Geologic units in Emporia City, Virginia

Bacons Castle Formation (Tertiary) at surface, covers 68 % of this area

Tb1/Tb2 Bacons Castle Formation (upper Pliocene, Coch, 1965). Gray, yellowish-orange, and reddish-brown sand, gravel, silt, and clay; constitutes surficial deposits of high plain extending from Richmond, eastward to the Surry scarp. Unit is subdivided into two members: Tb1, massive to thick-bedded pebble and cobble gravel grading upward into cross-bedded, pebbly sand and sandy and clayey silt, and Tb2, predominantly thin-bedded and laminated clayey silt and silty fine-grained sand. Tb2 is characterized by flaser, wavy, and lenticular bedding and rare to common clay-lined burrows including Ophiomorpha nodosa. Thickness is 0 to 70 feet.

Alluvium (Quaternary) at surface, covers 25 % of this area

Fine to coarse gravelly sand and sandy gravel, silt, and clay, light- to medium-gray and yellowish-gray. Deposited mainly in channel, point-bar, and flood-plain environments; includes sandy deposits of narrow estuarine beaches, and mud, muddy sand, and peat in swamps and in fresh- and brackish-water marshes bordering tidewater rivers. Grades into colluvium along steeper valley walls at margins of unit. Mostly Holocene but, locally, includes low-lying Pleistocene (?) terrace deposits. As much as 80 feet thick along major streams.

Mafic and Felsic Volcanic Rocks (Proterozoic) at surface, covers 4 % of this area

Heterogeneous layered metavolcanic sequence includes crystal and lithic tuff, dacite porphyry, chert, phyllite, and greenstone metabasalt; greenschist-facies metamorphic mineral assemblages occur in the various lithologies. This unit correlates with the Roanoke Rapids volcanogenic complex of the eastern slate belt in North Carolina (Farrar, 1985a, 1985b; Geologic Map of North Carolina, 1985; Horton and Stoddard, 1986). To the extent that correlation with lithologically similar Carolina slate belt rocks is valid, mafic and felsic metavolcanic rocks (v) are Late Proterozoic to Cambrian in age.

Windsor Formation (Tertiary-Quaternary) at surface, covers 3 % of this area

Windsor Formation (lower Pleistocene or upper Pliocene, Coch, 1968). Gray and yellowish- to reddish-brown sand, gravel, silt, and clay. Constitutes surficial deposits of extensive plain (altitude 85-95 feet.) seaward of Surry scarp and of coeval, fluvial-estuarine terraces west of scarp. Fining upward sequence beneath plain consists of a basal pebbly sand grading upward into cross-bedded, quartzose sand and massive, clayey silt and silty clay; lower and upper parts of sequence were deposited, respectively, in shallow-marine or open-bay and restricted-bay or lagoonal environments. In terraces west of Surry scarp, fluvial-estuarine deposits comprise muddy, coarse, trough cross-bedded sand and gravel grading upward to sandy silt and clay. Thickness is 0 to 40 feet.