Skip to main content

Geologic units containing Marble

Marble
A metamorphic rock consisting predominantly of fine- to coarse-grained recrystallized calcite and/or dolomite, usually with a granoblastic, saccharoidal texture.
Subtopics:
(none)

Alabama - Arizona - California - Colorado - Connecticut - Georgia - Idaho - Massachusetts - Maryland - Maine - Minnesota - North Carolina - New Hampshire - New Jersey - Nevada - New York - Oregon - Pennsylvania - Rhode Island - South Carolina - South Dakota - Texas - Utah - Virginia - Vermont - Washington

Alabama

Heflin Phyllite (Cambrian?)
Heflin Phyllite - grayish-green, medium-gray, and medium-bluish-gray calcareous sandy metasiltstone interbedded with minor greenish-gray fine to coarse-grained metasandstone and rare thin lenses of calcite and dolomite marble; an interval of greenish-gray to dark-gray phyllitic quartzite or quartz-pebble metaconglomerate is locally present near the base. The Heflin underlies the Lay Dam Formation and overlies the rocks tentatively identified as the Chilhowee Group undifferentiated.
Kahatchee Mountain Group; Brewer Phyllite (Precambrian?-Cambrian?)
Brewer Phyllite - dusky-red micaceous slate and phyllite, locally containing interbedded micaceous arkosic quartzite and metasiltstone; locally at the base is interbedded calcite and dolomite marble.
Kahatchee Mountain Group; Sawyer Limestone Member of Brewer Phyllite (Precambrian?-Cambrian?)
Sawyer Limestone Member of Brewer Phyllite - light to medium-gray argillaceous, silty to siliceous calcite and dolomite marble interbedded with phyllite and quartzite, locally cherty.
Pine Mountain Group; Chewacla Marble (Precambrian to Paleozoic)
Chewacla Marble - light-gray coarse to fine-grained dolomite marble; locally rich in phlogopite.
Sylacauga Marble Group; Fayetteville Phyllite (Cambrian?-Ordovician?)
Fayetteville Phyllite - dusky-red and medium-gray phyllite and slate interlayered with light-brown to light-gray feldspathic metasiltstone, fine-grained metasandstone and dolomite marble.
Sylacauga Marble Group; Gantts Quarry Formation (Cambrian?-Ordovician?)
Gantts Quarry Formation - white and pale-blue to light-gray calcite marble locally containing interlayered dolomite marble and thin phyllite layers.
Sylacauga Marble Group; Gooch Branch Chert (Cambrian?-Ordovician?)
Gooch Branch Chert - light-gray to light-brown dolomite marble associated with abundant light-gray to white massive to moderately foliated metachert.
Sylacauga Marble Group; Jumbo Dolomite (Cambrian?-Ordovician?)
Jumbo Dolomite - light to medium-gray thin to thick-bedded dolomite marble; contains intraclast-bearing dolomite, locally sandy in middle part.
Sylacauga Marble Group; Shelvin Rock Church Formation (Cambrian?-Ordovician?)
Shelvin Rock Church Formation - moderate-pink to light-gray calcite and locally dolomite marble.

Arizona

California

Carboniferous marine rocks, unit 1 (Western Mojave Desert) (Late Proterozoic to Pennsylvanian)
Shale, sandstone, conglomerate, limestone, dolomite, chert, hornfels, marble, quartzite; in part pyroclastic rocks
Carboniferous marine rocks, unit 7 (Bishop) (Mississippian to Early Permian)
Shale, sandstone, conglomerate, limestone, dolomite, chert, hornfels, marble, quartzite; in part pyroclastic rocks
Devonian marine rocks, unit 1 (Death Valley) (Middle to Late Devonian)
Limestone and dolomite, sandstone and shale; in part tuffaceous
Jurassic marine rocks, unit 4 (Peninsular Ranges and Western Transverse Ranges) (Paleozoic(?) to Late Jurassic)
Shale, sandstone, minor conglomerate, chert, slate, limestone; minor pyroclastic rocks
Jurassic marine rocks, unit 6 (Mono Lake) (Ordovician(?) to Triassic(?))
Shale, sandstone, minor conglomerate, chert, slate, limestone; minor pyroclastic rocks
Limestone of probable Paleozoic or Mesozoic age (Paleozoic to Mesozoic)
Limestone, dolomite, and marble whose age is uncertain but probably Paleozoic or Mesozoic
Paleozoic marine rocks, undivided, unit 1 (Mojave Desert and Death Valley area) (Late Proterozoic to Jurassic)
Undivided Paleozoic metasedimentary rocks. Includes slate, sandstone, shale, chert, conglomerate, limestone, dolomite, marble, phyllite, schist, hornfels, and quartzite
Paleozoic marine rocks, undivided, unit 2 (Northern Mojave Desert and Southeastern Sierra Nevada) (Cambrian to Jurassic)
Undivided Paleozoic metasedimentary rocks. Includes slate, sandstone, shale, chert, conglomerate, limestone, dolomite, marble, phyllite, schist, hornfels, and quartzite
Paleozoic marine rocks, undivided, unit 3 (Eastern Sierra Nevada) (Late Proterozoic(?) to Mesozoic(?))
Undivided Paleozoic metasedimentary rocks. Includes slate, sandstone, shale, chert, conglomerate, limestone, dolomite, marble, phyllite, schist, hornfels, and quartzite
Paleozoic marine rocks, undivided, unit 4 (Western Sierra Nevada) (Ordovician to Triassic)
Undivided Paleozoic metasedimentary rocks. Includes slate, sandstone, shale, chert, conglomerate, limestone, dolomite, marble, phyllite, schist, hornfels, and quartzite
Paleozoic marine rocks, undivided, unit 6 (Northwestern Sierra Nevada) (Permian(?) to Jurassic(?))
Undivided Paleozoic metasedimentary rocks. Includes slate, sandstone, shale, chert, conglomerate, limestone, dolomite, marble, phyllite, schist, hornfels, and quartzite
Paleozoic marine rocks, undivided, unit 9 (Western Klamath Mountains) (Devonian to Jurassic)
Undivided Paleozoic metasedimentary rocks. Includes slate, sandstone, shale, chert, conglomerate, limestone, dolomite, marble, phyllite, schist, hornfels, and quartzite
Paleozoic metavolcanic rocks, unit 5 (Mono Lake) (Triassic to Jurassic)
Undivided Paleozoic metavolcanic rocks. Mostly flows, breccia and tuff, including greenstone, diabase, and pillow lavas; minor interbedded sedimentary rocks
Permian marine sedimentary rocks, unit 1 (Death Valley and Mojave Desert) (Pennsylvanian to Triassic)
Shale, conglomerate, limestone and dolomite, sandstone, slate, hornfels, quartzite; minor pyroclastic rocks
Permian marine sedimentary rocks, unit 2 (Northwestern Sierra Nevada) (Paleozoic or Mesozoic)
Shale, conglomerate, limestone and dolomite, sandstone, slate, hornfels, quartzite; minor pyroclastic rocks
Precambrian rocks, undivided, unit 2 (Mojave Desert and Transverse Ranges) (Early Proterozoic to Miocene)
Conglomerate, shale, sandstone, limestone, dolomite, marble, gneiss, hornfels, and quartzite; may be Paleozoic in part
pre-Cenozoic metasedimentary and metavolcanic rocks undivided (Early Proterozoic to Cretaceous)
Undivided pre-Cenozoic metasedimentary and metavolcanic rocks of great variety. Mostly slate, quartzite, hornfels, chert, phyllite, mylonite, schist, gneiss, and minor marble.
Schist of various types and ages, unit 1 (Peninsular Ranges) (Triassic(?))
Schists of various types; mostly Paleozoic or Mesozoic age; some Precambrian
Schist of various types and ages, unit 2 (Southern and West-central California) (Late Cretaceous to Eocene)
Schists of various types; mostly Paleozoic or Mesozoic age; some Precambrian.
Schist of various types and ages, unit 4 (El Paso Mountains) (Paleozoic)
Schists of various types; mostly Paleozoic or Mesozoic age; some Precambrian.
Schist of various types and ages, unit 6 (Santa Cruz Mountains) (Paleozoic or Mesozoic)
Schists of various types; mostly Paleozoic or Mesozoic age; some Precambrian.
Schist of various types and ages, unit 7 (Klamath Mountains) (Devonian)
Schists of various types; mostly Paleozoic or Mesozoic age; some Precambrian.
Schist of various types and ages, unit 9 (Cargo Muchacho Mountains) (Jurassic(?))
Schists of various types; mostly Paleozoic or Mesozoic age; some Precambrian.
Silurian and/or Ordovician marine rocks, unit 2 (Bishop) (Late Cambrian(?) to Early Permian(?))
Sandstone, shale, conglomerate, chert, slate, quartzite, hornfels, marble, dolomite, phyllite; some greenstone
Triassic marine rocks, unit 6 (Southern Sierra Nevada) (Late Triassic to Early Jurassic)
Shale, conglomerate, limestone and dolomite, sandstone, slate, hornfels, quartzite; minor pyroclastic rocks

Colorado

Connecticut

Basal marble member [of Walloomsac Schist] (Middle Ordovician)
Basal marble member [of Walloomsac Schist] - Dark-gray to white, massive to layered schistose or phyllitic calcite-phlogopite marble.
Basal member [of The Straits Schist] (Silurian)
Basal member [of The Straits Schist] ( = Russell Mountain Formation of Massachusetts) - Distinguished by presence of layers of amphibolite, marble, calc-silicate rock, and quartzite within more uniform schist like that on either side. Minor, unevenly distributed mineralization in W, Bi, Cu, Ni, and other metals.
Beardsley Member [of Harrison (Prospect) Gneiss] (Middle? Ordovician)
Beardsley (hornblendic) Member [of Harrison (Prospect) Gneiss] - Medium- to dark-gray, medium-grained, well-layered and lineated gneiss, composed of plagioclase, quartz, microcline, hornblende, biotite, and epidote. Microcline may occur as megacrysts 1 to 3 cm across. Minor layers of garnetiferous schist and rarely of calc-silicate rock or marble. Pumpkin Ground and Beardsley Members of Harrison Gneiss, formerly considered conformable metavolcanic members, are here recognized as juxtaposed metaplutonic units and are renamed the Beardsley and Pumpkin Ground orthogneisses. Isotopic dating yields crystallization ages of 428+/-2 Ma (Early Silurian) for the Pumpkin Ground and 446+/-2 Ma (Late Ordovician) for the Beardsley. Age of the Beardsley based on analysis of seven zircon and two sphene fractions. The Harrison Gneiss as described by Rodgers (1985) has no stratigraphic significance and cannot be correlated regionally (Sevigny and Hanson, 1993).
Hornblende gneiss and amphibolite (Proterozoic Y)
Hornblende gneiss and amphibolite - Dark-gray to mottled, fine- to medium-grained, massive to foliated amphibolite and gneiss, composed of hornblende and plagioclase, also commonly biotite and minor quartz; commonly interlayered with banded felsic gneiss. Locally contains calc-silicate rock or diopsidic calcite marble.
Stockbridge Marble (Lower Ordovician and Cambrian)
Stockbridge Marble (including Inwood Marble) - White to gray, massive to layered marble, generally dolomitic but containing calcite marble in upper part, locally interlayered with schist or phyllite and with calcareous siltstone or sandstone.
Unit a [of Stockbridge Marble] (Lower Cambrian)
Unit a [of Stockbridge Marble] - White to pale-gray, massive, smooth-weathering dolomite marble.
Unit b [of Stockbridge Marble] (Upper and Middle? Cambrian)
Unit b [of Stockbridge Marble] - White, pink, cream, and light-gray, generally well bedded dolomitic marble interlayered with phyllite and schist and with siltstone, sandstone, or quartzite, commonly dolomitic.
Unit c [of Stockbridge Marble] (Upper Cambrian)
Unit c [of Stockbridge Marble] - Gray, generally massive dolomite marble, commonly contains quartz grains, locally beds of sandstone; may be calcitic near top.
Units e and d [of Stockbridge Marble] (Lower Ordovician)
Units e and d [of Stockbridge Marble] - White to gray massive calcite marble, commonly mottled with dolomite and locally interlayered with dolomite marble and calcareous siltstone and sandstone.
Units g and f [of Stockbridge Marble] (Lower Ordovician)
Units g and f [of Stockbridge Marble] - White to gray massive calcite marble with layers and laminae of dolomitic marble.

Georgia

Idaho

Black argillite, quartzite, siltite, marble, chert, and syngenetic silver-lead-zinc deposits; Devonian euxinic marine-basin deposits; central Idaho (Devonian)
Devonian thrusted, deep-water siliceous argillite and quartzite of central Idaho.
Limestone, slate; Upper Triassic greenschist-facies metamorphic rocks; western Idaho, Blue Mountains island-arc complex; (Late Triassic)
Upper Triassic shale overlying reefal limestone and dolomite in west-central Idaho.
Metasedimentary and meta-igneous rocks; Triassic to Mississippian greenschist-facies dismembered ophiolite, western Idaho, Blue Mountains island-arc complex (Triassic to Mississippian)
Jurassic marine wacke, volcanic, or carbonate metasediments of western Idaho.
Metasedimentary and metavolcanic rocks; Permian greenschist-facies rocks; western Idaho, Blue Mountains island-arc complex (Late Permian)
Upper Permian submarine volcanic complex in the Snake Canyon of western Idaho.
Metavolcanic and metasedimentary rocks; Jurassic greenschist-facies metamorphic rocks; western Idaho, Blue Mountains island-arc complex (Jurassic)
Jurassic mixed marine detrital and volcanic rocks of western Idaho.
Metavolcanic and metasedimentary rocks; Middle to Lower Triassic greenschist-facies metamorphic rocks; western Idaho, Blue Mountains island-arc complex (Middle and Early Triassic)
Middle and Lower Triassic metabasalt and submarine volcaniclastics of western Idaho
Mica schist, marble, quartzite, and amphibolite; Early Middle to Early Proterozoic metasedimentary rocks; southern Belt province (Early Middle Proterozoic to Early Proterozoic)
Older Precambrian high-grade metamorphic complex of eastern Idaho.
Quartzite and marble; Middle Proterozoic Hoodoo Quartzite; southern Belt province (Middle Proterozoic)
Intermediate Precambrian sediments, light-colored, massive quartzite of southern Idaho.
Quartzite, marble, Calc-silicate rock, schist, and meta-conglomerate; Ordovician to Middle Proterozoic metasedimentary rocks; central Idaho, Pioneer Mountains metamorphic core complex (Ordovician to Middle Proterozoic)
Ordovician to Middle Proterozoic metasedimentary rocks, undivided
Quartzite, mica schist, and marble; Cambrian and Late Proterozoic metasedimentary rocks; south-central Idaho, Albion-Range metamorphic core complex (Cambrian to Late Proterozoic)
Schist, quartzite and other metasediments of probable Lower Ordovician to Cambrian age.
Quartzite, siltstone, conglomerate, and metavolcanic rocks; Late and Middle Proterozoic, undivided; Atlanta batholith roof pendants (Late and Middle Proterozoic, undivided)
Precambrian, high-grade metamorphic rock
Schist, quartzite, marble, skarn, and mafic gneiss; Jurassic to Mississippian amphibolite-facies rocks; southwestern Idaho, western accreted island-arc complex (Jurassic to Mississippian)
Metamorphic complex of probable Paleozoic units of southwestern Idaho.

Massachusetts

Ammonoosuc Volcanics (Middle Ordovician)
Ammonoosuc Volcanics - Amphibolite, felsic gneiss, garnet-amphibole quartzite, and marble too thin to show separately at map scale. Gedrite, anthophyllite, cummingtonite locally abundant in amphibolite layers.
Blackstone Group (Proterozoic Z)
Blackstone Group - Undivided - Quartzite, schist, phyllite, marble, and metavolcanic rocks.
Calc-silicate granofels and gneiss (Proterozoic Y)
Calc-silicate granofels and gneiss - Including calcitic or dolomitic chondrodite-diopside marble, coarse hornblende-plagioclase-diopside and diopside rock, locally containing beds of lustrous muscovite-kyanite sillimanite-garnet schist.
Fitch Formation (Upper Silurian)
Fitch Formation - Calc-silicate granofels, biotite granofels, minor sulfidic schist and marble. Correlated with the fossiliferous Fitch Formation of western New Hampshire. Although the text and figures of this report show the Fitch as Silurian, a footnote [added just before this report went to press] cites a change in age from Silurian to Early Devonian based on conodonts found at the Bernardston, MA, locality, as reported in Elbert and others (1988). In Bronson Hill anticlinorium in MA, Fitch occurs as lenses between Clough Quartzite and Littleton Formation. Most common rock types in MA are gray, massive to weakly bedded, quartz-labradorite-biotite granulite containing a moderate amount of some combination of calc-silicate minerals (calcic amphibole, zoisite or clinozoisite, diopside, sphene, and microcline); commonly interbedded with biotite-free granulite that contains same calc-silicate minerals. One small exposure consists of nearly pure calcite marble. Larger lenses of Fitch consist of varieties of schist, similar to Partridge Formation. Best exposures are in low hills west of village of Orange, northeast of junction of MA Hwys 2A and 78. As shown on MA State bedrock geologic map, Fitch everywhere overlies Clough Quartzite and is never in contact with Partridge. Fossils dating the Fitch as Pridolian (Harris and others, 1983) are all from Littleton, NH, area [however, see mention of footnote, above] (Hatch and others, 1988).
Gile Mountain Formation (Lower Devonian)
Gile Mountain Formation - Like Dgm but having a higher percentage of quartzite.
Gile Mountain Formation (Lower Devonian)
Gile Mountain Formation - Gray, slightly rusty, poorly bedded phyllite and schist containing 20 cm to 2 m beds of light-gray, fine-grained quartzite, local punky-brown weathering calcareous granofels or quartzose marble, and pods and stringers of vein quartz.
Gray, well-layered biotite-plagioclase-quartz gneiss (Proterozoic Y)
Gray, well-layered biotite-plagioclase-quartz gneiss - Ybu may contain undifferentiated areas of Ycs, Yl, and Yhb.
Intimately interfolded Littleton and Partridge Formations (Lower Devonian and Middle Ordovician)
Intimately interfolded Littleton and Partridge Formations - In areas of poor exposure and incomplete mapping.
Littleton Formation (Lower Devonian)
Littleton Formation - Thinly laminated calcitic marble.
Nashoba Formation (Ordovician or Proterozoic Z)
Nashoba Formation - Sillimanite schist and gneiss, partly sulfidic, amphibolite, biotite gneiss, calc-silicate gneiss and marble. Nashoba Formation occurs in Nashoba zone of eastern MA. Consists of interlayered sillimanite-bearing, partly sulfidic schist and gneiss, calc-silicate gneiss, and subordinate quartzite and marble. Protoliths were probably volcanogenic sediments interlayered with limy marine sediments. Bell and Alvord (1976) divided Nashoba into 10 members on basis of lithology. Amphibolite is most abundant near presumed base, namely in Boxford Member. Skehan and Abu-Moustafa (1976) divided Nashoba into 30 members based on section in Wachusett-Marlborough tunnel. Although Bell and Alvord's and Skehan and Moustafa's sections contain similar lithologies, Bell and Alvord's is much thicker, and Boxford Member is not readily identified in Skehan and Abu-Moustafa's. Subdivision of Nashoba is conjectural south of Marlborough and Shrewsbury. On MA State bedrock map (Zen and others, 1983) only Boxford Member is separated out from the rest of the Nashoba because this unit was the only member clearly recognized in several area. A definite sequence of members probably does not exist anywhere in the Nashoba because of lenticularity of assemblages and repeated rock types, both of which could be accounted for by either sedimentary or tectonic processes. Although Castle (1965) considered Fish Brook to be either a premetamorphic intrusive rock or a core gneiss of intrusive or sedimentary ancestry, Bell and Alvord (1976) considered it to be volcanic or volcaniclastic in origin. Zircons in Fish Brook are certainly volcanic in origin and yield a date of 730 +/-26 Ma (Olszewski, 1980). If the rock were a core gneiss, that date would apply only to the Fish Brook and not to surrounding rocks; but, Bell and Alvord (1976) believe Fish Brook to be part of the Marlboro Formation-Nashoba Formation sequence and therefore the date does apply to the sequence. In addition, a 1500 Ma date for Shawsheen Gneiss [reference not given] helps bracket age of Marlboro-Nashoba sequence. An upper limit for the sequence was established from the 430 +/-5 Ma age of intruding Sharpers Pond Diorite and 450 +/-23 Ma age of the intruding Andover Granite (Zartman and Naylor, 1984). Although age on MA State bedrock map is shown as Proterozoic Z or Ordovician (due to uncertainty regarding actual rocks sampled by Olszewski and a strong belief that rocks of Nashoba zone correlated with Ordovician rocks to the west), author now feels that rocks of Nashoba zone (except for Tadmuck Brook Schist) are all Proterozoic, but that they are unlike the Proterozoic rocks of neighboring Milford-Dedham zone. [no formal age change made in this report] (Goldsmith, 1991).
Russell Mountain Formation (Silurian)
Russell Mountain Formation - Quartzite, calc-silicate granofels, and calc-silicate marble. Correlated with the fossiliferous Shaw Mountain Formation of eastern Vermont. In original definition of Russell Mountain Formation (Hatch and others (1970), calcareous granofels on Woronoco dome was included in unit. Subsequent mapping by Stanley and others (1982) indicates that rocks mapped on Woronoco dome are different from the rest of Russell Mountain Formation and are more logically included in overlying Lower Devonian sequence (mapped as an unnamed member of Goshen Formation in fig. 3). Other than this modification and mapping a few lenses of Russell Mountain Formation just north of Massachusetts Turnpike, original definition of Russell Mountain stands. Thickness does not exceed 35 m, but its correlative in CT, the basal member of The Straits Schist of Rodgers (1982, 1985), is locally at least twice as thick. Has not been shown to correlate with either Clough Quartzite or Fitch Formation to the east. Russell Mountain Formation is highly discontinuous except near Shelburne Falls dome. Locally overlies members A and D of Cobble Mountain Formation; overlain everywhere by Goshen Formation. Silurian age is based on correlation with discontinuous lenses of similar rocks at same stratigraphic position as Shaw Mountain Formation of VT. Recent field trips with J.B. Thompson, Jr. (Harvard University) and others has raised questions as to whether many of those rocks in southern VT are actually Shaw Mountain. Shaw Mountain Formation has been assigned a firm age of late Llandoverian to Gedinnian north of Albany, VT, based on HOWELLELA (Boucot and Thompson, 1963; Konig, 1961) (Hatch and others, 1988).
Sherman Marble (Proterozoic Y)
Sherman Marble - White, coarse-grained graphite dolomite-calcite marble at Sherman Reservoir at the State line.
Stockbridge Formation (Lower Ordovician)
Stockbridge Formation - Tan-beige weathering quartzose calcite and dolomite marble; minor cross-laminated quartzite.
Stockbridge Formation (Lower Cambrian)
Stockbridge Formation - Beige, tan, and dark-gray weathering quartzose dolomite marble containing interbeds of black, green and maroon phyllite and punky weathering blue quartz pebble quartzite.
Stockbridge Formation (Lower Cambrian)
Stockbridge Formation - Massive to finely laminated steel-gray calcitic dolomite marble containing a prominent zone of white quartz nodules near top.
Stockbridge Formation (Lower Ordovician)
Stockbridge Formation - Blue and gray mottled limestone and calcite marble and beds of beige dolostone.
Stockbridge Formation (Lower Ordovician)
Stockbridge Formation - White to blue-gray and white layered calcite marble.
Tatnic Hill Formation (Ordovician or Proterozoic Z)
Tatnic Hill Formation - Fly Pond Member - Calc-silicate gneiss and marble.
Tatnic Hill Formation (Ordovician or Proterozoic Z)
Tatnic Hill Formation - Sulfidic sillimanite schist, sillimanite schist and gneiss, biotite gneiss; minor amphibolite, calc-silicate gneiss and marble.
Waits River Formation (Lower Devonian)
Waits River Formation - Interbedded medium- to dark-gray, moderately rusty weathering, highly contorted, unbedded schist and punky-weathering calcareous granofels or quartzose marble, and pods and stringers of vein quartz.
Waits River Formation (Lower Devonian)
Waits River Formation - Dw containing thick (1 m) beds of calcareous granofels. Mapped only in Colrain quadrangle; included in Dw elsewhere.
Walloomsac Formation (Middle Ordovician)
Walloomsac Formation - Orange-brown weathering, graphite-albite-biotite calcitic marble and schistose marble and interbedded black phyllite.
Washington Gneiss (Proterozoic Y)
Washington Gneiss - Rusty-weathering diopside and sulfidic -rich calcite marble and calc-silicate rock.

Maryland

Maine

Minnesota

North Carolina

Amphibolite (Cambrian/Late Proterozoic)
Amphibolite - metamorphosed mafic extrusive and intrusive rock; includes hornblende gneiss, thin layers of mica schist, calc-silicate rock, and, rarely, marble. Also includes small masses of metadiorite and metagabbro.
Biotite Granitic Gneiss (Middle Proterozoic)
Biotite Granitic Gneiss - unconformity; pinkish gray to light gray, massive to well-foliated, granitic to quartz monzonitic; includes variably mylonitized orthogneiss and paragneiss, interlayered amphibolite, calc-silicate rock, and marble. Includes granites of the Bryson City area, Straight Fork window, and Elk Park Plutonic Suite.
Blacksburg Formation (Cambrian/Late Proterozoic)
Blacksburg Formation - sericite schist, locally with graphite, phyllite with sericite quartzite, banded marble, amphibolite, and minor calc-silicate rock.
Grandfather Mountain Formation; Metasiltstone (Late Proterozoic)
Metasiltstone - locally contains thin bedded iron-bearing dolomitic marble; interlayered with phyllite, metagraywacke, and meta-arkose.
Metagraywacke and Muscovite-Biotite Schist (Cambrian/Late Proterozoic)
Metagraywacke and Muscovite-Biotite Schist - metagraywacke (biotite gneiss) interlayered and gradational with muscovite-biotite schist; minor marble and granitic rock.
Murphy Marble, Andrews Formation, and Nottely Quartzite, undivided (Late Proterozoic)
Murphy Marble, Andrews Formation, and Nottely Quartzite, undivided - Murphy Marble: calcareous to dolomitic; Andrews Formation: calcareous cross-biotite schist; Nottely Quartzite: meta-orthoquartzite with slate.
Rocks of Brevard Fault Zone (Uncertain, possibly Permian or Devonian)
Rocks of Brevard Fault Zone - "fish scale" schist and phyllonite, graphitic; interlayered with feldspathic metasandstone, marble lenses.

New Hampshire

New Jersey

Franklin Marble (Middle Proterozoic)
Franklin Marble - White- to light-gray-weathering, white, grayish-white, or, less commonly pinkish-orange, coarse- to locally fine-crystalline calcite marble with accessory amounts of graphite, phlogopite, chondrodite, clinopyroxene, and serpentine. Contains pods and layers of clinopyroxene-garnet skarn, hornblende skarn, and clinopyroxene-rich rock. Thin layers of metaquartzite occur locally. Intruded by the Mount Eve Granite in the Pochuck Mountain area. Franklin Marble is host to the Franklin and Sterling Hill zinc ore bodies; exploited for talc and asbestiform minerals near Easton, Pennsylvania. Subdivided into an upper marble, "Wildcat marble," and a lower marble, "Franklin marble," by New Jersey Zinc Co. geologists (Hague and others, 1956).
Gneiss granofels and Migmatite (Middle Proterozoic)
Gneiss granofels and Migmatite - Gneiss and granofels range in composition from felsic to intermediate to mafic; intermediate compositions predominate. Contains a wide variety of rock types including graphitic schist and marble. Many rocks were injected by a granitoid that has blue quartz and augen of potassic feldspar and are arteritic migmatites. One body of gneiss contains a 1 m by 0.5 m (3 by 2 ft) phacoid of gabbro that is interpreted to be an olistolith. Unit probably represents a sequence of meta-sedimentary and metavolcanic rocks that have been heavily injected and migmatized by felsic magma.
Pyroxene Gneiss (Middle Proterozoic)
Pyroxene Gneiss - White- to tan-weathering, greenish-gray, fine- to medium-grained, well-layered gneiss containing oligoclase, clinopyroxene, variable amounts of quartz, and trace amounts of opaque minerals and titanite. Some phases contain scapolite and calcite. Commonly interlayered with pyroxene amphibolite or marble.

Nevada

New York

Calcitic and dolomitic marble (Middle Proterozoic)
Calcitic and dolomitic marble - predominantly; variably siliceous; in part with calcsilicate rock and amphibolite.
Calcitic and dolomitic marble (Middle Proterozoic)
Calcitic and dolomitic marble - variably siliceous; in part with calcsilicate rock and amphibolite.
Calcitic and dolomitic marble (Middle Proterozoic)
Calcitic and dolomitic marble - variably siliceous; in part with calcsilicate rock and amphibolite.
Dolomitic and calcitic marbles interlayered with significant amounts of calcsilicate rock (Middle Proterozoic)
Dolomitic and calcitic marbles interlayered with significant amounts of calcsilicate rock - metasedimentary amphibolite, pyroxene granulite, and various gneisses; includes interlayered diopsidic and tremolitic marble and quartzite, and talc-tremolite rock (mined in Balmat-Edwards belt, northwest Adirondacks).
Garnet-bearing gneiss and interlayered quartzite (Middle Proterozoic)
Garnet-bearing gneiss and interlayered quartzite - contains varying amounts of biotite, garnet, sillimanite; minor marble, amphibolite, rusty paragneiss.
Inwood Marble (Early Cambrian - Lower Ordovician)
Inwood Marble - dolomite marble, calc-schist, granulite, and quartzite, overlain by calcite marble; grades into underlying patchy Lowerre Quartzite of Early Cambrian age.
Manhattan Formation (A Member) (Middle Ordovician)
Manhattan Formation (A member) - sillimanite-garnet-muscovite-biotite-quartz- plagioclase schists; calcite marble and calcsilicate rock at base.
Rusty and gray biotite-quartz-feldspar gneiss (Middle Proterozoic)
Rusty and gray biotite-quartz-feldspar gneiss - rusty facies contains variable amounts of garnet, sillimanite, cordierite, graphite, sulfides; minor marble and calcsilicate rock.
Stockbridge Formation (Cambrian - Lower Ordovician)
Stockbridge Formation - calcitic and dolomitic marble.
Stockbridge Marble (Cambrian - Lower Ordovician)
Stockbridge Marble.

Oregon

Pennsylvania

Cockeysville Marble (Probably lower Paleozoic)
Cockeysville Marble - White to light bluish gray, finely to coarsely crystalline.
Elbrook Formation (Cambrian)
Elbrook Formation - Microcrystalline limestone and, in places, marble; includes subordinate dolomite containing abundant phyllitic layers; occurs in Chester and Montgomery Counties; relation to Elbrook of Cumberland Valley sequence is uncertain.
Franklin Marble (Precambrian)
Franklin Marble - White, coarsely crystalline; disseminated graphite flakes.
Graphitic felsic gneiss (Precambrian)
Graphitic felsic gneiss - Includes Pickering Gneiss and small areas of marble; dominantly quartz and feldspar with varying amounts of graphite and various metamorphic minerals; medium grained, light to dark gray and greenish gray; sedimentary origin.
Kinzers Formation (Cambrian)
Kinzers Formation - Base--dark-brown shale; middle--gray and white spotted limestone and, locally, marble having irregular partings; top--sandy limestone which weathers to a fine-grained, friable, porous, sandy mass.
Lower (Middle?) Cambrian rocks, undivided (Cambrian)
Lower (Middle?) Cambrian rocks, undivided - Lower Cambrian of Berks County includes tectonic slices of many of the following rock units: Zooks Corner (CAzc), Ledger (CAl), Kinzers (CAk), Vintage (CAv), Antietam (CAa, CAah), and Harpers (CAh, CAah) Formations.
Vintage Formation (Cambrian)
Vintage Formation - Dark-gray, knotty, argillaceous dolomite; impure light-gray marble at base locally.
Wakefield Marble (Probably lower Paleozoic)
Wakefield Marble - Light gray, coarsely crystalline; contains graphite flakes in places.

Rhode Island

South Carolina

South Dakota

Texas

Utah

Virginia

Vermont

Bascom Formation, and undifferentiated Luke Hill, Naylor Ledge and Hastings Creek Limestones (Ordovician)
Bascom Formation, and undifferentiated Luke Hill, Naylor Ledge and Hastings Creek Limestones - Interbedded dolomite, limestone or marble, calcareous sandstone, quartzite and limestone breccia; irregular dolomitic layers, thin sandy laminae, and slaty or phyllitic partings characterize limestone and marble of lower, middle, and upper parts of the Bascom, respectively; south of West Rutland it includes some of the Chipman formation. The combined Luke Hill, Naylor Ledge, and Hastings Creek, east of Philipsburg thrust, are stratigraphically equivalent to the Bascom.
Brezee Formation (Cambrian)
Brezee Formation - Dark gray to black phyllite with beds of blue-gray marble, dark gray dolomite, sandy dolomite, and dolomitic sandstone, in upper part; beds of massive quartzite as much as 20 ft thick occur locally and in places contain pebbles of blue quartz. Phyllites are locally highly albitic.
Cavendish Formation, Dolomite and Marble (Cambrian?)
Cavendish Formation, Dolomite and Marble - Buff dolomite; minor white to pink calcite marble; actinolitic and diopsidic marbles and beds of actinolite diopside granulite common in Chester dome. The Cavendish Formation is reinstated and considered part of the Mount Holly Complex in VT. Usage follows Thompson (1950), but is extended to include some rocks on Star Hill, including inner and outer cover rocks assigned by Downie (1982) to Hoosac and Pinney Hollow Formations. Formation is divided into four map units: calc-silicate rock and gneiss, marble, feldspathic schist or granofels, and the Gassetts Schist Member. The Cavendish correlates with the Wilcox Formation of the Mount Holly Complex in the Green Mountain massif, and therefore, is of Middle Proterozoic age (Ratcliffe, in press).
Chipman, Bridport, and Beldens Formations, Providence Island Dolomite; Beldens Member (Ordovician)
Chipman, Bridport, and Beldens Formations, Providence Island Dolomite; Beldens Member - Interbedded buff to brown heavily scored dolomite and white to blue-gray marble and limestone; designated Beldens Formation east of Highgate Springs thrust.
Forestdale Marble (Cambrian)
Forestdale Marble - Buff to rusty-weathered white, buff, and pink and white mottled dolomite containing local interbeds of dolomitic sandstone, gray-green phyllitic quartzite, and crossbedded sandy dolomite.
Mount Holly Complex, calcite and dolomite marbles (Precambrian)
Mount Holly Complex, calcite and dolomite marbles - locally coarse grained; commonly contain phlogopite, actinolite, and diopside, and are interbedded with medium- to coarse-grained calc-silicate granulite; includes minor amounts of other types of Precambrian rock.
Shelburne, Whitehall, and Strites Pond Formations (Ordovician)
Shelburne, Whitehall, and Strites Pond Formations - The Shelburne is chiefly a white marble or gray limestone characterized by raised reticulate lines of gray dolomite on the weathered surface; includes Sutherland Falls marble, intermediate dolomite and Columbian marble of the marble quarries. Interbedded massive dolomite increases westward and predominates in the Whitehall formation, west of Champlain and Orwell thrusts. The Strites Pond, which is identical to the Shelburne, is east of Philipsburg thrust.

Washington

Cambrian limestone and dolomite (Early Cambrian-Middle Ordovician)
Mostly massive dolomite, with a basal unit of gray to dark-gray limestone interbedded with limy shale, and an upper unit of fine-grained massive limestone with some marble; Pend Oreille and northern and central Stevens Counties. Three-fold division less evident in Colville area. Dolomite, with minor basal unit of interbedded limestone and phyllite in the Addy-Dunn Mountain area of Stevens County. Marble, dolomite, limestone, and limy slate in Hunters' district. Dolomitic marble in southern Stevens and northern Lincoln Counties. Middle Cambrian fossils near base in Metaline district, and Bathyuriscus-Elrathina fauna in lower unit in Leadpoint district. Phosphatic brachiopods in upper unit in Leadpoint district tentatively assigned to Middle and Upper Cambrian.
Cambrian phyllite (Cambrian)
Predominantly gray-green, banded phyllite, some sericite schist, abundant thin beds of quartzite, especially in lower part of unit, and limestone in upper part; northern Pend Oreille County. Much the same lithology but more conspicuous subunits of quartzite, limestone, and schist in northeastern Stevens County. Gray phyllite, greenish argillite, andalusite schist, minor inerbedded quartzite and siliceous dolomite, especially in lower part, and much gray limestone in upper part; north-central Stevens County. Limestone bed in lower part of unit contains Lower Cambrian fossils (Archaeocyathus).
Carboniferous-Permian sedimentary and volcanic rocks (Devonian to Permian, minor Mesozoic)
Predominantly sedimentary rocks. Graywacke, argillite, and slate; includes minor marble, siltstone, arkose, conglomerate, ribbon cherts, and volcanic rocks. Some Devonian rocks may be included in northwestern Washington.
Carboniferous-Permian sedimentary and volcanic rocks (Devonian to Permian; some Jurassic)
Sedimentary and volcanic rocks, undivided. Cherty and slaty argillite, siltstone, graywacke, chert, greenstone, tuff, andesite, and spilitic volcanics.
Lower Paleozoic rocks, undivided (Paleozoic; likely Ordovician)
Predominantly gneiss and schist in northern Ferry County. Quartzite, partly interbedded with dolomitic and calcitic marble, lime-silicate gneiss, and amphibolite; including in places forsterite marblean diopside marble, quartz-biotite-sillimanite schist and sillimanite-orthoclase gneiss in northeastern Ferry County. Quartzite with overlying limestone in southeastern Stevens County. Some upper Paleozoic and Precambrian rocks may be included.
Permian rocks (Permian-Triassic)
Conglomerate, graywacke, siltstone, argillite and interbedded fossiliferous limestone, greenstone, and minor angular conglomerate in northwestern Stevens and Ferry Counties. Impure quartzite, sandstone, graywacke, greenstone, ribbon chert, chert breccia, and limestone in Snohomish County and on San Juan Island. Lower Permian limestone on Black Mountain in northwestern Whatcom County. Middle Permian rocks in northeastern Washington.
Precambrian (?) phyllite (Cambrian-Precambrian boundary)
Mostly phyllite with interbedded carbonate rocks, quartzite, and gritstone; some tufflike beds and conglomerate at the base. Rocks confined to northeastern Pend Oreille County and central Stevens County.
Pre-Middle Jurassic sedimentary and volcanic rocks (Jurassic)
Predominantly sedimentary rocks. Graywacke, argillite, and slate; includes minor marble, siltstone, arkose, conglomerate, ribbon cherts, and volcanic rocks.
Pre-Tertiary metamorphic rocks, undivided (Probably Permian)
Schist, gneiss, marble, quartzite, amphibolite, greenstone, metaconglomerate, graywacke; includes metasedimentary, volcanic, and intrusive rocks. Some areas, as on San Juan Islands, show little if any metamorphism.
Pre-Tertiary sedimentary and metasedimentary rocks, undivided (Mostly Early Cretaceous to Middle Jurassic, possibly includes minor Eocene rocks)
Graywacke, argillite, phyllite, chert, talc, and graphite schist; some faulted-in blocks of serpentinite and greenstone. Includes minor limestone on San Juan Island.
Pre-Tertiary volcanic rocks, undivided (Probably mostly Jurassic)
Andesite and basalt flows, and greenstone; includes minor interbedded limestone, arkose, quartzite, and chert beds.
Pre-Upper Jurassic gneiss (Mostly Cretaceous)
Biotite, quartz diorite, trondhjemite, and hornblende gneisses, many of which are migmatitic; includes small granitic bodies locally. Small areas of mica schist, marble, amphibolite, and lime-silicate rocks in Entiat Mountains area of Chelan County.
Pre-Upper Jurassic metamorphic rocks of the low-grade zone (Jurassic)
Greenschist, phyllite, and slate; includes some limestone, quartzose phyllite, schistose metaconglomerate, breccia, and basic igneous rocks. Includes schist locally.
Pre-Upper Jurassic metamorphic rocks of the medium and high-grade zone (Early Jurassic-Triassic)
Schist, amphibolite, and minor lime-silicate rocks, marble, quartzite, and metaconglomerate.
Triassic sedimentary rocks, undivided (Triassic with Permian where impossible to differentiate)
Predominantly limestone, marble, and dolomite near Riverside in Okanogan County. Conglomerate, shale, graywacke, gritstone, and limestone on San Juan Island. Siltstone with greenstone locally on Orcas Island. Graywacke conglomerate, cherty greenstone, and limestone in northern Ferry County.