitic siltstone or very fine grained sandstone, mostly thick bedded to massive, with desiccation cracks, intraformational breccias, faint wavy laminations, burrows, euhedral pyrite grains, and dolomite or calcite specks. Alkaline-lake cycles are similar to freshwater-lake cycles, but are thinner, averaging 3 m (10 ft), have fewer fossils (mainly conchostracans), and commonly have red beds, extensive desiccation features, and abundant analcime and dolomite specks in the upper parts of cycles. Thickness near Byram is about 1,070 m (3,510 ft). The formation thins to the southeast and northeast; thickness near Princeton is less than 700 m (2,297 ft).

Stockton Formation (Upper Triassic) at surface, covers 1 % of this area

(Kmmel, 1897) - Light-gray, light-grayishbrown, yellowish- to pinkish-gray, or violet-gray to reddish-brown, medium- to coarse-grained arkosic sandstone and reddish- to purplish-brown mudstone, silty mudstone, argillaceous siltstone, and shale. Mudstone, siltstone and shale beds thicker and more numerous in central Newark basin west of Round Valley Reservoir. Sandstones mostly planar-bedded, with scoured bases containing pebble lags and mudstone rip-ups. Unit is coarser near Newark basin border fault, where poorly exposed, reddish-brown to pinkish-white, medium- to coarse-grained, feldspathic pebbly sandstone and conglomerate (Trss) and pebble to cobble quartzite conglomerate (Trscq). Maximum thickness of formation about 1,240 m (4,070 ft).

Lockatong Formation - Conglomerate facies (Upper Triassic) at surface, covers 1 % of this area

Unit Trla interfingers laterally and gradationally with quartz sandstone and conglomerate (Trls) and quartzite conglomerate (Trlcq) near Triassic border fault in southwestern area of map.

Passaic Formation gray bed (Lower Jurassic and Upper Triassic) at surface, covers 1 % of this area

Upper Triassic gray lake deposits (Trpg) consist of gray to black silty mudstone, gray and greenish- to purplish-gray argillaceous siltstone, black shale, and medium- to dark-gray, argillaceous, fine-grained sandstone and are abundant in the lower half of the Passaic Formation. Gray lakebeds occur in groups of two to five cycles although they also occur as single cycles in some parts of the formation. Several lakebed sequences consisting of one or two thick groups of drab-colored beds as much as 30 m (98 ft) thick or more can be traced over tens of kilometers. Many gray-bed sequences are locally correlated within fault blocks; some can be correlated across major faults or intrusive rock units. Thickness of the (entire Passaic) formation between Sourland Mountain and Sand Brook syncline is about 3,500 m (11,483 ft).

Biotite-Quartz-Feldspar Gneiss (Middle Proterozoic) at surface, covers 1 % of this area

Gray-weathering, locally rusty, gray to tan or greenish-gray, fine- to medium-coarse-grained, moderately layered and foliated gneiss that is variable in texture and composition. Composed of oligoclase, microcline microperthite, quartz, and biotite. Locally contains garnet, graphite, sillimanite, and opaque minerals.

Jutland Klippe Sequence Unit A (lower Middle Ordovician to Upper Cambrian) at surface, covers 1 % of this area

Jutland Klippe Sequence Unit A of Perissoratis and others (1979) - Interbedded red, green, and tan shale, sandstone, and dark-gray, aphanitic to fine-grained limestone, which contains floating quartz-sand grains. Grades downward through interbedded sequence of red, green and brown shale to medium-gray to brown, fine- to coarse-grained sandstone and quartz-pebble conglomerate. Lower beds are dark-gray shale and siltstone containing minor dark-gray, aphanitic to fine-grained, medium-bedded limestone. Lower contact is a fault. Contains graptolites in the span of Anisograptus to Isograptus caduceus of Berry (1968) (Perissoratis and others, 1979) and conodonts of the Cordylodus proavus to Paroistodus proteus faunas of the North Atlantic Realm. Thickness is unknown.

Stockton Formation Cobble Conglomerate and Sandstone facies (Upper Triassic) at surface, covers 1.0 % of this area

Unit is coarser near Newark basin border fault, where poorly exposed, reddish-brown to pinkish-white, medium- to coarse-grained, feldspathic pebbly sandstone and conglomerate (Trss) and pebble to cobble quartzite conglomerate (Trscq).

Lockatong Formation - Sandstone and Conglomerate facies (Upper Triassic) at surface, covers 0.9 % of this area

Unit Trla interfingers laterally and gradationally with quartz sandstone and conglomerate (Trls) and quartzite conglomerate (Trlcq) near Triassic border fault in southwestern area of map.

Leithsville Formation (Middle and Lower Cambrian) at surface, covers 0.9 % of this area

(Wherry, 1909) - Thin- to thick-bedded dolomite containing subordinate siliciclastic rocks. Upper part is medium- to medium-dark-gray, fine- to medium-grained, pitted, friable, mottled and massive dolomite. Middle part is medium-gray, stylolitic, fine-grained, thin- to medium-bedded dolomite that is interbedded with shaly dolomite and, less commonly, vari-colored quartz sandstone, siltstone, and shale. Lower part is medium-gray, medium-grained, medium-bedded dolomite containing quartz-sand grains in stringers and lenses near the contact with the Hardyston Quartzite. Archaeocyathids of Early Cambrian age suggest an intraformational disconformity separating rocks of Middle and Early Cambrian age (Palmer and Rozanov, 1976). Thickness approximately 305 m (1,000 ft).

Diabase (Early Jurassic) at surface, covers 0.9 % of this area

Fine-grained to aphanitic dikes; medium- to coarsegrained, subophitic discordant stock-like intrusions of dark-greenish-gray to black diabase; and plugs of dark gray, concordant to discordant sheetlike, medium- to coarse-grained, quartz-rich to albite-rich granophyre (map unit Jg). The chilled margins of diabase masses are aphanitic to very fine grained. Diabase is dense, hard, and sparsely fractured. It is composed mostly of plagioclase (An50-70), clinopyroxene (mostly augite) and magnetiteñilmenite. Accessory minerals include apatite, quartz, alkali feldspar, hornblende, titantite, and zirocon. Olivine is rare. Within about 200 m (655 ft) above and 150 m (490 ft) below the large diabase sheets, red mudstones are typically metamorphosed into indurated, bluish-gray hornfels commonly with clots or crystals of tourmaline or cordierite, whereas argillitic siltstone is metamorphosed into brittle, black, very fine grained hornfels, Sheetlike intrusions are as much as 360 to 400 m (1,180-1,310 ft) thick. Dikes range in thickness from 3 to 15 m (10-50 ft) and several kilometers (miles) long. Thickness of the stocklike bodies is unknown.

Hypersthene-Quartz-Oligoclase Gneiss (Middle Proterozoic) at surface, covers 0.9 % of this area

Gray- to tan-weathering, greenish-gray to greenish-brown, medium-grained, moderately well layered and foliated, greasy-lustered gneiss of charnockitic affinity composed of andesine or oligoclase, quartz, clinopyroxene, hornblende, hypersthene, and sparse amounts of biotite. Commonly interlayered with amphibolite and mafic-rich quartz-plagioclase gneiss.

Passaic Formation Limestone-clast Conglomerate facies (Lower Jurassic and Upper Triassic) at surface, covers 0.8 % of this area

Limestone conglomerate unit (JTrpcl) is medium-bedded to massive, pebble to boulder conglomerate. Clasts are subangular dolomitic limestone in matrix of brownish- to purplish-red sandstone to mudstone; matrix weathers light-gray to white near faults. Maximum thickness unknown.

Stockton Formation Cobble Conglomerate and Sandstone facies (Upper Triassic) at surface, covers 0.8 % of this area

Unit is coarser near Newark basin border fault, where poorly exposed, reddish-brown to pinkish-white, medium- to coarse-grained, feldspathic pebbly sandstone and conglomerate (Trss) and pebble to cobble quartzite conglomerate (Trscq).

Diorite (Middle Proterozoic) at surface, covers 0.8 % of this area

Gray- to tan-weathering, greenish-gray to brownish-gray, medium- to coarse-grained, greasy-lustered, massive diorite containing andesine or oligoclase, clinopyroxene, hornblende, hypersthene, and sparse amounts of biotite and magnetite. Amphibolite layers common.

Migmatite (Middle Proterozoic) at surface, covers 0.8 % of this area

Mixed rock consisting of amphibolite containing veins, lenses, layers, and irregular clots of albite-oligoclase granite or microperthite alaskite.

Beekmantown Group, Lower Part (Lower Ordovician) at surface, covers 0.7 % of this area

(Clarke and Schuchert, 1899) - Very thin to thick-bedded, interbedded dolomite and minor limestone. Upper beds are light-olive-gray to dark-gray, fine- to medium-grained, thin- to thick-bedded dolomite. Middle part is olivegray-, light-brown-, or dark-yellowish-orange- weathering, dark-gray, aphanitic to fine-grained, laminated to medium-bedded dolomite and light-gray to light-bluish-gray-weathering, medium-dark- to dark-gray, fine-grained, thin- to medium-bedded limestone, that is characterized by mottling with reticulate dolomite and light-olive-gray to grayish-orange, dolomitic shale laminae surrounding limestone lenses. Limestone grades laterally and down section into medium- gray, fine-grained dolomite. Lower beds consist of medium-light- to dark-gray, aphanitic to coarse-grained, laminated to medium-bedded, locally slightly fetid dolomite having thin black chert beds, quartz-sand laminae, and oolites. Lenses of light-gray, very coarse to coarse-grained dolomite and floating quartz sand grains and quartz-sand stringers at base of sequence. Lower contact placed at top of distinctive medium-gray quartzite. Contains conodonts of Cordylodus proavus to Rossodus manitouensis zones of North American Midcontinent province as used by Sweet and Bergstrom (1986). Unit Obl forms Stonehenge Formation of Drake and Lyttle (1985) and Drake and others (1985), upper and middle beds are included in Epler Formation, and lower beds are in Rickenbach Dolomite of Markewicz and Dalton (1977). Unit is about 183 m (600 ft) thick.

Pyroxene Gneiss (Middle Proterozoic) at surface, covers 0.6 % of this area

White- to tan-weathering, greenish-gray, fine- to medium-grained, well-layered gneiss containing oligoclase, clinopyroxene, variable amounts of quartz, and trace amounts of opaque minerals and titanite. Some phases contain scapolite and calcite. Commonly interlayered with pyroxene amphibolite or marble.

Pyroxene Alaskite (Middle Proterozoic) at surface, covers 0.6 % of this area

Light-gray- or tan-weathering, greenish-buff to light-pinkish-gray, medium- to coarse-grained, massive, moderately foliated granite composed of mesoperthite to microantiperthite, oligoclase, and quartz. Common accessory minerals are clinopyroxene, titanite and magnetite. Locally includes small bodies of amphibolite not shown on map.

Leithsville Formation (Middle and Lower Cambrian) at surface, covers 0.5 % of this area

(Wherry, 1909) - Light- to dark-gray and lightolive-gray, fine- to medium-grained, thin- to medium-bedded dolomite. Grades downward through medium-gray, grayish-yellow, or pinkish-gray dolomite and dolomitic sandstone, siltstone and shale to medium-gray, medium-grained, medium-bedded dolomite containing quartz sand grains as stringers and lenses near the base. Lower contact gradational. Thickness ranges from 0 to 56 m (0-185 ft) due to erosion.

Jutland Klippe Sequence Unit B (Middle Ordovician) at surface, covers 0.4 % of this area

Jutland Klippe Sequence Unit B of Perissoratis and others (1979) - Heterogeneous sequence of interbedded red, green, tan and gray shale; interlaminated dolomite and shale; interbedded fine-grained graywacke siltstone and beds or lenses of sandstone; light-gray to pale-pinkish-gray quartzite; and interbedded fine-grained, thin-bedded limestone and red and green shale. Limestone locally resembles an intraformational conglomerate because it is disrupted, boudinaged, and surrounded by shale beds. Lower contact gradational and within interbedded sequence of thin- to medium-bedded sandstone, siltstone, and limestone. Perissoratis and others (1979) placed this contact at boundary between graptolite faunas Isograptus caduceus and Paraglossograptus etheridgei of Berry (1968). The youngest graptolites occur within Climacograptus bicornis zone of Berry (1968). Some shale beds contain conodonts (Ethington and others, 1958; Karklins and Repetski, 1989) and brachiopod fragments. Carbonate and pelitic rocks locally contain conodonts of Prioniodus triangularis to Pygodus anserinus faunas of North Atlantic Realm. Thickness varies due to structural complexity, but may be about 460 to 550 m (1,500-1,800 ft).

Lockatong Formation red bed (Upper Triassic) at surface, covers 0.4 % of this area

Cyclically-deposited sequences consisting of light- to dark-gray, greenish-gray, and black, dolomitic or analcime-bearing silty argillite, laminated mudstone, silty to calcareous, argillaceous, very-fine-grained pyritic sandstone and siltstone, and minor silty limestone (Trl). Grayish-red, grayish-purple, and dark-brownish-red sequences (Trlr) common in upper half.

Microantiperthite Alaskite (Middle Proterozoic) at surface, covers 0.3 % of this area

White-weathering, locally rusty, light-greenish-gray medium- to coarse-grained, gneissic granite and alaskite containing microantiperthite, quartz, oligoclase, and sparse amounts of hornblende, clinopyroxene, biotite, and magnetite.

Pyroxene Syenite (Middle Proterozoic) at surface, covers 0.3 % of this area

Gray- to buff- or tan-weathering, greenish-gray, medium- to coarse-grained, massive, indistinctly foliated syenite composed of mesoperthite to microantiperthite, oligoclase and clinopyroxene. Contains sparse amounts of quartz, titanite, magnetite, and trace amounts of pyrite.

Hardyston Quartzite (Lower Cambrian) at surface, covers 0.3 % of this area

(Wolff and Brooks, 1898) - Medium- to light-gray, fine- to coarse-grained, medium- to thick-bedded quartzite, arkosic sandstone and dolomitic sandstone. Basal pebble to cobble conglomerate typically contains clasts of local basement affinities. Contains fragments of the trilobite Olenellus thompsoni of Early Cambrian age. Thickness approximately 0.5 to 62 m (1.6-200 ft).

Biotite-quartz-oligoclase gneiss (Middle Proterozoic) at surface, covers 0.2 % of this area

White- to light-gray-weathering, light- to medium-gray or greenish-gray, fine- to coarse-grained, massive to moderately well layered, foliated gneiss composed of oligoclase or andesine, quartz, biotite, and, locally, garnet. Commonly interlayered with amphibolite.

Albite-Oligoclase Granite (Middle Proterozoic) at surface, covers 0.2 % of this area

White-weathering, light-greenish-gray, medium- to coarse-grained granite composed of albite or oligoclase, quartz, and sparse amounts of hornblende or clinopyroxene. Petrogenetically related to quartz-oligoclase gneiss (Ylo) but Yla has a more granulitic texture. Includes small bodies of pegmatite not shown on map.

Potassic Feldspar Gneiss (Middle Proterozoic) at surface, covers 0.2 % of this area

Light-gray- to pinkish-buff-weathering, pinkish-white to light-pinkish-gray, fine- to medium-grained, moderately foliated gneiss and lesser amounts of granofels composed of quartz, microcline, microcline microperthite and local accessory amounts of biotite, garnet, sillimanite, and opaque minerals.

Feltville Formation (Lower Jurassic) at surface, covers 0.2 % of this area

(Olsen, 1980) - Interbedded brownish-red to light-grayish-red, fine- to coarse-grained sandstone, gray and black, coarse siltstone in upward-fining cycles, and silty mudstone. Fine-grained sandstone and siltstone are moderately well sorted, commonly cross-laminated, and have 15 percent or more feldspar; interbedded with brownish-red, indistinctly laminated, bioturbated calcareous mudstone. Thermally metamorphosed into hornfels where in contact with Preakness Basalt. Near the base are two thin, laterally continuous beds of black, carbonaceous limestone and gray, calcareous siltstone, each up to 3 m (10 ft) thick. These contain abundant fish, reptile, anthropod, and diagnostic plant fossils. Three or four, thin, gray to black siltstone and mudstone sequences occur in upper part of unit. Near Oakland, subrounded pebbles to cobbles of quartzite and quartz in a red siltstone and sandstone matrix (Jfc) interfinger with sandstone and siltstone of the Feltville Formation. Maximum thickness about 155 m (510 ft).

Beekmantown Group, Upper Part (Lower Ordovician) at surface, covers 0.2 % of this area

(Clarke and Schuchert, 1899) - Locally preserved upper beds are light- to medium-gray- to yellowish-gray-weathering, medium-light- to medium-gray, aphanitic to medium-grained, thin- to thick-bedded, locally laminated, slightly fetid dolomite. Medium-dark to dark-gray, fine-grained, medium-bedded, sparsely fossiliferous limestone lenses occur locally. Lower beds are medium-dark- to dark-gray, medium- to coarse-grained, mottled surface weathering, medium- to thick-bedded, strongly fetid dolomite that contains pods and lenses of dark-gray to black chert. Cauliflower-textured black chert beds of variable thickness occur locally. Gradational lower contact is placed at top of laminated to thin-bedded dolomite of the lower part (Obl) of the Beekmantown Group. Contains conodonts high in the Rossodus manitouensis zone to low zone D of the North American midcontinent province as used by Sweet and Bergstrom (1986). Upper beds are included in Epler Formation; lower beds are included in Rickenbach Dolomite of Drake and Lyttle (1985) and Drake and others (1985); entire upper part (Obu) is Ontelaunee Formation of Markewicz and Dalton (1977). Thickness ranges from 0 to 244 m (0-800 ft).

Granophyre (Early Jurassic) at surface, covers 0.1 % of this area

Fine-grained to aphanitic dikes; medium- to coarsegrained, subophitic discordant stock-like intrusions of dark-greenish-gray to black diabase; and plugs of dark gray, concordant to discordant sheetlike, medium- to coarse-grained, quartz-rich to albite-rich granophyre (map unit Jg). The chilled margins of diabase masses are aphanitic to very fine grained. Diabase is dense, hard, and sparsely fractured. It is composed mostly of plagioclase (An50-70), clinopyroxene (mostly augite) and magnetiteñilmenite. Accessory minerals include apatite, quartz, alkali feldspar, hornblende, titantite, and zirocon. Olivine is rare. Within about 200 m (655 ft) above and 150 m (490 ft) below the large diabase sheets, red mudstones are typically metamorphosed into indurated, bluish-gray hornfels commonly with clots or crystals of tourmaline or cordierite, whereas argillitic siltstone is metamorphosed into brittle, black, very fine grained hornfels, Sheetlike intrusions are as much as 360 to 400 m (1,180-1,310 ft) thick. Dikes range in thickness from 3 to 15 m (10-50 ft) and several kilometers (miles) long. Thickness of the stocklike bodies is unknown.

Clinopyroxene-Quartz-Feldspar Gneiss (Middle Proterozoic) at surface, covers 0.1 % of this area

Pinkish-gray- or pinkish-buff-weathering, white to pale-pinkish-white or light-gray, fine- to medium-grained, massive to moderately well-layered gneiss composed of microcline, quartz, oligoclase, clinopyroxene, and trace amounts of epidote, biotite, titanite, and opaque minerals. Commonly interlayered with amphibolite or pyroxene amphibolite.

Feltville Formation (Lower Jurassic) at surface, covers 0.1 % of this area

Mostly fine-grained, feldspathic sandstone, coarse siltstone, and silty mudstone, brownish-red to light-grayish-red. Fine-grained sandstone is moderately well sorted, cross laminated, and contains 15 percent or more feldspar; interbedded with mudstone, indistinctly laminated, bioturbated, and calcareous in places. A thin bed (0-2 m (0-7 ft) thick) of black, microlaminated carbonaceous limestone and gray calcareous mudstone occurs near the base and contains fish and plant fossils, and thermally mature hydrocarbons. Thickness of unit in the Sand Brook syncline is about 155 m (509 ft).

Orange Mountain Basalt (Lower Jurassic) at surface, covers 0.1 % of this area

(Olsen, 1980) - Dark-greenish-gray to greenish-black basalt composed mostly of calcic plagioclase (typically An65) and clinopyroxene (augite and pigeonite); crystals are generally less than 1 mm (0.04 in) long. Consists of three major flows. The flows are separated in places by a weathered zone or by a thin, up to 3-m- (10-ft-) thick bed of red siltstone (not shown on map) or volcaniclastic rock. Lowest flow is generally massive and has widely spaced curvilinear joints; columnar joints in lowest flow become more common toward the northeast. Middle flow is massive or has columnar jointing. Lower part of the uppermost flow has pillow structures; upper part has pahoehoe flow structures. Tops and bottoms of flow layers are vesicular. Maximum thickness is about 182 m (597 ft).

Orange Mountain Basalt (Lower Jurassic) at surface, covers 0.1 % of this area

Basalt, fine-grained to aphanitic, dark-greenish-gray, composed mostly of calcic plagioclase and augite; crystals smaller than 1 mm (0.04 in). Unit consists of three major tholeiitic lava-flow sequences, each about 80 m (262 ft) thick. Lowest flow is generally massive with widely spaced curvilinear joints; middle flow is massive or has columnar joints; lower part of uppermost flow has pillow structures and upper part has pahoehoe flow structures. Thickness in map area is about 160 m (525 ft).

Trenton Gravel (Quaternary) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Gray or pale-reddish-brown, very gravelly sand interstratified with crossbedded sand and clay-silt beds; includes areas of Holocene alluvium and swamp deposits.

Biotite Granite (Middle Proterozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Pink- to buff-weathering, light-pinkish-gray, medium-grained, massive, moderately foliated granite composed of microcline microperthite, quartz, oligoclase, and biotite.

Jutland Klippe Sequence, undifferentiated (Middle Ordovician to Upper Cambrian?) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Rocks of the Jutland klippe sequence occur in six isolated fragments of the Jutland klippe east of Jutland and two fragments of the Peapack klippe along the Peapack-Ralston fault in the New Jersey Highlands hinterland. The sequence is largely varicolored shale and sandstone, but contains lesser amounts of limestone, dolomite and pebble conglomerate. Lash and Drake (1984) correlate this sequence with the accretionary prism deposits of the Greenwich slice of the Hamburg klippe in eastern Pennsylvania. Rocks of the Jutland klippe sequence were folded and thrust over rocks of the Kittatinny Valley sequence during the Taconic orogeny and then were deformed during the Alleghanian orogeny and again during Mesozoic rifting of eastern North America.

Stockton Formation Cobble Conglomerate and Sandstone facies (Upper Triassic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Predominantly medium- to coarse-grained, light-gray, light-grayish-brown, or yellowish- to pinkish-gray arkosic sandstone and medium- to fine-grained, violet-gray to reddish-brown arkosic sandstone; with lesser, reddish to purplish-brown, silty mudstone, argillaceous siltstone, and shale. Some coarse-grained sandstone in lower part contains thick beds of conglomerate (Trsc) which have been mapped in the vicinity of Stockton. Sandstone, deposited in high-gradient stream channels, is mostly planar bedded with scoured bases containing pebble lags and mudstone rip-up clasts. Upper part of channel beds are burrowed. Large-scale trough crossbeds occur in some very coarse grained sandstone beds; smaller scale trough and climbing-ripple cross lamination occur in the upper part of channel sequences and in finer grained sandstone beds. Typical floodplain mudstones are irregularly thin bedded and extensively burrowed. Floodplain beds are thicker and more numerous in the central Newark basin, near the Delaware River. Thickness of the unit (including Trsc) near Stockton is about 1,240 m (4,068 ft).

Jacksonburg Limestone (Middle Ordovician) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

(Kmmel, 1908; Miller, 1937) - Upper part is medium- to dark-gray, laminated to thin-bedded shaly limestone and less abundant medium-gray arenaceous limestone containing quartz-sand lenses. Upper part thin to absent to northeast. Lower part is interbedded medium- to dark-gray, fine- to medium-grained, very thin to medium-bedded fossiliferous limestone and minor medium- to thick-bedded dolomite-cobble conglomerate having a limestone matrix. Unconformable on Beekmantown Group and conformable on the discontinuous sequence at Wantage in the Paulins Kill area. Contains conodonts of North American midcontinent province from Phragmodus undatus to Aphelognathus shatzeri zones of Sweet and Bergstrom (1986). Thickness ranges from 41 to 244m (135-800 ft).

Hardyston Quartzite (Lower Cambrian) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

(Wolff and Brooks, 1898) - Light- to medium-gray and bluish-gray conglomeratic sandstone. Varies from pebble conglomerate, to fine-grained, well-cemented quartzite, to arkosic or dolomitic sandstone. Conglomerate contains subangular to subrounded white quartz pebbles up to 2.5 cm (1 in.). Lower contact unconformable. About 0 to 9 m (1-30 ft) thick.

Bushkill Member (Middle Ordovician) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

(Drake and Epstein, 1967) - Interbedded medium- to dark gray, thinly laminated to thick-bedded shale and slate and less abundant medium-gray to brownish-gray, laminated to thin-bedded siltstone. To the southwest, fine-grained, thin dolomite lenses occur near base. Complete turbidite sequences (Bouma, 1962) occur locally, but basal cutout sequences (Tbcde, Tcde or Tde) dominate. Conformable lower contact is placed at top of highest shaly limestone; elsewhere, lower contact is commonly strain slipped. Correlates with graptolite Climacograptus bicornis to Corynoides americanus zones of Riva (1969, 1974) (Parris and Cruikshank, 1992). Thickness ranges from 1,250 m (4,100 ft) in Delaware River Valley to 457 m (1,500 ft) at New York State line.

Preakness Basalt (Lower Jurassic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Basalt, coarse-crystalline, very dark greenish gray to black. Texture is subophitic; plagioclase and augite crystals are nearly equal in size; no fine-grained groundmass. Plagioclase (An55-60) is subhedral, mostly 0.2 to 0.3 mm (0.008-0.012 in) long, with a few crystals up to 2 mm (0.08 in) long. Clinopyroxene and orthopyroxene grains are equant, mostly anhedral, 0.3 mm (0.012 in) average diameter. Iron-titanium oxides are mostly interstitial, 0.2 to 0.5 mm (0.008-0.02 in) in diameter. Thickness of unit is unknown in Sand Brook syncline.

Preakness Basalt (Lower Jurassic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

(Olsen, 1980) - Dark-greenish-gray to black, very-fine-grained, dense, hard basalt composed mostly of intergrown calcic plagioclase (An55-60) and clinopyroxene (pigeonite and augite). Crystals are generally less than 1 mm (0.04 in) long, but locally feldspar crystals are larger than 1.3 cm (0.5 in.). Small spherical to tubular cavities (gas-escape vesicles) may be filled by zeolite minerals or calcite. Consists of at least three major flows. Prominent amydaloidal zones occur at most contacts between flows. A thin, 2 to 8 m (6.6-26 ft) bed of siltstone (Jps) separates the lower flows. The basal 20 m (66 ft) of the lowest flow is commonly highly vesicular or brecciated. Radiating slender columns 20 to 71 cm (8-28 in) wide, caused by shrinkage while cooling, are most abundant in the highest flow. The small, circiular extrusive body forming Round Top west of Oldwick is identified as Preakness Basalt by geochemistry and position above the Orange Mountain Basalt (Houghton and others, 1992). Thickness ranges from 250 m (820ft) (Olsen and others, 1989) to 320 m (1,050 ft).

Epidote Gneiss (Middle Proterozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Light-gray- to pinkish-white-weathering, light-grayish-pink to pinkish-white, medium-grained, moderately layered and foliated gneiss containing quartz, microcline, and epidote. Some phases contain scapolite. May be interlayered with and related to potassium-feldspar gneiss (Yk), and (or) clinopyroxene-quartz-feldspar gneiss (Ymp). Two elongate bodies mapped east of Franklin.

Wantage Sequence (Middle Ordovician) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

(Monteverde and Herman, 1989) - Restricted, discontinuous sequence of interbedded limestone, dolomite, conglomerate, siltstone, and shale. Upper part is medium-yellowish-brown- to olive-gray-weathering, medium- to dark-gray, very fine to fine-grained, laminated to massive limestone and dolomite that grade down into underlying clastic rocks of lower part. Upper part locally absent. Lower part ranges from grayish-red, medium-gray, pale-brown, and greenish-gray to pale-green mudstone and siltstone containing disseminated subangular to subrounded chert-gravel, quartz-sand lenses, and chert-pebble conglomerate. Lower contact unconformable. Thickness ranges from 0 to 46 m (0-150 ft).

Chestnut Hill Formation (Late Proterozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

(Drake, 1984) - Interbedded arkose, ferruginous quartzite, quartzite conglomerate, metarhyolite, and metasaprolite. Confined to a few small areas north and east of Phillipsburg, on the western side of Bowling Green Mountain, northwest of High Bridge, and a few areas too small to show at this map scale.

Hornblende-Quartz-Feldspar Gneiss (Middle Proterozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Pinkish-gray- to buff-weathering, light- pinkish-white to pinkish-gray, fine- to medium-grained, massive to moderately well layered gneiss containing microcline, quartz, oligoclase, hornblende, and magnetite. Locally contains garnet and biotite.