Geologic units containing Pegmatite

Pegmatite
An exceptionally coarse-grained igneous rock, with interlocking crystals, usually found as irregular dikes, lenses, or veins, esp. at the margins of batholiths.
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Alabama - Arizona - California - Connecticut - Delaware - Idaho - Massachusetts - Maryland - North Carolina - New Hampshire - New Jersey - Nevada - Pennsylvania - Rhode Island - Tennessee - Texas - Virginia - Vermont

Alabama

Dadeville Complex; Agricola Schist (Precambrian to Paleozoic)
Agricola Schist - biotiite +/- garnet +/- sillimanite-feldspar-quartz schist, interlayered with thin-bedded dark-brown hornblende amphibolite; contains pegmatite pods and veins.
Hatchet Creek Group; Hanover Schist (Precambrian to Paleozoic)
Hanover Schist - coarse to fine-grained feldspathic biotite-sericite-quartz-muscovite schist, commonly containing staurolite, garnet, and locally sillimanite in northeastern outcrop areas includes zones of aluminous graphite schist, hornblende quartzite, garnet quartzite, and rare amphibolite. Schist commonly retrograded to sericite-garnet-quartz schist. Numerous granitic pegmatites.
Higgins Ferry Group (Precambrian to Paleozoic)
Higgins Ferry Group - thinly layered coarse to fine-grained biotite-feldspar-quartz gneiss, sericite-feldspar-muscovite schist, +/- biotite +/- garnet-muscovite schist, and biotite-garnet feldspathic gneiss; locally common pegmatites.
Mad Indian Group (Precambrian to Paleozoic)
Mad Indian Group - fine-grained feldspathic biotite gneiss; medium to coarse-grained muscovite-biotite-garnet schist; locally kyanite and sillimanite. Many of the schists have been retrograded to chlorite-garnet-quartz-sericite schist. Both mi and migr extensively cut by feldspathic dikes and pegmatites.
Mad Indian Group; Irregular zones of sericite-quartz schist (Precambrian to Paleozoic)
Mad Indian Group; Irregular zones of sericite-quartz schist - irregular zones of sericite-quartz schist (+/- garnet) containing finely disseminated graphite, possibly infolded Wedowee Group equivalents. Both mi and migr extensively cut by feldspathic dikes and pegmatites.
Opelika Complex; Auburn Gneiss (Precambrian to Paleozoic)
Auburn Gneiss - fine-grained biotite-oligoclase gneiss intermixed with coarse-grained muscovite-biotite schist; locally contains muscovite-rich pegmatite.
Poe Bridge Mountain Group (Precambrian to Paleozoic)
Poe Bridge Mountain Group - coarse to fine-grained feldspathic graphite schist, +/- staurolite +/- kyanite +/- sillimanite-muscovite-biotite schist, and garnet-biotite-muscovite schist, and gneiss; locally common pegmatites. Rocks in the area of Turkey Heaven Mountain in Cleburne and Randolph Counties that are here assigned to the Poe Bridge Mountain Group also have been interpreted as part of the Wedowee Group.
Rockford Granite (Precambrian to Paleozoic)
Rockford Granite - leucocratic granite, granodiorite, and trondhjemite; locally well foliated, numerous pegmatites. Includes unnamed granitoids in Chilton County.
Wacoochee Complex; Halawaka Schist (Precambrian to Paleozoic)
Halawaka Schist - feldspathic muscovite-biotite schist and quartz-diorite gneiss; locally contains lenses of muscovite-graphite schist and amphibolite; commonly cut by feldspathic veins and pegmatites.
Zana Granite (Precambrian to Paleozoic)
Zana Granite - quartz monzonite to granite with strong gneissic texture, cut by small pegmatites and aplite dikes, generally elongate; semiconcordant to foliation of country rock.

Arizona

Early Proterozoic granitic rocks (Early Proterozoic)
Wide variety of granitic rocks, including granite, granodiorite, tonalite, quartz diorite, diorite, and gabbro. These rocks commonly are characterized by steep, northeast-striking foliation. (1600-1800 Ma)
Early Tertiary to Late Cretaceous granitic rocks (Late Cretaceous to Early Tertiary)
Porphyritic to equigranular granite to diorite emplaced during the Laramide orogeny. Larger plutons are characteristically medium-grained, biotite +/- hornblende granodiorite to granite. Smaller, shallow-level intrusions are typically porphyritic. Most of the large copper deposits in Arizona are associated with porphyritic granitic rocks of this unit, and are thus named 'porphyry copper deposits'. (50-82 Ma)
Early Tertiary to Late Cretaceous muscovite-bearing granitic rocks (Late Cretaceous to Early Tertiary)
Light-colored peraluminous muscovite granite with or without garnet; commonly forms sills and is associated with abundant pegmatite dikes and sills. This unit includes granites in the Harcuvar and Harquahala Mountains of western Arizona and in the Santa Catalina, Rincon, Tortolita, Picacho, and Coyote Mountains of south-central Arizona. These granites typically represent the youngest phase of voluminous magmatism during the Laramide orogeny in Arizona. This unit also includes several muscovite-bearing granites in southern Arizona that are associated with calc-alkaline granites of unit TKg, and a batholith in the Cabeza Prieta area of southwestern Arizona. (50-80 Ma)
Jurassic granitic rocks (Jurassic)
Granite to diorite, locally foliated and locally alkalic; includes Triassic(?) granitoids in the Trigo Mountains. This unit includes two dominant assemblages of igneous rocks. The Kitt Peak-Trigo Peaks superunit includes, from oldest to youngest: dark, foliated or gneissic diorite, medium-grained equigranular to porphyritic granodiorite, and small, irregular intrusions of light-colored, fine-grained granite. The Ko Vaya superunit, limited to south-central Arizona, includes texturally heterogeneous K-feldspar-rich granitic rocks. (150-180 Ma)
Middle Miocene to Oligocene granitic rocks (Oligocene to Middle Miocene)
Granite to diorite representing solidified magma chambers that were the likely source of overlying and nearby volcanic rocks of map unit Tv. The granitic rocks are typically equigranular and fine- to medium-grained. (14-26 Ma)
Middle Proterozoic diabase (Middle Proterozoic)
Dark gray to black sills (intrusions mostly parallel to bedding) in strata of the Apache Group and irregular to sheet-like intrusions in other rocks. Present in east-central and southeastern Arizona. Some sills are more than 100 m thick. Exposures are extensive north of Globe. (1050-1150 Ma)
Middle Proterozoic granitic rocks (Middle Proterozoic)
Mostly porphyritic biotite granite with large microcline phenocrysts, with local fine-grained border phases and aplite. Associated pegmatite and quartz veins are rare. This unit forms large plutons, including the Oracle Granite, Ruin Granite, granite in the Pinnacle Peak - Carefree area northeast of Phoenix, and several bodies west of Prescott. (1400-1450 Ma)
Proterozoic granitic rocks (Proterozoic)
Undivided Early and Middle Proterozoic granitic rocks (units Xg and Yg). (1400-1800 Ma)
Tertiary to Early Proterozoic gneissic rocks (Early Proterozoic to Tertiary)
Gneissic rocks with complex histories, typically with well developed, light-colored granitoid layers and dark-colored biotite- and amphibole-rich layers. Protoliths are of Tertiary to Proterozoic age. This unit includes variably mylonitic gneisses in metamorphic core complexes that have been exhumed from middle crustal levels by large-displacement middle Tertiary normal faults, and gneiss exposed at scattered locations near the Colorado River in southwestern Arizona. These rocks are interpreted to record Proterozoic, Mesozoic, and Tertiary metamorphism and deformation. (15-1800 Ma)

California

Connecticut

Maromas Granite Gneiss (Devonian?)
Maromas Granite Gneiss - Light-gray to buff, medium- to fine-grained granitic gneiss, composed of quartz and microcline with minor plagioclase and biotite. Central body is massive, but outlying strips are foliated and have accessory hornblende or garnet. Massive parts may be young anatectic intrusive rocks; foliated parts may include older felsic metavolcanic rocks belonging to unit Ochv. Pegmatite bodies are common in the vicinity.
Narragansett Pier Granite (Permian)
Narragansett Pier Granite - Pink to red, medium- to coarse-grained (commonly pegmatitic), generally massive (not gneissic) granite, composed of microcline, oligoclase, quartz, and biotite, and accessory muscovite and magnetite. Considerable associated pegmatite.
Nonewaug Granite (Devonian)
Nonewaug Granite - White to pink, fine- to very coarse-grained (commonly pegmatitic), massive to layered granite composed of albite, microcline, quartz, and muscovite, with minor biotite and garnet. Microcline commonly graphic; quartz and muscovite commonly in plumose aggregates.
Plainfield Formation plus Potter Hill Granite Gneiss plus Narragansett Pier Granite (Proterozoic Z? and Permian)
Plainfield Formation plus Potter Hill Granite Gneiss plus Narragansett Pier Granite - Plainfield Formation - Interlayered light-gray, thin-bedded quartzite, in places with feldspar, mica, graphite, or pyrite, light- to medium-gray gneiss composed of quartz, oligoclase, and biotite (rarely microcline), medium- to dark-gray schist composed of quartz, oligoclase, biotite, sillimanite, and garnet, dark-gray or green gneiss composed of plagioclase, quartz, biotite, and hornblende (commonly with diopside), amphibolite, diopsite-bearing quartzite, and calc-silicate rock. In places contains quartz-sillimanite nodules. Potter Hill Granite Gneiss - Light-pink to gray, tan-weathering, fine- to medium-grained, rarely porphyritic, well-foliated (not lineated) granitic gneiss, composed of microcline, quartz, oligoclase (or albite), biotite, and magnetite, minor muscovite, and local garnet. Narragansett Pier Granite - Pink to red, medium- to coarse-grained (commonly pegmatitic), generally massive (not gneissic) granite, composed of microcline, oligoclase, quartz, and biotite, and accessory muscovite and magnetite. Considerable associated pegmatite.
Plainfield Formation plus Stony Creek Granite Gneiss plus Narragansett Pier Granite (Proterozoic Z? and Permian)
Plainfield Formation - Interlayered light-gray, thin-bedded quartzite, in places with feldspar, mica, graphite, or pyrite, light- to medium-gray gneiss composed of quartz, oligoclase, and biotite (rarely microcline), medium- to dark-gray schist composed of quartz, oligoclase, biotite, sillimanite, and garnet, dark-grey or green gneiss composed of plagioclase, quartz, biotite, and hornblende (commonly with diopside), amphibolite, diopside-bearing quartzite, and calc-silicate rock. In places contains quartz-sillimanite nodules. Stony Creek Granite Gneiss - Red to pink, unevenly medium to very coarse grained, variably foliated granite or granite gneiss, composed of oligoclase, K-feldspar, and quartz with minor biotite and magnetite, sporatic garnet (in foliated varieties), and local muscovite. Commonly contains granite and pegmatite of Narragansett Pier type (and probably age). In much of area both granites occur as innumerable veins penetrating other units or as larger bodies full of inclusions of those units, which can be mapped through the bodies of granite. Narragansett Pier Granite (Permian) - Pink to red, medium- to coarse-grained (commonly pegmatitic), generally massive (not gneissic) granite, composed of microcline, oligoclase, quartz, and biotite, and accessory muscovite and magnetite. Considerable associated pegmatite.
Potter Hill Granite Gneiss plus Narragansett Pier Granite (Proterozoic Z? and Permian)
Potter Hill Granite Gneiss plus Narragansett Pier Granite - Potter Hill Granite Gneiss - Light-pink to gray, tan-weathering, fine- to medium-grained, rarely porphyritic, well-foliated (not lineated) granitic gneiss, composed of microcline, quartz, oligoclase (or albite), biotite, and magnetite, minor muscovite, and local garnet. Narragansett Pier Granite (Permian) - Pink to red, medium- to coarse-grained (commonly pegmatitic), generally massive (not gneissic) granite, composed of microcline, oligoclase, quartz, and biotite, and accessory muscovite and magnetite. Considerable associated pegmatite.
Quartzite unit [in Plainfield Formation] plus Stony Creek Granite Gneiss plus Narragansett Pier Granite (Proterozoic Z? and Permian)
Quartzite unit [in Plainfield Formation] plus Stony Creek Granite Gneiss plus Narragansett Pier Granite - Quartzite unit [in Plainfield Formation] - light-gray, glassy, generally thin bedded quartzite, also feldspathic and micaceous quartzite containing quartz-sillimanite nodules. Stony Creek Granite Gneiss - Red to pink, unevenly medium to very coarse grained, variably foliated granite or granite gneiss, composed of oligoclase, K-feldspar, and quartz with minor biotite and magnetite, sporatic garnet (in foliated varieties), and local muscovite. Commonly contains granite and pegmatite of Narragansett Pier type (and probably age). In much of area both granites occur as innumerable veins penetrating other units or as larger bodies full of inclusions of those units, which can be mapped through the bodies of granite. Narragansett Pier Granite (Permian) - Pink to red, medium- to coarse-grained (commonly pegmatitic), generally massive (not gneissic) granite, composed of microcline, oligoclase, quartz, and biotite, and accessory muscovite and magnetite. Considerable associated pegmatite.
Stony Creek Granite Gneiss plus Narragansett Pier Granite (Proterozoic Z? and Permian)
Stony Creek Granite Gneiss plus Narragansett Pier Granite - Stony Creek Granite Gneiss - Red to pink, unevenly medium to very coarse grained, variably foliated granite or granite gneiss, composed of oligoclase, K-feldspar, and quartz with minor biotite and magnetite, sporatic garnet (in foliated varieties), and local muscovite. Commonly contains granite and pegmatite of Narragansett Pier type (and probably age). In much of area both granites occur as innumerable veins penetrating other units or as larger bodies full of inclusions of those units, which can be mapped through the bodies of granite. Narragansett Pier Granite (Permian) - Pink to red, medium- to coarse-grained (commonly pegmatitic), generally massive (not gneissic) granite, composed of microcline, oligoclase, quartz, and biotite, and accessory muscovite and magnetite. Considerable associated pegmatite.
Waterford Group plus Stony Creek Granite Gneiss plus Narragansett Pier Granite (Proterozoic Z? and Permian)
Waterford Group plus Stony Creek Granite Gneiss plus Narragansett Pier Granite - Waterford Group (may be equivalent in part to Monson Gneiss) - Interlayered part (but layers locally distinct) of Waterford Group, light to dark, generally medium grained gneiss, composed of plagioclase, quartz, and biotite, with hornblende in some layers and microcline in others. Some layers of amphibolite. Stony Creek Granite Gneiss - Red to pink, unevenly medium to very coarse grained, variably foliated granite or granite gneiss, composed of oligoclase, K-feldspar, and quartz with minor biotite and magnetite, sporatic garnet (in foliated varieties), and local muscovite. Commonly contains granite and pegmatite of Narragansett Pier type (and probably age). In much of area both granites occur as innumerable veins penetrating other units or as larger bodies full of inclusions of those units, which can be mapped through the bodies of granite. Narragansett Pier Granite (Permian) - Pink to red, medium- to coarse-grained (commonly pegmatitic), generally massive (not gneissic) granite, composed of microcline, oligoclase, quartz, and biotite, and accessory muscovite and magnetite. Considerable associated pegmatite.

Delaware

Idaho

Massachusetts

Maryland

North Carolina

New Hampshire

New Jersey

Nevada

Pennsylvania

Rhode Island

Narragansett Pier Plutonic Suite - granite (Permian)
Narragansett Pier Plutonic Suite - granite - Dark-pink to pale-gray, medium-grained equigranular granite, with lesser granodiorite and quartz monzonite. Composed of microcline, oligoclase, quartz, and accessory biotite, magnetite, ilmenite, apatite, sphene, zircon, monazite, apatite, and allanite; muscovite and garnet locally present; secondary chlorite and calcite. Mainly massive, but locally exhibits faint flow foliation. Cut locally by abundant pegmatite, aplite, and composite aplite-pegmatite of mineralogy similar to the host granite. Unit is a 5 km by 40 km batholith that underlies the southern coast of RI. Intrusion during the latter part of Alleghanian deformation of the Narragansett Basin is indicated by its Permian age, rapid cooling, and field relations. The age of the Narragansett Pier is well constrained by several factors. Brown and others (1978) report a Pennsylvanian fossil contained in an inclusion in the pluton. Radiometric ages of 276 Ma by Kocis and others (1978), 272+/-4 Ma by Hermes and others (1981), and 273+/-2 Ma by Zartman and Hermes (1987) are consistently Early Permian. Structural studies by Mosher (1983) and Reck and Mosther (1988) indicate that intrusion began during the third period of deformation in the Narragansett Basin. Argon release patterns (Dallmeyer, 1982) indicate that the granite and intruded sediments had cooled below argon retention temperatures of hornblende by the Late Permian and of biotite by the Early Triassic. Intruded by the Westerly Granite, which has been radiometrically dated at 276+/-7 Ma. The two granites are probably genetically related based on similarities in age, mineralogy, and geochemistry (Hozik, 1992).
Narragansett Pier Plutonic Suite - leucocratic granite (Permian)
Narragansett Pier Plutonic Suite - leucocratic granite - White to gray leucocratic granite composed of microcline, oligoclase, and quartz. Up to 10% accessory muscovite and garnet, with lesser apatite, zircon, and monazite. Biotite and opaque minerals notably sparse or absent. Mainly massive, but locally exhibits flow foliation caused by alternating layers of pegmatite, aplite, and medium-grained equigranular granite; pegmatitic and aplitic material of mineralogy similar to the host granite. The granite contains widespread xenolithic inclusions and screens of metasedimentary rock, some of which are PAnbr; bedding and fabric in the screens generally is oriented parallel to that in the host metasedimentary country rock. Unit is a 5 km by 40 km batholith that underlies the southern coast of RI. Intrusion during the latter part of Alleghanian deformation of the Narragansett Basin is indicated by its Permian age, rapid cooling, and field relations. The age of the Narragansett Pier is well constrained by several factors. Brown and others (1978) report a Pennsylvanian fossil contained in an inclusion in the pluton. Radiometric ages of 276 Ma by Kocis and others (1978), 272+/-4 Ma by Hermes and others (1981), and 273+/-2 Ma by Zartman and Hermes (1987) are consistently Early Permian. Structural studies by Mosher (1983) and Reck and Mosther (1988) indicate that intrusion began during the third period of deformation in the Narragansett Basin. Argon release patterns (Dallmeyer, 1982) indicate that the granite and intruded sediments had cooled below argon retention temperatures of hornblende by the Late Permian and of biotite by the Early Triassic. Intruded by the Westerly Granite, which has been radiometrically dated at 276+/-7 Ma. The two granites are probably genetically related based on similarities in age, mineralogy, and geochemistry (Hozik, 1992).

Tennessee

Texas

Virginia

Vermont

Mount Holly Complex (Precambrian)
Mount Holly Complex - Mainly fine- to medium-grained biotitic gneiss, locally muscovitic, and in western areas chloritic; massive and granitoid in some localities, fine-grained or schistose and compositionally layered in others; also abundant amphibolite and hornblende gneiss, and minor beds of mica schist, quartzite, and calc-silicate granulite; includes numerous small bodies of pegmatite and gneissoid granitic rock. Includes a suite of metatonalites, metatrondhjemite, and possible metadacite with chemical characteristics of a calc-alkaline volcanic-plutonic suite. Mappable units are College Hill Granite Gneiss and 10 unnamed subdivisions including several varieties of gneiss as well as schist, amphibolite, and quartzite. U-Pb zircon upper intercept ages of 1.35 to 1.30 Ga have been determined and interpreted as age of crystallization (Ratcliffe and others, unpub. data). Cores of abraded zircon obtained from College Hill Granite Gneiss of Mount Holly Complex have a U-Pb upper intercept age of 1245 +/-14 Ma, interpreted as crystallization age for that granite (Aleinikoff and others, 1990). Dust collected by abrasion of zircons, thought to represent migmatitic overgrowth, has a Pb-Pb age of approx 1100 Ma. These data suggest that College Hill Granite Gneiss was intruded at 1245 Ma and migmatized at 1100 Ma. On north and south slopes of College Hill, College Hill Granite Gneiss grades outward into migmatitic biotite granite gneiss of Mount Holly Complex. College Hill is discordant to contacts and folds in paragneiss units of Mount Holly Complex. Dacitic metavolcanics are found within Washington Gneiss of Berkshire massif of MA (Ratcliffe and Zartman, 1968). They are interbedded with thick succession of rusty-weathering, quartz-pebble gneisses, calc-silicate rocks and garnet-sillimanite schist similar to, but much thicker than, the rusty-weathering gneiss and schist unit of Mount Holly Complex exposed in Green Mountains of VT. It is possible that the metadacitic and metatrondhjemitic suite of VT constitutes a lateral, south-to-north facies of the Washington Gneiss of MA (Ratcliffe, in press).
Mount Holly Complex, quartzite and schist (Precambrian)
Mount Holly Complex, quartzite and schist - Quartzite, locally in massive beds as much as 30 ft thick, micaceous quartzite, and quartz-mica schist that commonly contains garnet or pseudomorphs (largely chlorite) after garnet; schists are locally rusty weathered and contain conspicuous flakes of graphite; also includes amphibolite and minor hornblende gneiss, biotite gneiss, and pegmatite.