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Geologic units containing Dacite

Dacite
A volcanic rock defined in the QAPF diagram as having Q/(Q+A+P) between 20 and 60% and P/(P+A) > 65%...
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Alabama

Arizona

Cretaceous to Late Jurassic sedimentary rocks with minor volcanic rocks (Late Jurassic to Cretaceous)
Sandstone and conglomerate, rarely forms prominent outcrops; massive conglomerate is typical near base of unit and locally in upper part. These deposits are nonmarine except in southeastern Arizona, where prominent gray marine limestone (Mural Limestone) forms the middle of the Bisbee Group. Sandstones are typically medium-bedded, drab brown, lithic-feldspathic arenites. Includes Bisbee Group (largely Early Cretaceous) and related rocks, Temporal, Bathtub, and Sand Wells formations, rocks of Gu Achi, McCoy Mountains Formation, and Upper Cretaceous Fort Crittenden Formation and equivalent rocks. (80-160 Ma)
Early Proterozoic metavolcanic rocks (Early Proterozoic)
Weakly to strongly metamorphosed volcanic rocks. Protoliths include basalt, andesite, dacite, and rhyolite deposited as lava or tuff, related sedimentary rock, and shallow intrusive rock. These rocks, widely exposed in several belts in central Arizona, include metavolcanic rocks in the Yavapai and Tonto Basin supergroups. (1650 to 1800 Ma)
Early Tertiary to Late Cretaceous volcanic rocks (Late Cretaceous to Early Tertiary)
Rhyolite to andesite and closely associated sedimentary and near-surface intrusive rocks; commonly dark gray to dark greenish gray or greenish brown. In the ranges west of Tucson, this unit includes thick welded ash-flow tuffs. Volcanic rocks of this unit are inferred to be derived from vents and volcanoes above magma chambers that solidified to form the granitic rocks of map unit TKg. These rocks are restricted to southeastern Arizona except for a small outcrop near Bagdad. (50-82 Ma)
Holocene to middle Pliocene basaltic rocks (Middle Pliocene to Holocene)
Mostly dark-colored basaltic lava and cinders young enough that some original volcanic landforms are still apparent. Includes a small amount of andesite, dacite, and rhyolite. Rocks of this map unit are largely restricted to six areas widely distributed in Arizona: San Francisco and Uinkaret volcanic fields in northern Arizona (0-4 Ma); Springerville (0-4 Ma) and San Carlos (0-2 Ma) volcanic fields in east-central Arizona; and San Bernardino (0-1 Ma) and Sentinel (1-4 Ma) volcanic fields in southern Arizona. Rocks of this unit are also present in the extreme southwestern part of Arizona where they were erupted at the edge of the Pinacate volcanic field (0-2 Ma) in northwestern Sonora. (0-4 Ma)
Holocene to middle Pliocene volcanic rocks (Middle Pliocene to Holocene)
Rhyolite to andesite deposited as a sequence of lava flows and associated rocks; generally light to medium gray, tan, or reddish brown. These rocks are part of the San Francisco volcanic field. (0-4 Ma)
Jurassic sedimentary and volcanic rocks (Jurassic)
Sandstone and conglomerate derived from volcanic rocks with associated intermediate-composition lava flows, breccias, and tuffs. In southern Arizona this unit includes rocks of the Artesa sequence, Pitoikam Formation, Mulberry Wash volcanics, Rudolfo Red Beds, Recreation Red Beds, and Gardner Canyon Formation. In western Arizona it includes the Harquar Formation, rocks of Slumgullion, and related(?) unnamed units in the Kofa and Middle Mountains. This unit is characterized by maroon, brown, and purplish-gray volcanic-lithic sandstone and siltstone, with subordinate to abundant conglomerate, quartz-rich sandstone and sparse limestone. (150-170 Ma)
Jurassic volcanic rocks (Jurassic)
Massive quartz-feldspar porphyry, generally interpreted as thick, welded rhyolitic tuffs, with locally abundant lava, and sandstone and conglomerate derived from volcanic rocks. Rare eolian quartzite units are interbedded in southern Arizona. Includes Ali Molina Formation, Mount Wrightson Formation, part of the Canelo Hills Volcanics, Cobre Ridge tuff, Black Rock volcanics, Planet Volcanics, and equivalent rocks. (160-200 Ma)
Late to middle Miocene basaltic rocks (Middle to Late Miocene)
Mostly dark, mesa-forming basalt deposited as lava flows. Rocks of this unit are widely exposed south of Camp Verde (Hickey Formation basalts), in the Mohon Mountains north of Bagdad, "The Mesa" east of Parker, and at other scattered locations in western Arizona. Rocks of this unit were not tilted by middle-Tertiary normal faulting except in a narrow belt from north of Phoenix to the northwest corner of the state. (8-16 Ma)
Middle Miocene to Oligocene shallow intrusions (Oligocene to Middle Miocene)
Generally very fine-grained, porphyritic rhyolite to dacite in small, irregular-shaped bodies formed as subvolcanic intrusions in volcanic fields of southern and western Arizona, or in concentrated zones of dikes in the Mohave and Black Mountains of northwestern Arizona. The unit consists of mafic tuff, breccia and shallow intrusions at Buell Park in northeastern Arizona. (14-35 Ma)
Middle Miocene to Oligocene volcanic and sedimentary rocks, undivided (Oligocene to Middle Miocene)
Sequences of diverse volcanic rocks with abundant interbedded sedimentary rocks. (11-32 Ma)
Middle Miocene to Oligocene volcanic rocks (Oligocene to Middle Miocene)
Lava, tuff, fine-grained intrusive rock, and diverse pyroclastic rocks. These compositionally variable volcanic rocks include basalt, andesite, dacite, and rhyolite. Thick felsic volcanic sequences form prominent cliffs and range fronts in the Black (Mohave County), Superstition, Kofa, Eagletail, Galiuro, and Chiricahua Mountains. This unit includes regionally extensive ash-flow tuffs, such as the Peach Springs tuff of northwestern Arizona and the Apache Leap tuff east of Phoenix. Most volcanic rocks are 20-30 Ma in southeastern Arizona and 15 to 25 Ma in central and western Arizona, but this unit includes some late Eocene rocks near the New Mexico border in east-central Arizona. (11-38 Ma)
Pliocene to middle Miocene volcanic rocks (Middle Miocene to Pliocene)
Rhyolite to andesite deposited as lava flows and related rocks associated with basaltic rocks of map units Tby and Tb. (2-12 Ma)

California

Cretaceous marine rocks (in part nonmarine) (?), unit 1 (Blythe) (Middle Jurassic(?) to Late Cretaceous)
Undivided Cretaceous sandstone, shale, and conglomerate; minor nonmarine rocks in Peninsular Ranges (?)
Cretaceous marine rocks (in part nonmarine), unit 2 (West Walker River) (Triassic(?) and/or Jurassic(?))
Undivided Cretaceous sandstone, shale, and conglomerate; minor nonmarine rocks in Peninsular Ranges
Miocene marine rocks and Franciscan schist (Cretaceous(?) to Miocene)
Quaternary pyroclastic and volcanic mudflow deposits, unit 3 (Sutter Buttes) (Quaternary (1.5-2.5 Ma))
Quaternary pyroclastic and volcanic mudflow deposits.
Quaternary volcanic flow rocks, unit 1 (Cascade Volcanic Field) (Quaternary)
Quaternary volcanic flow rocks; minor pyroclastic deposits; in part Pliocene and Miocene.
Quaternary volcanic flow rocks, unit 1, questionably identified (Cascade Volcanic Field) (Quaternary)
Quaternary volcanic flow rocks; minor pyroclastic deposits; in part Pliocene and Miocene.
Quaternary volcanic flow rocks, unit 3 (Clear Lake Volcanic Field) (Quaternary (0-4 Ma))
Quaternary volcanic flow rocks; minor pyroclastic deposits; in part Pliocene and Miocene.
Quaternary volcanic flow rocks, unit 4 (Sutter Buttes) (Quaternary (1.5-2.5 Ma))
Quaternary volcanic flow rocks; minor pyroclastic deposits; in part Pliocene and Miocene.
Quaternary volcanic flow rocks, unit 5 (Coso Volcanic Field) (Quaternary (0-4 Ma))
Quaternary volcanic flow rocks; minor pyroclastic deposits; in part Pliocene and Miocene.
Recent (Holocene) volcanic flow rocks, unit 1 (Cascade Volcanic Field) (Holocene)
Recent (Holocene) volcanic flow rocks; minor pyroclastic deposits; in part Pleistocene.
Tertiary intrusive rocks (hypabyssal), unit 1 (Cascades Volcanic Field) (Tertiary)
Tertiary intrusive rocks; mostly shallow (hypabyssal) plugs and dikes. Includes some Mesozoic rocks.
Tertiary intrusive rocks (hypabyssal), unit 2 (Quien Sabe Volcanic Field) (Tertiary)
Tertiary intrusive rocks; mostly shallow (hypabyssal) plugs and dikes. Includes some Mesozoic rocks.
Tertiary intrusive rocks (hypabyssal), unit 4 (Tranquillon-Obispo) (Tertiary)
Tertiary intrusive rocks; mostly shallow (hypabyssal) plugs and dikes. Includes some Mesozoic rocks.
Tertiary intrusive rocks (hypabyssal), unit 5 (Southern California Basin) (Tertiary)
Tertiary intrusive rocks; mostly shallow (hypabyssal) plugs and dikes. Includes some Mesozoic rocks.
Tertiary intrusive rocks (hypabyssal), unit 6 (Southern Mojave Desert) (Tertiary)
Tertiary intrusive rocks; mostly shallow (hypabyssal) plugs and dikes. Includes some Mesozoic rocks.
Tertiary intrusive rocks (hypabyssal), unit 7 (Northern Mojave Desert) (Tertiary)
Tertiary intrusive rocks; mostly shallow (hypabyssal) plugs and dikes. Includes some Mesozoic rocks.
Tertiary intrusive rocks (hypabyssal), unit 8 (Crescent City) (Tertiary)
Tertiary intrusive rocks; mostly shallow (hypabyssal) plugs and dikes. Includes some Mesozoic rocks.
Tertiary pyroclastic and volcanic mudflow deposits, unit 1 (Sonoma Volcanic Field) (Tertiary (3-7 Ma))
Tertiary pyroclastic and volcanic mudflow deposits.
Tertiary pyroclastic and volcanic mudflow deposits, unit 2 (Berkeley Hills) (Tertiary (8-12 Ma))
Tertiary pyroclastic and volcanic mudflow deposits.
Tertiary pyroclastic and volcanic mudflow deposits, unit 3 (Pinnacles-Neenach) (Tertiary (22-24 Ma))
Tertiary pyroclastic and volcanic mudflow deposits.
Tertiary pyroclastic and volcanic mudflow deposits, unit 4 (Tranquillon-Obispo) (Tertiary (16-18 Ma))
Tertiary pyroclastic and volcanic mudflow deposits.
Tertiary pyroclastic and volcanic mudflow deposits, unit 7 (Southern Mojave Desert) (Tertiary (8-28 Ma))
Tertiary pyroclastic and volcanic mudflow deposits.
Tertiary pyroclastic and volcanic mudflow deposits, unit 8 (Northern Mojave Desert) (Tertiary (4-22 Ma))
Tertiary pyroclastic and volcanic mudflow deposits.
Tertiary volcanic flow rocks, unit 12 (Sam Emigdio) (Tertiary (22-25 Ma))
Tertiary volcanic flow rocks; minor pyroclastic deposits.
Tertiary volcanic flow rocks, unit 13 (Plush Ranch-Vasquez-Diligencia) (Tertiary (19-23 Ma))
Tertiary volcanic flow rocks; minor pyroclastic deposits.
Tertiary volcanic flow rocks, unit 14 (Tranquillon-Obispo) (Tertiary (16-18 Ma))
Tertiary volcanic flow rocks; minor pyroclastic deposits.
Tertiary volcanic flow rocks, unit 15 (Southern Mojave Desert) (Tertiary (8-28 Ma))
Tertiary volcanic flow rocks; minor pyroclastic deposits.
Tertiary volcanic flow rocks, unit 16 (Northern Mojave Desert) (Tertiary (4-22 Ma))
Tertiary volcanic flow rocks; minor pyroclastic deposits.
Tertiary volcanic flow rocks, unit 17 (Cascade Range) (Tertiary (2-24 Ma))
Tertiary volcanic flow rocks; minor pyroclastic deposits.
Tertiary volcanic flow rocks, unit 1 (Quien Sabe-Burdell Mountain) (Tertiary (9.5-13 Ma))
Tertiary volcanic flow rocks; minor pyroclastic deposits.
Tertiary volcanic flow rocks, unit 2 (Pinnacles-Neenach) (Tertiary (22-24 Ma))
Tertiary volcanic flow rocks; minor pyroclastic deposits.
Tertiary volcanic flow rocks, unit 3 (Sonoma Volcanic Field) (Tertiary (3-7 Ma))
Tertiary volcanic flow rocks; minor pyroclastic deposits.
Tertiary volcanic flow rocks, unit 4 (Berkeley Hills) (Tertiary (8-12 Ma))
Tertiary volcanic flow rocks; minor pyroclastic deposits.
Tertiary volcanic flow rocks, unit 6 (Page Mill-Mindego) (Tertiary (12-15 Ma))
Tertiary volcanic flow rocks; minor pyroclastic deposits.
Tertiary volcanic flow rocks, unit 8 (Southern California Basin) (Tertiary (8-25 Ma; most near 15))
Tertiary volcanic flow rocks; minor pyroclastic deposits.
Triassic marine rocks, unit 2 (Eastern Klamath Mountains) (Middle to Late Triassic)
Shale, conglomerate, limestone and dolomite, sandstone, slate, hornfels, quartzite; minor pyroclastic rocks

Connecticut

Idaho

Massachusetts

Michigan

Nevada

Andesite and related rocks of intermediate composition (Late Miocene to Middle Miocene)
ANDESITE AND RELATED ROCKS OF INTERMEDIATE COMPOSITION-Flows and breccias
Andesite and related rocks of intermediate composition (Early Oligocene to Early Miocene)
ANDESITE AND RELATED ROCKS OF INTERMEDIATE COMPOSITION-Flows and breccias
Ash-flow tuffs and tuffaceous sedimentary rocks (Middle Miocene to Late Miocene)
ASH-FLOW TUFFS AND TUFFACEOUS SEDIMENTARY ROCKS
Ash-flow tuffs, rhyolitic flows, and shallow intrusive rocks (Middle Miocene to Late Miocene)
ASH-FLOW TUFFS, RHYOLITIC FLOWS, AND SHALLOW INTRUSIVE ROCKS
Rhyolitic flows and shallow intrusive rocks (Early Oligocene to Early Miocene)
RHYOLITIC FLOWS AND SHALLOW INTRUSIVE ROCKS
Rhyolitic flows and shallow intrusive rocks (Late Eocene to Middle Eocene)
RHYOLITIC FLOWS AND SHALLOW INTRUSIVE ROCKS
Rhyolitic flows and shallow intrusive rocks (Middle Miocene to Late Miocene)
RHYOLITIC FLOWS AND SHALLOW INTRUSIVE ROCKS
Rhyolitic flows and shallow intrusive rocks (Miocene to Quaternary)
RHYOLITIC FLOWS AND SHALLOW INTRUSIVE ROCKS
Shale, sandstone, volcanogenic clastic rocks, andesite, rhyolite, and locally thick carbonate units (Late Triassic to Early Cretaceous)
SHALE, SANDSTONE, VOLCANOGENIC CLASTIC ROCKS, ANDESITE, RHYOLITE, AND LOCALLY THICK CARBONATE UNITS-Undivided sequence locally containing recognizable equivalents of the Luning and Dunlap Formations
Volcanic flows and flow breccias, chiefly of andesitic composition, tuffs, sparse sandstone and graywacke (Permian to Jurassic)
VOLCANIC FLOWS AND FLOW BRECCIAS, CHIEFLY OF ANDESITIC COMPOSITION, TUFFS, SPARSE SANDSTONE AND GRAYWACKE-Includes Happy Creek Volcanic Series and related rocks in Humboldt County and similar rocks in Washoe and Pershing Counties; includes andesite breccias and volcanogenic sedimentary rocks in Mineral County
Volcanic sandstone, felsic ash-flow tuffs, rhyolite, and rhyodacite flows (Middle Jurassic to Early Cretaceous)
VOLCANIC SANDSTONE, FELSIC ASH-FLOW TUFFS, RHYOLITE, AND RHYODACITE FLOWS (Upper? Jurassic)-Pony Trail Group of Cortez Mountains, Eureka County
Welded and nonwelded silicic ash-flow tuffs (Early Oligocene to Early Miocene)
WELDED AND NONWELDED SILICIC ASH-FLOW TUFFS-Locally includes thin units of air-fall tuff and sedimentary rock
Welded and nonwelded silicic ash-flow tuffs (Late Eocene to Middle Eocene)
WELDED AND NONWELDED SILICIC ASH-FLOW TUFFS-Locally includes thin units of air-fall tuff and sedimentary rock

Oregon

Andesite and dacite and sedimentary rocks (Miocene? and Oligocene) (Oligocene to Miocene)
Lava flows, breccia, volcaniclastic and epiclastic rocks mostly of andesitic and dacitic composition; includes minor amounts of altered basaltic rocks. Joint surfaces and cavities commonly lined with hematite or montmorillonite clay, secondary silica minerals, zeolites, celadonite, or calcite. Andesite and dacite typically have plagioclase, hornblende, and clinopyroxene phenocrysts; some flows aphyric. Platy flow-jointing common. Age, mostly Oligocene; may include some rocks of early Miocene age. As shown, may include some rocks older than Oligocene, correlative with upper parts of unit Tea. One potassium-argon age of about 28 Ma on porphyritic hornblende andesite from Sheep Creek, southwest corner of Union County, indicates in part coeval with unit Tsf
Andesite (Holocene and Pleistocene) (Quaternary)
Forms major stratovolcanoes dominantly of aphyric to porphyritic basaltic andesite and andesite; phenocrysts are principally pyroxene, olivine, plagioclase, and, rarely, hornblende. Locally includes dacite and minor basalt
Basaltic and andesitic rocks (upper and middle Miocene) (Middle to Late Miocene)
Lava flows and flow breccia of hypersthene and olivine andesite, basaltic andesite containing plagioclase and pyroxene phenocrysts, and basalt; many flows contain phenocrysts of both hypersthene and augite. Includes interbedded volcaniclastic and epiclastic rocks mostly of andesitic composition, but partly of dacitic or rhyodacitic composition. Includes really restricted flows of silicic andesite or dacite. Upper part of unit mostly unaltered, although olivine crystals are locally altered to clay minerals. Lower parts commonly altered; secondary minerals include nontronite and saponite, chalcedony, calcite, and zeolites. Older parts of this unit locally are propylitically altered adjacent to larger intrusions. Erupted mostly from widespread, northwest- and north-trending dikes and dike swarms and related plugs and lava cones. Potassium-argon ages range from about 10 Ma to about 17 Ma. Much of this unit was previously assigned to the Sardine Formation (Peck and others, 1964), although the type locality of the Sardine Formation ("Sardine Series" as mapped by Thayer, 1939) may be older. Includes Elk Lake Formation (White, 1980a, 1980b), part of the Rhododendron Formation (Trimble, 1963; Wise, 1969), and andesite of Nohorn Creek of Hammond and others (1982)
Marine facies (Middle Eocene to Late Eocene)
Basaltic clastic rocks and pillow lavas, locally mapped separately by Wells and others (1983). Foraminiferal assemblages are assigned to the lower part of the Narizian Stage of Mallory (1959); see Wells and others (1983) for summary
Marine facies (Middle Eocene to Late Eocene)
Basaltic clastic rocks and pillow lavas, locally mapped separately by Wells and others (1983). Foraminiferal assemblages are assigned to the lower part of the Narizian Stage of Mallory (1959); see Wells and others (1983) for summary
Mazama ash-flow deposits (Holocene) (Holocene)
Rhyodacitic to andesitic ash-flow deposits related to climactic eruptions of Mount Mazama about 6,845 yr B.P. (14C) (Bacon, 1983)
Mazama pumice deposits (Holocene) (Holocene)
Primary and reworked air-fall rhyodacite pumice related to climactic eruptions of Mount Mazama about 6,845 yr B.P.(14C). Mapped only where it extensively covers older units
Porphyritic basalt (upper Eocene) (Late Eocene)
Subaerial lava flows and breccia of porphyritic basalt, minor basaltic andesite, and rare dacite. Includes basalt of Cascade Head (Wells and others, 1983), Yachats Basalt (Snavely and others, 1976c) and Goble Volcanic Series (Warren and others, 1945). Also includes camptonitic extrusive rocks (tuff breccia, lapilli tuff, and minor pillow flows) interbedded in Nestucca Formation
Rhyolite and dacite domes and flows and small hypabyssal intrusive bodies (Miocene to upper Eocene?) (Late Eocene to Miocene)
Mostly light-gray to red, dense, flow-banded, nonporphyritic and porphyritic rhyolite and dacite in nested domes, small intrusive bodies, and related flows. Includes some near-vent breccias, pumice-lapilli tuffs, and coarse pumicites. Commonly associated with mercury mineralization. Includes several small hypabyssal intrusions of diorite, granodiorite, and quartz monzonite exposed in Paisley Hills of Lake County (Muntzert, 1969; Muntzert and Field, 1968). In many places represents vents for lava flows and tuff of unit Tsf
Rhyolite and dacite (Holocene and Pleistocene) (Pleistocene to Holocene)
Domes and related flows and flow breccia of aphyric and plagioclase and hornblende porphyritic rhyolite and dacite. Includes rhyolite and dacite on Newberry volcano and at South Sister volcano in the Cascade Range that are younger than Mazama ash deposits (Qma , Qmp; radiometrically dated by 14C methods at approximately 6,800 yr old)
Rhyolite and dacite (Pliocene? and Miocene) (Miocene to Pliocene)
Ash-flow tuff, lava flows, pumice-lapilli tuff, coarse pumicite, flow breccia, and domal complexes of rhyolitic, rhyodacitic, and dacitic composition; in places includes peralkaline rhyolite and some andesite and andesite breccia. Locally porphyritic with phenocrysts of alkali feldspar, plagioclase, and minor augite, ferro-hedenbergite, hornblende, hypersthene, or biotite. Commonly flow banded; locally glassy. Many of the ash--flow tuffs exhibit flow features and only obscure vitro-clastic textures. In places includes interlayers of silicic volcaniclastic rocks and tuffaceous sedimentary rocks. Includes rhyolite at Owyhee Dam, Jump Creek Rhyolite, and Littlefield Rhyolite, all of Kittleman and others (1965); Dooley Rhyolite Breccia of Gilluly (1937), radiometrically dated at 14.7 +/- 0.4 Ma by potassium-argon methods (Fiebelkorn and others, 1983); resurgent domal masses in McDermitt caldera area; and extensive unnamed flows and ash-flow tuffs in the central and southern part of the Owyhee Upland. Also includes isolated masses of dacitic and rhyodacitic flows, breccia, and ash-flow tuff along eastern slope of Cascade Range that are lapped by flows and sediments of the Madras (or Deschutes) Formation. Potassium-argon ages on rocks in unit from southeast Oregon range from about 13 to 16 Ma; lenses of interbedded tuffaceous sedimentary rocks locally contain a Miocene (Barstovian) vertebrate fauna
Rhyolite and dacite (Pliocene? and Miocene) (Miocene to Pliocene)
Ash-flow tuff, lava flows, pumice-lapilli tuff, coarse pumicite, flow breccia, and domal complexes of rhyolitic, rhyodacitic, and dacitic composition; in places includes peralkaline rhyolite and some andesite and andesite breccia. Locally porphyritic with phenocrysts of alkali feldspar, plagioclase, and minor augite, ferro-hedenbergite, hornblende, hypersthene, or biotite. Commonly flow banded; locally glassy. Many of the ash--flow tuffs exhibit flow features and only obscure vitro-clastic textures. In places includes interlayers of silicic volcaniclastic rocks and tuffaceous sedimentary rocks. Includes rhyolite at Owyhee Dam, Jump Creek Rhyolite, and Littlefield Rhyolite, all of Kittleman and others (1965); Dooley Rhyolite Breccia of Gilluly (1937), radiometrically dated at 14.7 +/- 0.4 Ma by potassium-argon methods (Fiebelkorn and others, 1983); resurgent domal masses in McDermitt caldera area; and extensive unnamed flows and ash-flow tuffs in the central and southern part of the Owyhee Upland. Also includes isolated masses of dacitic and rhyodacitic flows, breccia, and ash-flow tuff along eastern slope of Cascade Range that are lapped by flows and sediments of the Madras (or Deschutes) Formation. Potassium-argon ages on rocks in unit from southeast Oregon range from about 13 to 16 Ma; lenses of interbedded tuffaceous sedimentary rocks locally contain a Miocene (Barstovian) vertebrate fauna
Silicic ash-flow tuff (lower Pliocene and upper Miocene) (Late Miocene to Early Pliocene)
Ash-flow tuff and associated pumiceous air-fall tuff mostly of rhyolitic and rhyodacitic composition; includes minor tuffaceous sedimentary rocks. Grades laterally through less-densely welded tuff to nonwelded ash-flow tuff and interlayered tuffaceous sediments of unit Ts. Potassium-argon ages (Greene and others, 1972; Parker and Armstrong, 1972; Walker, 1979; McKee and others, 1976) on several different ash-flow tuffs included in unit range from about 4 to 10 Ma; although most ages are in the range of 6 to 9 Ma. Includes the Devine Canyon, Prater Creek, and Rattlesnake Ash-flow Tuffs (Walker, 1979), originally considered a part of the (now obsolete) Danforth Formation of Piper and others (1939), and the Rattlesnake Formation and the volcanic and fluvial deposits (undivided) and marginal facies of the Columbia River Group (undivided) of Brown and Thayer (1966). Also includes the welded soda--rhyolite tuff breccia of Dickinson and Vigrass (1965) in the Suplee-Izee area, the upper Miocene or lower Pliocene welded tuff of Prostka (1962; 1967) in the Baker area. "Welded ash-flow tuff" of Swanson (1969a) and the Pliocene Peyerl Tuff (Hampton, 1964) west of Fort Rock Valley, dated at about 4.5 Ma (McKee and others, 1976)
Silicic vent complexes (Pliocene, Miocene, and upper Oligocene) (Miocene)
Large, rhyolitic to dacitic vent areas in the Cascade Range that commonly include multiple intrusions and much associated silicic eruptive breccia and erosional debris and some flows
Silicic vent deposits (Pleistocene and Pliocene) (Pliocene to Pleistocene)
Complex domal masses of rhyolite and dacite that include near-vent flows, breccia, pumicite, perlite, obsidian, and ash-flow tuff
Silicic vent rocks (Pliocene, Miocene, Oligocene, and Eocene?) (Eocene to Pliocene)
Plugs and domal complexes of rhyolitic, rhyodacitic, and dacitic composition; includes related near-vent flows, flow breccia, and deposits of obsidian, perlite, and pumice. Locally includes resurgent domes related to caldera complexes. In southeast Oregon many domal complexes younger than 11 Ma exhibit a well-defined southeast to northwest age progression (Walker, 1974; MacLeod and others, 1976) from about 11 Ma to less than 1 Ma
Strawberry Volcanics (Pliocene? and Miocene) (Miocene to Pliocene)
Flows and flow breccia of basalt, basaltic andesite, and andesite; includes restricted domal complexes and related flows and breccia of rhyolite and dacite (Thayer, 1957; Brown and Thayer, 1966). Potassium-argon ages are mostly in the range of 12 to 20 Ma (Robyn, 1977; Fiebelkorn and others, 1983)
Tillamook Volcanics (upper and middle Eocene) (Middle Eocene to Late Eocene)
Subaerial basaltic flows and breccia and submarine basaltic breccia, pillow lavas, lapilli and augite-rich tuff with interbeds of basaltic sandstone, siltstone, and conglomerate. Includes some basaltic andesite and, near the top of the sequence, some dacite. Potassium-argon ages on middle and lower parts of sequence range from about 43 to 46 Ma (Magill and others, 1981): one potassium-argon age from dacite near top of sequence is about 40 Ma (see Wells and others, 1983)
Undifferentiated tuffaceous sedimentary rocks, tuffs, and basalt (Miocene and Oligocene) (Oligocene to Miocene)
Heterogeneous assemblage of continental, largely volcanogenic deposits of basalt and basaltic andesite, including flows and breccia, complexly interstratified with epiclastic and volcaniclastic deposits of basaltic to rhyodacitic composition. Includes extensive rhyodacitic to andesitic ash-flow and air-fall tuffs, abundant lapilli tuff and tuff breccia, andesitic to dacitic mudflow (lahar) deposits, poorly bedded to well-bedded, fine- to coarse-grained tuffaceous sedimentary rocks, and volcanic conglomerate. Originally included in Little Butte Volcanic Series (Peck and others, 1964); includes Mehama Volcanics and Breitenbush Tuffs or Series of Thayer (1933, 1936, 1939), Breitenbush Formation of Hammond and others (1982), Mehama Formation of Eubanks (1960), and Molalla Formation of Miller and Orr (1984a). In Columbia River Gorge, includes Miocene and older rocks previously assigned to the Skamania Volcanic Series (Trimble, 1963), or to the Eagle Creek Formation (Waters, 1973). Lower parts of unit exhibit low-grade metamorphism with primary constituents altered to clay minerals, calcite, zeolites (stilbite, laumontite, heulandite), and secondary silica minerals. In contact aureoles adjacent to stocks and larger dikes of granitic and dioritic composition or in areas of andesitic dike swarms, both wallrocks and intrusions are pervasively propylitized; locally rocks also have been subjected to potassic alteration. Epiclastic part of assemblage locally contains fossil plants assigned to the Angoonian Stage (Wolfe, 1981) or of Oligocene age. A regionally extensive biotite-quartz rhyodacite ash-flow tuff, the ash-flow tuff of Bond Creek of Smith and others (1982), is exposed in southern part of Western Cascade Range near and at base of unit. A K-Ar age of 34.9 Ma was determined on biotite from the tuff (Smith, 1980). Ash-flow tuffs, higher in the section and in the same area, have been radiometrically dated at 22 to 32 Ma by potassium-argon methods (J.G. Smith, unpublished data; Evernden and James, 1964; Fiebelkorn and others, 1983). In the central part of the Western Cascade Range, the unit has yielded a number of K-Ar ages in the range of about 32 to 19 Ma (Verplanck, 1985, p. 53-54). A fission-track age of 23.8 +/- 1.4 Ma was obtained on a red, crystal-rich ash-flow tuff (J.A. Vance, oral communication, 1983) collected at an elevation of about 3,000 ft on U.S. Highway 20 west-southwest of Echo Mountain. Most ages from basalt and basaltic andesite lava flows are in the range of about 35 to 18 Ma. Locally intruded by small stocks of granitoid rocks and by dikes, sills, plugs, and invasive flows of basaltic andesite and basalt; in many places, the intrusions are indistinguishable from poorly exposed interbedded lava flows; K-Ar ages on several of the mafic intrusions or invasive flows are about 27 to 31 Ma. In places subdivided into Tus, Tut, and Tub
Volcanic and metavolcanic rocks (Upper Triassic) (Late Triassic)
Green to gray spilite and keratophyre flows and flow breccia; and subordinate amounts of coarse volcaniclastic sandstone, tuff, sandstone, siltstone, chert, conglomerate, and limestone. Marine fauna from interlayered sedimentary rocks indicates unit is mostly of Karnian (Late Triassic) age. Includes Late Triassic "andesitic and basaltic rocks" of Nolf and Taubeneck (1963), and the basaltic to rhyolitic metavolcanic rocks and interbedded sedimentary rocks of the Huntington Formation of Brooks (1979). Equivalent, in part, to unit TrPv
Volcanic rocks (Triassic and Permian) (Triassic and (or) Jurassic)
Massive flows of porphyritic meta-andesite, metabasalt, spilite, and keratophyre, volcanic breccia, and subordinate amounts of fine-grained volcaniclastic rocks. In southwest Oregon includes hornblende, pyroxene, and plagioclase porphyritic andesite flows, breccia, agglomerate, tuff, and locally, some basalt flows and dacitic tuffs of the Applegate Group
Welded tuffs and tuffaceous sedimentary rocks (upper? and middle Miocene) (Middle to Late Miocene)
Partly to densely welded vitric and vitric-crystal tuff of soda-rhyolitic, rhyolitic, and rhyodacitic composition that interfingers with and grades laterally into unit Tit. Includes some nonwelded ash-flow tuff and tuffaceous sedimentary rocks. Potassium-argon ages range from about 13 to 16 Ma. In Harney and Malheur Counties, it commonly overlies unit Tmb. Includes Dinner Creek Welded Tuff of Haddock (1965; 1967) and middle and upper Miocene ash-flow tuffs of Rytuba and others (1982; 1983a, b), widely exposed in the Trout Creek Mountains and adjacent areas, erupted from the McDermitt caldera complex, west and southwest of McDermitt, Nevada-Oregon, the White Horse caldera, northwest of McDermitt, and several other vent areas
Welded tuffs and tuffaceous sedimentary rocks (upper? and middle Miocene) (Middle to Late Miocene)
Partly to densely welded vitric and vitric-crystal tuff of soda-rhyolitic, rhyolitic, and rhyodacitic composition that interfingers with and grades laterally into unit Tit. Includes some nonwelded ash-flow tuff and tuffaceous sedimentary rocks. Potassium-argon ages range from about 13 to 16 Ma. In Harney and Malheur Counties, it commonly overlies unit Tmb. Includes Dinner Creek Welded Tuff of Haddock (1965; 1967) and middle and upper Miocene ash-flow tuffs of Rytuba and others (1982; 1983a, b), widely exposed in the Trout Creek Mountains and adjacent areas, erupted from the McDermitt caldera complex, west and southwest of McDermitt, Nevada-Oregon, the White Horse caldera, northwest of McDermitt, and several other vent areas

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Washington

Devonian rocks (Devonian to Permian)
Thin alternating beds of cherty quartzite and argillite, occasional limestone lenses, volcanic rocks, sandstone, and graywacke on northwest shore of Orcas Island. Small outcrops of Devonian limestone included under Pzu in southeastern Stevens County and under PMPms in northwestern Whatcom County.
Eocene-Oligocene volcanic rocks (Eocene-Oligocene)
Predominantly light-green, bedded andesite breccia with interbedded andesite and basalt flows, mudflows, and tuff beds; becomes more tuffaceous near top of unit. Includes tuffaceous and arkosic sandstone, shale, and carbonaceous shale beds in central and southern Cascade Mountians. Rhyodacite and quartz latite flows in northwestern Ferry County.
Eocene volcanic rocks (Eocene )
Predominantly andesite flows and breccia; includes interbedded sedimentary rocks south of Startup in Snohomish and King Counties.
Lower Tertiary volcanic rocks, undivided (Eocene)
Predominantly andesite flows and flow breccia; includes basalt flows, minor rhyolitic rocks, and some sedimentary rocks.
Middle Jurassic volcanic rocks (Middle Jurassic)
Andesite, dacite, and minor basalt with slate and graywacke interbeds in the Nooksack River region of Whatcom County.
Miocene volcanic rocks (Middle Miocene)
Dark-gray to black, dense aphanitic basalt flows; commonly columnar jointed, less commonly irregularly and platy jointed; some flows vesicular, grading to scoriaceous; includes minor pillow lava, palagonite beds, and interbedded soil profiles and sedimentary beds; contains diatomite beds locally. Maximum thickness in south-central Washington may be in excess of 10,000 feet; much thinner in western Washington, where flows are mostly associated with marine sedimentary rocks. Includes acidic and intermediate volcanic rocks in northern Cascade Mountains.
Oligocene-Miocene volcanic rocks (Miocene)
Andesite flow breccia, andesite flows, and minor tuff beds; includes some basalt flows and flow breccia. Commonly more massive and less altered than similar-appearing Eocene-Oligocene volcanic rocks. Clastic flows and flows of black glass, and course to fine-grained clastic and pyroclastic rocks in the Republic and Curlew areas of Ferry County.
Pleistocene-Recent volcanic rocks (Pleistocene to Holocene)
Predominantly dark-gray to black vesicular basalt; olivine-rich in part. Includes andesite flows and pyroclastic rocks of Mount Baker, Glacier Peak, Mount Rainier, Mount Adams, Mount St. Helens, and all cinder cones in southern part of the State. Also includes some Recent flows southeast of Mount St. Helens.
Pre-Carboniferous intrusive rocks (Paleozoic)
Meta-quartz diorite, hypersthene diorite, and gneissose and directionless quartz diorite of eastern Skagit County. Quartz diorite and diorite in the San Juan Islands. Includes amphibolite and gneiss locally.
Pre-Tertiary sedimentary and metasedimentary rocks, undivided (Mostly Early Cretaceous to Middle Jurassic, possibly includes minor Eocene rocks)
Graywacke, argillite, phyllite, chert, talc, and graphite schist; some faulted-in blocks of serpentinite and greenstone. Includes minor limestone on San Juan Island.
Tertiary dikes, sills, and small intrusive bodies (Middle to Late Tertiary)
Dikes are commonly diabase; plugs and sills are generally andesite porphyry and dacite.
Tertiary granitic rocks (Probably mostly Eocene; ranges from Miocene to Paleocene)
Granite, quartz monzonite, quartz diorite, granodiorite, and trondhjemite. Includes dacite porphyry and granite breccia near Bumping Lake, Yakima County.
Tertiary volcanic rocks, undivided (Mostly Oligocene-Eocene)
Includes andesite, basalt, and rhyolite flows, and associated pyroclastic rocks. In isolated areas across the northern part of the State.
Upper Eocene volcanic rocks (Late Eocene to Oligocene)
Predominantly basalt flows and flow breccia; includes some pyroclastic and andesite rocks. Chiefly in western Washington.
Upper Tertiary volcanic rocks, undivided (Miocene-Oligocene)
Mostly massive andesite flows, flow breccia, and pyroclastic material; includes some basalt flows and sedimentary rocks.

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