Geologic units in Georgia (state in United States)

Additional scientific data in this geographic area

Neogene undifferentiated (Neogene) at surface, covers 16 % of this area

Includes Altamaha Grit (Dall, 1892); Citronelle Formation (Matson & Berry, 1916); and "Hawthorn Formation" (Cooke, 1939). (*) - outcrops of indurated sandstone and claystone

Pleistocene-Pliocene sands and gravels (Pleistocene-Pliocene) at surface, covers 6 % of this area

Includes, in part, Sunderland, Coharie, and Brandywine "Formations" of Cooke, 1939

Ocala Limestone (Eocene) at surface, covers 5 % of this area

Generally covered with Oligocene and Eocene residuum (Flint River Formation of Cooke, 1939); includes up-dip area, Tivola Limestone of Connell (1955). (*)- outcrops of Ocala Limestone on Dougherty Plain.

Miccosukee Formation (Neogene) at surface, covers 4 % of this area

Miccosukee Formation

Biotitic Gneiss / Mica Schist/ Amphibolite (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers 4 % of this area

Biotitic Gneiss / Mica Schist/ Amphibolite

Granitic Gneiss undifferentiated (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers 3 % of this area

Granitic Gneiss undifferentiated

Stream alluvium (Quaternary) at surface, covers 3 % of this area

Stream alluvium and undifferentiated terrace deposits

Wicomico Shoreline Complex - marsh and lagoonal facies (Pleistocene) at surface, covers 3 % of this area

Wicomico Shoreline Complex - marsh and lagoonal facies

Biotite Gneiss (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers 3 % of this area

Biotite gneiss

Mica Schist/ Gneiss/ Amphibolite (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers 2 % of this area

Mica Schist/ Gneiss/ Amphibolite

Eocene and Oligocene Residuum, undifferentiated (Eocene-Oligocene) at surface, covers 2 % of this area

Eocene and Oligocene Residuum, undifferentiated

Suwannee Limestone and its residuum (Oligocene) at surface, covers 2 % of this area

As mapped, includes Chattahoochee Limestone in Seminole and Decatur Cos.; Flint River Formation, in part, (Cooke, 1939); Jacksonboro Limestone in Screven Co.; and Glendon and Marianna Limestones in Pulaski Co.

Irwinton Sand (Eocene) at surface, covers 2 % of this area

Up-dip equivalent of Twiggs Clay, Sandersville Limestone, and Cooper Marl. As mapped, also includes younger clastics of indefinite Late Tertiary age.

Mica Schist/ Gneiss (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers 2 % of this area

Mica Schist/ Gneiss

Pamlico shoreline complex - marsh and lagoonal facies (Pleistocene) at surface, covers 2 % of this area

Pamlico shoreline complex - marsh and lagoonal facies

Hornblende Gneiss/ Amphibolite (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers 2 % of this area

Hornblende Gneiss/ Amphibolite

Granite Gneiss/ Amphibolite (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers 2 % of this area

Granite Gneiss/ Amphibolite

Twiggs Clay (Eocene) at surface, covers 2 % of this area

Twiggs Clay

Knox Group undifferentiated (Ordovician-Cambrian) at surface, covers 2 % of this area

Knox Group undifferentiated

Biotite Gneiss/ Feldspathic Biotite Gneiss (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers 1 % of this area

Biotite Gneiss/ Feldspathic Biotite Gneiss

Hawthorn Formation (Miocene) at surface, covers 1 % of this area

Includes Marks Head Formation; Parachucia Beds (Sloan, 1905); and Alum Bluff Formation (Veatch and Stephenson, 1911).

Granite undifferentiated (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers 1 % of this area

Granite undifferentiated

Biotite Granite Gneiss/ Feldspathic Biotite Gneiss/ Amphibolite Hornblende Gneiss (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers 1 % of this area

Biotite Granite Gneiss/ Feldspathic Biotite Gneiss/ Amphibolite Hornblende Gneiss

Lower Tertiary-Cretaceous undifferentiated (Lower Tertiary-Cretaceous) at surface, covers 1 % of this area

As mapped includes Middendorf Formation (Sloan, 1904); "Channel Sands" (LaMoreaux, 1946); Tuscaloosa Formation (Cooke, 1939); and "Huber beds" (Buie, informal terminology)

Holocene Shoreline Complex - marsh and lagoonal facies (Holocene) at surface, covers 1.0 % of this area

Holocene Shoreline Complex - marsh and lagoonal facies

Providence Sand (Cretaceous) at surface, covers 1.0 % of this area

Providence Sand, includes Perote Member

Metagraywacke/ Mica Schist (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers 0.9 % of this area

Metagraywacke/ Mica Schist

Penholoway shoreline complex - marsh and lagoonal facies (Pleistocene) at surface, covers 0.9 % of this area

Penholoway shoreline complex - marsh and lagoonal facies

Claiborne undifferentiated (Eocene) at surface, covers 0.8 % of this area

Up-dip equivalent of Lisbon and Tallahatta Formations

Ripley Formation (Cretaceous) at surface, covers 0.8 % of this area

Ripley Formation

Metagraywacke/ Mica Schist-Quartzite/ Amphibolite (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers 0.7 % of this area

Metagraywacke/ Mica Schist-Quartzite/ Amphibolite

Mica Schist (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers 0.7 % of this area

Mica Schist

Eocene undifferentiated (Eocene) at surface, covers 0.7 % of this area

Highly weathered sands and sandy clays of lower Tertiary age

Conasauga Group; Upper unit; limestone and shale unit (Cambrian) at surface, covers 0.7 % of this area

Includes limestone and shale unit (Ccsl). Possible equivalent of the Maryville Limestone and Nolichucky Shale of Tennessee with a dolostone member (Ccd).

Wicomico Shoreline Complex - barrier island facies (Pleistocene) at surface, covers 0.6 % of this area

Wicomico Shoreline Complex - barrier island facies

Granite/ gneissic biotite granite (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers 0.6 % of this area

Granite/ gneissic biotite granite

Phyllite and Quartzite (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers 0.6 % of this area

Phyllite and Quartzite

Cusseta Sand (Cretaceous) at surface, covers 0.5 % of this area

Cusseta Sand

Penholoway shoreline complex - barrier island facies (Pleistocene) at surface, covers 0.5 % of this area

Penholoway shoreline complex - barrier island facies

Undifferentiated Metavolcanics/ Sericite phyllite/ Meta-argillite/ Quartz mica schist (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers 0.5 % of this area

Undifferentiated Metavolcanics/ Sericite phyllite/ Meta-argillite/ Quartz mica schist

Tuscaloosa Formation (Cretaceous) at surface, covers 0.5 % of this area

Tuscaloosa Formation

Porphyritic granite (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers 0.5 % of this area

Porphyritic granite

Sillimanite Schist/ Gneiss/ Amphibolite (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers 0.5 % of this area

Sillimanite Schist/ Gneiss/ Amphibolite

Conasauga Group; Lower unit; shale and sandstone unit (Cambrian) at surface, covers 0.5 % of this area

Includes shale and sandstone unit (Ccs) with lower dolostone unit (Ccdl). Possible equivalent of Pumpkin Valley Shale of Tennessee

Sillimanite Schist (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers 0.5 % of this area

Sillimanite Schist

Blufftown Formation (Cretaceous) at surface, covers 0.4 % of this area

Blufftown Formation

Garnet Mica Schist (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers 0.4 % of this area

Garnet Mica Schist

Felsic Metavolcanics (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers 0.4 % of this area

Felsic Metavolcanics

Talbot shoreline complex - marsh and lagoonal facies (Pleistocene) at surface, covers 0.4 % of this area

Talbot shoreline complex - marsh and lagoonal facies

Granite Gneiss/ Granite (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers 0.4 % of this area

Granite Gneiss/ Granite

Biotite Gneiss/ Amphibolite (Age uncertain) at surface, covers 0.4 % of this area

Biotite Gneiss/ Amphibolite

Quartzite (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers 0.4 % of this area

Quartzite

Nanafalia, Porters Creek, and Clayton Formations, undifferentiated (Paleocene) at surface, covers 0.3 % of this area

Nanafalia, Porters Creek, and Clayton Formations, undifferentiated

Tuscahoma Sand (Paleocene) at surface, covers 0.3 % of this area

As mapped includes lower Eocene Bashi Marl Member of the Hatchetigbee Formation

Aluminous Schist (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers 0.3 % of this area

Aluminous Schist

Hornblende Gneiss/ Amphibolite/ Granite Gneiss (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers 0.3 % of this area

Hornblende Gneiss/ Amphibolite/ Granite Gneiss

Floyd Shale (Mississippian) at surface, covers 0.3 % of this area

Includes the Hartselle Sandstone Member (Mh) in Floyd County and an unnamed limestone member (Ml in Floyd County) at the base

Rome Formation (Cambrian) at surface, covers 0.3 % of this area

Rome Formation

Red Mountain Formation (Silurian) at surface, covers 0.3 % of this area

Red Mountain Formation

Granitic Gneiss / Gneissic Granite (augen or porphyritic) (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers 0.3 % of this area

Granitic Gneiss / Gneissic Granite (augen or porphyritic)

Slate/ Quartzite/ Conglomerate (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers 0.3 % of this area

Slate/ Quartzite/ Conglomerate

Pennsylvanian undifferentiated (Pennsylvanian) at surface, covers 0.2 % of this area

Pennsylvanian undifferentiated

Pamlico shoreline complex - barrier island facies (Pleistocene) at surface, covers 0.2 % of this area

Pamlico shoreline complex - barrier island facies

Metadacite (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers 0.2 % of this area

Metadacite

Graphite Schist (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers 0.2 % of this area

Graphite Schist

Cusseta, Blufftown, and Eutaw Formations, undifferentiated (Cretaceous) at surface, covers 0.2 % of this area

Cusseta, Blufftown, and Eutaw Formations, undifferentiated

Chickamauga Group undivided (Ordovician) at surface, covers 0.2 % of this area

Chickamauga Group undivided

Newala Limestone (Ordovician) at surface, covers 0.2 % of this area

Newala Limestone

Eutaw Formation (Cretaceous) at surface, covers 0.2 % of this area

Eutaw Formation

Amphibolite/ Mica Schist/ Biotitic Gneiss (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers 0.2 % of this area

Amphibolite/ Mica Schist/ Biotitic Gneiss

Sillimanite Schist/ Gneiss (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers 0.2 % of this area

Sillimanite Schist/ Gneiss

Sericite Schist (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers 0.2 % of this area

Sericite Schist

Hornblende Gneiss (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers 0.2 % of this area

Hornblende Gneiss

Biotitic Gneiss Undifferentiated (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers 0.2 % of this area

Biotitic Gneiss Undifferentiated

Nanafalia Formation (Paleocene) at surface, covers 0.2 % of this area

Nanafalia Formation

Hornblende Gneiss/ Granite Gneiss/ Biotite Gneiss (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers 0.2 % of this area

Hornblende Gneiss/ Granite Gneiss/ Biotite Gneiss

Talbot shoreline complex - barrier island facies (Pleistocene) at surface, covers 0.2 % of this area

Talbot shoreline complex - barrier island facies

Quartzite/ Mica Schist (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers 0.2 % of this area

Quartzite/ Mica Schist

Amphibolite/ Biotitic Gneiss/ Quartz Sericite Schist (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers 0.2 % of this area

Amphibolite/ Biotitic Gneiss/ Quartz Sericite Schist

Princess Anne shoreline complex - barrier island facies (Pleistocene) at surface, covers 0.2 % of this area

Princess Anne shoreline complex - barrier island facies

Princess Anne shoreline complex - marsh and lagoonal facies (Pleistocene) at surface, covers 0.2 % of this area

Princess Anne shoreline complex - marsh and lagoonal facies

Amphibolite (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers 0.2 % of this area

Amphibolite

Conasauga Group; Middle unit; Shale unit (Cambrian) at surface, covers 0.2 % of this area

Includes limestone unit (Ccls), possible equivalent of Rutledge Limestone of Tennessee and shale unit (Cc), possible equivalent of Rogersville Shale of Tennessee

Biotitic Gneiss / Amphibolite (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers 0.2 % of this area

Biotitic Gneiss / Amphibolite

Mica Schist/ Metasiltstone (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers 0.1 % of this area

Mica Schist/ Metasiltstone

Silver Bluff shoreline complex (Pleistocene) at surface, covers 0.1 % of this area

Silver Bluff shoreline complex

Conasauga Group; Middle unit; Limestone unit (Cambrian) at surface, covers 0.1 % of this area

Includes limestone unit (Ccls), possible equivalent of Rutledge Limestone of Tennessee and shale unit (Cc), possible equivalent of Rogersville Shale of Tennessee

Mica Schist/ Amphibolite (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers 0.1 % of this area

Mica Schist/ Amphibolite

Mississippian undifferentiated (Mississippian) at surface, covers 0.1 % of this area

Includes Pennington Shale, Bangor Limestone (except in Floyd County), Hartselle Sandstone, Golconda Formation, Gasper Limestone, Ste. Genevieve Limestone and St. Louis Limestone

Granite/ granite gneiss (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers 0.1 % of this area

Granite/ granite gneiss

Devonian-Missisippian undivided (Devonian-Mississippian) at surface, covers 0.1 % of this area

Includes Fort Payne Chert, Chattanooga Shale in Dade Co.; Fort Payne Chert at top, Chattanooga Shale in middle and Armuchee Shale at bottom in all areas except Polk Co. and Dade Co.; Fort Payne Chert, and Armuchee Chert in Polk Co. CHATTANOOGA Shale (Dc)

Mylonite and ultramylonite (Age uncertain) at surface, covers 0.1 % of this area

Mylonite and ultramylonite

Mica Schist/ Quartzite/ Gneiss/ Amphibolite (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers 0.1 % of this area

Mica Schist/ Quartzite/ Gneiss/ Amphibolite

Garnet Mica Schist/ Gneiss (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Garnet Mica Schist/ Gneiss

Fort Payne Chert (Mississippian) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Fort Payne Chert (Mfp) with Lavender Shale Member (Mls)

Cross-Biotite Schist (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Cross-Biotite Schist

Conasauga Group; Maynardville Limestone (Cambrian) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Conasauga Group; Maynardville Limestone

Chickamauga Group; Upper and Middle Ordovician rocks (Oum) includes Sequatchie Limestone, Murfreesboro Limestone, Ridley Limestone, Moccasin Limestone and Bays Formation. (Ordovician) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Chickamauga Group; Upper and Middle Ordovician rocks (Oum) includes Sequatchie Limestone, Murfreesboro Limestone, Ridley Limestone, Moccasin Limestone and Bays Formation.

Chickamauga Group; Upper and Middle Ordovician Rocks (Omb) includes Moccasin Limestone and Bays Formation (Ordovician) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Chickamauga Group; Upper and Middle Ordovician Rocks (Omb) includes Moccasin Limestone and Bays Formation.

Graphitic Phyllite (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Graphitic Phyllite

Chickamauga Group; Middle Ordovician rocks; Rockmart Slate (Middle Ordovician) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Chickamauga Group; Middle Ordovician rocks; Rockmart Slate

Cooper Marl (Eocene) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

It is now recognized that this unit is not the precise lithologic or biostratigraphic equivalent of type Cooper Marl (Huddlestun, Marsalis & Pickering, 1974).

Aeolian sand deposits - parabolic dunes (Quaternary) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Aeolian sand deposits - parabolic dunes

Granite/ biotite granite/ amphibolite (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Granite/ biotite granite/ amphibolite

Calc-silicate Granite Gneiss (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Calc-silicate Granite Gneiss

Quartzite/ Phyllite (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Quartzite/ Phyllite

Button Mica Schist (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Button Mica Schist

Holocene Shoreline Complex - barrier island facies (Holocene) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Holocene Shoreline Complex - barrier island facies

Ultramafic rocks undifferentiated (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Ultramafic rocks undifferentiated

Lookout Sandstone; Sewanee Sandstone (Pennsylvanian) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Lookout Sandstone; Sewanee Sandstone

Lisbon Formation (Eocene) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Lisbon Formation

Meta-argillite/ Phyllite (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Meta-argillite/ Phyllite

Amphibolite/ Epidote Quartzite/ Granite Gneiss (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Amphibolite/ Epidote Quartzite/ Granite Gneiss

Undifferentiated pelitic rocks (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Includes mica schists, metasiltstones, metaconglomerates, and metagraywackes

Meta-argillite/ Sericite phyllite/ Metavolcanics (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Meta-argillite/ Sericite phyllite/ Metavolcanics

Epidote Quartzite/ Amphibolite/ Sericite Schist/ Biotite Granite Gneiss (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Epidote Quartzite/ Amphibolite/ Sericite Schist/ Biotite Granite Gneiss

Quartz Mica Schist/ Hornblende Schist/ Biotitic Gneiss (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Quartz Mica Schist/ Hornblende Schist/ Biotitic Gneiss

Hornblende-Biotite Gneiss/ Amphibolite (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Hornblende-Biotite Gneiss/ Amphibolite

Charnockite (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Charnockite

Lookout Sandstone; Gizzard Formation (Pennsylvanian) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Lookout Sandstone; Gizzard Formation

Quartz Sericite Schist/ Biotitic Gneiss (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Quartz Sericite Schist/ Biotitic Gneiss

Gabbro (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Gabbro

Sericite Schist/ Amphibolite (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Sericite Schist/ Amphibolite

Metagraywacke/ Mica Schist/ Calc-silicate Gneiss (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Metagraywacke/ Mica Schist/ Calc-silicate Gneiss

Shady Dolomite (Cambrian) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Shady Dolomite

Conasauga Group; Lower unit; lower dolostone unit (Cambrian) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Includes shale and sandstone unit (Ccs) with lower dolostone unit (Ccdl). Possible equivalent of Pumpkin Valley Shale of Tennessee

Amphibolite/ Ultramafic (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Amphibolite/ Ultramafic

Quartzite/ Mica Schist/ Amphibolite (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Quartzite/ Mica Schist/ Amphibolite

Non-porphyritic granite (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Non-porphyritic granite

Fort Payne Shale; Lavender Shale Member (Mississippian) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Fort Payne Shale (Mfp) with Lavender Shale Member (Mls)

Chilhowee Formation (Cambrian) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Includes Weisner Formation of Kesler, 1950

Phyllite undifferentiated (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Phyllite undifferentiated

Sericite Schist/ Amphibolite/ Granite gneiss (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Sericite Schist/ Amphibolite/ Granite gneiss

Clayton Formation (Paleocene) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Clayton Formation

Conasauga Group; Upper unit; Dolostone member (Cambrian) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Includes limestone and shale unit (Ccsl). Possible equivalent of the Maryville Limestone and Nolichucky Shale of Tennessee with a dolostone member (Ccd).

Biotite Gneiss/ Hornblende Gneiss/ Granite Gneiss (Age uncertain) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Biotite Gneiss/ Hornblende Gneiss/ Granite Gneiss

Amphibolite/ Metagraywacke/ Mica Schist (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Amphibolite/ Metagraywacke/ Mica Schist

Charlton Formation and Duplin Marl (Pliocene) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Charlton Formation and Duplin Marl

Alluvial, coastal and low terrace deposits (Holocene) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Varicolored fine to coarse quartz sand containing clay lenses and gravel in places. Gravel composed of quartz and chert pebbles and assorted metmorphic and igneous rock fragments in streams near the Piedmont. In areas of the Valley and Ridge province gravel composed of angular to subrounded chert, quartz, and quartzite pebbles. Coastal deposits include fine to medium quartz sand with shell fragments and accessory heavy minerals along Gulf beaches and fine to medium quartz sand, silt, clay, peat, mud and ooze in the Mississippi Sound, Little Lagoon, bays, lakes, streams, and estuaries.

Quartzite/ Metagraywacke (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Quartzite/ Metagraywacke

McBean Formation (Eocene) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

McBean Formation

Amphibolitic Schist (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Amphibolitic Schist

Amphibolitic Schist/ Amphibolite (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Amphibolitic Schist/ Amphibolite

Muscovite Granite Gneiss (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Muscovite Granite Gneiss

Chickamauga Group; Middle Ordovician rocks; Athens Shale (Middle Ordovician) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Chickamauga Group; Middle Ordovician rocks; includes the Athens Shale (Oa)

Biotite Gneiss/ Mica Schist (Age uncertain) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Biotite Gneiss/ Mica Schist

Amphibolitic Schist/ Amphibolite-Metagraywacke/ Mica Schist (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Amphibolitic Schist/ Amphibolite-Metagraywacke/ Mica Schist

Quartzite/ Biotite Granite Gneiss (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Quartzite/ Biotite Granite Gneiss

Mafic Hornfels (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Mafic Hornfels

Alluvial Valley Swamp (Quaternary) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Unconformable on all underlying units, fluvial sand and gravel at base, grading upwards into fine sands and silts, local peat. May be overrun with recent sediments from forest cutting and agriculture.

Armuchee Chert (Devonian) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Armuchee Chert

Sericite Schist/ Micaceous Quartzite/ Sericite Phyllite (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Sericite Schist/ Micaceous Quartzite/ Sericite Phyllite

Clinchfield Sand (Eocene) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Clinchfield Sand

Frog Mountain (Devonian) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Frog Mountain

Amphibolite / gabbro (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Amphibolite / gabbro

Floyd Shale; Hartselle Sandstone member (Mississippian) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Hartselle Sandstone member (Mh) in Floyd County

Mafic to intermediate metavolcanic rocks (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Mafic to intermediate metavolcanic rocks

Conglomerate (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Conglomerate

Calcareous mica schist/ Micaceous marble/ Mica schist (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Calcareous mica schist/ Micaceous marble/ Mica schist

Tallahatta Formation (Eocene) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Tallahatta Formation

Garnet Mica Schist/ Amphibolite (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Garnet Mica Schist/ Amphibolite

Tidal Marsh (Quaternary) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Peat and muck deposits along tidal margins of esturaries and back bays. Deposits range from a few feet to 60+ feet deep. Locally include silt and fine sand and clay as levees on tidal channels. At depth peaty material may be accumulated from fresh water plants. Peat at the surface dominated by spartina and other salt tolerant species.

Marble (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Marble

Sillimanite Schist/ Amphibolite (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Sillimanite Schist/ Amphibolite

Chickamauga Group; Holston Limestone (Ordovician) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Chickamauga Group; Holston Limestone

Bangor Limestone (Mississippian) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Bangor Limestone

Metagraywacke undifferentiated (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Metagraywacke undifferentiated

Chickamauga Group; Chota Formation (Ordovician) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Chickamauga Group; Chota Formation

Floyd Shale; unnamed limestone member (Mississippian) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Floyd Shale; unnamed limestone member (Ml in Floyd County) at the base

Flinty Crush Rock (Age uncertain) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Flinty Crush Rock

Little River Sequence, metasedimentary rocks (Cambrian or Neoproterozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

White-mica schist and phyllite, metatuff, quartz-muscovite schist, and minor quartzite

Hawthorn Group, Statenville Formation (Miocene) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

The Statenville Formation occurs at or near the surface in a limited area of Hamilton, Columbia and Baker Counties on the northeastern flank of the Ocala Platform. The formation consists of interbedded sands, clays and dolostones with common to very abundant phosphate grains. The sands predominate and are light gray to light olive gray, poorly indurated, phosphatic, fine to coarse grained with scattered gravel and with minor occurrences of fossils. Clays are yellowish gray to olive gray, poorly consolidated, variably sandy and phosphatic, and variably dolomitic. The dolostones, which occur as thin beds, are yellowish gray to light orange, poorly to well indurated, sandy, clayey and phosphatic with scattered mollusk molds and casts. Phosphate occurs in the Statenville Formation in economically important amounts. Silicified fossils and opalized claystones are found in the Statenville Formation. Permeability of these sediments is generally low, forming part of the intermediate confining unit/aquifer system.

Aeolian sand deposits - formless deposits (Quaternary) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Aeolian sand deposits - formless deposits

Tallulah Falls Formation, gneiss and schist (Neoproterozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Biotite-quartz-plagioclase gneiss interpreted to be metagraywacke, and interlayered biotite-muscovite schist, garnet-mica schist and amphibolite

Wallhalla metamorphic suite (Cambrian or Neoproterozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Predominately hornblende-plagioclase gneiss and amphibolite, locally having interlayers of biotite-quartz-feldspar gneiss, undivided

Dadeville Complex; Ropes Creek Amphibolite (Precambrian to Paleozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Layered and massive amphibolite; locally includes hornblende migmatite and ultramafic pods.

Undifferentiated sediments (Pliocene/Pleistocene) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Undifferentiated Tertiary-Quaternary Sediments - These sediments are siliciclastics that are separated from undifferentiated Quaternary sediments solely on the basis of elevation. Based on the suggestion that the Pleistocene sea levels reached a maximum of approximately 100 feet (30 meters) msl (Colquhoun, 1969), these sediments, which occur above 100 feet (30 meters) msl, are predominantly older than Pleistocene but contain some sediments reworked during the Pleistocene. This unit may include fluvial and aeolian deposits. The undifferentiated Tertiary-Quaternary sediments occur in a band extending from the Georgia-Florida state line in Baker and Columbia Counties southward to Alachua County. These sediments are gray to blue green, unconsolidated to poorly consolidated, fine to coarse grained, clean to clayey, unfossiliferous sands, sandy clays and clays. Organic debris and disseminated organics are present in these sediments. The undifferentiated Tertiary-Quaternary sediments are part of the surficial aquifer system.

Hawthorn Group, Torreya Formation (Miocene) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

The Torreya Formation is exposed or near the surface from western Gadsden County eastward to western-most Hamilton County. It is informally subdivided into a lower carbonate unit and an upper siliciclastic unit (Scott, 1988). The majority of Torreya Formation outcrops expose the siliciclastic part of the unit. The carbonate sediments are white to light olive gray, generally poorly indurated, variably sandy and clayey, fossiliferous (molds and casts) limestone (mudstone and wackestone). The limestones often grade into calcareous-cemented sands. Phosphate is present in the carbonate sediments, particularly in the Sopchoppy Member. The siliciclastics vary from white to light olive gray, unconsolidated to poorly indurated, slightly clayey sands with minor phosphate to light gray to bluish gray, poorly consolidated, variably silty clay (Dogtown Member). The siliciclastics are sporadically fossiliferous. The Torreya Formation overlies the FAS and forms part of the intermediate confining unit/aquifer system.

Ashe Metamorphic Suite and Tallulah Falls Formation; Biotite gneiss (Late Proterozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Interlayered with biotite-garnet gneiss, biotite-muscovite schist, garnet-mica schist, and amphibolite.

Residuum on Oligocene sediments (Oligocene) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

The undifferentiated Oligocene residuum, mapped on parts of the Chattahoochee "Anticline", characteristically consists of reddish brown, variably sandy clay with inclusions of variably fossiliferous, silicified limestone (Huddlestun, 1993). The residuum includes Lower and Upper Oligocene weathered sediments (Huddlestun, 1993).

Sandersville Limestone (Eocene) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Sandersville Limestone

Miccosukee Formation (Pliocene) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

The Miccosukee Formation, named by Hendry and Yon (1967), is a siliciclastic unit with a limited distribution in the eastern panhandle. It occurs in the Tallahassee Hills from central Gadsden County to eastern Madison County, often capping hills. The Miccosukee Formation grades to the west, through a broad facies transition, in central Gadsden County into the Citronelle Formation. The Miccosukee Formation is a prodeltaic deposit. The Miccosukee Formation is composed of grayish orange to grayish red, mottled, poorly to moderately consolidated, interbedded clay, sand and gravel of varying coarseness and admixtures (Hendry and Yon, 1967). The unit is relatively impermeable but is considered a part of the surficial aquifer system (Southeastern Geological Society, 1986).

Migmatite paragneiss and schist of Kiokee belt (Cambrian or Neoproterozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Migmatitic hornblende-biotite paragneiss having interlayered sillimanite schist and amphibolite

Biotite-plagioclase-quartz gneiss and biotite-muscovite schist (Cambrian or Neoproterozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Variably interlayered, containing subordinate layers of amphibolite and sillimanite-mica schist

Nolichucky Shale, and Maryville, Rogersville, and Rutledge Formations, and Pumpkin Valley Shale (Cambrian) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

(Cn) Nolichucky Shale - Pastel-colored (pink, greenish, olive), flaky clay shale; gray, commonly oolitic, shaly limestone lenses; locally stromatolitic limestone layers; thin, blocky siltstone near middle. Thickness 500 feet in the east to 900 feet in the west.; (Cmr) Maryville, Rogersville, and Rutledge Formations - Maryvile and Rutledge are gray limestone, in part oolitic, with gray dolomite locally. Rogersville is green clay shale. Thickness 400 to 1,000 feet. Pumpkin Valley Shale - Dull-brown to maroon shale with numerous interbeds of thin, blocky, sandy siltstone. Thickness 100 to 600 feet.

Chickamauga Group; Middle Ordovician rocks; Lenoir Limestone (Middle Ordovician) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Chickamauga Group; Middle Ordovician rocks; Lenoir Limestone

Dadeville Complex; Rock Mills Granite Gneiss (Precambrian to Paleozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Coarse to medium-grained biotite granite gneiss; locally includes thick bands of epidote and thin, small amphibolite bodies. Boundary between Rock Mills Granite Gneiss and Camp Hill Granite Gneiss arbitrarily defined.

Wedowee Group; Wedowee Group undifferentiated (Precambrian to Paleozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Wedowee Group undifferentiated includes the Cragford Phyllite and Cutnose Gneiss. Cragford Phyllite -- interbedded fine-grained graphite-chlorite-sericite schist and phyllite, garnet-sericite schist and phyllite, graphite-quartz-sericite phyllite, locally feldspathic biotite gneiss, calc-silicate rock, and quartzite. Cutnose Gneiss -- cyclically interbedded fine-grained quartz-biotite feldspathic gneiss, graphite-chlorite-sericite schist, locally thin interbeds of graphite-quartz-sericite phyllite, and quartzite. Rocks in the area northeast of Clanton in Chilton and Coosa Counties that are here assigned to the Wedowee Group also have been interpreted as part of the Higgins Ferry Group.

Great Smoky Group, including Anakeesta Formation, Thunderhead Sandstone, and Elkmont Sandstone (Precambrian) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Great Smoky Group - Characterized by very massive layers of coarse graywacke and arkose. The formations have been mapped only in the region of the Great Smoky Mountains. Near Ducktown, in ascending order, the Copperhill, Hughes Gap, Hothouse, and Dean Formations are recognized. Thickness 14,000 to about 40,000 feet. Includes Anakeesta Formation - Dark-gray, bluish-gray, and black slate with dark-gray interbeds of fine-grained sandstone. Thickness 3,000 to 4,500 feet; Thunderhead Sandstone - Coarse, gray feldspathic sandstone, graywacke, and conglomerate; occurs in massive ledges; graded bedding and blue quartz characteristic. Thickness 5,500 to 6,300 feet; Elkmont Sandstone - Coarse to fine, gray feldspathic sandstone, graywacke, and fine conglomerate; generally finer grained beds in lower part; graded bedding typical. Thickness 1,000 to 8,000 feet.

Walden Creek Group; Sandsuck Formation (Precambrian) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Olive-green and gray, argillaceous, micaceous shale with coarse feldspathic sandstone and quartz- pebble conglomerate. Thickness about 2,000 feet.

Ocoee Supergroup, Great Smokey Group; Metasandstone, Metagraywacke, Metasiltstone, and Mica Schist (Late Proterozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Beds and lenses of calc-silicate rock locally abundant; garnet, staurolite, and cross-biotite porphyroblasts common in fine-grained layers. Includes Hughes Gap and Hothouse formations in southern area; Horse Branch Member of Ammons Formation and Grassy Branch Formation in northern area.

Migmatitic granitoid gneiss (Ordovician) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Variably foliated, variably migmatitic, and granitic to quartz dioritic in composition

Walden Creek Group, including Sandsuck Formation, Wilhite Formation, Shields Formation, and Licklog Formation (Cambrian) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Walden Creek Group - The formations, other than the Sandsuck, are applicable mainly in the region of the Great Smoky Mountains. Thickness about 8,000 feet, Includes Sandsuck Formation - Olive-green and gray, argillaceous, micaceous shale with coarse feldspathic sandstone and quartz- pebble conglomerate. Thickness about 2,000 feet; Wilhite Formation - Gray to green siltstone and slate with interbeds of pebble conglomerate, sandstone, and quartzite. Thickness about 4,000 feet; Shields Formation - Massive conglomerate, sandstone, argillaceous slate; conglomerate (pebbles of various rock types) characteristic. Thickness about 1,500 feet.; Licklog Formation - Feldspathic sandstone, greenish phyllite, and bluish-gray slate. Thickness about 1,500 feet.

Opelika Complex; Auburn Gneiss (Precambrian to Paleozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Fine-grained biotite-oligoclase gneiss intermixed with coarse-grained muscovite-biotite schist; locally contains muscovite-rich pegmatite.

Uchee Complex; Phenix City Gneiss (Precambrian to Paleozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Biotite-epidote quartz diorite gneiss and biotite-hornblende gneiss; locally includes migmatitic amphibolite; cut by numerous granitic veins.

Granodiorite gneiss and granite gneiss (Devonian to Silurian) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Granodiorite gneiss and granite gneiss

Wilcox Group; Tuscahoma Sand (Paleocene) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Light-gray to light-olive-gray laminated and thin-bedded carbonaceous silt and clay interbedded with fine sand; thin lignite beds occur locally. Lower part of the formation includes beds of fossiliferous, glauconitic fine quartz sand containing speroidal sandstone concretions, gravel and clay pebbles.

Syenite (Precambrian-Paleozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Syenite

Coweeta Group; Biotite Gneiss (Middle/Late Proterozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Migmatitic; interlayered and gradational with biotite-garnet gneiss and amphibolite; locally abundant quartz and alumino-silicates. Stratigraphic position uncertain.

Gneissic granite of Starr (Silurian to Ordovician) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Gneissic biotite granite to granodiorite of Starr pluton and nearby satellite plutons

Gizzard Group, including Signal Point Shale, Warren Point Sandstone, and Raccoon Mountain Formation (Pennsylvanian) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Gizzard Group - Shale, siltstone, sandstone, and conglomerate; from base of Sewannee Conglomerate to top of Mississippian. Thickness 0 to 520 feet, including Signal Point Shale - Mostly dark-gray to light-brown shale, with minor siltstone. Wilder coal near top. Thickness 0 to 180 feet, average about 60 feet; Warren Point Sandstone - Sandstone and conglomeratic sandstone, gray to brown, fine- to medium-grained, locally interbedded with shale containing coal. Thickness 0 to 300 feet, thins from southeast to northwest, average thickness about 100 feet; Raccoon Mountain Formation - Shale, siltstone, and sandstone. Bon Air coal near top; White Oak and Sale Creek coals near base. Thickness 0 to 260 feet.

Emuckfaw Group; Emuckfaw Group undifferentiated in part (Precambrian to Paleozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Interbedded muscovite +/- garnet-biotite schist, metagraywacke, calc-silicate rock, and quartzite; rare thin amphibolite. Includes thin layers of aluminous graphitic schist. Locally sheared to mylonite schist.

Newman Limestone (Mississippian) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Gray limestone sequence near Cumberland Plateau and on Whiteoak Mountain. Shaly limestone, shale, siltstone, and sandstone on Chilhowee Mountain. Thickness about 700 feet.

Ocoee Supergroup, Great Smokey Group; Dean Formation (Late Proterozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Sericite schist with cross-biotite, staurolite, and garnet porphyroblasts; interbedded metagraywacke and quartz-pebble metaconglomerate.

Suwannee Limestone (Oligocene) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Peninsular Lower Oligocene carbonates crop out on the northwestern, northeastern and southwestern flanks of the Ocala Platform. The Suwannee Limestone is absent from the eastern side of the Ocala Platform due to erosion, nondeposition or both, an area referred to as Orange Island (Bryan, 1991). The Suwannee Limestone, originally named by Cooke and Mansfield (1936), consists of a white to cream, poorly to well indurated, fossiliferous, vuggy to moldic limestone (grainstone and packstone). The dolomitized parts of the Suwannee Limestone are gray, tan, light brown to moderate brown, moderately to well indurated, finely to coarsely crystalline, dolostone with limited occurrences of fossiliferous (molds and casts) beds. Silicified limestone is common in Suwannee Limestone. Fossils present in the Suwannee Limestone include mollusks, foraminifers, corals and echinoids.

Hawthorn Group, Coosawhatchie Formation, Charlton Member (Miocene/Pliocene) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

The Charlton Member (originally the Charlton formation, Veatch and Stevenson, 1911), crops out only in northern Nassau County near and along the St. Marys River. The Charlton Member in this area consists primarily of light gray to greenish gray, poorly to moderately consolidated, dolomitic to calcareous, silty, sandy, locally fossiliferous clays. Few carbonate beds occur.

Coweeta Group (Late Proterozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Quartz dioritic gneiss, feldspar-quartz-biotite gneiss, metasandstone and quartzite, alumino-silicate schist, garnetiferous biotite gneiss, and minor amphibolite. Quartz dioritic gneiss predominant.

Conasauga Formation (Cambrian) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Light to dark-gray finely to coarsely crystalline, medium to thick-bedded dolomite containing minor greenish-gray shale and light-bluish-gray chert. In the Columbiana area of Shelby County, the Conasauga is dominated by thin to medium-bedded, dark-gray dolomitic limestone and minor dark-gray shale. In Bibb County and southwestern Shelby County, the Conasauga consists of medium-bluish-gray fine-grained, thin-bedded argillaceous limestone and interbedded dark-gray shale. In the eastern Valley and Ridge the lower part includes dark-green to pale-olive fossiliferous shale with a few dark-gray limestone interbeds.

Copper Ridge Dolomite (Cambrian) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Copper Ridge Dolomite

Knox Group, including Newala Formation, Mascot Dolomite, Kingsport Formation, Longview Dolomite, Chepultepec Dolomite, and Copper Ridge Dolomite (Ordovician to Cambrian) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Siliceous dolomite and magnesian limestone sequence. Thickness 2,500 to 3,000 feet.

Selma Group; Providence Sand (Cretaceous) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Upper part consists of cross-bedded fine to coarse sand and white, dark-gray and pale-red-purple mottled clay containing lignite, sand, and kaolin; lower part consists of dark-gray laminated to thin-bedded silty clay and abundantly micaceous, carbonaceous, fossiliferous very fine to fine sand. The Providence Sand extends eastward from southeastern Lowndes County into Georgia.

Conasauga Group, including Maynardville Limestone, Nolichucky Shale, the Maryville, Rogersville, and Rutledge Formations, Pumpkin Valley Shale, Rome Formation, and Shady Dolomite (Cambrian) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Conasauga Group - Mostly shale northwest of a line connecting Etowah and Bearden (Knoxville); to the east it consists of the six formations at right [Cmn, Maynardville Limestone. Ccl including Cn, Nolichucky Shale, Cmr Maryville, Rogersville, and Rutledge Formations, and Pumpkin Valley Shale; Cr, Rome Formation, and Cs, Shady Dolomite. Thickness about 2,000 feet.

Dadeville Complex; Waresville Schist (Precambrian to Paleozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Banded amphibolite interlayered with chlorite schist, chlorite amphibolite, chlorite-actinolite schist, chlorite +/- magnetite quartzite, and actinolite quartzite; may include small ultramafic pods.

Ashe Metamorphic Suite and Tallulah Falls Formation; Muscovite-biotite gneiss (Late Proterozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Locally sulfidic; interlayered and gradational with mica schist, minor amphibolite, and hornblende gneiss.

Emuckfaw Group; Glenloch Schist (Precambrian to Paleozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Graphite-garnet-muscovite schist with interlayered metagraywacke.

Athens Shale (Ordovician) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Medium- to dark-gray, calcareous, graptolitic shale; calcareous gray sandstone, siltstone, and locally fine-pebble quartz conglomerate; nodules of shaly limestone near base. Maximum thickness 1,500 feet.

Mylonitic rocks of Modoc Fault Zone (Late Paleozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Mylonite gneiss

Lincolnton Metadacite (Neoproterozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Lincolnton Metadacite

Cypresshead Formation (Pliocene) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

The Cypresshead Formation named by Huddlestun (1988), is composed of siliciclastics and occurs only in the peninsula and eastern Georgia. It is at or near the surface from northern Nassau County southward to Highlands County forming the peninsular highlands. It appears that the Cypresshead Formation occurs in the subsurface southward from the outcrop region and similar sediments, the Long Key Formation, underlie the Florida Keys. The Cypresshead Formation is a shallow marine, near shore deposit equivalent to the Citronelle Formation deltaic sediments and the Miccosukee Formation prodeltaic sediments. The Cypresshead Formation consists of reddish brown to reddish orange, unconsolidated to poorly consolidated, fine to very coarse grained, clean to clayey sands. Cross bedded sands are common within the formation. Discoid quartzite pebbles and mica are often present. Clay beds are scattered and not areally extensive. In general, the Cypresshead Formation in exposure occurs above 100 feet (30 meters) above mean sea level (msl). Original fossil material is not present in the sediments although poorly preserved molds and casts of mollusks and burrow structures are occasionally present. The presence of these fossil "ghosts" and trace fossils documents marine influence on deposition of the Cypresshead sediments. The permeable sands of the Cypresshead Formation form part of the surficial aquifer system.

Pennington Formation (Mississippian) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Highly variegated clay shale, distinctive; contains siltstone and locally gray, fine-grained sandstone. Thickness 400 to 700 feet.

Copper Ridge Dolomite (Cambrian) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Coarse, dark-gray, knotty dolomite, asphaltic in places, with much gray, medium-grained, well- bedded dolomite; abundant chert; cryptozoans typical. Thickness about 1,000 feet.

Mylonitic and Cataclastic Rocks in the Brevard, Towaliga, and Goat Rock Fault Zones (Precambrian to Paleozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Blastomylonite, mylonite gneiss, locally includes mylonite schist and mylonite quartzite in Towaliga fault zone.

Chickamauga Group, includes Upper part of Chickamauga Group (Reedsville Shale, and Unnamed limestone unit) and Middle and Lower part of Chickamauga Group (Moccasin Formation, Bays Formation, Ottosee Shale, Holston Formation, Lenoir Limestone, Athens Shale, and Sevier Shale) (Ordovician) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

In the northwest part of the Valley and Ridge a predominantly limestone sequence about 2,000 feet thick. Becomes progressively more clastic and thicker to the southeast, including Upper part of Chickamauga Group (Reedsville Shale- Greenish-gray calcareous shale. Thickness 0 to 400 feet, and Unnamed Limestone Unit - Medium-grained, fossiliferous, gray limestone, shaly in part. Thickness as much as 600 feet ) and.Middle and lower parts of Chickamauga Group (Omlc).

Dadeville Complex; Waverly Gneiss (Precambrian to Paleozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Feldspathic biotite-hornblende gneiss with thin layers of amphibolite, calc-silicate rock, garnet quartzite, and muscovite schist; locally rich in manganese.

Motts Gneiss (Precambrian to Paleozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Leucocratic quartz-rich quartz diorite pencil gneiss.

Persimmon Fork Formation (Cambrian to Neoproterozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Predominately metatuff

Biotite quartz-plagioclase gneiss (Paleozoic or Neoproterozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Biotite quartz-plagioclase gneiss with minor interlayers of amphibolite gneiss and mica schist

Claiborne Group; Tallahatta Formation (Eocene) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

White to very light-greenish-gray thin-bedded to massive siliceous claystone; interbedded with thin layers of fossiliferous clay, sandy clay, and glauconitic sand and sandstone. White to light-greenish-gray fine to coarse sand and fine gravel occur at the base of the formation in southwest Alabama (Meridian Sand Member).

Dadeville Complex; Agricola Schist (Precambrian to Paleozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Agricola Schist - biotiite +/- garnet +/- sillimanite-feldspar-quartz schist, interlayered with thin-bedded dark-brown hornblende amphibolite; contains pegmatite pods and veins.

Rabun Gneiss (Ordovician) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Weakly to well foliated, granitic to quartz monzonitic.

Granite (Carboniferous to Permian) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Granite

Rockwood Formation (Silurian) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Brown to maroon shale, thin gray siltstone and sandstone, and thin lenticular layers of oolitic and fossiliferous red hematite. Thickness 200 to 800 feet.

Undifferentiated sediments (Pleistocene/Holocene) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Undifferentiated Quaternary Sediments - Much of Florida's surface is covered by a varying thickness of undifferentiated sediments consisting of siliciclastics, organics and freshwater carbonates. Where these sediments exceed 20 feet (6.1 meters) thick, they were mapped as discrete units. In an effort to subdivide the undifferentiated sediments, those sediments occurring in flood plains were mapped as alluvial and flood plain deposits (Qal). Sediments showing surficial expression of beach ridges and dunes were mapped separately (Qbd) as were the sediments composing Trail Ridge (Qtr). Terrace sands were not mapped (refer to Healy [1975] for a discussion of the terraces in Florida). The subdivisions of the Undifferentiated Quaternary Sediments (Qu) are not lithostratigraphic units but are utilized in order to facilitate a better understanding of the State's geology. The siliciclastics are light gray, tan, brown to black, unconsolidated to poorly consolidated, clean to clayey, silty, unfossiliferous, variably organic-bearing sands to blue green to olive green, poorly to moderately consolidated, sandy, silty clays. Gravel is occasionally present in the panhandle. Organics occur as plant debris, roots, disseminated organic matrix and beds of peat. Freshwater carbonates, often referred to as marls in the literature, are scattered over much of the State. In southern Florida, freshwater carbonates are nearly ubiquitous in the Everglades. These sediments are buff colored to tan, unconsolidated to poorly consolidated, fossiliferous carbonate muds. Sand, silt and clay may be present in limited quantities. These carbonates often contain organics. The dominant fossils in the freshwater carbonates are mollusks.

Latimer complex of Griffin (1979) (Paleozoic or Neoproterozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Metamorphosed mafic-ultramafic complex consisting mainly of mafic rocks including amphibolite, metagabbro, and greenstone metabasalt

Metamorphosed granitoid rocks, undivided (Paleozoic to Neoproterozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Metamorphosed granitoid rocks, undivided

Mineral Bluff Formation (Late Proterozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Quartz-chlorite-sericite schist and phyllite with thin quartzite layers and minor interbedded graphitic schist, garnet-mica schist, staurolite schist, cross-biotite schist, and dark slate.

Black Creek/Cusseta/Blufftown Formations (Cretaceous) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Moderately to poorly sorted sand and clay deposited in delta-dominated shallow marine environments. Unit is characterized by sands containing locally abundant (F-VC grained) tourmaline and (F-VC grained) muscovite with some monazite and garnet. Clay layers are also common and some lower delta plain deposits form commercial kaolin bodies. Generally very restricted marine in eastern Georgia becoming more open marine to the east and west.

Gneissic granite of Antreville pluton (Silurian to Ordovician) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Gneissic biotite granite to granodiorite

Selma Group; Cusseta Sand Member of the Ripley Formation (Cretaceous) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Cross-bedded, medium to coarse sand; glauconitic, fossiliferous fine sand; and dark-gray fossiliferous, micaceous, carbonaceous clay. The member occurs at the base of the Ripley Formation and extends from Georgia westward into Montgomery County where it merges with the Demopolis Chalk.

Chauga River Formation and Poor Mountain Formation, undivided (Cambrian or Neoproterozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Chauga River Formation and Poor Mountain Formation, undivided

Unnamed (upper part of Knox Group), including Newala Formation, Mascot Dolomite, Kingsport Formation, Longview Dolomite, and Chepultepec Dolomite (Ordovician) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

(Onc) Unnamed (upper part of the Knox Group), including the (On) Newala Formation; (Oma) Mascot Dolomite - Light-gray, fine-grained, well-bedded cherty dolomite; mottled (red and green) dolomite characteristic; interbeds of bluish-gray limestone in upper part; chert-matrix quartz sandstone at base. Erosional unconformity at top. Thickness 350 to 800 feet; (Ok) Kingsport Formation - Gray, fine-grained, sparingly cherty dolomite with basal dense, gray limestone sequence. Thickness about 250 feet. and (Olc) Unnamed (middle part of the Knox Group), including (Olv) Longview Dolomite - Siliceous, gray, fine-grained, medium-bedded dolomite; interbeds of gray limestone in upper part. Thickness about 300 feet; (Oc) Chepultepec Dolomite - Light-gray, fine-grained, well-bedded dolomite, moderately cherty; fine-grained limestone locally in upper part; quartz sandstone beds at base. Average thickness about 800 feet.

Jacksons Gap Group; Jacksons Gap Group undifferentiated in part (Precambrian to Paleozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Principally graphitic sericite (muscovite)-quartz schist; includes sericite-quartz phyllonite; sericite phyllonite, blastomylonite, porphyroclastic blastomylonite schist, and mylonite quartzite occur principally along margins in south and form most of unit northeast of Jacksons Gap, Tallapoosa County.

Knox Group undifferentiated in part (Ordovician-Cambrian) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Light-gray to light-brown locally sandy dolomite, dolomitic limestone, and limestone; characterized by abundant light-colored chert.

Opelika Complex; Loachapoka Schist (Precambrian to Paleozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Muscovite-quartz schist; locally contains biotite-garnet-muscovite schist, many layers conatin sillimanite (northeast of Mount Jefferson, Lee County); kyanite (west of Mount Jefferson); locally muscovite-rich schist and quartzite common.

Nantahala Formation and Tusquitee Quartzite, undivided (Late Proterozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Nantahala Formation: slate and metasiltstone, dark gray, laminated to thin bedded, sulfidic; Tusquitee Quartzite: white to light yellowish gray, numerous, thin slate layers.

Brasstown Formation (Late Proterozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Cross-biotite schist; includes micaceous quartzite in lower part.

Fort Payne Formation (Mississippian) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Bedded chert, calcareous and dolomitic, somewhat crinoidal; and minor shale. Thin green shale (Maury) at base. Average thickness about 200 feet.

Metavolcanic and metasedimentary rocks of Bel Air Belt (Ordovician to Neoproterozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Metavolcanic and metasedimentary rocks of Bel Air Belt

Ocoee Supergroup, Great Smokey Group; Wehutty Formation (Late Proterozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Slate to schist, dark gray, graphitic and sulfidic; includes mica schist, metagraywacke, and metaconglomerate.

Red Mountain Formation (Silurian) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Interbedded yellowish-gray to moderate-red sandstone, siltstone and shale; greenish-gray to moderate-red fossiliferous partly silty and sandy limestone; few thin hematitic beds.

Talladega Group; Lay Dam Formation (Silurian?-Devonian) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Interbedded dark-green phyllite, medium-gray to light-brown and black metasiltstone, dark-green feldspathic metagraywacke, and light-gray and dark-gray medium to coarse-grained arkosic quartzite and metaconglomerate; graphitic phyllite common in upper part. In Cleburne and Calhoun Counties, rocks mapped as the Lay Dam include the Abel Gap Formation of Bearce (1973) and consist of interbedded greenish-gray metasiltstone and quartzite, black phyllitic metasiltstone, medium-gray to greenish-gray arkosic quartzite, and dark-gray pyritic quartzite. In Clay Chounty the upper part of the Lay Dam includes black graphitic sericite phyllite and slate reportedly containing plant fossils (Erin Slate Member).

Monteagle Limestone (Mississippian) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Mainly fragmental and oolitic, light-gray limestone; blocky bryozoan chert weathers from base. Thickness 180 to 300 feet.

Socastee Formation (Pleistocene) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Low coastal formation in Carolinas like Penholoway but younger and lower in altitude.

Rome Formation (Cambrian) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Variegated (red, green, yellow) shale and siltstone with beds of gray, fine-grained sandstone. Maximum exposed thickness 1,500 feet.

Red Mountain Formation (Silurian) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Interbedded yellowish-gray to moderate-red sandstone, siltstone and shale; greenish-gray to moderate-red fossiliferous partly silty and sandy limestone; few thin hematitic beds.

Sequatchie Formation (Ordovician) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Maroon and gray shaly limestone, mottled greenish; with interbeds of calcareous, olive to maroon shale and siltstone. Average thickness about 200 feet.

Waccamaw Formation (Pleistocene) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Another Carolina costalized terrace of early-middle Pleistocene age. Deeply weathered.

Chenier plain and deltas of Suwannee & Chattahoochie Rivers (Holocene) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Chenier plain and deltas of Suwannee & Chattahoochie Rivers

Tuscumbia Limestone and Fort Payne Chert undivided (Mississippian) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Tuscumbia Limestone -- light-gray partly oolitic limestone; very coarse bioclastic crinoidal limestone common; light-gray chert nodules and concretions locally abundant. Fort Payne Chert -- very light to light-olive-gray, thin to thick-bedded fine to coarse-grained bioclastic (abundant pelmatozoans) limestone containing abundant nodules, lenses and beds of light to dark-grey chert. Upper part of formation locally consists of light-bluish-gray laminated siltstone containing vugs lined or filled with quartz and scattered throughout the formation are interbeds of medium to greenish-gray shale, shaly limestone and siltstone. Lenses of dark-gray siliceous shale occur locally at the base of the Fort Payne in Wills Valley. Commonly present below the Fort Payne is a ligh-olive-gray claystone or shale (Maury Formation) which is mapped with the Fort Payne. The Tuscumbia and Fort Payne are undifferentiated in Murphrees and Wills Valleys.

Maynardville Limestone (Cambrian) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Thick-bedded, bluish-gray, ribboned (silt and dolomite), nodular limestone; light-gray, fine- grained, laminated to thin-bedded, noncherty dolomite in upper part. Thickness 150 to 400 feet.

High terrace deposits (Pleistocene) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Varicolored lenticular beds of poorly sorted sand, ferruginous sand, silt, clay, and gravelly sand. Sand consists primarily of very fine to very coarse poorly sorted quartz grains; gravel composed of quartz, quartzite, and chert pebbles.

Ottosee Shale (Ordovician) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Bluish-gray calcareous shale, weathers yellow; with reef lenses of coarsely crystalline reddish fossiliferous limestone ("marble"). Thickness about 1,000 feet.

Pottsville Formation (Pennsylvanian) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Light-gray thin to thick-bedded quartzose sandstone and conglomerate containing interbedded dark-gray shale, siltstone, and coal. Mapped on Lookout Mountain, Blount and Chandler Mountains, and Sand Mountain northeats of Blount County, and on the mountains of Jackson, Marshall and Madison Counties north and west of the TN river.

Ocoee Supergroup, Great Smokey Group; Copperhill Formation (Late Proterozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Metagraywacke, massive, graded bedding common; includes dark-gray slate, mica schist, and nodular calc-silicate rock.

Mylonitic rocks of Brevard fault zone (Late Paleozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Mylonitic and phyllonitic equivalents of Chauga River Formation and other adjacent rock units

Penholoway Formation (Pleistocene) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Similar to Cape May, broad lateral extent underlying terraces in the Carolinas; swamps and ridges on terrace surface were originally barrier islands and back bays. Superimposed on these landforms are swarms of Carolina bays.

Ocoee Supergroup; Great Smokey Group, undivided (Late Proterozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Thick metasedimentary sequence of massive to graded beds of metagraywacke and metasiltstone with interbedded graphitic and sulfidic slate and schist.

Floyd Shale (Mississippian) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Dark-gray shale, sideritic in part; thin beds of sandstone, limestone and chert are locally present; beds of partly bioclastic, partly argillaceous limestone are abundant in parts of Calhoun and Cherokee Counties.

Residuum on Eocene sediments (Eocene) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

The post-Eocene residuum lying on Eocene sediments in the panhandle consists of reddish brown, sandy clays and clayey sands with inclusions of weathered Eocene limestones. Some of the inclusions are silicified carbonates.

Mylonitic and Cataclastic Rocks in the Brevard, Towaliga, and Goat Rock Fault Zones (Precambrian to Paleozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Mylonite and blastomylonite; contains minor ultramylonite, mylonite schist, and mylonite gneiss.

Citronelle Formation (Pliocene) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

The Citronelle Formation is widespread in the Gulf Coastal Plain. The type section for the Citronelle Formation, named by Matson (1916), is near Citronelle, Alabama. The Citronelle Formation grades laterally, through a broad facies transition, into the Miccosukee Formation of the eastern Florida panhandle. Coe (1979) investigated the Citronelle Formation in portions of the western Florida panhandle. The Citronelle Formation is a siliciclastic, deltaic deposit that is lithologically similar to, and time equivalent with, the Cypresshead Formation and, at least in part, the Long Key Formation (Cunningham et al., 1998) of the peninsula. In the western panhandle, some of the sediments mapped as Citronelle Formation may be reworked Citronelle. The lithologies are the same and there are few fossils present to document a possible younger age. The Citronelle Formation consists of gray to orange, often mottled, unconsolidated to poorly consolidated, very fine to very coarse, poorly sorted, clean to clayey sands. It contains significant amounts of clay, silt and gravel which may occur as beds and lenses and may vary considerably over short distances. Limonite nodules and limonite-cemented beds are common. Marine fossils are rare but fossil pollen, plant remains and occasional vertebrates are found. Much of the Citronelle Formation is highly permeable. It forms the Sand and Gravel Aquifer of the surficial aquifer system.

Chickamauga Limestone (Ordovician) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Medium to dark-gray thick to thin-bedded partly argillaceous, locally fossiliferous limestone. Restricted to the western part of the Valley and Ridge province and Murphrees Valley and Wills Valley anticlines. Locally includes a thin interval of Attalla Chert Conglomerate Member at base. Attalla Chert Conglomerate - conglomerate of pebbles, cobbles, and boulders of chert and rare dolomite and quartzite in a sand-sized matrix; thin beds of gray-green or dusky-red shale common at base.

Talladega Group; Jemison Chert and Chulafinnee Schist undifferentiated (Silurian?-Devonian) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Grayish-white to yellowish-orange massive, thick-bedded, fine-grained, locally argillaceous, locally fossiliferous metachert and light to dark-greenish-gray fine to medium-grained fissile quartz-sericite-chlorite phyllite and schist which locally includes thin chlorite phyllite and quartzose phyllite beds.

Midway Group; Clayton Formation (Paleocene) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

White to yellowsih-gray argillaceous limestone occurs in the upper part (McBryde Limestone Member): the lower part is medium-gray fossiliferous calcareous silt, glauconitic sand and thin beds of sandy limestone and calcareous sandstone (Pine Barren Member). At the base of the formation in southeast AL is a gravelly medium to coarse sand containing clay pebbles. The formation thins west of Wilcox County and westward from Thomaston in eastern Marengo County is mapped with the Porters Creek Formation. The formation is generally deeply weathered and fresh exposures are rare. In western areas exposures consist of weathered white to yellowish-gray argillaceous, fossiliferous sandy limestone, ferruginous sand, and fossiliferous sandstone. In eastern areas exposures consist of residual accumulations of chert boulders, moderate-reddish-orange sand, and clay containing masses and thin layers of iron minerals (limonite-goethite).

Ashe Metamorphic Suite and Tallulah Falls Formation; Amphibolite (Late Proterozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Equigranular, massive to well foliated, interlayered, rarely discordant, metamorphosed intrusive to extrusive mafic rock; may include metasedimentary rock.

Murphy Marble, Andrews Formation, and Nottely Quartzite, undivided (Late Proterozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Murphy Marble: calcareous to dolomitic; Andrews Formation: calcareous cross-biotite schist; Nottely Quartzite: meta-orthoquartzite with slate.

Dadeville Complex; Mafic and ultramafic rock (Precambrian to Paleozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Ultramafic rock including enstatite pyroxenite, layered actinolite-tremolite amphibolite altered locally to serpentine, anthophyllite, and talc; metanorite; metagabbro; hornblendite; garnet-hornblendite, and massive amphibolite.

Bangor Limestone and Hartselle Formation (Mississippian) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Bangor Limestone - Dark brownish-gray limestone, thick-bedded. Thickness 70 to 400 feet., and Hartselle Formation - Thin-bedded, fine-grained sandstone interbedded with gray shale; with oolitic and coarse-grained limestone beds locally. Thickness 0 to 80 feet.

Monteagle Limestone (Mississippian) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Light-gray oolitic limestone containing interbedded argillaceous, bioclastic, or dolomitic limestone, dolomite, and medium-gray shale.

Burkes Mountain complex, ultramafic rock (Cambrian or Neoproterozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Burkes Mountain complex, ultramafic rock

Crab Orchard Mountains Group, including Rockcastle Conglomerate, Vandever Formation, Newton Sandstone, Whitwell Shale, and Sewanee Conglomerate (Pennsylvanian) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Crab Orchard Mountains Group - Conglomerate, sandstone, siltstone, shale, and coal; from top of Rockcastle Conglomerate to base of Sewanee Conglomerate. Thickness 200 to 950 feet; including Rockcastle Conglomerate - Conglomeratic sandstone and sandstone, gray to brown, fine- to coarse-grained. Thin coal-bearing shale locally present near middle. Thickness 150 to 220 feet; Vandever Formation - Mostly shale and siltstone, dark-gray to light-brown; conglomerate or sandstone in middle to south. Lantana and Morgan Springs coals near base and top. Thickness as much as 450 feet, average about 300 feet; Newton Sandstone - Sandstone, gray to brown or pink, fine- to medium-grained, locally conglomeratic. Thickness as much as 200 feet; average about 90 feet; Whitwell Shale - Mostly dark-gray to light-brown shale, with minor siltstone; locally middle part is sandstone. Richland coal near base; Sewanee coal in upper part. Thickness as much as 220 feet, average about 75 feet; Sewanee Conglomerate - Conglomeratic sandstone and sandstone, gray to brown, fine- to coarse-grained. Thickness as much as 200 feet, average about 100 feet.

Richtex Formation (Ordovician to Middle Cambrian) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Laminated metamudstone; contains Middle Cambrian or younger sponge spicules

Parkwood and Pennington Formations undifferentiated (Pennsylvanian-Mississippian) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Interbedded medium to dark-gray shale and light to medium-gray sandstone, locally contains lithic conglomerate, dusky-red and grayish-green mudstone, argillaceous limestone, and clayey coal.

Bangor Limestone (Mississippian) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Medium-gray bioclastic and oolitic limestone, containing interbeds of dusky-red and olive-green mudstone in upper part.

Motts Gneiss, Unnamed unit (Precambrian to Paleozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Unnamed unit comprised of masses of epidote-hornblende-oligoclase mylonitic gneiss and amphibolite.

Lenoir Limestone (Ordovician) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Nodular, argillaceous, gray limestone; in places basal sedimentary breccia, conglomerate, quartz sand; Mosheim Limestone Member (dense, light- to medium-gray limestone) near base. Thickness 25 to 500 feet.

Sequatchie Formation, Colvin Mountain Sandstone, Greensport Formation undifferentiated (Ordovician) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Variegated dusky-red and pale-yellowish-orange shale, calcareous mudstone, dolomite, siltstone, and minor sandstone. Mapped in areas of facies transition with the Chickamauga Limestone (Scraper Mountain) and in the structurally complex area at the east end of Dry Creek Mountain.

Sequatchie Formation (Ordovician) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Light-olive-gray and dusky-red calcareous shale interbedded with light to dark-gray fine to coarse-grained partly bioclastic, argillaceous, locally glauconitic limestone.

Pine Mountain Group; Manchester Schist (Precambrian to Paleozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Interlayered muscovite-quartz schist and quartzite, locally contains garnet, sillimanite and graphite; commonly intensely shared.

Copper Ridge Dolomite (Ordovician) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Coarse, dark-gray, knotty dolomite, asphaltic in places; with much gray, medium-grained, well- bedded dolomite; abundant chert; cryptozoans typical. Thickness about 1,000 feet.

Holston Formation (Ordovician) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Pink, gray, and red coarsely crystalline limestone (Holston Marble); in many areas upper part is sandy, crossbedded ferruginous limestone and brown to greenish calcareous shale. Thickness 200 to 600 feet.

Little Oak and Lenoir Limestones undifferentiated (Ordovician) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Dark-gray argillaceous, fossiliferous medium to thick-bedded limestone; locally contains rare chert in upper part and an interval of fenestral mudstone in lower part (Mosheim Limestone Member of the Lenoir Limestone). Between Siluria and Pelham in Shelby County, the Little Oak and Lenoir Limestones are seperated by a tongue of the Athens Shale.

Coweeta Group; Amphibolite (Middle/Late Proterozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Equigranular, massive to well foliated, interlayered, rarely discordant, metamorphosed intrusive to extrusive mafic rock; may include metasedimentary rock.

Tuscumbia Limestone and Fort Payne Chert undifferentiated (Mississippian) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Tuscumbia Limestone -- light to dark-gray fossiliferous and oolitic partly argillaceous and cherty limestone. Apparently present only along part of the northwest limb of the Coosa synclinorium. Fort Payne Chert -- dark-gray to light-gray limestone with abundant irregular light-gray chert nodules and beds. Commonly present below the Fort Payne is greenish-gray to grayish-red phosphatic shale (Maury Formation) which is mapped with the Tuscumbia Limestone and Fort Payne Chert undifferentiated.

Beaverdam Amphibolite (Precambrian to Paleozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Dark-green to dark-gray hornblende amphibolite, extensively sheared and folded, and locally retrograded to actinolite-tremolite-chlorite schist. Includes all amphibolite associated with the Wedowee Group.

St. Louis Limestone and Warsaw Limestone (Mississippian) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

St. Louis Limestone - Fine-grained, brownish-gray limestone, dolomitic and cherty. Thickness 80 to 160 feet.; and Warsaw Limestone - Mainly medium- to coarse-grained, gray limestone, crossbedded. Includes much calcareous sandstone and shale to the north. Thickness 100 to 130 feet.

Selma Group; Ripley Formation (Cretaceous) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Light-gray to pale-olive massive, micaceous, glauconitic, fossiliferous fine sand; sandy calcareous clay; and thin indurated beds of fossiliferous sandstone.

Bangor and Monteagle Limestones undivided in part (Mississippian) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Bangor Limestone -- medium-gray bioclastic and oolitic limestone, containing interbeds of dusky-red and olive-green mudstone in upper part. Monteagle Limestone -- light-gray oolitic limestone containing interbedded argillaceous, bioclastic, or dolomitic limestone, dolomite, and medium-gray shale.

Conasauga Formation (Cambrian) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Medium-bluish-gray fine-grained, thin-bedded argillaceous limestone and interbedded dark-gray shale in varying proportions.

Meta-ultramafic Rock (Paleozoic/Late Proterozoic) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Metamorphosed dunite, local peridotite; serpentinite, soapstone, and other altered ultramafic rock. Only larger bodies shown.

Rome Formation (Cambrian) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Variegated thinly interbedded mudstone, shale, siltstone, and sandstone; limestone and dolomite occur locally. Quartzose sandstone commonly present near top of formation.

Claiborne Group; Gosport Sand and Lisbon Formation undifferentiated in part (Eocene) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Greenish-gray calcareous, glauconitic, fossiliferous clayey sand; marl; carbonaceous sand; carbonaceous silty clay; and coarse glauconitic, fossiliferous, quartz sand.

Red Mountain Formation (Silurian) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Dark-reddish-brown to olive-gray partly fossiliferous, mostly fine-grained sandstone interbedded with siltstone and shale; minor amounts of bioclastic limestone and conglomerate sandstone; includes hematitic beds and beds of ferruginous sandstone, outcrops in northeastern AL are finer grained and include more limestone.

Tuscumbia Limestone and Fort Payne Chert undifferentiated (Mississippian) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Tuscumbia Limestone -- light to dark-gray fossiliferous and oolitic partly argillaceous and cherty limestone, absent locally and too thin to map seperately. Fort Payne Chert -- dark-gray to light-gray limestone with abundant irregular light-gray chert nodules and beds. Commonly present below the Fort Payne is greenish-gray to grayish-red phosphatic shale (Maury Formation) which is mapped with the Tuscumbia Limestone and Fort Payne Chert undifferentiated.

Attalla Chert Conglomerate Member of the Chickamauga Limestone (Ordovician) at surface, covers < 0.1 % of this area

Conglomerate of pebbles, cobbles, and boulders of chert and rare dolomite and quartzite in a sand-sized chert and quartz matrix; thin beds of gray-green or dusky-red shale common at base.