Geologic units in Hancock county, West Virginia

Conemaugh Group (Pennsylvanian) at surface, covers 67 % of this area

Cyclic sequences of red and gray shale, siltstone, and sandstone, with thin limestones and coals. Mostly non-marine. May be divided into Casselman and Glenshaw Formations. Extends from the base of the Pittsburgh coal to the top of the Upper Freeport coal. Includes the Elk Lick, Bakerstown, and Mahoning coals, and the Ames and Brush Creek Limestones.

Allegheny Formation (Pennsylvanian) at surface, covers 20 % of this area

Cyclic sequences of sandstone, siltstone, shale, limestone, and coal. Includes the Freeport, Kittanning and Clarion coals, also, the Princess coals of Kentucky . Extends from the top of the Upper Freeport coal to the top of the Homewood Sandstone.

Quaternary Alluvium (Quaternary) at surface, covers 10 % of this area

Alluvial deposits of sand, gravel, silt, and clay.

Monongahela Group (Pennsylvanian) at surface, covers 1 % of this area

Non-marine cyclic sequences of sandstone, siltstone, red and gray shale, limestone, and coal. Contains the Uniontown and Pittsburgh Formations. Extends from the top of the Waynesburg coal to the base of the Pittsburgh coal. Includes the Waynesburg, Uniontown, Sewickley, Redstone and Pittsburgh coals. Thickness is 170 feet in Mineral and Grant Counties.

Allegheny and Pottsville Groups, Undivided (Pennsylvanian) at surface, covers 0.5 % of this area

Shale, siltstone, and underclay: Shale, black, gray, and olive; clayey to silty; locally contains marine fossils; calcareous in part. Siltstone, gray, greenish and olive; clayey to sandy; thin bedded to medium bedded; locally contain marine fossils. Underclay, gray and olive; generally 3 feet or less in thickness; clayey to silty; commonly rooted and underlying coal beds; nonbedded; locally varies from flint to plastic clay. Sandstone, light to medium gray weathers to shades of yellow-brown; mostly very fine to medium grained, locally quartzose and conglomeratic in lower one-third of unit; thin to massive to cross bedded; locally calcareous; Limestone, flint and coal. Limestone, black to light gray; micritic to medium grained; locally grades into flint; thin to medium bedded to discoidal concretions containing marine fossils; locally nonmarine, micritic limestones occur beneath coal beds in upper one third of unit. Coal, mostly banded bituminous, locally cannel; thin to locally as much as 12 feet thick; generally in discrete beds but locally contain shale partings and split into multiple beds. Lateral and vertical lithic variability and gradation common. Unit as much as 700 feet thick.

Casselman Formation (Pennsylvanian) at surface, covers 0.1 % of this area

Cyclic sequences of shale, siltstone, sandstone, red beds, thin, impure limestone, and thin, nonpersistent coal; red beds are associated with landslides; base is at top of Ames limestone.

Conemaugh Group (Pennsylvanian) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Shale, siltstone, and mudstone: Shale, black, gray, green and red; clayey to silty; locally contains marine fossils in lower half of unit; calcareous in part. Siltstone, gray, green and red, locally variegated; clayed to sandy; thin bedded to nonbedded. Mudstone, black, gray, green, red, and yellow, variegated in part; clayey to silty; locally calcareous; commonly nonbedded. Sandstone, green-gray weathers to shades of yellow-brown; mostly very fine to medium grained, locally conglomeratic; thin to massive to cross bedded; locally calcareous. Limestone and coal; thin and discontinuous. Limestone, black, gray and green; micritic to coarse grained; thin bedded to concretionary with marine fossils common in lower half of interval; thin to medium bedded, nonmarine limestone common in upper half of unit. Coal, thin, bituminous, impure; very locally thick enough for economic development. Lateral and vertical lithic variability and gradation common. Unit as much as 500 feet thick.

Glenshaw Formation (Pennsylvanian) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Cyclic sequences of shale, sandstone, red beds, and thin limestone and coal; includes four marine limestone or shale horizons; red beds are involved in landslides; base is at top of Upper Freeport coal.

Allegheny Formation (Pennsylvanian) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Cyclic sequences of sandstone, shale, limestone, clay, and coal; includes valuable clay deposits and Vanport Limestone; commercially valuable Freeport, Kittanning, and Brookville-Clarion coals present; base is at bottom of Brookville-Clarion coal.