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Integrated Geologic Map Databases for the United States: Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina, and South Carolina

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What does this data set describe?

Title:
Integrated Geologic Map Databases for the United States: Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina, and South Carolina
Abstract:
This open-file report presents the results of the USGS Mineral Resources Program activity to compile a national-scale geologic map database to support national and regional level projects, including mineral resource and geoenvironmental assessments. The only comprehensive sources of regional- and national-scale geologic maps are state geologic maps with scales ranging from 1:100,000 to 1:1,000,000. Digital versions of these state maps form the core of what is presented here. Because no adequate geologic map exists for the state of Alaska, it is being compiled in regional blocks that also form part of this national database. It is expected that this series will completed by approximately the end of 2007. These maps and databases are being released in blocks of states or, in the case of Alaska, as compiled blocks of 1:250,000-scale quadrangles as chapters in this series. For Alaska, formal maps as well as databases are being published here, whereas for the conterminous U.S. only state databases and preview graphics are presented, because published maps for most states already exist. For Alaska these regional compilations will form the base for compiling a new geologic map of the state. As documented in Chapter A, standards for the conterminous U.S. are somewhat different than those for Alaska and Hawaii.
Supplemental_Information:
This database consists of five major Arc/Info GIS datasets for each state; - one: geologic map with formations, - two: faults (where present), - three: dikes (where present), - four: miscellaneous line features (where present), - five: miscellaneous point features (where present).
  1. How might this data set be cited?
    Nicholson, Suzanne W., Dicken, Connie L., Foose, Michael P., and Mueller, Julia A.L., Integrated Geologic Map Databases for the United States: Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina, and South Carolina: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2005-1323, U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, VA.

    Online Links:

  2. What geographic area does the data set cover?
    West_Bounding_Coordinate: -84.321673
    East_Bounding_Coordinate: -75.164774
    North_Bounding_Coordinate: 36.588257
    South_Bounding_Coordinate: 33.652108
  3. What does it look like?
  4. Does the data set describe conditions during a particular time period?
    Currentness_Reference: publication date
  5. What is the general form of this data set?
    Geospatial_Data_Presentation_Form: map
  6. How does the data set represent geographic features?
    1. How are geographic features stored in the data set?
      This is a Vector data set.
    2. What coordinate system is used to represent geographic features?
      The map projection used is Lambert Conformal Conic.
      Projection parameters:
      Standard_Parallel: 33
      Standard_Parallel: 45
      Longitude_of_Central_Meridian: -100.0
      Latitude_of_Projection_Origin: 0
      False_Easting: 0.00000
      False_Northing: 0.00000
      Planar coordinates are encoded using coordinate pair
      Abscissae (x-coordinates) are specified to the nearest 0.01
      Ordinates (y-coordinates) are specified to the nearest 0.01
      Planar coordinates are specified in Meters
      The horizontal datum used is North American Datum of 1927.
      The ellipsoid used is Clarke 1866.
      The semi-major axis of the ellipsoid used is 6378206.4.
      The flattening of the ellipsoid used is 1/294.98.
  7. How does the data set describe geographic features?
    nc_geol.pat
    Polygon attribute table for the North Carolina geologic coverage. (Source: ESRI)
    orig_label
    unmodified map unit symbol from source cover.

    type: character width: 12 output width: 12 (Source: Doug Stoeser)
    ValueDefinition
    bzRocks of Brevard Fault Zone
    CclChilhowee Group; Lower Chilhowee
    CcuChilhowee Group; Upper Chilhowee
    ChgHenderson Gneiss
    CrRome Formation
    CsShady Dolomite
    CZabAmphibolite and Biotite Gneiss
    CZamAmphibolite
    CZbaMegacrystic Biotite Gneiss
    CZbbBanded Gneiss
    CZbfFine-grained Biotite Gneiss
    CZbgBiotite Gneiss and Schist
    CZblBlacksburg Formation
    CZcVolcanic Metaconglomerate
    CZfgFelsic Mica Gneiss
    CZfvFelsic Metavolcanic Rock
    CZfv1Uwharrie Formation; Felsic Metavolcanic Rock
    CZfv2Cid Formation; Felsic Metavolcanic Rock
    CZgMetamorphosed Granitic Rock
    CZgmsGarnet-Mica Schist
    CZigInjected Gneiss
    CZivIntermediate Metavolcanic Rock
    CZlgLineated Felsic Mica Gneiss
    CZma1Metagraywacke, Amphibolite, and Kyanite Schist
    CZma2Metagraywacke
    CZmdMetamudstone and Meta-Argillite
    CZmd1Tillery Formation; Metamudstone and Meta-Argillite
    CZmd2Cid Formation; Metamudstone and Meta-Argillite
    CZmd3Floyd Church Formation; Metamudstone and Meta-Argillite
    CZmgMetagraywacke and Muscovite-Biotite Schist
    CZmsMica Schist
    CZmvMafic Metavolcanic Rock
    CZmv1Cid Formation; Mafic Metavolcanic Rock
    CZpgInequigranular Biotite Gneiss
    CZphPhyllite and Schist
    CZqQuartzite
    CZtpPorphyroblastic Gneiss
    CZvMetavolcanic Rock
    CZveMetavolcanic-Epiclastic Rock
    CZyYadkin Formation
    DOgGranitic Rock
    DOgbGabbro of Concord Plutonic Suite
    DqdQuartz Diorite to Granodiorite
    DScCaesars Head Granite Gneiss
    DSgGranite of Salisbury Plutonic Suite
    DSsSyenite of Concord Plutonic Suite
    JdDiabase
    JrRhyolite
    KbBlack Creek Formation
    KcCape Fear Formation
    KmMiddendorf Formation
    KpPeedee Formation
    McCherryville Granite
    OCgMetamorphosed Granitic Rock
    OCgmMigmatitic Granitic Gneiss
    OrgRabun Gneiss
    PPgGranitic Rock
    PPgbPee Dee Gabbro
    PPmgFoliated to Massive Granitic Rock
    PzZgMetamorphosed Gabbro and Diorite
    PzZmMetamorphosed Mafic Rock
    PzZqMetamorphosed Quartz Diorite
    PzZuMeta-ultramafic Rock
    QpSurficial Deposits, Undivided
    SgShelton Granite Gneiss
    SOggGranite Gneiss
    TecCastle Hayne Formation; Comfort Member and New Hanover Member, undivided
    TecsCastle Hayne Formation; Spring Garden Member
    TobBelgrade Formation, Undivided
    TorRiver Bend Formation
    TpPinehurst Formation
    TpaBeaufort Formation, Undivided
    TpyYorktown Formation and Duplin Formation, Undivided
    TpywWaccamaw Formation
    TRcNewark Supergroup, Chatham Group; Chatham Group, Undivided
    TRccNewark Supergroup, Chatham Group; Cumnock Formation
    TRcpNewark Supergroup, Chatham Group; Pekin Formation
    TRcsNewark Supergroup, Chatham Group; Sanford Formation
    TRdNewark Supergroup, Dan River Group; Dan River Group, Undivided
    TRdcNewark Supergroup, Dan River Group; Cow Branch Formation
    TRdpNewark Supergroup, Dan River Group; Pine Hall Formation
    TRdsNewark Supergroup, Dan River Group; Stoneville Formation
    TtTerrace Deposits and Upland Sediment
    waterwater
    YbamAmphibolite
    YbggBiotite Granitic Gneiss
    YbrgBlowing Rock Gneiss
    YgGranitic Gneiss
    YggGranodioritic Gneiss
    YmamAmphibolite
    YmgMigmatitic Biotite-Hornblende Gneisses
    YtgToxaway Gneiss
    ZaOcoee Supergroup, Great Smokey Group; Anakeesta Formation
    ZabaAlligator Back Formation; Amphibolite
    ZabgAlligator Back Formation; Gneiss
    ZabsAlligator Back Formation; Mica schist and phyllite
    ZataAshe Metamorphic Suite and Tallulah Falls Formation; Amphibolite
    ZatbAshe Metamorphic Suite and Tallulah Falls Formation; Biotite gneiss
    ZatmAshe Metamorphic Suite and Tallulah Falls Formation; Muscovite-biotite gneiss
    ZatsAshe Metamorphic Suite and Tallulah Falls Formation; Mica schist
    ZatwAshe Metamorphic Suite and Tallulah Falls Formation; Metagraywacke
    ZbBrasstown Formation
    ZbgOcoee Supergroup, Great Smokey Group; Boyd Gap Formation
    ZbtBattleground Formation
    ZchOcoee Supergroup, Great Smokey Group; Copperhill Formation
    ZchsOcoee Supergroup, Great Smokey Group; Slate of Copperhill Formation
    ZcoCoweeta Group
    ZdOcoee Supergroup, Great Smokey Group; Dean Formation
    ZfOcoee Supergroup, Great Smokey Group; Phyllite
    ZgMetamorphosed Granitic Rock
    ZgmaChilhowee Group, Grandfather Mountain Formation; Meta-arkose
    ZgmfChilhowee Group, Grandfather Mountain Formation; Porphyritic felsic volcanic rock
    ZgmgChilhowee Group, Grandfather Mountain Formation; Greenstone
    ZgmsChilhowee Group, Grandfather Mountain Formation; Metasiltstone
    ZgmuChilhowee Group, Grandfather Mountain Formation; Felsic metavolcanic rocks and metasedimentary rocks
    ZgmwChilhowee Group, Grandfather Mountain Formation; Metagraywacke
    ZgsOcoee Supergroup; Great Smokey Group, undivided
    ZhhaOcoee Supergroup, Great Smokey Group; Metasandstone, Metagraywacke, Metasiltstone, and Mica Schist
    ZlmLinville Metadiabase
    ZmMax Patch Granite
    ZmanMurphy Marble, Andrews Formation, and Nottely Quartzite, undivided
    ZmbMineral Bluff Formation
    ZmfMount Rogers Formation; Metafelsite
    ZmlMount Rogers Formation; Metagraywacke
    ZntNantahala Formation and Tusquitee Quartzite, undivided
    ZrbOcoee Supergroup, Great Smokey Group; Rich Butt Sandstone
    ZsOcoee Supergroup, Snowbird Group, undivided
    ZslOcoee Supergroup, Snowbird Group; Longarm Quartzite
    ZspOcoee Supergroup, Snowbird Group; Pigeon Siltstone
    ZsrOcoee Supergroup, Snowbird Group; Roaring Fork Sandstone
    ZssOcoee Supergroup, Walden Creek Group; Sandsuck Formation
    ZswOcoee Supergroup, Snowbird Group; Wading Branch Formation
    ZwcOcoee Supergroup; Walden Creek Group, undivided
    ZweOcoee Supergroup, Great Smokey Group; Wehutty Formation
    ZYbaCoweeta Group; Amphibolite
    ZYbnCoweeta Group; Biotite Gneiss
    sgmc_label
    orig_label + ;n where n= province number (n=0 if no province number)

    type: character width: 16 output width: 16 (Source: Doug Stoeser)
    ValueDefinition
    bz;5Rocks of Brevard Fault Zone
    CAcl;2Chilhowee Group; Lower Chilhowee
    CAcl;3Chilhowee Group; Lower Chilhowee
    CAcu;2Chilhowee Group; Upper Chilhowee
    CAcu;3Chilhowee Group; Upper Chilhowee
    CAhg;5Henderson Gneiss
    CAr;2Rome Formation
    CAs;2Shady Dolomite
    CAs;3Shady Dolomite
    CAZab;5Amphibolite and Biotite Gneiss
    CAZam;1Amphibolite
    CAZam;2Amphibolite
    CAZam;5Amphibolite
    CAZam;8Amphibolite
    CAZba;5Megacrystic Biotite Gneiss
    CAZbb;5Banded Gneiss
    CAZbf;4Fine-grained Biotite Gneiss
    CAZbf;5Fine-grained Biotite Gneiss
    CAZbf;6Fine-grained Biotite Gneiss
    CAZbg;5Biotite Gneiss and Schist
    CAZbg;6Biotite Gneiss and Schist
    CAZbg;7Biotite Gneiss and Schist
    CAZbg;8Biotite Gneiss and Schist
    CAZbl;4Blacksburg Formation
    CAZc;7Volcanic Metaconglomerate
    CAZfg;6Felsic Mica Gneiss
    CAZfg;8Felsic Mica Gneiss
    CAZfv;6Felsic Metavolcanic Rock
    CAZfv;7Felsic Metavolcanic Rock
    CAZfv;10Felsic Metavolcanic Rock
    CAZfv1;7Uwharrie Formation; Felsic Metavolcanic Rock
    CAZfv2;7Cid Formation; Felsic Metavolcanic Rock
    CAZg;6Metamorphosed Granitic Rock
    CAZg;7Metamorphosed Granitic Rock
    CAZg;8Metamorphosed Granitic Rock
    CAZg;10Metamorphosed Granitic Rock
    CAZgms;5Garnet-Mica Schist
    CAZig;8Injected Gneiss
    CAZiv;7Intermediate Metavolcanic Rock
    CAZiv;10Intermediate Metavolcanic Rock
    CAZlg;8Lineated Felsic Mica Gneiss
    CAZma1;5Metagraywacke, Amphibolite, and Kyanite Schist
    CAZma2;5Metagraywacke
    CAZmd;7Metamudstone and Meta-Argillite
    CAZmd;10Metamudstone and Meta-Argillite
    CAZmd1;7Tillery Formation; Metamudstone and Meta-Argillite
    CAZmd2;7Cid Formation; Metamudstone and Meta-Argillite
    CAZmd3;7Floyd Church Formation; Metamudstone and Meta-Argillite
    CAZmg;5Metagraywacke and Muscovite-Biotite Schist
    CAZms;5Mica Schist
    CAZms;8Mica Schist
    CAZmv;6Mafic Metavolcanic Rock
    CAZmv;7Mafic Metavolcanic Rock
    CAZmv;10Mafic Metavolcanic Rock
    CAZmv1;7Cid Formation; Mafic Metavolcanic Rock
    CAZpg;5Inequigranular Biotite Gneiss
    CAZph;5Phyllite and Schist
    CAZph;6Phyllite and Schist
    CAZph;7Phyllite and Schist
    CAZph;8Phyllite and Schist
    CAZph;10Phyllite and Schist
    CAZq;5Quartzite
    CAZq;6Quartzite
    CAZq;10Quartzite
    CAZtp;5Porphyroblastic Gneiss
    CAZv;6Metavolcanic Rock
    CAZv;7Metavolcanic Rock
    CAZve;7Metavolcanic-Epiclastic Rock
    CAZve;10Metavolcanic-Epiclastic Rock
    CAZy;7Yadkin Formation
    DOg;6Granitic Rock
    DOgb;6Gabbro of Concord Plutonic Suite
    Dqd;2Quartz Diorite to Granodiorite
    DSc;5Caesars Head Granite Gneiss
    DSg;6Granite of Salisbury Plutonic Suite
    DSs;6Syenite of Concord Plutonic Suite
    Jd;4Diabase
    Jd;5Diabase
    Jd;6Diabase
    Jd;7Diabase
    Jd;8Diabase
    Jd;9Diabase
    Jd;10Diabase
    Jr;8Rhyolite
    Jr;10Rhyolite
    Kb;11Black Creek Formation
    Kc;11Cape Fear Formation
    Km;11Middendorf Formation
    Kp;11Peedee Formation
    Mc;4Cherryville Granite
    Mc;5Cherryville Granite
    OCAg;5Metamorphosed Granitic Rock
    OCAgm;5Migmatitic Granitic Gneiss
    Org;2Rabun Gneiss
    PPAg;6Granitic Rock
    PPAg;7Granitic Rock
    PPAg;8Granitic Rock
    PPAg;10Granitic Rock
    PAgb;7Pee Dee Gabbro
    PPAmg;4Foliated to Massive Granitic Rock
    PPAmg;8Foliated to Massive Granitic Rock
    PPAmg;10Foliated to Massive Granitic Rock
    PZZg;5Metamorphosed Gabbro and Diorite
    PZZg;6Metamorphosed Gabbro and Diorite
    PZZg;7Metamorphosed Gabbro and Diorite
    PZZg;8Metamorphosed Gabbro and Diorite
    PZZg;10Metamorphosed Gabbro and Diorite
    PZZm;6Metamorphosed Mafic Rock
    PZZm;7Metamorphosed Mafic Rock
    PZZq;4Metamorphosed Quartz Diorite
    PZZq;6Metamorphosed Quartz Diorite
    PZZq;7Metamorphosed Quartz Diorite
    PZZq;10Metamorphosed Quartz Diorite
    PZZu;2Meta-ultramafic Rock
    PZZu;5Meta-ultramafic Rock
    PZZu;6Meta-ultramafic Rock
    PZZu;7Meta-ultramafic Rock
    PZZu;8Meta-ultramafic Rock
    PZZu;10Meta-ultramafic Rock
    Qp;11Surficial Deposits, Undivided
    Sg;6Shelton Granite Gneiss
    SOgg;5Granite Gneiss
    Tec;11Castle Hayne Formation; Comfort Member and New Hanover Member, undivided
    Tecs;11Castle Hayne Formation; Spring Garden Member
    Tob;11Belgrade Formation, Undivided
    Tor;11River Bend Formation
    Tp;11Pinehurst Formation
    Tpa;11Beaufort Formation, Undivided
    Tpy;11Yorktown Formation and Duplin Formation, Undivided
    Tpyw;11Waccamaw Formation
    TRc;9Newark Supergroup, Chatham Group; Chatham Group, Undivided
    TRcc;9Newark Supergroup, Chatham Group; Cumnock Formation
    TRcp;9Newark Supergroup, Chatham Group; Pekin Formation
    TRcs;9Newark Supergroup, Chatham Group; Sanford Formation
    TRd;9Newark Supergroup, Dan River Group; Dan River Group, Undivided
    TRdc;9Newark Supergroup, Dan River Group; Cow Branch Formation
    TRdp;9Newark Supergroup, Dan River Group; Pine Hall Formation
    TRds;9Newark Supergroup, Dan River Group; Stoneville Formation
    Tt;11Terrace Deposits and Upland Sediment
    water;0water
    Ybam;2Amphibolite
    Ybgg;2Biotite Granitic Gneiss
    Ybgg;3Biotite Granitic Gneiss
    Y3brg;3Blowing Rock Gneiss
    Y3g;5Granitic Gneiss
    Y3gg;2Granodioritic Gneiss
    Ymam;2Amphibolite
    Y2mg;2Migmatitic Biotite-Hornblende Gneisses
    Y2tg;2Toxaway Gneiss
    Za;2Ocoee Supergroup, Great Smokey Group; Anakeesta Formation
    Zaba;2Alligator Back Formation; Amphibolite
    Zabg;2Alligator Back Formation; Gneiss
    Zabs;2Alligator Back Formation; Mica schist and phyllite
    Zata;2Ashe Metamorphic Suite and Tallulah Falls Formation; Amphibolite
    Zatb;2Ashe Metamorphic Suite and Tallulah Falls Formation; Biotite gneiss
    Zatm;2Ashe Metamorphic Suite and Tallulah Falls Formation; Muscovite-biotite gneiss
    Zats;2Ashe Metamorphic Suite and Tallulah Falls Formation; Mica schist
    Zatw;2Ashe Metamorphic Suite and Tallulah Falls Formation; Metagraywacke
    Zb;1Brasstown Formation
    Zbg;2Ocoee Supergroup, Great Smokey Group; Boyd Gap Formation
    Zbt;4Battleground Formation
    Zch;2Ocoee Supergroup, Great Smokey Group; Copperhill Formation
    Zchs;2Ocoee Supergroup, Great Smokey Group; Slate of Copperhill Formation
    Zco;2Coweeta Group
    Zd;2Ocoee Supergroup, Great Smokey Group; Dean Formation
    Zf;2Ocoee Supergroup, Great Smokey Group; Phyllite
    Zg;2Metamorphosed Granitic Rock
    Zg;3Metamorphosed Granitic Rock
    Zg;5Metamorphosed Granitic Rock
    Zgma;3Chilhowee Group, Grandfather Mountain Formation; Meta-arkose
    Zgmf;3Chilhowee Group, Grandfather Mountain Formation; Porphyritic felsic volcanic rock
    Zgmg;3Chilhowee Group, Grandfather Mountain Formation; Greenstone
    Zgms;3Chilhowee Group, Grandfather Mountain Formation; Metasiltstone
    Zgmu;3Chilhowee Group, Grandfather Mountain Formation; Felsic metavolcanic rocks and metasedimentary rocks
    Zgmw;3Chilhowee Group, Grandfather Mountain Formation; Metagraywacke
    Zgs;2Ocoee Supergroup; Great Smokey Group, undivided
    Zhha;2Ocoee Supergroup, Great Smokey Group; Metasandstone, Metagraywacke, Metasiltstone, and Mica Schist
    Zlm;3Linville Metadiabase
    Zm;2Max Patch Granite
    Zman;1Murphy Marble, Andrews Formation, and Nottely Quartzite, undivided
    Zmb;1Mineral Bluff Formation
    Zmf;2Mount Rogers Formation; Metafelsite
    Zml;2Mount Rogers Formation; Metagraywacke
    Znt;1Nantahala Formation and Tusquitee Quartzite, undivided
    Zrb;2Ocoee Supergroup, Great Smokey Group; Rich Butt Sandstone
    Zs;2Ocoee Supergroup, Snowbird Group, undivided
    Zsl;2Ocoee Supergroup, Snowbird Group; Longarm Quartzite
    Zsp;2Ocoee Supergroup, Snowbird Group; Pigeon Siltstone
    Zsr;2Ocoee Supergroup, Snowbird Group; Roaring Fork Sandstone
    Zss;2Ocoee Supergroup, Walden Creek Group; Sandsuck Formation
    Zsw;2Ocoee Supergroup, Snowbird Group; Wading Branch Formation
    Zwc;2Ocoee Supergroup; Walden Creek Group, undivided
    Zwe;2Ocoee Supergroup, Great Smokey Group; Wehutty Formation
    ZYba;2Coweeta Group; Amphibolite
    ZYbn;2Coweeta Group; Biotite Gneiss
    unit_link
    composite map label = ST + sgmc_label This creates a unique identifier for every unit in the CONUS (continental United States) covers.

    type: character width: 18 output width: 18 (Source: Doug Stoeser)
    ValueDefinition
    NCbz;5Rocks of Brevard Fault Zone
    NCCAcl;2Chilhowee Group; Lower Chilhowee
    NCCAcl;3Chilhowee Group; Lower Chilhowee
    NCCAcu;2Chilhowee Group; Upper Chilhowee
    NCCAcu;3Chilhowee Group; Upper Chilhowee
    NCCAhg;5Henderson Gneiss
    NCCAr;2Rome Formation
    NCCAs;2Shady Dolomite
    NCCAs;3Shady Dolomite
    NCCAZab;5Amphibolite and Biotite Gneiss
    NCCAZam;1Amphibolite
    NCCAZam;2Amphibolite
    NCCAZam;5Amphibolite
    NCCAZam;8Amphibolite
    NCCAZba;5Megacrystic Biotite Gneiss
    NCCAZbb;5Banded Gneiss
    NCCAZbf;4Fine-grained Biotite Gneiss
    NCCAZbf;5Fine-grained Biotite Gneiss
    NCCAZbf;6Fine-grained Biotite Gneiss
    NCCAZbg;5Biotite Gneiss and Schist
    NCCAZbg;6Biotite Gneiss and Schist
    NCCAZbg;7Biotite Gneiss and Schist
    NCCAZbg;8Biotite Gneiss and Schist
    NCCAZbl;4Blacksburg Formation
    NCCAZc;7Volcanic Metaconglomerate
    NCCAZfg;6Felsic Mica Gneiss
    NCCAZfg;8Felsic Mica Gneiss
    NCCAZfv;6Felsic Metavolcanic Rock
    NCCAZfv;7Felsic Metavolcanic Rock
    NCCAZfv;10Felsic Metavolcanic Rock
    NCCAZfv1;7Uwharrie Formation; Felsic Metavolcanic Rock
    NCCAZfv2;7Cid Formation; Felsic Metavolcanic Rock
    NCCAZg;6Metamorphosed Granitic Rock
    NCCAZg;7Metamorphosed Granitic Rock
    NCCAZg;8Metamorphosed Granitic Rock
    NCCAZg;10Metamorphosed Granitic Rock
    NCCAZgms;5Garnet-Mica Schist
    NCCAZig;8Injected Gneiss
    NCCAZiv;7Intermediate Metavolcanic Rock
    NCCAZiv;10Intermediate Metavolcanic Rock
    NCCAZlg;8Lineated Felsic Mica Gneiss
    NCCAZma1;5Metagraywacke, Amphibolite, and Kyanite Schist
    NCCAZma2;5Metagraywacke
    NCCAZmd;7Metamudstone and Meta-Argillite
    NCCAZmd;10Metamudstone and Meta-Argillite
    NCCAZmd1;7Tillery Formation; Metamudstone and Meta-Argillite
    NCCAZmd2;7Cid Formation; Metamudstone and Meta-Argillite
    NCCAZmd3;7Floyd Church Formation; Metamudstone and Meta-Argillite
    NCCAZmg;5Metagraywacke and Muscovite-Biotite Schist
    NCCAZms;5Mica Schist
    NCCAZms;8Mica Schist
    NCCAZmv;6Mafic Metavolcanic Rock
    NCCAZmv;7Mafic Metavolcanic Rock
    NCCAZmv;10Mafic Metavolcanic Rock
    NCCAZmv1;7Cid Formation; Mafic Metavolcanic Rock
    NCCAZpg;5Inequigranular Biotite Gneiss
    NCCAZph;5Phyllite and Schist
    NCCAZph;6Phyllite and Schist
    NCCAZph;7Phyllite and Schist
    NCCAZph;8Phyllite and Schist
    NCCAZph;10Phyllite and Schist
    NCCAZq;5Quartzite
    NCCAZq;6Quartzite
    NCCAZq;10Quartzite
    NCCAZtp;5Porphyroblastic Gneiss
    NCCAZv;6Metavolcanic Rock
    NCCAZv;7Metavolcanic Rock
    NCCAZve;7Metavolcanic-Epiclastic Rock
    NCCAZve;10Metavolcanic-Epiclastic Rock
    NCCAZy;7Yadkin Formation
    NCDOg;6Granitic Rock
    NCDOgb;6Gabbro of Concord Plutonic Suite
    NCDqd;2Quartz Diorite to Granodiorite
    NCDSc;5Caesars Head Granite Gneiss
    NCDSg;6Granite of Salisbury Plutonic Suite
    NCDSs;6Syenite of Concord Plutonic Suite
    NCJd;4Diabase
    NCJd;5Diabase
    NCJd;6Diabase
    NCJd;7Diabase
    NCJd;8Diabase
    NCJd;9Diabase
    NCJd;10Diabase
    NCJr;8Rhyolite
    NCJr;10Rhyolite
    NCKb;11Black Creek Formation
    NCKc;11Cape Fear Formation
    NCKm;11Middendorf Formation
    NCKp;11Peedee Formation
    NCMc;4Cherryville Granite
    NCMc;5Cherryville Granite
    NCOCAg;5Metamorphosed Granitic Rock
    NCOCAgm;5Migmatitic Granitic Gneiss
    NCOrg;2Rabun Gneiss
    NCPPAg;6Granitic Rock
    NCPPAg;7Granitic Rock
    NCPPAg;8Granitic Rock
    NCPPAg;10Granitic Rock
    NCPAgb;7Pee Dee Gabbro
    NCPPAmg;4Foliated to Massive Granitic Rock
    NCPPAmg;8Foliated to Massive Granitic Rock
    NCPPAmg;10Foliated to Massive Granitic Rock
    NCPZZg;5Metamorphosed Gabbro and Diorite
    NCPZZg;6Metamorphosed Gabbro and Diorite
    NCPZZg;7Metamorphosed Gabbro and Diorite
    NCPZZg;8Metamorphosed Gabbro and Diorite
    NCPZZg;10Metamorphosed Gabbro and Diorite
    NCPZZm;6Metamorphosed Mafic Rock
    NCPZZm;7Metamorphosed Mafic Rock
    NCPZZq;4Metamorphosed Quartz Diorite
    NCPZZq;6Metamorphosed Quartz Diorite
    NCPZZq;7Metamorphosed Quartz Diorite
    NCPZZq;10Metamorphosed Quartz Diorite
    NCPZZu;2Meta-ultramafic Rock
    NCPZZu;5Meta-ultramafic Rock
    NCPZZu;6Meta-ultramafic Rock
    NCPZZu;7Meta-ultramafic Rock
    NCPZZu;8Meta-ultramafic Rock
    NCPZZu;10Meta-ultramafic Rock
    NCQp;11Surficial Deposits, Undivided
    NCSg;6Shelton Granite Gneiss
    NCSOgg;5Granite Gneiss
    NCTec;11Castle Hayne Formation; Comfort Member and New Hanover Member, undivided
    NCTecs;11Castle Hayne Formation; Spring Garden Member
    NCTob;11Belgrade Formation, Undivided
    NCTor;11River Bend Formation
    NCTp;11Pinehurst Formation
    NCTpa;11Beaufort Formation, Undivided
    NCTpy;11Yorktown Formation and Duplin Formation, Undivided
    NCTpyw;11Waccamaw Formation
    NCTRc;9Newark Supergroup, Chatham Group; Chatham Group, Undivided
    NCTRcc;9Newark Supergroup, Chatham Group; Cumnock Formation
    NCTRcp;9Newark Supergroup, Chatham Group; Pekin Formation
    NCTRcs;9Newark Supergroup, Chatham Group; Sanford Formation
    NCTRd;9Newark Supergroup, Dan River Group; Dan River Group, Undivided
    NCTRdc;9Newark Supergroup, Dan River Group; Cow Branch Formation
    NCTRdp;9Newark Supergroup, Dan River Group; Pine Hall Formation
    NCTRds;9Newark Supergroup, Dan River Group; Stoneville Formation
    NCTt;11Terrace Deposits and Upland Sediment
    NCwater;0water
    NCYbam;2Amphibolite
    NCYbgg;2Biotite Granitic Gneiss
    NCYbgg;3Biotite Granitic Gneiss
    NCY3brg;3Blowing Rock Gneiss
    NCY3g;5Granitic Gneiss
    NCY3gg;2Granodioritic Gneiss
    NCYmam;2Amphibolite
    NCY2mg;2Migmatitic Biotite-Hornblende Gneisses
    NCY2tg;2Toxaway Gneiss
    NCZa;2Ocoee Supergroup, Great Smokey Group; Anakeesta Formation
    NCZaba;2Alligator Back Formation; Amphibolite
    NCZabg;2Alligator Back Formation; Gneiss
    NCZabs;2Alligator Back Formation; Mica schist and phyllite
    NCZata;2Ashe Metamorphic Suite and Tallulah Falls Formation; Amphibolite
    NCZatb;2Ashe Metamorphic Suite and Tallulah Falls Formation; Biotite gneiss
    NCZatm;2Ashe Metamorphic Suite and Tallulah Falls Formation; Muscovite-biotite gneiss
    NCZats;2Ashe Metamorphic Suite and Tallulah Falls Formation; Mica schist
    NCZatw;2Ashe Metamorphic Suite and Tallulah Falls Formation; Metagraywacke
    NCZb;1Brasstown Formation
    NCZbg;2Ocoee Supergroup, Great Smokey Group; Boyd Gap Formation
    NCZbt;4Battleground Formation
    NCZch;2Ocoee Supergroup, Great Smokey Group; Copperhill Formation
    NCZchs;2Ocoee Supergroup, Great Smokey Group; Slate of Copperhill Formation
    NCZco;2Coweeta Group
    NCZd;2Ocoee Supergroup, Great Smokey Group; Dean Formation
    NCZf;2Ocoee Supergroup, Great Smokey Group; Phyllite
    NCZg;2Metamorphosed Granitic Rock
    NCZg;3Metamorphosed Granitic Rock
    NCZg;5Metamorphosed Granitic Rock
    NCZgma;3Chilhowee Group, Grandfather Mountain Formation; Meta-arkose
    NCZgmf;3Chilhowee Group, Grandfather Mountain Formation; Porphyritic felsic volcanic rock
    NCZgmg;3Chilhowee Group, Grandfather Mountain Formation; Greenstone
    NCZgms;3Chilhowee Group, Grandfather Mountain Formation; Metasiltstone
    NCZgmu;3Chilhowee Group, Grandfather Mountain Formation; Felsic metavolcanic rocks and metasedimentary rocks
    NCZgmw;3Chilhowee Group, Grandfather Mountain Formation; Metagraywacke
    NCZgs;2Ocoee Supergroup; Great Smokey Group, undivided
    NCZhha;2Ocoee Supergroup, Great Smokey Group; Metasandstone, Metagraywacke, Metasiltstone, and Mica Schist
    NCZlm;3Linville Metadiabase
    NCZm;2Max Patch Granite
    NCZman;1Murphy Marble, Andrews Formation, and Nottely Quartzite, undivided
    NCZmb;1Mineral Bluff Formation
    NCZmf;2Mount Rogers Formation; Metafelsite
    NCZml;2Mount Rogers Formation; Metagraywacke
    NCZnt;1Nantahala Formation and Tusquitee Quartzite, undivided
    NCZrb;2Ocoee Supergroup, Great Smokey Group; Rich Butt Sandstone
    NCZs;2Ocoee Supergroup, Snowbird Group, undivided
    NCZsl;2Ocoee Supergroup, Snowbird Group; Longarm Quartzite
    NCZsp;2Ocoee Supergroup, Snowbird Group; Pigeon Siltstone
    NCZsr;2Ocoee Supergroup, Snowbird Group; Roaring Fork Sandstone
    NCZss;2Ocoee Supergroup, Walden Creek Group; Sandsuck Formation
    NCZsw;2Ocoee Supergroup, Snowbird Group; Wading Branch Formation
    NCZwc;2Ocoee Supergroup; Walden Creek Group, undivided
    NCZwe;2Ocoee Supergroup, Great Smokey Group; Wehutty Formation
    NCZYba;2Coweeta Group; Amphibolite
    NCZYbn;2Coweeta Group; Biotite Gneiss
    source
    An alphanumeric code (e.g. US001) that designates the source material used.

    type: character width: 6 output width: 8 (Source: Doug Stoeser)
    ValueDefinition
    NC001Rhodes, Thomas S., and Conrad, Stephen G., 1985, Geologic Map of North Carolina: Department of Natural Resources and Community Development, Division of Land Resources, and the NC Geological Survey, 1:500,000-scale, compiled by Brown, Philip M., et al, and Parker, John M. III, and in association with the State Geologic Map Advisory Committee.
    NC002The North Carolina Dept. of Environment, Health, and Natural Resources, Division of Land Resources, NC Geological Survey, in cooperation with the NC Center for Geographic Information and Analysis, 1998, Geology - North Carolina (1:250,000), coverage data file geol250. The data represents the digital equivalent of the official State Geology map (1:500,000 scale), but was digitized from (1:250,000 scale) base maps.
    NC201Water polygons that are generated when the standard base map is used (US001).
    NC202Polygon attributes were modified by C.L. Dicken to match paper source (NC002).
    unit_age
    The geologic age from the source map used.

    type: character width: 60 output width: 60 (Source: Doug Stoeser)
    ValueDefinition
    Cambrian 
    Cambrian/Late Proterozoic 
    Cretaceous 
    Devonian 
    Devonian/Ordovician 
    Devonian/Silurian 
    Jurassic 
    Late Middle Proterozoic 
    Late Proterozoic 
    Middle Proterozoic 
    Middle/Late Proterozoic 
    Mississippian 
    Ordovician 
    Ordovician/Cambrian 
    Paleozoic/Late Proterozoic 
    Pennsylvanian 
    Permian/Pennsylvanian 
    Quaternary 
    Silurian 
    Silurian/Ordovician 
    Tertiary 
    Triassic 
    Uncertain, possibly Permian or Devonian 
    rocktype1
    The predominant lithology found in the formation.

    type: character width: 40 output width: 40 (Source: Johnson Lith Class 6.1a)
    ValueDefinition
    amphibolite 
    arenite 
    biotite gneiss 
    carbonate 
    clay or mud 
    conglomerate 
    diabase 
    dolostone (dolomite) 
    felsic gneiss 
    felsic metavolcanic rock 
    gabbro 
    gneiss 
    granite 
    granitic gneiss 
    greenstone 
    intermediate metavolcanic rock 
    lake or marine deposit (non-glacial) 
    limestone 
    mafic metavolcanic rock 
    marble 
    meta-argillite 
    meta-conglomerate 
    metamorphic rock 
    metasedimentary rock 
    mica schist 
    mudstone 
    phyllite 
    quartz diorite 
    quartzite 
    sand 
    sandstone 
    schist 
    shale 
    siltstone 
    slate 
    syenite 
    terrace 
    water 
    rocktype2
    The second most predominant lithology in the formation.

    type: character width: 40 output width: 40 (Source: Johnson Lith Class 6.1a)
    ValueDefinition
    amphibolite 
    augen gneiss 
    basalt 
    biotite gneiss 
    calcarenite 
    clay or mud 
    conglomerate 
    dolostone (dolomite) 
    eolian 
    felsic metavolcanic rock 
    gneiss 
    granodiorite 
    gravel 
    greenstone 
    intermediate metavolcanic rock 
    mafic gneiss 
    mafic metavolcanic rock 
    marble 
    meta-argillite 
    meta-conglomerate 
    metasedimentary rock 
    metavolcanic rock 
    mica schist 
    mudstone 
    paragneiss 
    pegmatite 
    phyllite 
    phyllonite 
    quartzite 
    sand 
    sandstone 
    schist 
    serpentinite 
    shale 
    silt 
    siltstone 
    slate 
    nc_geol.aat
    Arc attribute table for North Carolina geologic coverage. (Source: ESRI)
    arc-code
    Unique identifier for the line feature

    type: integer width: 3 output width: 3 (Source: AAT data dictionary)
    ValueDefinition
    1contact, location certain
    7shoreline or riverbank
    30fault, sense of displacement unknown or undefined, location certain
    124state boundary
    arc-para1
    Used for "decorated" lines where additional information is needed.

    type: integer width: 3 output width: 3 (Source: AAT data dictionary)
    ValueDefinition
    0no additional information
    arc-para2
    "Scratch" field used mostly in Alaska.

    type: integer width: 3 output width: 3 (Source: AAT data dictionary)
    ValueDefinition
    0no additional information
    source
    An alphanumeric code (e.g. US001) that designates the source material used.

    type: character width: 6 output width: 8 (Source: Doug Stoeser)
    ValueDefinition
    NC002The North Carolina Dept. of Environment, Health, and Natural Resources, Division of Land Resources, NC Geological Survey, in cooperation with the NC Center for Geographic Information and Analysis, 1998, Geology - North Carolina (1:250,000), coverage data file geol250. The data represents the digital equivalent of the official State Geology map (1:500,000 scale), but was digitized from (1:250,000 scale) base maps.
    NC101Faults that have been heads-up digitized from state fault file by C.L. Dicken.
    US001Johnson, Bruce R. and Leveritch, Beth, 1998, 1:100,000 Scale State Boundaries of the Conterminous United States: U.S. Geological Survey, unpublished (see metadata file: st100kmeta.txt, Chapter A)
    Entity_and_Attribute_Overview:
    Coding for polygon attributes:

    NAME: FEATURE: orig_label unmodified map unit symbols from source cover sgmc_label orig_label modified for standard geologic age symbols and an integer code added for province unit_link sgmc_label and a state code identifier source reference to source of data unit_age geologic age rocktype1 predominant lithology rocktype2 second most predominant lithology

    Coding for arc attributes:

    NAME: FEATURE: arc-code unique integer identifier arc-para1 used where additional information is needed arc-para2 scratch field source reference to source of data

    Coding for point attributes:

    NAME: FEATURE: point_feature name of feature on map source reference to source of data

    Coding for dikes (special arcs) attributes:

    NAME: FEATURE: orig_label unmodified map unit symbols from source cover sgmc_label orig_label modified for standard geologic age symbols and an integer code added for province arc-code unique integer identifier dike_lith general lithology dike_age geologic age source reference to source of data

    Entity_and_Attribute_Detail_Citation: ESRI

Who produced the data set?

  1. Who are the originators of the data set? (may include formal authors, digital compilers, and editors)
  2. Who also contributed to the data set?
    State Geologic Map Compilation (SGMC) activity of the National Surveys and Analysis projects of the US Geological Survey Mineral Resources Program.

  3. To whom should users address questions about the data?
    Suzanne W. Nicholson
    U.S. Geological Survey
    12201 Sunrise Valley Dr. MS954
    Reston, VA
    USA

    703-648-6344 (voice)
    swnich@usgs.gov

Why was the data set created?

A primary goal of this work is to develop geologic map datasets with standardized structure and attribution. The database design and standards are documented in Chapter A of this series. The intent is that contiguous databases can be merged seamlessly and without any additional effort. In addition to a common database structure, the conterminous U.S. state databases (the contiguous 48 states) have been fitted to a set of standard state boundaries so that, when states are merged, they match without slivers or overlap. No attempt has been made to reconcile differences in mapping across state boundaries.

How was the data set created?

  1. From what previous works were the data drawn?
  2. How were the data generated, processed, and modified?
    Date: 2003 (process 1 of 11)
    The purpose of this standardization is to allow all SGMC covers to be seamlessly joined without any additional effort to form regional or national level digital maps. Note that for Alaska, the state is being compiled as blocks of 1:250k quadrangles that will ultimately be used to compile a new state map. Douglas Stoeser and Ric Wilson are co-coordinators for the overall SGMC effort, with Stoeser coordinating work on the mainland states and Wilson coordinating work for Alaska and Hawaii.
    Date: 11-Dec-2003 (process 2 of 11)
    C.L. Dicken obtained the digital geologic map of North Carolina by purchasing the dataset from NORTH CAROLINA CORPORATE GEOGRAPHIC DATABASE (http://www.cgia.state.nc.us).

    The coverage was re-projected into the following:

    projection: Lambert Conformal Conic units: meters datum: NAD27 standard parallel 1: 33 0 0.000 standard parallel 2: 45 0 0.000 central meridian: -100 0 0.000 reference latitude: 0 0 0.000 false easting: 0.00000 false northing: 0.00000

    All attributes were deleted except GEO-NAME.

    (Note: Attributes associated with the generation of the coverages were not deleted. PAT - shape, area, perimeter, coverage#, and coverage-id AAT - shape, fnode#, tnode#, lnode#, rnode#, length, coverage#, and coverage-id)

    The values from GEO-NAME where then calculated into a new field called orig_label.
    Date: 30-Nov-2004 (process 3 of 11)
    The relevant state outline (arcs) was removed from the coverage and replaced with the arcs from the 1:100,000 Scale State Boundaries of the Conterminous United States.

    This allows for a seamless fit of each state to a standard state boundary base.
    Date: 30-Nov-2004 (process 4 of 11)
    The following attributes were exported from Filemaker as a .dbf: orig_label, map_symbol2, unit_link, reference_id, unit_age, rocktype1, and rocktype2.

    orig_label reflects the original map symbol used on the source map

    map_symbol2 reflects map-symbol1 with the addition of a province number

    unit_link is an auto generated field based on map-symbol2 and the state abbreviation (e.g. IN001) that produces a unique identifier for each map unit

    reference_id was populated with an alphanumeric code (e.g. US001) that designates the source used for the linework and other references used to describe the age or lithologies of the unit.

    unit_age was populated with general age assignment

    rocktype1 records dominant lithology (must be >50% of unit), using standardized data dictionary

    rocktype2 records second most dominant lithology, using standardized data dictionary

    The attributes were then converted using the following structure:

    item name: orig_label width: 12 output: 12 type: c

    item name: sgmc_label width: 16 output: 16 type: c

    item name: unit_link width: 18 output: 18 type: c

    item name: source width: 6 output: 8 type: c

    item name: unit_age width: 60 output: 60 type: c

    item name: rocktype1 width: 40 output: 40 type: c

    item name: rocktype2 width: 40 output: 40 type: c
    Date: 01-Dec-2004 (process 5 of 11)
    Once the .dbf was in the correct format with standardized column widths and data structure, it was converted into a lookup table (.lut) in Arc/Info. Then a joinitem was performed to join the look-up table to the polygon attribute table. orig_label was used as the merge item.

    Special attention was taken to this join because there are multiple units that have more than one province assoicated with the orig_label. Due to this, when joining on orig_label, not all polygons will have the correct attributes associated with them. C.L. Dicken had to go into the coverage after the join and manually update those units with multiple provinces. There are 28 units in North Carolina.

    Date: 01-Dec-2004 (process 6 of 11)
    Next, in preparing the uniform .aat file, the following items were added to the table:

    item name: arc-code width: 3 output: 3 type: i

    item name: arc-para1 width: 3 output: 3 type: i

    item name: arc-para2 width: 3 output: 3 type: i

    item name: source width: 6 output: 8 type: c

    Date: 01-Dec-2004 (process 7 of 11)
    Arc-code was populated using the paper map source to tag the lines using the AAT line type data dictionary (see Chapter A in this series).

    Arc-para1 was populated when additional information was available such as identifying the upthrown side of a fault or direction of thrusting on a fault. (see Chapter A)

    Arc-para2 is a scratch field that is used mostly in Alaska.

    Source was populated with an alphanumeric code (e.g. US001) that designates the source used for the linework.

    Date: 06-Dec-2004 (process 8 of 11)
    The following polygons were modified from the digital source material to match the paper source map. ZYbA was changed to ZYba (one polygon) Dsc was changed to DSc (five polygons) Deleted polygon CZma and removed 3 arcs associated with that polygon. Changed PzZq to PzZg (one polygon) Changed CZv to CZfv (one polygon) Changed CZg to CZbg (one polygon) Split one polygon of Ybgg into two separate polygons because of province boundaries.

    These changes were sourced as NC202.

    Additionally, fsome aults were heads-up digitized from state file and sourced as NC101.
    (process 9 of 11)
    Once the .aat and the .pat were populated with the correct attributes, the coverage was exported as an .e00 file (ncgeol_lcc.e00).

    Then it was unprojected into geographic coordinates and exported again (ncgeol_dd.e00).
    (process 10 of 11)
    The faults were extracted to generate a separate fault file. PUT was the command used to copy the line features from the geology line coverage into a new fault line coverage.

    The data were exported as ncfaults_lcc.e00 and then unprojected into geographic coordinates and exported again (ncfaults_dd.e00).
    (process 11 of 11)
    Finally, the geology lines, geology polygons and fault line coverages were converted into shapefiles; in both geographic coordinates and in Lambert Conformal Conic projection.
  3. What similar or related data should the user be aware of?

How reliable are the data; what problems remain in the data set?

  1. How well have the observations been checked?
    The values of the attributes ROCKTYPE1 and ROCKTYPE2 were assigned based on the information in the legends of the source maps (most of which are paper). The definitions of these values are described in the draft document Geologic Map Classification version 6.1 (Johnson and others); available at the following website: http://geology.usgs.gov/dm
  2. How accurate are the geographic locations?
    Accuracy of North Carolina state boundary and those arcs intersecting it: The accuracy of the state boundary arcs is based on the 1:100,000 scale original data used to produce this boundary. (Johnson, Bruce R. and Leveritch, Beth, 1998, 1:100,000 Scale State Boundaries of the Conterminous United States: U.S. Geological Survey, unpublished (see metadata file: st100kmeta.txt, Chapter A))

    Those internal arcs intersecting the state boundary were extended or shortened as needed to complete polygons, possibly creating a small amount of error.
  3. How accurate are the heights or depths?
  4. Where are the gaps in the data? What is missing?
    Bodies of water are classified as water, and the geologic units underlying them are not included in this coverage.
  5. How consistent are the relationships among the observations, including topology?
    All internal polygons were checked for closure with vendor software and on hard copy plots. Overshoots and undershoots have been deleted or corrected as appropriate.

How can someone get a copy of the data set?

Are there legal restrictions on access or use of the data?
Access_Constraints: none
Use_Constraints:
This database is not meant to be used or displayed at any scale other than 1:500,000.

Any hardcopies utilizing these data sets shall clearly indicate their source. If the licensee has modified the data in any way they are obligated to describe the types of modifications they have performed on the hardcopy map. Licensee specifically agrees not to misrepresent these data sets, nor to imply that changes they made were approved by the U.S. Geological Survey.

  1. Who distributes the data set? (Distributor 1 of 1)
    U.S. Geological Survey Information Services Reston-ESIC
    U.S. Geological Survey
    507 National Center
    Reston, Virginia
    USA

    1-888-ASK-USGS or 1-703-648-5953 (voice)
    http://www.usgs.gov/contact/
  2. What's the catalog number I need to order this data set?
  3. What legal disclaimers am I supposed to read?
    Any use of trade, product, or firm names is for descriptive purposes only and does not imply endorsement by the USGS. Although these data have been used by the USGS and have been successfully imported into data base programs, no warranty, expressed or implied, is made by the USGS as to how successfully or accurately the data can be imported into any specific application software running on any specific hardware platform. The fact of distribution shall not constitute any such warranty, and no responsibility is assumed by the USGS in connection therewith. This data base GIS is not meant to be used or displayed at any scale other than 1:500,000.
  4. How can I download or order the data?

Who wrote the metadata?

Dates:
Last modified: 18-Mar-2005
Metadata author:
U.S. Geological Survey
Attn: Connie L. Dicken
12201 Sunrise Valley Dr. MS954
Reston, VA
USA

703-648-6482 (voice)
cdicken@usgs.gov
Metadata standard:
Content Standards for Digital Geospatial Metadata (FGDC-STD-001-1998)

This page is <https://mrdata.usgs.gov/geology/state/metadata/nc.faq.html>

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