USGS - science for a changing world

Mineral Resources On-Line Spatial Data

Geologic units containing calc-silicate rock

Earth material > Metamorphic rock
Calc-silicate rock
A metamorphic rock consisting mainly of calcium-bearing silicates such as diopside and wollastonite, and formed by metamorphism of impure limestone or dolomite.
Subtopics:
(none)

Alabama - Connecticut - Idaho - Massachusetts - Maine - North Carolina - New Hampshire - New York - Rhode Island - South Carolina - Virginia - Washington
Alabama
Dadeville Complex; Waverly Gneiss (Precambrian to Paleozoic)
Waverly Gneiss - feldspathic biotite-hornblende gneiss with thin layers of amphibolite, calc-silicate rock, garnet quartzite, and muscovite schist; locally rich in manganese.
Emuckfaw Group; Emuckfaw Group undifferentiated in part (Precambrian to Paleozoic)
Emuckfaw Group undifferentiated in part - interbedded muscovite +/- garnet-biotite schist, metagraywacke, calc-silicate rock, and quartzite; rare thin amphibolite. Includes thin layers of aluminous graphitic schist. Locally sheared to mylonite schist.
Wedowee Group; Wedowee Group undifferentiated (Precambrian to Paleozoic)
Wedowee Group undifferentiated - Wedowee Group undifferentiated includes the Cragford Phyllite and Cutnose Gneiss. Cragford Phyllite -- interbedded fine-grained graphite-chlorite-sericite schist and phyllite, garnet-sericite schist and phyllite, graphite-quartz-sericite phyllite, locally feldspathic biotite gneiss, calc-silicate rock, and quartzite. Cutnose Gneiss -- cyclically interbedded fine-grained quartz-biotite feldspathic gneiss, graphite-chlorite-sericite schist, locally thin interbeds of graphite-quartz-sericite phyllite, and quartzite. Rocks in the area northeast of Clanton in Chilton and Coosa Counties that are here assigned to the Wedowee Group also have been interpreted as part of the Higgins Ferry Group.
Connecticut
Basal member [of The Straits Schist] (Silurian)
Basal member [of The Straits Schist] ( = Russell Mountain Formation of Massachusetts) - Distinguished by presence of layers of amphibolite, marble, calc-silicate rock, and quartzite within more uniform schist like that on either side. Minor, unevenly distributed mineralization in W, Bi, Cu, Ni, and other metals.
Beardsley Member [of Harrison (Prospect) Gneiss] (Middle? Ordovician)
Beardsley (hornblendic) Member [of Harrison (Prospect) Gneiss] - Medium- to dark-gray, medium-grained, well-layered and lineated gneiss, composed of plagioclase, quartz, microcline, hornblende, biotite, and epidote. Microcline may occur as megacrysts 1 to 3 cm across. Minor layers of garnetiferous schist and rarely of calc-silicate rock or marble. Pumpkin Ground and Beardsley Members of Harrison Gneiss, formerly considered conformable metavolcanic members, are here recognized as juxtaposed metaplutonic units and are renamed the Beardsley and Pumpkin Ground orthogneisses. Isotopic dating yields crystallization ages of 428+/-2 Ma (Early Silurian) for the Pumpkin Ground and 446+/-2 Ma (Late Ordovician) for the Beardsley. Age of the Beardsley based on analysis of seven zircon and two sphene fractions. The Harrison Gneiss as described by Rodgers (1985) has no stratigraphic significance and cannot be correlated regionally (Sevigny and Hanson, 1993).
Brimfield Schist (Upper? and Middle Ordovician)
Brimfield Schist (includes Hamilton Resevoir Formation) - Gray, rusty-weathering, medium- to coarse-grained, interlayered schist and gneiss, composed of oligoclase, quartz, K-feldspar, and biotite, and commonly garnet, sillimanite, graphite, and pyrrhotite. K-feldspar partly as augen 1 to 3 cm across. Minor layers and lenses of hornblende- and pyroxene-bearing gneiss, amphibolite, and calc-silicate rock.
Brimfield Schist (uncertain) (Upper? and Middle Ordovician)
Brimfield Schist (uncertain) (includes Hamilton Resevoir Formation) - Gray, rusty-weathering, medium- to coarse-grained, interlayered schist and gneiss, composed of oligoclase, quartz, K-feldspar, and biotite, and commonly garnet, sillimanite, graphite, and pyrrhotite. K-feldspar partly as augen 1 to 3 cm across. Minor layers and lenses of hornblende- and pyroxene-bearing gneiss, amphibolite, and calc-silicate rock.
Collins Hill Formation (Upper? and Middle Ordovician)
Collins Hill Formation ( = Partridge Formation of New Hampshire) - Gray, rusty-weathering, medium- to coarse-grained, poorly layered schist, composed of quartz, oligoclase, muscovite, biotite, and garnet, and commonly staurolite, kyanite, or sillimanite, generally graphitic, interlayered with fine-grained two-mica gneiss, especially to the west, and with calc-silicate and amphibolite layers, also rare quartz-spessartine (coticule) layers.
Fitch Formation (Silurian)
Fitch Formation - Gray, fine- to medium-grained calc-silicate rock, composed of quartz, biotite, calcite, actinolite, diopside, microcline, and locally garnet, scapolite, or epidote, interlayered with two-mica schist.
Gneiss (metavolcanic) member [of Brimfield Schist] (Upper? and Middle Ordovician)
Gneiss (metavolcanic) member [of Brimfield Schist] - Medium-gray, medium-grained, layered gneiss and schist, composed of oligoclase, quartz, and biotite; some gneiss and most schist layers contain garnet and sillimanite; some gneiss layers contain garnet, hornblende or pyroxene or grade into amphibolite or calc-silicate rock. Probably includes metavolcanic rocks.
Hebron Gneiss (Silurian and Ordovician)
Hebron Gneiss - Interlayered dark-gray, medium- to coarse-grained schist, composed of andesine, quartz, biotite, and local K-feldspar, and greenish-gray, fine- to medium-grained calc-silicate rock, composed of labradorite, quartz, biotite, actinolite, hornblende, and diopside, and locally scapolite. Local lenses of graphitic two-mica schist.
Hornblende gneiss and amphibolite (Proterozoic Y)
Hornblende gneiss and amphibolite - Dark-gray to mottled, fine- to medium-grained, massive to foliated amphibolite and gneiss, composed of hornblende and plagioclase, also commonly biotite and minor quartz; commonly interlayered with banded felsic gneiss. Locally contains calc-silicate rock or diopsidic calcite marble.
Layered gneiss (Proterozoic Y)
Layered gneiss - Gray, medium-grained, well-foliated and generally well layered, light and dark, but locally wispy gneiss, composed of quartz and plagioclase, with microcline locally in the light layers and abundant biotite and common hornblende in the dark layers; garnet or epidote locally. Layers and lenses of calc-silicate rock and amphibolite in some areas.
Mamacoke Formation (Proterozoic Z?)
Mamacoke Formation - Interlayered (but layers locally indistinct) light- to dark-gray, medium-grained gneiss, composed of plagioclase, quartz, and biotite; sillimanite, garnet, hornblende, or microcline in certain layers; in upper part locally contains quartz-sillimanite nodules or thin layers of quartzite, amphibolite, or calc-silicate rock.
Middle member [of Bigelow Brook Formation] (Silurian or perhaps Ordovician)
Middle member [of Bigelow Brook Formation] - Greenish-gray, medium-grained calc-silicate rock, composed of plagioclase, quartz, and diopside (locally hornblende and scapolite), interbedded with schist and granofels composed of plagioclase, quartz, biotite, and commonly garnet and sillimanite.
Middletown Formation (Middle Ordovician)
Middletown Formation ( = Ammonoosuc Volcanics of New Hampshire) - Heterogeneously interlayered dark- to light-gray, generally medium grained gneiss and granofels, ranging from quartz-biotite gneiss through felsic amphibole gneiss to amphibolite and characteristically containing anthophyllite or cummingtonite with or without hornblende. Also layers of calc-silicate rock and of biotite gneiss with quartz-sillimanite nodules.
Middletown Formation (Middle Ordovician)
Middletown Formation ( = Ammonoosuc Volcanics of New Hampshire) - Heterogeneously interlayered dark- to light-gray, generally medium grained gneiss and granofels, ranging from quartz-biotite gneiss through felsic amphibole gneiss to amphibolite and characteristically containing anthophyllite or cummingtonite with or without hornblende. Also layers of calc-silicate rock and of biotite gneiss with quartz-sillimanite nodules.
Plainfield Formation (Proterozoic Z?)
Plainfield Formation - Interlayered light-gray, thin-bedded quartzite, in places with feldspar, mica, graphite, or pyrite, light- to medium-gray gneiss composed of quartz, oligoclase, and biotite (rarely microcline), medium- to dark-gray schist composed of quartz, oligoclase, biotite, sillimanite, and garnet, dark-gray or green gneiss composed of plagioclase, quartz, biotite, and hornblende (commonly with diopside), amphibolite, diopsite-bearing quartzite, and calc-silicate rock. In places contains quartz-sillimanite nodules.
Plainfield Formation plus Potter Hill Granite Gneiss plus Narragansett Pier Granite (Proterozoic Z? and Permian)
Plainfield Formation plus Potter Hill Granite Gneiss plus Narragansett Pier Granite - Plainfield Formation - Interlayered light-gray, thin-bedded quartzite, in places with feldspar, mica, graphite, or pyrite, light- to medium-gray gneiss composed of quartz, oligoclase, and biotite (rarely microcline), medium- to dark-gray schist composed of quartz, oligoclase, biotite, sillimanite, and garnet, dark-gray or green gneiss composed of plagioclase, quartz, biotite, and hornblende (commonly with diopside), amphibolite, diopsite-bearing quartzite, and calc-silicate rock. In places contains quartz-sillimanite nodules. Potter Hill Granite Gneiss - Light-pink to gray, tan-weathering, fine- to medium-grained, rarely porphyritic, well-foliated (not lineated) granitic gneiss, composed of microcline, quartz, oligoclase (or albite), biotite, and magnetite, minor muscovite, and local garnet. Narragansett Pier Granite - Pink to red, medium- to coarse-grained (commonly pegmatitic), generally massive (not gneissic) granite, composed of microcline, oligoclase, quartz, and biotite, and accessory muscovite and magnetite. Considerable associated pegmatite.
Plainfield Formation plus Stony Creek Granite Gneiss plus Narragansett Pier Granite (Proterozoic Z? and Permian)
Plainfield Formation - Interlayered light-gray, thin-bedded quartzite, in places with feldspar, mica, graphite, or pyrite, light- to medium-gray gneiss composed of quartz, oligoclase, and biotite (rarely microcline), medium- to dark-gray schist composed of quartz, oligoclase, biotite, sillimanite, and garnet, dark-grey or green gneiss composed of plagioclase, quartz, biotite, and hornblende (commonly with diopside), amphibolite, diopside-bearing quartzite, and calc-silicate rock. In places contains quartz-sillimanite nodules. Stony Creek Granite Gneiss - Red to pink, unevenly medium to very coarse grained, variably foliated granite or granite gneiss, composed of oligoclase, K-feldspar, and quartz with minor biotite and magnetite, sporatic garnet (in foliated varieties), and local muscovite. Commonly contains granite and pegmatite of Narragansett Pier type (and probably age). In much of area both granites occur as innumerable veins penetrating other units or as larger bodies full of inclusions of those units, which can be mapped through the bodies of granite. Narragansett Pier Granite (Permian) - Pink to red, medium- to coarse-grained (commonly pegmatitic), generally massive (not gneissic) granite, composed of microcline, oligoclase, quartz, and biotite, and accessory muscovite and magnetite. Considerable associated pegmatite.
Ratlum Mountain Schist (Lower Ordovician)
Ratlum Mountain Schist - Gray, medium-grained, interlayered schist and granofels, composed of quartz, oligoclase, muscovite (in the schist), biotite, and garnet, also staurolite and kyanite in the schist. Numerous layers and lenses of amphibolite; also some of quartz-spessartine (coticule) and calc-silicate rock.
Ratlum Mountain Schist (Lower? Ordovician)
Ratlum Mountain Schist - Gray, medium-grained, interlayered schist and granofels, composed of quartz, oligoclase, muscovite (in the schist), biotite, and garnet, also staurolite and kyanite in the schist. Numerous layers and lenses of amphibolite; also some of quartz-spessartine (coticule) and calc-silicate rock.
Ratlum Mountain Schist plus Amphibolite unit [in Ratlum Mountain Schist] (Lower Ordovician)
Ratlum Mountain Schist plus Amphibolite unit [in Ratlum Mountain Schist] - Ratlum Mountain Schist - Gray, medium-grained, interlayered schist and granofels, composed of quartz, oligoclase, muscovite (in the schist), biotite, and garnet, also staurolite and kyanite in the schist. Numerous layers and lenses of amphibolite; also some of quartz-spessartine (coticule) and calc-silicate rock. Amphibolite unit [in Ratlum Mountain Schist] (Lower? Ordovician) - Black or mottled, generally massive amphibolite and hornblende gneiss, composed of hornblende and andesine, commonly with minor quartz and magnetite, and locally with garnet, biotite, and epidote.
Rowe Schist (Lower Ordovician or Cambrian or both)
Rowe Schist - Light-gray to silvery, fine- to medium-grained, generally poorly layered schist, composed of quartz, muscovite, biotite, oligoclase, and generally garnet, staurolite, and kyanite or sillimanite. Layers of granofels common; also some layers of amphibolite, quartz-spessartine rock (coticule), and calc-silicate rock.
Shelton Member [of Trap Falls Formation] (Middle or Lower Ordovician)
Shelton (white gneiss) Member [of Trap Falls Formation] - White, light-gray, or buff, fine- to medium-grained, generally well foliated granitic gneiss, composed of sodic plagioclase, quartz, microcline, muscovite, and garnet (in tiny almost ubiquitous grains), also commonly minor biotite; generally interlayered with mica schist, biotite gneiss, and calc-silicate rock. Thought to be metavolcanic equivalent of unit Og. Shelton Member of Trap Falls Formation (Rodgers, 1985) is here referred to as Shelton muscovite granite. On the basis of field and laboratory studies, Ansonia, Beardsley, Pumpkin Ground, and Shelton gneisses, previously considered stratigraphic units, are reinterpreted as plutonic. Shelton is a foliated, medium-grained, garnet-bearing muscovite leucogranite with a conspicuous white color and abundant garnets. Age of crystallization determined from U-Pb garnet analysis is 380+/-3 Ma (Middle Devonian). Southeast margin of the Shelton is in contact with the Trap Falls Formation (Sevigny and Hanson, 1993).
Southbridge Formation (Silurian or Ordovician or both)
Southbridge Formation - Dark- to light-gray, locally rusty, fine- to medium-grained interlayered granofels and schist, composed of quartz, plagioclase, and biotite, with muscovite in schist, and amphibole, calc-silicate minerals, K-feldspar in certain layers; also locally mappable units and thinner layers of calc-silicate rock, amphibolite, and sillimanite-garnet and sillimanite-graphite-pyrrhotite schist.
Tatnic Hill Formation (Upper? and Middle Ordovician)
Tatnic Hill Formation - Medium- to dark-gray, medium-grained gneiss or schist composed of quartz, andesine, biotite, garnet, and sillimanite, locally kyanite, muscovite, or K-feldspar, interlayered with locally mappable units and thinner layers of rusty-weathering graphitic pyrrhotitic two-mica schist, amphibolite, and calc-silicate rock.
Idaho
Argillite, quartzite, and calc-silicate rock; Middle Proterozoic Yellowjacket Formation; southern Belt province (Middle Proterozoic)
Intermediate Precambrian sediments, dark-colored, feldspathic quartzite with minor limestone beds of southern Idaho.
Black argillite, quartzite, siltite, marble, chert, and syngenetic silver-lead-zinc deposits; Devonian euxinic marine-basin deposits; central Idaho (Devonian)
Devonian thrusted, deep-water siliceous argillite and quartzite of central Idaho.
Felsic gneiss, mafic gneiss, orthogneiss, and calc-silicate rock; Early Proterozoic metamorphic rocks; central Idaho; Pioneer Mountains metamorphic core complex (Early Proterozoic)
Precambrian, high-grade metamorphic rock; metasediment subdivisions are (PC3, PC2, PC1).
High-grade metasedimentary biotite schist, biotite gneiss, and calc-silicate gneiss; Middle Proterozoic northern Belt province near Idaho batholith (Middle Proterozoic)
Precambrian high-grade metamorphic rock; kyanite-sillimanite calc-silcate bearing schist and gneiss; scapolite common
Metamorphosed granitoid plutonic rocks and metasedimentary rocks, undivided; Cretaceous orthogneiss in Middle Proterozoic metasedimentary host rocks; west-central Idaho (Cretaceous to Middle Proterozoic)
Highly metamorphosed rock of central Idaho; age and origin of rock questionable.
Mica schist, quartzite, and calc-silcicate rock; Proterozoic high-grade metasedimentary rocks; trans-Idaho metamorphic province (Proterozoic)
Precambrian high-grade metamorphic rock; metasediment; kyanite-sillimanite calc-silicate schist and gneiss, scapolite common
Mica schist, quartzite, gneiss, and amphibolite; Late to Early Proterozoic high-grade metasedimentary rocks (subunits are ZXmhs, ZXmhq, and ZXmhc); trans-Idaho metamorphic province (Proterozoic)
Precambrian high-grade metamorphic rock; metasediment
Quartzite and biotite schist in fault contact; Middle Proterozoic metasedimentary rocks; southern Belt province (Middle Proterozoic)
Intermediate Precambrian age metasediments; dominantly quartzite with minor micaceous layers and mica schists of northern Idaho
Quartzite, marble, Calc-silicate rock, schist, and meta-conglomerate; Ordovician to Middle Proterozoic metasedimentary rocks; central Idaho, Pioneer Mountains metamorphic core complex (Ordovician to Middle Proterozoic)
Ordovician to Middle Proterozoic metasedimentary rocks, undivided
Quartzite, mica schist, and calc-silicate rock; Proterozoic high-grade metasedimentary rocks; trans-Idaho metamorphic province (Proterozoic)
Precambrian, high-grade metamorphic rock; metasediments; kyanite-sillimanite schist, and micaceous quartzite
Quartzite, siltstone, conglomerate, and metavolcanic rocks; Late and Middle Proterozoic, undivided; Atlanta batholith roof pendants (Late and Middle Proterozoic, undivided)
Precambrian, high-grade metamorphic rock
Schist, phyllite, quartzite, and calc-silicate rock; Middle Proterozoic metasedimentary rocks of Wallace Formation; northern Belt province (Middle Proterozoic)
Intermediate Precambrian age metasediments; generally low-to-medium grade; carbonate bearing argillite and siltite of northern Idaho.
Massachusetts
Black and white, well-layered hornblende-biotite-plagioclase gneiss and amphibolite (Proterozoic Y)
Black and white, well-layered hornblende-biotite-plagioclase gneiss and amphibolite - Contains irregular pods of diopside or cummingtonite-talc rock or amphibole calc-silicate, epidote-layered quartz-plagioclase gneiss near Hinsdale.
Boylston Schist (Silurian or Ordovician)
Boylston Schist - Carbonaceous phyllite and schist, locally sulfidic; quartzite; calc-silicate beds.
Clough Quartzite (Upper Silurian)
Clough Quartzite - Quartz-pebble conglomerate, quartzite, and minor mica schist and calc-silicate rocks. Fossils at Bernardston are similar to those at Croyden Mountain, New Hampshire which indicate late Llandoverian age. Parts of the Littleton and Partridge Formations, and Clough Quartzite in MA are here reassigned to the Rangeley Formation [here geographically extended to MA]. The four mapped areas of Clough Quartzite in the Amherst area west of the Connecticut Valley border fault are now interpreted as conglomerate lenses in the Rangeley. Clough is considered the key stratigraphic unit in Bronson Hill anticlinorium because 1) it is dominated by distinctive, readily recognizable rock types, 2) where present, it is base of Silurian-Devonian sequence, resting with detectable unconformity on older rocks, and 3) it contains late Llandoverian fossils at several localities in western NH and adjacent VT, and at Bernardston, MA. Consists mostly of quartz-pebble conglomerate in which pebbles are typically deformed; other lithologies are quartz grit or white to pink, well-bedded quartzite. Locally contains some mica schist beds. On the MA State bedrock geologic map (Zen and others, 1983), thickness is locally exaggerated because at many localities, the unit was only a few meters or less thick and could not be shown at a scale of 1:250,000. Maximum thickness is 200 m on west limb of Northfield syncline. Unconformably overlies Fourmile Gneiss in Pelham dome and in Kempfield anticline, or Ammonoosuc Volcanics over most gneiss domes. Partridge Formation occurs along Clough-Ammonoosuc contact as lenses in many areas (Hatch and others, 1988).
Cobble Mountain Formation (Middle Ordovician)
Cobble Mountain Formation - Light-brown, fine- to medium-grained pelitic schist and granofels locally graded in beds less than 15 cm thick. Local amphibolite. Rare calc-silicate rock, feldspar gneiss, coticule and cummingtonite schist.
Collinsville Formation (Middle Ordovician or older)
Collinsville Formation - Interlayered amphibolite and white felsic gneiss containing biotite, hornblende, and magnetite. Local calc-silicate beds. Coticule-bearing granofels, muscovite quartzite and amphibolite in upper part.
Fitch Formation (Upper Silurian)
Fitch Formation - Sulfidic calc-silicate and minor sulfidic schist. Although the text and figures of this report show the Fitch as Silurian, a footnote [added just before this report went to press] cites a change in age from Silurian to Early Devonian based on conodonts found at the Bernardston, MA, locality, as reported in Elbert and others (1988). In Bronson Hill anticlinorium in MA, Fitch occurs as lenses between Clough Quartzite and Littleton Formation. Most common rock types in MA are gray, massive to weakly bedded, quartz-labradorite-biotite granulite containing a moderate amount of some combination of calc-silicate minerals (calcic amphibole, zoisite or clinozoisite, diopside, sphene, and microcline); commonly interbedded with biotite-free granulite that contains same calc-silicate minerals. One small exposure consists of nearly pure calcite marble. Larger lenses of Fitch consist of varieties of schist, similar to Partridge Formation. Best exposures are in low hills west of village of Orange, northeast of junction of MA Hwys 2A and 78. As shown on MA State bedrock geologic map, Fitch everywhere overlies Clough Quartzite and is never in contact with Partridge. Fossils dating the Fitch as Pridolian (Harris and others, 1983) are all from Littleton, NH, area [however, see mention of footnote, above]. [Papers presented as chapters in U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1366 are intended as explanations and (or) revisions to MA State bedrock geologic map of Zen and others (1983) at scale of 1:250,000.] (Hatch and others, 1988).
Hoosac Formation (Lower Cambrian and Proterozoic Z)
Hoosac Formation - Aluminous rusty-weathering kyanite schist with distinctive quartz lenses and minor thin beds of calc-silicate rocks.
Hoosac Formation (Lower Cambrian and Proterozoic Z)
Hoosac Formation - Undifferentiated Hoosac Formation.
Intimately interfolded Littleton and Partridge Formations (Lower Devonian and Middle Ordovician)
Intimately interfolded Littleton and Partridge Formations - In areas of poor exposure and incomplete mapping.
Partridge Formation (Middle Ordovician)
Partridge Formation (includes Brimfield Schist of Emerson, 1917) - Sulfidic schist and abundant calc-silicate.
Plainfield Formation (Proterozoic Z)
Plainfield Formation - Quartzite, pelitic schist, minor calc-silicate rock and amphibolite. Plainfield Formation extend into MA in Webster-Oxford area from eastern CT and western RI along west flank of Rhode Island batholith, along same strike as elongate lenses of Westboro Formation (as shown on State bedrock map of Zen and others, 1983). Lithology of Plainfield in New London area of southeastern CT (Goldsmith, 1966, 1976) and in eastern CT (Harwood and Goldsmith, 1971), and its structural and stratigraphic position indicate Plainfield and Westboro are equivalent. Plainfield is truncated along CT-RI border by Lake Char fault; however, in New London area, Plainfield is overlain by suite of largely mafic metavolcanic rocks (Waterford Group of Goldsmith, 1980), a relationship similar to that of the Westboro Formation and overlying metavolcanic rocks. Base of Plainfield is unknown, but gneiss and schist in center of Lyme dome may lie below it. Probably equivalent to quartzite and schist of Blackstone Group on basis of similar lithology and structural relations with Rhode Island batholith rocks (Goldsmith, 1991).
Washington Gneiss (Proterozoic Y)
Washington Gneiss - Well-layered, rusty-tan weathering muscovite-biotite plagioclase-microcline-quartz granofels containing layers of rusty sulfidic calc-silicate rocks.
Washington Gneiss (Proterozoic Y)
Washington Gneiss - Rusty-weathering diopside and sulfidic -rich calcite marble and calc-silicate rock.
Maine
Devonian Hildreths Formation (Devonian)
Devonian Hildreths Formation
Devonian - Ordovician Bucksport Formation (Devonian - Ordovician)
Devonian - Ordovician Bucksport Formation
Devonian - Silurian Madrid Formation (Devonian - Silurian)
Devonian - Silurian Madrid Formation
Ordovician - Precambrian Z calc-silicate rocks of the Passagassawakeag block (Ordovician - Precambrian Z)
Ordovician - Precambrian Z calc-silicate rocks of the Passagassawakeag block
Silurian Greenvale Cove Formation (Silurian)
Silurian Greenvale Cove Formation
Silurian - Precambrian Z Eliot Formation (Silurian - Precambrian Z)
Silurian - Precambrian Z Eliot Formation
Silurian Sangerville Formation (Silurian)
Silurian Sangerville Formation
Silurian Sangerville Formation limestone member (Silurian)
Silurian Sangerville Formation limestone member
Silurian Sangerville Formation Patch Mountain member (Silurian)
Silurian Sangerville Formation Patch Mountain member
Silurian Smalls Falls Formation (Silurian)
Silurian Smalls Falls Formation
Silurian Smalls Falls Formation? (Silurian)
Silurian Smalls Falls Formation?
Silurian Waterville Formation (Silurian)
Silurian Waterville Formation
Silurian Waterville Formation limestone member (Silurian)
Silurian Waterville Formation limestone member
North Carolina
Amphibolite (Cambrian/Late Proterozoic)
Amphibolite - metamorphosed mafic extrusive and intrusive rock; includes hornblende gneiss, thin layers of mica schist, calc-silicate rock, and, rarely, marble. Also includes small masses of metadiorite and metagabbro.
Biotite Gneiss and Schist (Cambrian/Late Proterozoic)
Biotite Gneiss and Schist - inequigranular, locally abundant potassic feldspar and garnet; interlayered and gradational with calc-silicate rock, sillimanite-mica schist, mica schist, and amphibolite. Contains small masses of granitic rock.
Biotite Gneiss and Schist (Cambrian/Late Proterozoic)
Biotite Gneiss and Schist - inequigranular and megacrystic; abundant potassic feldspar and garnet; interlayered and gradational with calc-silicate rock, sillimanite-mica schist, mica schist, and amphibolite. Contains small masses of granitic rock.
Biotite Gneiss and Schist (Cambrian/Late Proterozoic)
Biotite Gneiss and Schist - (Located in the Lilesville granite aureole) inequigranular, locally abundant potassic feldspar and garnet; interlayered and gradational with calc-silicate rock, sillimanite-mica schist, mica schist, and amphibolite. Contains small masses of granitic rock.
Biotite Granitic Gneiss (Middle Proterozoic)
Biotite Granitic Gneiss - unconformity; pinkish gray to light gray, massive to well-foliated, granitic to quartz monzonitic; includes variably mylonitized orthogneiss and paragneiss, interlayered amphibolite, calc-silicate rock, and marble. Includes granites of the Bryson City area, Straight Fork window, and Elk Park Plutonic Suite.
Blacksburg Formation (Cambrian/Late Proterozoic)
Blacksburg Formation - sericite schist, locally with graphite, phyllite with sericite quartzite, banded marble, amphibolite, and minor calc-silicate rock.
Mica Schist (Cambrian/Late Proterozoic)
Mica Schist - Garnet, staurolite, kyanite, or sillimanite occur locally; lenses and layers of quartz schist, micaceous quartzite, calc-silicate rock, biotite gneiss, amphibolite, and phyllite.
Migmatitic Biotite-Hornblende Gneisses (Middle Proterozoic)
Migmatitic Biotite-Hornblende Gneisses (1214 my) - unconformity; layered biotite-granite gneiss, biotite-hornblende gneiss, amphibolite, calc-silicate rock; locally contains relict granulite facies rock.
Ocoee Supergroup, Great Smokey Group; Copperhill Formation (Late Proterozoic)
Copperhill Formation - metagraywacke, massive, graded bedding common; includes dark-gray slate, mica schist, and nodular calc-silicate rock.
Ocoee Supergroup, Great Smokey Group; Metasandstone, Metagraywacke, Metasiltstone, and Mica Schist (Late Proterozoic)
Metasandstone, Metagraywacke, Metasiltstone, and Mica Schist - beds and lenses of calc-silicate rock locally abundant; garnet, staurolite, and cross-biotite porphyroblasts common in fine-grained layers. Includes Hughes Gap and Hothouse formations in southern area; Horse Branch Member of Ammons Formation and Grassy Branch Formation in northern area.
New Hampshire
Greenvale Cove Formation (Lower Silurian? )
Greenvale Cove Formation - Grayish-violet interlaminated metashale, feldspathic metasandstone, and calc-silicate rock of the Piermont allochthon in western New Hampshire.
Littleton Formation, Calc-silicate rock (Lower Devonian)
Littleton Formation, Calc-silicate rock - Possibly equivalent in part to Hildreths Formation of Maine but not restricted to one horizon. Locally fossiliferous, as in Moosilauke quadrangle.
Lower part of Rangeley Formation (Lower Silurian (Llandoverian))
Lower part of Rangeley Formation - Gray, thinly laminated (5-25 mm) metapelite with local lentils of turbidites and thin quartz conglomerates in western New Hampshire. Sparse calc-silicate pods and coticule. Probably equivalent to member B of Rangeley Formation of Maine.
Massabesic Gneiss Complex (Late Proterozoic)
Massabesic Gneiss Complex - Quartzose-feldspathic gneiss and biotite schists (locally rusty), granofels, and cal-silicate rocks closely intruded by, and grading into, a pink gneissic granite (623 Ma) that produced a migmatite.
Merrimack Group, Eliot Formation (Ordovician? - Silurian?)
Merrimack Group, Eliot Formation - Gray to green phyllite, calcareous quartzite, quartz-mica schist, and well-bedded calc-silicate.
Perry Mountain and Rangeley Formations, undivided (Silurian)
Perry Mountain and Rangeley Formations, undivided.
Rangeley Formation, Pink to green calc-silicate and purple biotite granofels (Lower Silurian (Llandoverian))
Rangeley Formation, Pink to green calc-silicate and purple biotite granofels - Thinly bedded. Close to transition from lower to upper parts of the Rangeley Formation. Probably equivalent to part of Paxton Formation of Zen and others (1983) in Massachusetts.
Rangeley Formation, Ribbon-banded calc-silicate of eastern New Hampshire (Lower Silurian (Llandoverian))
Rangeley Formation, Ribbon-banded calc-silicate of eastern New Hampshire - Probably equivalent to Patch Mountain Member of the Sangerville Formation (Llandoverian and Wenlockian) of central Maine.
Rangeley Formation, undivided (Lower Silurian (Llandoverian))
Rangeley Formation, undivided.
Upper part of Rangeley Formation (Lower Silurian (Llandoverian))
Upper part of Rangeley Formation - Rusty-weathering, pelitic schist, metasandstone, and local coarse-grained metasandstone lentils; calc-silicate pods common; minor coticule. Probably equivalent to member C of Rangeley Formation of Maine.
New York
Amphibolite (Middle Proterozoic)
Amphibolite - pyroxenic amphibolite, hornblende gneiss, commonly biotitic, garnetiferous; subordinate calcsilicate rock.
Biotite-quartz-plagioclase gneiss (Middle Proterozoic)
Biotite-quartz-plagioclase gneiss - with subordinate biotite granitic gneiss, amphibolite, calcsilicate rock.
Calcitic and dolomitic marble (Middle Proterozoic)
Calcitic and dolomitic marble - variably siliceous; in part with calcsilicate rock and amphibolite.
Calcitic and dolomitic marble (Middle Proterozoic)
Calcitic and dolomitic marble - predominantly; variably siliceous; in part with calcsilicate rock and amphibolite.
Calcitic and dolomitic marble (Middle Proterozoic)
Calcitic and dolomitic marble - variably siliceous; in part with calcsilicate rock and amphibolite.
Calcsilicate rock (Middle Proterozoic)
Calcsilicate rock
Dolomitic and calcitic marbles interlayered with significant amounts of calcsilicate rock (Middle Proterozoic)
Dolomitic and calcitic marbles interlayered with significant amounts of calcsilicate rock - metasedimentary amphibolite, pyroxene granulite, and various gneisses; includes interlayered diopsidic and tremolitic marble and quartzite, and talc-tremolite rock (mined in Balmat-Edwards belt, northwest Adirondacks).
Garnet-biotite-quartz-feldspar gneiss (Middle Proterozoic)
Garnet-biotite-quartz-feldspar gneiss - quartzite, quartz-feldspar gneiss, calcsilicate rock.
Manhattan Formation (A Member) (Middle Ordovician)
Manhattan Formation (A member) - sillimanite-garnet-muscovite-biotite-quartz- plagioclase schists; calcite marble and calcsilicate rock at base.
Rusty and gray biotite-quartz-feldspar gneiss (Middle Proterozoic)
Rusty and gray biotite-quartz-feldspar gneiss - rusty facies contains variable amounts of garnet, sillimanite, cordierite, graphite, sulfides; minor marble and calcsilicate rock.
Rhode Island
Waterford Group - Mamacoke Formation (Late Proterozoic? or older?)
Waterford Group - Mamacoke Formation - Light- to dark gray, medium-grained amphibolitic gneiss composed of plagioclase, microcline, quartz, biotite, hornblende, and garnet; locally contains quartz-sillimanite nodules, and thin layers of quartzite and calc-silicate rock.
South Carolina
Biotite gneiss with interlayered marble, calcsilicate gneiss, sillimanite-muscovite schist, and garnet-quartz rock (undetermined)
Biotite gneiss having interlayered marble, calc-silicate rock, sillimanite-muscovite schist, and garnet-quartz rock
Blacksburg Formation (Neoproterozoic)
Blacksburg Formation: metamorphosed sedimentary sequence of interlayered sericite schist and phyllite, sericite quartzite, marble, amphibolite and calc-silicate rock
Virginia
Mather Gorge Formation -- Schist (Proterozoic Z-Cambrian)
Mather Gorge Formation - Schist.
Washington
Pre-Tertiary metamorphic rocks, undivided (Probably Permian)
Schist, gneiss, marble, quartzite, amphibolite, greenstone, metaconglomerate, graywacke; includes metasedimentary, volcanic, and intrusive rocks. Some areas, as on San Juan Islands, show little if any metamorphism.
Pre-Upper Jurassic metamorphic rocks of the medium and high-grade zone (Early Jurassic-Triassic)
Schist, amphibolite, and minor lime-silicate rocks, marble, quartzite, and metaconglomerate.

Accessibility FOIA Privacy Policies and Notices

USA.gov logo U.S. Department of the Interior | U.S. Geological Survey
URL: http://mrdata.usgs.gov/geology/state/sgmc-lith.php?text=calc-silicate+rock
Page Contact Information: pschweitzer@usgs.gov
Page Last modified: 15:10 on 07-Dec-2016