Geologic units in Somerset county, New Jersey

Passaic Formation (Lower Jurassic and Upper Triassic) at surface, covers 50 % of this area

(Olsen, 1980) - Reddish-brown to brownish-purple and grayish-red siltstone and shale (JTrp) maximum thickness 3,600 m (11,810 ft). At places contains mapped sandy mudstone (JTrpms), sandstone (JTrps), conglomeratic sandstone (JTrpsc) and conglomerate containing clasts of quartzite (JTrpcq), or limestone (JTrpcl). Formation coarsens up section and to the southwest. Quartzite conglomerate unit (JTrpcq) is reddish-brown pebble conglomerate, pebbly sandstone, and sandstone, in upward-fining sequences 1 to 2 m (3-6 ft) thick. Clasts are subangular to subrounded, quartz and quartzite in sandstone matrix. Sandstone is medium to coarse grained, feldspathic (up to 20 percent feldspar), and locally contains pebble and cobble layers. Conglomerate thickness exceeds 850 m (2,790 ft). Limestone conglomerate unit (JTrpcl) is medium-bedded to massive, pebble to boulder conglomerate. Clasts are subangular dolomitic limestone in matrix of brownish- to purplish-red sandstone to mudstone; matrix weathers light-gray to white near faults. Maximum thickness unknown. Conglomeratic sandstone (JTrpsc) is brownish-red pebble conglomerate, medium- to coarse-grained, feldspathic sandstone and micaceous siltstone; unit is planar to low-angle trough cross laminated, burrowed, and contains local pebble layers. Unit forms upward-fining sequences 0.5 to 2.5 m (1.6-8 ft) thick. Conglomeratic sandstone thickness exceeds 800 m (2,625 ft). Sandstone (JTrps) is interbedded grayish-red to brownish-red, medium- to fine-grained, medium- to thick-bedded sandstone and brownish-to purplish-red coarse-grained siltstone; unit is planar to ripple cross-laminated, fissile, locally calcareous, containing desiccation cracks and root casts. Upward-fining cycles are 1.8 to 4.6 m (6-15 ft) thick. Sandstone beds are coarser and thicker near conglomerate units (JTrpcq, JTrpcl). Maximum thickness about 1,100 m (3,610 ft). Sandy mudstone (JTrpms) is reddish-brown to brownish-red, massive, silty to sandy mudstone and siltstone, which are bioturbated, ripple cross-laminated and interbedded with lenticular sandstone. To southwest where similar lithologic units also occur, they have not been mapped separately, but have been included in undivided unit JTrp. Rhythmic cycles 2 to 7 m (7-23 ft) of thick gray-bed sequences (Trpg), termed Van Houten cycles by Olsen (1985), contain basal thin-bedded to finely laminated shale to siltstone, which grade upward through laminated to microlaminated, locally calcareous mudstone to siltstone and finally into massive silty mudstone. Lowest part of cycle has some desiccation features and local fossils; middle part has highest organic content and the most fossils; highest part contains mudcracks, burrows, and root casts. Gray-bed cycles are abundant in lower half of Passaic Formation and less common in upper half. Rocks of the Passaic Formation have been locally thermally metamorphosed to hornfels where in contact with the Orange Mountain Basalt, diabase dikes, and sheetlike intrusions. Total thickness of formation ranges from 3500 to 3600 m (11480-11810 ft).

Passaic Formation (Lower Jurassic and Upper Triassic) at surface, covers 12 % of this area

Predominantly red beds consisting of argillaceous siltstone; silty mudstone; argillaceous, very fine grained sandstone; and shale; mostly reddish-brown to brownish-purple, and grayish-red. Red beds occur typically in 3- to 7-m (10- to 23-ft-)-thick, cyclic playa-lake-mudflat sequences and fining-upward fluvial sequences. Lamination is commonly indistinct due to burrowing, desiccation, and paleosol formation. Where layering is preserved, most bedforms are wavy parallel lamination and trough and climbing-ripple cross lamination. Calcite- or dolomite-filled vugs and flattened cavities, mostly 0.5 to 0.2 mm (0.02-0.08 in) across, occur mostly in the lower half. Sand-filled burrows, 2 to 5 mm (0.08-0.2 in) in diameter, are prevalent in the upper two-thirds of the unit. Desiccation cracks, intraformational breccias, and curled silt laminae are abundant in the lower half. Lake cycles, mostly 2 to 5 m (7-16 ft) thick, have a basal, greenish-gray, argillaceous siltstone; a medial, dark-gray to black, pyritic, carbonaceous, fossiliferous, and, in places, calcareous lake-bottom fissile mudstone or siltstone; and an upper thick-bedded, gray to reddish and purplish-gray argillaceous siltstone with desiccation cracks, intraformational breccias, burrows, and mineralized vugs. Thickness of the formation between Sourland Mountain and Sand Brook syncline is about 3,500 m (11,483 ft).

Preakness Basalt (Lower Jurassic) at surface, covers 8 % of this area

(Olsen, 1980) - Dark-greenish-gray to black, very-fine-grained, dense, hard basalt composed mostly of intergrown calcic plagioclase (An55-60) and clinopyroxene (pigeonite and augite). Crystals are generally less than 1 mm (0.04 in) long, but locally feldspar crystals are larger than 1.3 cm (0.5 in.). Small spherical to tubular cavities (gas-escape vesicles) may be filled by zeolite minerals or calcite. Consists of at least three major flows. Prominent amydaloidal zones occur at most contacts between flows. A thin, 2 to 8 m (6.6-26 ft) bed of siltstone (Jps) separates the lower flows. The basal 20 m (66 ft) of the lowest flow is commonly highly vesicular or brecciated. Radiating slender columns 20 to 71 cm (8-28 in) wide, caused by shrinkage while cooling, are most abundant in the highest flow. The small, circiular extrusive body forming Round Top west of Oldwick is identified as Preakness Basalt by geochemistry and position above the Orange Mountain Basalt (Houghton and others, 1992). Thickness ranges from 250 m (820ft) (Olsen and others, 1989) to 320 m (1,050 ft).

Orange Mountain Basalt (Lower Jurassic) at surface, covers 4 % of this area

(Olsen, 1980) - Dark-greenish-gray to greenish-black basalt composed mostly of calcic plagioclase (typically An65) and clinopyroxene (augite and pigeonite); crystals are generally less than 1 mm (0.04 in) long. Consists of three major flows. The flows are separated in places by a weathered zone or by a thin, up to 3-m- (10-ft-) thick bed of red siltstone (not shown on map) or volcaniclastic rock. Lowest flow is generally massive and has widely spaced curvilinear joints; columnar joints in lowest flow become more common toward the northeast. Middle flow is massive or has columnar jointing. Lower part of the uppermost flow has pillow structures; upper part has pahoehoe flow structures. Tops and bottoms of flow layers are vesicular. Maximum thickness is about 182 m (597 ft).

Towaco Formation (Lower Jurassic) at surface, covers 4 % of this area

(Olsen, 1980) - Reddish-brown to brownish-purple, fine- to medium-grained micaceous sandstone, siltstone, and silty mudstone in upward-fining sequences 1 to 3 m (3-10 ft) thick. Distributed throughout formation are eight or more sequences of gray to greenish- or brownish-gray, fine-grained sandstone, siltstone and calcareous siltstone and black, microlaminated calcareous siltstone and mudstone containing diagnostic pollen, fish and dinosaur tracks. Sandstone is commonly trough cross laminated; siltstone is commonly planar laminated or bioturbated, but can be indistinctly laminated to massive. Thermally metamorphosed into hornfels where in contact with Hook Mountain Basalt. Conglomerate and conglomeratic sandstone with subrounded quartzite and quartz clasts in matrix of light-red sand to brownish-red silt (Jtc) interfingers with rocks of the Towaco Formation north and west of New Vernon. Maximum thickness is about 380 m (1,250 ft).

Hornblende Granite (Middle Proterozoic) at surface, covers 4 % of this area

Pinkish-gray- to medium-buff-weathering, pinkish-white or light-pinkish-gray, medium- to coarse-grained, gneissoid to indistinctly foliated granite and sparse granite gneiss composed principally of microcline microperthite, quartz, oligoclase, and hornblende. Some phases are quartz syenite or quartz monzonite. Includes small bodies of pegmatite and amphibolite not shown on map. U-Pb age approximately 1,090 Ma (Drake and others, 1991b).

Feltville Formation (Lower Jurassic) at surface, covers 3 % of this area

(Olsen, 1980) - Interbedded brownish-red to light-grayish-red, fine- to coarse-grained sandstone, gray and black, coarse siltstone in upward-fining cycles, and silty mudstone. Fine-grained sandstone and siltstone are moderately well sorted, commonly cross-laminated, and have 15 percent or more feldspar; interbedded with brownish-red, indistinctly laminated, bioturbated calcareous mudstone. Thermally metamorphosed into hornfels where in contact with Preakness Basalt. Near the base are two thin, laterally continuous beds of black, carbonaceous limestone and gray, calcareous siltstone, each up to 3 m (10 ft) thick. These contain abundant fish, reptile, anthropod, and diagnostic plant fossils. Three or four, thin, gray to black siltstone and mudstone sequences occur in upper part of unit. Near Oakland, subrounded pebbles to cobbles of quartzite and quartz in a red siltstone and sandstone matrix (Jfc) interfinger with sandstone and siltstone of the Feltville Formation. Maximum thickness about 155 m (510 ft).

Passaic Formation Conglomerate and Sandstone facies (Lower Jurassic and Upper Triassic) at surface, covers 2 % of this area

Conglomeratic sandstone (JTrpsc) is brownish-red pebble conglomerate, medium- to coarse-grained, feldspathic sandstone and micaceous siltstone; unit is planar to low-angle trough cross laminated, burrowed, and contains local pebble layers. Unit forms upward-fining sequences 0.5 to 2.5 m (1.6-8 ft) thick. Conglomeratic sandstone thickness exceeds 800 m (2,625 ft).

Diabase (Jurassic) at surface, covers 2 % of this area

Concordant to discordant, predominantly sheet-like intrusions of medium- to fine-grained diabase and dikes of fine-grained diabase; dark-greenish-gray to black; subophitic texture. Dense, hard, sparsely fractured rock composed mostly of plagioclase (An50-70), clinopyroxene (mostly augite), and magnetite-ilmenite. Orthopyroxene (En75-80) is locally abundant in the lower part of the sheets. Accessory minerals include apatite, quartz, alkali feldspar, hornblende, sphene, zircon, and rare olivine. Diabase in the map area was derived primarily from high-titanium, quartz-tholeiite magma. Sedimentary rocks within about 300 m (984 ft) above and 200 m (656 ft) below major diabase sheets are thermally metamorphosed. Red mudstone is typically altered to indurated, bluish-gray hornfels with clots or crystals of tourmaline or cordierite. Gray argillitic siltstone is typically altered to brittle, black, very fine grained hornfels. Sills are 365 to 400 m (1,197-1,312 ft) thick. Dikes range in thickness from 3 to 10 m (10-33 ft) and are many kilometers long.

Passaic Formation gray bed (Lower Jurassic and Upper Triassic) at surface, covers 2 % of this area

Upper Triassic gray lake deposits (Trpg) consist of gray to black silty mudstone, gray and greenish- to purplish-gray argillaceous siltstone, black shale, and medium- to dark-gray, argillaceous, fine-grained sandstone and are abundant in the lower half of the Passaic Formation. Gray lakebeds occur in groups of two to five cycles although they also occur as single cycles in some parts of the formation. Several lakebed sequences consisting of one or two thick groups of drab-colored beds as much as 30 m (98 ft) thick or more can be traced over tens of kilometers. Many gray-bed sequences are locally correlated within fault blocks; some can be correlated across major faults or intrusive rock units. Thickness of the (entire Passaic) formation between Sourland Mountain and Sand Brook syncline is about 3,500 m (11,483 ft).

Lockatong Formation (Upper Triassic) at surface, covers 2 % of this area

Predominantly cyclic lacustrine sequences of silty, dolomitic or analcime-bearing argillite; laminated mudstone; silty to calcareous, argillaceous very fine grained sandstone and pyritic siltstone; and minor silty limestone, mostly light- to dark-gray, greenishgray, and black. Grayish-red, grayish-purple, and dark-brownish-red sequences (Trlr) occur in some places, especially in upper half. Two types of cycles are recognized: freshwater-lake (detrital) and alkaline-lake (chemical) cycles. Freshwater-lake cycles average 5.2 m (17 ft) thick. They consist of basal, transgressive, fluvial to lake-margin deposits that are argillaceous, very fine grained sandstone to coarse siltstone with indistinct lamination, planar or cross lamination, or are disrupted by convolute bedding, desiccation cracks, root casts, soil-ped casts, and tubes. Medial lake-bottom deposits are laminated siltstones, silty mudstones, or silty limestones that are dark gray to black with calcite laminae and grains and lenses, or streaks of pyrite; fossils are common, including fish scales and articulated fish, conchostracans, plants, spores, and pollen. Upper regressive lake margin, playa lake, and mudflat deposits are light- to dark-gray silty mudstone to argillitic siltstone or very fine grained sandstone, mostly thick bedded to massive, with desiccation cracks, intraformational breccias, faint wavy laminations, burrows, euhedral pyrite grains, and dolomite or calcite specks. Alkaline-lake cycles are similar to freshwater-lake cycles, but are thinner, averaging 3 m (10 ft), have fewer fossils (mainly conchostracans), and commonly have red beds, extensive desiccation features, and abundant analcime and dolomite specks in the upper parts of cycles. Thickness near Byram is about 1,070 m (3,510 ft). The formation thins to the southeast and northeast; thickness near Princeton is less than 700 m (2,297 ft).

Boonton Formation (Lower Jurassic) at surface, covers 1 % of this area

(Olsen, 1980) - Reddish-brown to brownish-purple, fine-grained sandstone, siltstone, and mudstone; sandstone commonly micaceous, interbedded with siltstone and mudstone in fining-upward sequences mostly 1.5 to 4 m (5-13 ft) thick. Red, gray and brownish-purple siltstone and black, blocky, partly dolomitic siltstone and shale common in lower part. Irregular mudcracks, symmetrical ripple marks, and burrows, as well as gypsum, glauberite, and halite pseudomorphs are abundant in red mudstone and siltstone. Gray, fine-grained sandstone may have carbonized plant remains and reptile footprints in middle and upper parts of unit. Near Morristown, beds of quartz-pebble conglomerate (unit Jbcq) as much as 0.5 m (1.6 ft) thick interfinger with beds of sandstone, siltstone, and shale. Northeast of Boonton, beds of quartz-pebble conglomerate (not mapped separately as Jbcq) occur locally with conglomerate containing abundant clasts of gneiss and granite in matrix of reddish-brown sandstone and siltstone. Maximum thickness is about 500 m (1,640 ft).

Passaic Formation Mudstone facies (Lower Jurassic and Upper Triassic) at surface, covers 1 % of this area

Sandy mudstone (JTrpms) is reddish-brown to brownish-red, massive, silty to sandy mudstone and siltstone, which are bioturbated, ripple cross-laminated and interbedded with lenticular sandstone. To southwest where similar lithologic units also occur, they have not been mapped separately, but have been included in undivided unit JTrp.

Passaic Formation Quatzite-clast Conglomerate facies (Lower Jurassic and Upper Triassic) at surface, covers 0.9 % of this area

Quartzite conglomerate unit (JTrpcq) is reddish-brown pebble conglomerate, pebbly sandstone, and sandstone, in upward-fining sequences 1 to 2 m (3-6 ft) thick. Clasts are subangular to subrounded, quartz and quartzite in sandstone matrix. Sandstone is medium to coarse grained, feldspathic (up to 20 percent feldspar), and locally contains pebble and cobble layers. Conglomerate thickness exceeds 850 m (2,790 ft).

Hook Mt. Basalt (Lower Jurassic) at surface, covers 0.9 % of this area

(Olsen, 1980) - Light- to dark-greenish-gray, medium- to coarse-grained, amygdaloidal basalt composed of plagioclase (typically An65 and commonly porphyritic), clinopyroxene (augite and pigeonite), and iron-titanium oxides such as magnetite and ilmenite. Locally contains small spherical to tubular cavities (gas-escape vesicles), some filled by zeolite minerals or calcite. Consists of two major flows. Base of lowest flow is intensely vesicular. Tops of flows are weathered and vesicular. Maximum thickness is about 110 m (360 ft) (Olsen and others, 1989).

Quartz-Oligoclase Gneiss (Middle Proterozoic) at surface, covers 0.7 % of this area

White-weathering, light-greenish-gray, medium- to coarse-grained, moderately layered to indistinctly foliated gneiss and lesser amounts of granofels composed of quartz, oligoclase or andesine, and, locally, biotite, hornblende and (or) clinopyroxene. Contains thin amphibolite layers.

Passaic Formation gray bed (Lower Jurassic and Upper Triassic) at surface, covers 0.4 % of this area

Rhythmic cycles 2 to 7 m (7-23 ft) of thick gray-bed sequences (Trpg), termed Van Houten cycles by Olsen (1985), contain basal thin-bedded to finely laminated shale to siltstone, which grade upward through laminated to micro-laminated, locally calcareous mudstone to siltstone and finally into massive silty mudstone. Lowest part of cycle has some desiccation features and local fossils; middle part has highest organic content and the most fossils; highest part contains mudcracks, burrows, and root casts. Gray-bed cycles are abundant in lower half of Passaic Formation and less common in upper half.

Leithsville Formation (Middle and Lower Cambrian) at surface, covers 0.3 % of this area

(Wherry, 1909) - Thin- to thick-bedded dolomite containing subordinate siliciclastic rocks. Upper part is medium- to medium-dark-gray, fine- to medium-grained, pitted, friable, mottled and massive dolomite. Middle part is medium-gray, stylolitic, fine-grained, thin- to medium-bedded dolomite that is interbedded with shaly dolomite and, less commonly, vari-colored quartz sandstone, siltstone, and shale. Lower part is medium-gray, medium-grained, medium-bedded dolomite containing quartz-sand grains in stringers and lenses near the contact with the Hardyston Quartzite. Archaeocyathids of Early Cambrian age suggest an intraformational disconformity separating rocks of Middle and Early Cambrian age (Palmer and Rozanov, 1976). Thickness approximately 305 m (1,000 ft).

Preakness Basalt (Lower Jurassic) at surface, covers 0.2 % of this area

A thin, 2 to 8 m (6.6-26 ft) bed of siltstone (Jps) separates the lower flows.

Stockton Formation (Upper Triassic) at surface, covers 0.2 % of this area

Predominantly medium- to coarse-grained, light-gray, light-grayish-brown, or yellowish- to pinkish-gray arkosic sandstone and medium- to fine-grained, violet-gray to reddish-brown arkosic sandstone; with lesser, reddish to purplish-brown, silty mudstone, argillaceous siltstone, and shale. Some coarse-grained sandstone in lower part contains thick beds of conglomerate (Trsc) which have been mapped in the vicinity of Stockton. Sandstone, deposited in high-gradient stream channels, is mostly planar bedded with scoured bases containing pebble lags and mudstone rip-up clasts. Upper part of channel beds are burrowed. Large-scale trough crossbeds occur in some very coarse grained sandstone beds; smaller scale trough and climbing-ripple cross lamination occur in the upper part of channel sequences and in finer grained sandstone beds. Typical floodplain mudstones are irregularly thin bedded and extensively burrowed. Floodplain beds are thicker and more numerous in the central Newark basin, near the Delaware River. Thickness of the unit (including Trsc) near Stockton is about 1,240 m (4,068 ft).

Hardyston Quartzite (Lower Cambrian) at surface, covers 0.2 % of this area

(Wolff and Brooks, 1898) - Medium- to light-gray, fine- to coarse-grained, medium- to thick-bedded quartzite, arkosic sandstone and dolomitic sandstone. Basal pebble to cobble conglomerate typically contains clasts of local basement affinities. Contains fragments of the trilobite Olenellus thompsoni of Early Cambrian age. Thickness approximately 0.5 to 62 m (1.6-200 ft).

Biotite-Quartz-Feldspar Gneiss (Middle Proterozoic) at surface, covers 0.1 % of this area

Gray-weathering, locally rusty, gray to tan or greenish-gray, fine- to medium-coarse-grained, moderately layered and foliated gneiss that is variable in texture and composition. Composed of oligoclase, microcline microperthite, quartz, and biotite. Locally contains garnet, graphite, sillimanite, and opaque minerals.

Hornblende-Quartz-Feldspar Gneiss (Middle Proterozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Pinkish-gray- to buff-weathering, light- pinkish-white to pinkish-gray, fine- to medium-grained, massive to moderately well layered gneiss containing microcline, quartz, oligoclase, hornblende, and magnetite. Locally contains garnet and biotite.

Passaic Formation Limestone-clast Conglomerate facies (Lower Jurassic and Upper Triassic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Limestone conglomerate unit (JTrpcl) is medium-bedded to massive, pebble to boulder conglomerate. Clasts are subangular dolomitic limestone in matrix of brownish- to purplish-red sandstone to mudstone; matrix weathers light-gray to white near faults. Maximum thickness unknown.

Amphibolite (Middle Proterozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Gray- to grayish-black, medium-grained amphibolite composed of hornblende and andesine. Some phases contain biotite and (or) clinopyroxene. Ubiquitous and associated with almost all other Middle Proterozoic units. Some amphibolite is clearly metavolcanic in origin, some is metasedimentary, and some appears to be metagabbro.

Allentown Dolomite (Lower Ordovician and Upper Cambrian) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

(Wherry, 1909) - Very thin to very thick bedded dolomite containing minor orthoquartzite and shale. Upper part is medium-light- to medium-dark-gray, fine- to medium-grained, locally coarse-grained, medium- to very thick bedded dolomite. Floating quartz sand grains and two sequences of medium-light- to very light gray, thin-bedded quartzite and discontinuous, dark-gray chert lenses occur directly below upper contact. Rhythmically bedded lower dolomite beds alternate between light and dark gray weathering, medium and very light gray, fine and medium grained, and thin and medium bedded, which are interbedded with shaly dolomite. Ripple marks, crossbeds, edgewise conglomerate, mud cracks, oolites, and algal stromatolites occur throughout unit, but more typically in lower part. Shaly dolomite increases downward toward lower conformable contact with the Leithsville Formation. Oldest beds contain trilobite fauna of early Late Cambrian age; younger beds contain latest Cambrian fauna (Howell, 1945; Howell and others, 1950). Thickness about 580 m (1,900 ft).

Pyroxene Gneiss (Middle Proterozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

White- to tan-weathering, greenish-gray, fine- to medium-grained, well-layered gneiss containing oligoclase, clinopyroxene, variable amounts of quartz, and trace amounts of opaque minerals and titanite. Some phases contain scapolite and calcite. Commonly interlayered with pyroxene amphibolite or marble.

Magothy Formation (Upper Cretaceous, middle and lower Santonian) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Sand, quartz, fine- to coarse-grained, locally gravelly (especially at the base), white; weathers yellow brown or orange brown, interbedded with thin-bedded clay or dark-gray clay-silt mainly at the top of the formation. Muscovite and feldspar are minor sand constituents. Large wood fragments occur in many clay layers. Clay weathers to gray brown or white. Formation characterized by local vertical and lateral facies changes. The Magothy is best exposed and thickest (about 80 m (262 ft)) in the Raritan Bay area. The outcrop belt is widest in the north and narrows to the southwest. The formation is about 25 m (82 ft) thick or less in the southern sheet. The formation is poorly exposed because of its sandy nature and its widespread cover by younger sediments. The old geologic map of New Jersey (Lewis and Kmmel, 1910-1912, revised 1950) showed the Magothy to consist of only one lithology (Cliffwood beds at Cliffwood Beach, Monmouth County). Subsequent pollen studies of the Magothy and the underlying Raritan Formation showed most of the Raritan to be the same age as the Magothy. Wolfe and Pakiser (1971) redefined and considerably expanded the Magothy. Kmmel and Knapp (1904) had already recognized that the Magothy, as used here, contained a large number of lithologies. At the time of their study, the Magothy was extensively mined for clay and sand and was well exposed. Their subdivisions had economic designations (for example, Amboy stoneware clay). Barksdale and others (1943) later gave geographic names to these subdivisions, discussed individually below. The lower contact of the Magothy in the Delaware River valley is difficult to place because the lower part of the Magothy is lithically similar to the underlying Potomac Formation. The contact is placed at the base of the lowest dark-gray clay in the Magothy. The best faunas from the Magothy were obtained from siderite concretions and slabs in and near Cliffwood Beach representing only the top of the formation. These faunas were discussed in detail by Weller (1904, 1907) and supplemented by Sohl (in Owens and others, 1977). The presence of Ostrea cretacea in the Cliffwood Beach fauna suggests that the upper part of the Magothy is late Santonian in age. Wolfe and Pakiser (1971) and Christopher (1979, 1982) discussed the microfloral assemblage in the Magothy. Christopher subdivided the Magothy into three zones: Complexipollis exigua-Santalacites minor (oldest), Pseudoplicapollis longiannulata-Plicapollis incisa (middle), and Pseudoplicapollis cuneata-Semioculopollis verrucosa (youngest). The oldest zone, originally considered to be as old as Turonian, was subsequently considered to be post-Coniacian Christopher, 1982). The middle and upper zones are also probably Santonian. Christopher (1979) followed the nomenclature for the subdivisions elaborated upon earlier. The Cliffwood and Morgan beds, and, presumably the upper thin-bedded sequence, would include the youngest pollen zone; the Amboy Stoneware Clay Member and perhaps the uppermost part of the Old Bridge Sand Member, the middle pollen zone; and the lower part of the Old Bridge Sand Member and South Amboy Fire Clay Member, the oldest pollen zone. The Magothy is considered herein to be of Santonian age. Cliffwood beds - Typically very sandy, horizontally bedded to crossbedded, mainly small-scale trough crossbeds. Thin layers of dark, fine, carbonaceous matter are interbedded with sand. Carbonaceous units are conspicuously micaceous; the sand is less so. Sand is typically fine to medium grained and locally burrowed. Burrows include the small-diameter Ophiomorpha nodosa and some that are not clay lined. Slabs of dark-reddish-brown siderite were common at the base of the bluff at Cliffwood Beach before the outcrop was covered. Some of these slabs had many fossil molds, typically a large number of pelecypods. Lower in the section, between high and low tide level, there is a pale-gray clay-silt about 1.5 m (5 ft) thick with many small reddish-brown siderite concretions. These concretions have many fossils that were described in detail by Weller (1904). The Cliffwood beds are about 7.5 m (25 ft) thick in outcrop. Equivalents of the Cliffwood beds are exposed near the Delaware River between Trenton and Florence, Burlington County. These beds are mainly sand, as are those at Cliffwood Beach, but they tend to have more crossbedding than the typical Cliffwood strata and no burrows or marine fossils. In addition, beds of quartz gravel are present in the Cliffwood near Riverside, Burlington County. Morgan beds - Occur only in the northern part of the central sheet. They consist of interbedded, thin, dark-colored clay and fine-grained, light-colored, micaceous sand. Clay is locally more abundant in the Morgan than in the Cliffwood beds. Sand ranges from massive to locally crossbedded and locally has fine organic matter. This unit is exposed only in the South Amboy quadrangle where it is as much as 12 m (39 ft) thick. It grades downward into underlying clay. Amboy Stoneware Clay Member - Crops out only in the South Amboy quadrangle in the central sheet and is mainly dark-gray, white-weathering, interbedded clay and silt to fine-grained quartz sand. Clay has abundant, fine, carbonaceous matter and fine mica flakes. Small cylindrical burrows are abundant in this unit. Locally, the clay is interbedded with sand and contains large pieces of lignitized, bored (Teredolites) logs. Large slabs of pyrite-cemented sand are associated with the woody beds. Amber occurs in some of the wood. Unit is approximately 7.5 m (25 ft) thick, but pinches out along strike. The Amboy Stoneware is disconformable on the underlying sand. Old Bridge Sand Member - Predominantly a light-colored sand, extensively crossbedded and locally interbedded with dark-gray laminae; clay is highly carbonaceous, woody, in discontinuous beds, especially near the base. The scale of crossbedding varies from small to large. Locally, small burrows are present. Unit is as much as 12 m (39 ft) thick and rests disconformably on the underlying unit. South Amboy Fire Clay Member - Basal member of the Magothy Formation. Unit resembles the Amboy Stoneware Clay Member, particularly in its lensing character. Unit is best exposed in the central sheet in the South Amboy quadrangle and in the Delaware River valley at the base of the bluffs at Florence. The South Amboy is a dark, massive to finely laminated clay, locally oxidized to white or red. Unit fills large channels and has local concentrations of large, pyrite-encrusted, lignitized logs. Some of the clay is slumped, suggesting post-depositional undercutting during channel migration. The clay is interbedded with fine- to medium-grained, crossbedded sand. The basal contact with the underlying Raritan is well exposed in the Sayre and Fisher Pit in Sayreville, Middlesex County, where the contact is marked by a deeply weathered gravel zone.

Potassic Feldspar Gneiss (Middle Proterozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Light-gray- to pinkish-buff-weathering, pinkish-white to light-pinkish-gray, fine- to medium-grained, moderately foliated gneiss and lesser amounts of granofels composed of quartz, microcline, microcline microperthite and local accessory amounts of biotite, garnet, sillimanite, and opaque minerals.

Diabase (Early Jurassic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Fine-grained to aphanitic dikes; medium- to coarsegrained, subophitic discordant stock-like intrusions of dark-greenish-gray to black diabase; and plugs of dark gray, concordant to discordant sheetlike, medium- to coarse-grained, quartz-rich to albite-rich granophyre (map unit Jg). The chilled margins of diabase masses are aphanitic to very fine grained. Diabase is dense, hard, and sparsely fractured. It is composed mostly of plagioclase (An50-70), clinopyroxene (mostly augite) and magnetiteñilmenite. Accessory minerals include apatite, quartz, alkali feldspar, hornblende, titantite, and zirocon. Olivine is rare. Within about 200 m (655 ft) above and 150 m (490 ft) below the large diabase sheets, red mudstones are typically metamorphosed into indurated, bluish-gray hornfels commonly with clots or crystals of tourmaline or cordierite, whereas argillitic siltstone is metamorphosed into brittle, black, very fine grained hornfels, Sheetlike intrusions are as much as 360 to 400 m (1,180-1,310 ft) thick. Dikes range in thickness from 3 to 15 m (10-50 ft) and several kilometers (miles) long. Thickness of the stocklike bodies is unknown.

Microperthite Alaskite (Middle Proterozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Pink- to buff-weathering, light-pinkish-gray or pinkish-white, medium- to coarse-grained, gneissoid to indistinctly foliated granite composed principally of microcline microperthite, quartz and oligoclase. Includes small bodies of amphibolite not shown on map.

Hypersthene-Quartz-Oligoclase Gneiss (Middle Proterozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Gray- to tan-weathering, greenish-gray to greenish-brown, medium-grained, moderately well layered and foliated, greasy-lustered gneiss of charnockitic affinity composed of andesine or oligoclase, quartz, clinopyroxene, hornblende, hypersthene, and sparse amounts of biotite. Commonly interlayered with amphibolite and mafic-rich quartz-plagioclase gneiss.

Diorite (Middle Proterozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Gray- to tan-weathering, greenish-gray to brownish-gray, medium- to coarse-grained, greasy-lustered, massive diorite containing andesine or oligoclase, clinopyroxene, hornblende, hypersthene, and sparse amounts of biotite and magnetite. Amphibolite layers common.

Jutland Klippe Sequence Unit B (Middle Ordovician) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Jutland Klippe Sequence Unit B of Perissoratis and others (1979) - Heterogeneous sequence of interbedded red, green, tan and gray shale; interlaminated dolomite and shale; interbedded fine-grained graywacke siltstone and beds or lenses of sandstone; light-gray to pale-pinkish-gray quartzite; and interbedded fine-grained, thin-bedded limestone and red and green shale. Limestone locally resembles an intraformational conglomerate because it is disrupted, boudinaged, and surrounded by shale beds. Lower contact gradational and within interbedded sequence of thin- to medium-bedded sandstone, siltstone, and limestone. Perissoratis and others (1979) placed this contact at boundary between graptolite faunas Isograptus caduceus and Paraglossograptus etheridgei of Berry (1968). The youngest graptolites occur within Climacograptus bicornis zone of Berry (1968). Some shale beds contain conodonts (Ethington and others, 1958; Karklins and Repetski, 1989) and brachiopod fragments. Carbonate and pelitic rocks locally contain conodonts of Prioniodus triangularis to Pygodus anserinus faunas of North Atlantic Realm. Thickness varies due to structural complexity, but may be about 460 to 550 m (1,500-1,800 ft).