Geologic units in Dinwiddie county, Virginia

Petersburg Granite (Mississippian) at surface, covers 24 % of this area

Light- to dark-gray to pink, fine- to coarse-grained, equigranular to porphyritic, foliated to nonfoliated, ranges from granite to granodiorite in composition; multiple intrusive phases are present. The granite contains xenoliths of biotite gneiss and amphibolite. Mineralogy: quartz + sodic plagioclase + potassium feldspar + biotite ± hornblende; accessory minerals include ilmenite, magnetite, pyrite, zircon, apatite, titanite, muscovite, and fluorite (Goodwin, 1970; Daniels and Onuschak, 1974; Wright and others, 1975). Current mapping restricts the Petersburg Granite to a contiguous unit that crops out in the Cities of Richmond and Petersburg; this roughly corresponds to one of four discrete plutons mapped as Petersburg Granite on the 1963 Geologic Map of Virginia. Samples from within this pluton were dated at 330±8 Ma (U-Pb zircon; Wright, and others, 1975). The northwestern edge of the pluton is mylonitized along the Hylas fault zone (Bobyarchick and Glover, 1979).

Mafic and Felsic Volcanic Rocks (Proterozoic) at surface, covers 17 % of this area

Heterogeneous layered metavolcanic sequence includes crystal and lithic tuff, dacite porphyry, chert, phyllite, and greenstone metabasalt; greenschist-facies metamorphic mineral assemblages occur in the various lithologies. This unit correlates with the Roanoke Rapids volcanogenic complex of the eastern slate belt in North Carolina (Farrar, 1985a, 1985b; Geologic Map of North Carolina, 1985; Horton and Stoddard, 1986). To the extent that correlation with lithologically similar Carolina slate belt rocks is valid, mafic and felsic metavolcanic rocks (v) are Late Proterozoic to Cambrian in age.

Bacons Castle Formation (Tertiary) at surface, covers 16 % of this area

Tb1/Tb2 Bacons Castle Formation (upper Pliocene, Coch, 1965). Gray, yellowish-orange, and reddish-brown sand, gravel, silt, and clay; constitutes surficial deposits of high plain extending from Richmond, eastward to the Surry scarp. Unit is subdivided into two members: Tb1, massive to thick-bedded pebble and cobble gravel grading upward into cross-bedded, pebbly sand and sandy and clayey silt, and Tb2, predominantly thin-bedded and laminated clayey silt and silty fine-grained sand. Tb2 is characterized by flaser, wavy, and lenticular bedding and rare to common clay-lined burrows including Ophiomorpha nodosa. Thickness is 0 to 70 feet.

Biotite Gneiss (Proterozoic) at surface, covers 13 % of this area

Light-gray, medium- to coarse grained, compositionally-layered and locally migmatitic rocks, include interlayered biotite gneiss, muscovite-biotite gneiss, muscovite-biotite schist, and sillimanite-mica schist; also includes minor interlayers and lenses of granitic gneiss, biotite-amphibole gneiss, amphibolite, garnet-mica schist, calc-silicate granofels, and rare ultramafic rocks. This unit correlates with Raleigh belt rocks in North Carolina (Parker, 1979; Geologic Map of North Carolina, 1985).

Pliocene Sand and Gravel (Tertiary) at surface, covers 8 % of this area

Interbedded yellowish-orange to reddish-brown gravelly sand, sandy gravel, and fine to coarse sand, poorly to well-sorted, cross-bedded in part, in cludes lesser amounts of clay and silt in thin to medium beds. Commonly caps drainage divides (altitude 250-170 feet) in western part of Coastal Plain. Lower part of unit, showing flaser and lenticular bedding and containing rare to abundant Ophiomorpha nodosa represents deposition in marginal-marine environments and is, in part, a nearshore equivalent of the more downdip, marine facies of the Yorktown Formation. In the northern part of the Coastal Plain, the more poorly sorted and less cleanly washed upper part of unit, which lacks fossils, comprises fluvial-deltaic sediments that prograded eastward across the shelf during a regressive phase of the Yorktown. To the south, the upper part of unit is massively bedded clayey sand in places containing heavy mineral concentrations that average 8 percent or more; the sands are nearshore, beach and dune origin; interstitial clay was derived, in part, from in-situ weathering of feldspar sand. Thick ness is 0 to 50 feet.

Mylonite, Mylonite Gneiss, and Cataclastic Rocks (Proterozoic - Paleozoic ?) at surface, covers 6 % of this area

Mylonite. Includes protomylonite, mylonite, ultramylonite, and cataclastic rocks. Lithology highly variable, depending on the nature of the parent rock, and on intensive parameters and history of deformation. In most mapped belts of mylonite and cataclastic rock (my), tectonized rocks anastomose around lenses of less-deformed or undeformed rock. In the Blue Ridge, some of these lenses are large enough to show at 1:500,000 scale. In many places mylonitic and cataclastic rocks are gradational into less deformed or undeformed adjacent rocks, and location of contacts between tectonized rocks (my) and adjacent units is approximate or arbitrary. These boundaries are indicated on the map by color-color joins with superimposed shear pattern. Most mapped belts of mylonite represent fault zones with multiple movement histories. In the Blue Ridge, Paleozoic age contractional deformation fabrics are superimposed on Late Precambrian extensional fabrics (Simpson and Kalaghan, 1989; Bailey and Simpson, 1993). Many Piedmont mylonite zones contain dextral-transpressional kinematic indicators that formed during Late Paleozoic collision al tectonics (Bobyarchick and Glover, 1979; Gates and others, 1986). Paleozoic and older faults were reactivated in many places to form extensional faults during the Mesozoic (Bobyarchick and Glover, 1979).

Altered Diorite and Gabbro (Proterozoic) at surface, covers 5 % of this area

Grayish-olive-green, medium-grained gabbro, hornblende gabbro, and diorite exhibit variable degrees of saussuritization and uralitization. The gabbros are commonly concordant with adjacent metavolcanic rocks.

Gneissic Granite and Granodiorite (Proterozoic) at surface, covers 4 % of this area

Light-gray to white, fine- to medium-grained, massive to foliated, muscovite-biotite gneissic granite to granodiorite containing minor garnet, and xenoliths of biotite gneiss and amphibolite. Several different intrusive phases are present.

Alluvium (Quaternary) at surface, covers 2 % of this area

Fine to coarse gravelly sand and sandy gravel, silt, and clay, light- to medium-gray and yellowish-gray. Deposited mainly in channel, point-bar, and flood-plain environments; includes sandy deposits of narrow estuarine beaches, and mud, muddy sand, and peat in swamps and in fresh- and brackish-water marshes bordering tidewater rivers. Grades into colluvium along steeper valley walls at margins of unit. Mostly Holocene but, locally, includes low-lying Pleistocene (?) terrace deposits. As much as 80 feet thick along major streams.

Gneiss and Schist (Proterozoic) at surface, covers 1 % of this area

Includes graphite schist; garnet staurolite- biotite-sericite schist containing kyanite, sillimanite, and less commonly muscovite; garnet-biotite gneiss; biotite muscovite gneiss; phyllonite; and, mylonitic to ultramylonitic garnet-muscovite-biotite gneiss. This unit may correlate with biotite gneiss and schist (rbg), and with Raleigh belt rocks of North Carolina (Geologic Map of North Carolina, 1985; Stoddard and others, 1991 and references therein).

Chesapeake Group (Tertiary) at surface, covers 1 % of this area

May include the following fomations - Chowan River, Yorktown, Eastover, St. Marys, Choptank, and Calvert. Chesapeake Group (upper Pliocene to lower Miocene,Darton, 1891). Fine-to coarse-grained, quartzose sand, silt, and clay; variably shelly and diatomaceous, deposited mainly in shallow, inner- and middle-shelf waters. Ages of units based on studies of foraminiferal, nannofossil, diatom, and moluscan assemblages in Virginia and adjacent states (Andrews, 1988; Gibson, 1983; Gibson and others, 1980; Poag, 1989; Ward and Blackwelder, 1980; Ward and Krafft, 1984). Includes the following formations, from youngest to oldest: Chowan River Formation (upper Pliocene, Blackwelder, 1981). Gray to dusky-blue-green sand, fine- to medium-grained, clayey and silty, commonly very shelly; grades laterally into laminated, silty clay and upward into cross-bedded, biofragmental sand, clayey silt, and silty clay. Discontinuous pebbly to bouldery sand at very irregular base of unit. Mollusks include Glycymeris hummi, Noetia carolinensis, and Carolinapecten eboreus bertiensis. Thickness is 0 to 50 feet. Recognized only in southeasternmost Virginia and North Carolina. Yorktown Formation (lower upper Pliocene to lower Pliocene, Clark and Miller, 1906). Bluish-gray and brownish-yellow sand, fine- to coarse-grained, in part glauconitic and phosphatic, commonly very shelly, interbedded with sandy and silty blue-gray clay. In lower York and James River basins, unit includes cross-bedded shell hash. Mollusks in clude Glycymeris subovata, Chesapecten jeffersonius, Chesapecten madisonius, Mercenaria tridacnoides, Panopea reflexa. Coarse-grained sand and gravel facies of the Yorktown in updip areas is mapped separately as unit psg. Thickness is 0 to 150 feet. Eastover Formation (upper Miocene, Ward and Blackwelder, 1980). Dark-gray to bluish-gray, muddy sand, very fine to fine, micaceous, interbedded with sandy silt and clay. Lower part of unit is dominantly medium- to very-thin-bedded and laminated silt and clay interbedded with very-fine sand, lenticular and wavy bedding common; upper part is mainly very-fine- to fine-grained sand containing abundant clay laminae. Typical mol lusks include Chesapecten middlesexensis, Marvacrassatella surryensis, Glossus fraterna. Thickness is 0 to 270 feet. St. Marys Formation (upper and middle Miocene, Shattuck, 1902). Bluish- to pinkish-gray, muddy, very-fine sand and sandy clay-silt, locally abundantly shelly. Chesapecten santamaria, Buccinofusus parilis, and Ecphora gardnerae are characteristic mollusks. Occurs northeast of Mattaponi River. Thickness is 0 to 40 feet. Choptank Formation (middle Miocene, Shattuck, 1902). Olive-gray sand, fine to very-fine, clayey and silty, shelly, and diatomaceous clay-silt; common y forms fining-upward sequences. Mollusks include Chesapecten nefrens, Mercenaria cuneata, Ecphora meganae. Thickness is 0 to 50 feet. Calvert Formation (middle and lower Miocene, Shattuck, 1902). Commonly consists of 2 to 7 fining-upward sequences. Each sequence includes a light- to dark-olive-gray basal sand, very fine to fine, clayey and silty, very sparsely to abundantly shelly; grades upward to sandy, diatomaceous clay-silt and diatomite. Typical molluscs include Chesapecten coccymelus, Crassatella melinus, Ecphora tricostata. Thickness is 0 to 600 feet.

Windsor Formation (Tertiary-Quaternary) at surface, covers 1.0 % of this area

Windsor Formation (lower Pleistocene or upper Pliocene, Coch, 1968). Gray and yellowish- to reddish-brown sand, gravel, silt, and clay. Constitutes surficial deposits of extensive plain (altitude 85-95 feet.) seaward of Surry scarp and of coeval, fluvial-estuarine terraces west of scarp. Fining upward sequence beneath plain consists of a basal pebbly sand grading upward into cross-bedded, quartzose sand and massive, clayey silt and silty clay; lower and upper parts of sequence were deposited, respectively, in shallow-marine or open-bay and restricted-bay or lagoonal environments. In terraces west of Surry scarp, fluvial-estuarine deposits comprise muddy, coarse, trough cross-bedded sand and gravel grading upward to sandy silt and clay. Thickness is 0 to 40 feet.

Granite (Proterozoic) at surface, covers 0.8 % of this area

Light-gray to pink, fine- to medium-grained granite and granodiorite; zoned plagioclase crystals with epidotized and saussuritized cores are characteristic. The granite contains xenoliths of mafic volcanic rocks near its margins. The granite intrudes volcanic rocks east of the Hollister fault zone southeast of Petersburg. Samples from the quarry at Skippers were dated by Rb-Sr whole-rock methods (Bottino and Fullagar, 1968); these data show considerable scatter, implying age of crystallization ranging from 460 Ma to as old as 690 Ma. This unit was shown as Petersburg Granite on the 1963 Geologic Map of Virginia, but field relations, petrology, and the apparent age indicate that it is a separate pluton.

Newark Supergroup; Triassic Sandstone, Siltstone, and Shale (Upper Triassic) at surface, covers 0.4 % of this area

Sandstone, very fine- to coarse-grained, reddish-brown to gray, micaceous, minor conglomerate beds. Siltstone, reddish-brown to gray, micaceous. Shale, reddish-brown, greenish-gray, gray, yellowish-brown, laminated, fossiliferous. Upward-fining sequences, discontinuous vertically and horizontally.

Newark Supergroup; Conglomerate, mixed clasts (Upper Triassic) at surface, covers 0.3 % of this area

Rounded to subangular pebbles, cobbles, and boulders of mixed lithologies including quartz, phyllite, quartzite, gneiss, schist, greenstone, and marble in a matrix of medium- to very-coarse-grained, reddish-brown to gray, locally arkosic, sandstone.