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Geologic units containing sedimentary breccia

Earth material > Sedimentary rock > Clastic rock
Sedimentary breccia
A breccia (coarse-grained clastic rock composed of angular broken rock fragments held together by a mineral cement or a fine-grained matrix) formed by sedimentary processes
This category is also used for breccia.
Subtopics:
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Arizona - California - Illinois - Massachusetts - Michigan - Montana - Nevada - Texas - Virginia - Vermont - Washington
Arizona
Cretaceous to Late Jurassic sedimentary rocks with minor volcanic rocks (Late Jurassic to Cretaceous)
Sandstone and conglomerate, rarely forms prominent outcrops; massive conglomerate is typical near base of unit and locally in upper part. These deposits are nonmarine except in southeastern Arizona, where prominent gray marine limestone (Mural Limestone) forms the middle of the Bisbee Group. Sandstones are typically medium-bedded, drab brown, lithic-feldspathic arenites. Includes Bisbee Group (largely Early Cretaceous) and related rocks, Temporal, Bathtub, and Sand Wells formations, rocks of Gu Achi, McCoy Mountains Formation, and Upper Cretaceous Fort Crittenden Formation and equivalent rocks. (80-160 Ma)
Holocene to middle Pliocene basaltic rocks (Middle Pliocene to Holocene)
Mostly dark-colored basaltic lava and cinders young enough that some original volcanic landforms are still apparent. Includes a small amount of andesite, dacite, and rhyolite. Rocks of this map unit are largely restricted to six areas widely distributed in Arizona: San Francisco and Uinkaret volcanic fields in northern Arizona (0-4 Ma); Springerville (0-4 Ma) and San Carlos (0-2 Ma) volcanic fields in east-central Arizona; and San Bernardino (0-1 Ma) and Sentinel (1-4 Ma) volcanic fields in southern Arizona. Rocks of this unit are also present in the extreme southwestern part of Arizona where they were erupted at the edge of the Pinacate volcanic field (0-2 Ma) in northwestern Sonora. (0-4 Ma)
Jurassic sedimentary and volcanic rocks (Jurassic)
Sandstone and conglomerate derived from volcanic rocks with associated intermediate-composition lava flows, breccias, and tuffs. In southern Arizona this unit includes rocks of the Artesa sequence, Pitoikam Formation, Mulberry Wash volcanics, Rudolfo Red Beds, Recreation Red Beds, and Gardner Canyon Formation. In western Arizona it includes the Harquar Formation, rocks of Slumgullion, and related(?) unnamed units in the Kofa and Middle Mountains. This unit is characterized by maroon, brown, and purplish-gray volcanic-lithic sandstone and siltstone, with subordinate to abundant conglomerate, quartz-rich sandstone and sparse limestone. (150-170 Ma)
Late to middle Miocene basaltic rocks (Middle to Late Miocene)
Mostly dark, mesa-forming basalt deposited as lava flows. Rocks of this unit are widely exposed south of Camp Verde (Hickey Formation basalts), in the Mohon Mountains north of Bagdad, "The Mesa" east of Parker, and at other scattered locations in western Arizona. Rocks of this unit were not tilted by middle-Tertiary normal faulting except in a narrow belt from north of Phoenix to the northwest corner of the state. (8-16 Ma)
Middle Miocene to Oligocene sedimentary rocks (Oligocene to Middle Miocene)
Con-glomerate, sandstone, mudstone, limestone, and rock-avalanche breccia (sheet-like deposits of crushed rock) deposited and tilted during widespread normal faulting and basin development. Sediments, mostly conglomerate and sandstone, are commonly medium to dark brown, reddish brown, or brownish gray; younger strata are generally lighter colors. Most deposits are 20 to 30 Ma in southeastern Arizona and 15 to 25 Ma in central and western Arizona. (11-32 Ma)
Middle Miocene to Oligocene shallow intrusions (Oligocene to Middle Miocene)
Generally very fine-grained, porphyritic rhyolite to dacite in small, irregular-shaped bodies formed as subvolcanic intrusions in volcanic fields of southern and western Arizona, or in concentrated zones of dikes in the Mohave and Black Mountains of northwestern Arizona. The unit consists of mafic tuff, breccia and shallow intrusions at Buell Park in northeastern Arizona. (14-35 Ma)
Middle Miocene to Oligocene volcanic and sedimentary rocks, undivided (Oligocene to Middle Miocene)
Sequences of diverse volcanic rocks with abundant interbedded sedimentary rocks. (11-32 Ma)
Middle Miocene to Oligocene volcanic rocks (Oligocene to Middle Miocene)
Lava, tuff, fine-grained intrusive rock, and diverse pyroclastic rocks. These compositionally variable volcanic rocks include basalt, andesite, dacite, and rhyolite. Thick felsic volcanic sequences form prominent cliffs and range fronts in the Black (Mohave County), Superstition, Kofa, Eagletail, Galiuro, and Chiricahua Mountains. This unit includes regionally extensive ash-flow tuffs, such as the Peach Springs tuff of northwestern Arizona and the Apache Leap tuff east of Phoenix. Most volcanic rocks are 20-30 Ma in southeastern Arizona and 15 to 25 Ma in central and western Arizona, but this unit includes some late Eocene rocks near the New Mexico border in east-central Arizona. (11-38 Ma)
Middle Proterozoic sedimentary rocks (Middle Proterozoic)
Red-brown shale and sandstone, buff to orange quartzite, limestone, basalt, black shale, and sparse conglomerate. This unit includes the Grand Canyon Supergroup, Apache Group, and Troy Quartzite. These rocks were deposited in shallow marine, coastal nonmarine, and fluvial settings. (700-1300)
Moenkopi Formation (Early and Middle(?) Triassic)
Dark red sandstone and mudstone; includes gypsum beds in northwestern Arizona; deposited on a low-relief coastal plain. (230-245 Ma)
Permian to Pennsylvanian sedimentary rocks (Pennsylvanian to Permian)
Interbedded sandstone, shale, and limestone usually characterized by ledgy outcrops. Orange to reddish sandstone forms cliffs near Sedona. This unit includes Supai Group and Hermit Shale in northern Arizona and Naco Group in southern Arizona. It was deposited in coastal-plain to shallow-marine settings during time of variable and changing sea level. Rocks of this map unit in southern Arizona may be in part equivalent to Permian rocks of map unit P in central and northern Arizona. (280-310 Ma)
Pliocene to late Miocene basaltic rocks (Late Miocene to Pliocene)
Mostly dark, inconspicuously flat, low-lying or mesa-forming basalt deposited as lava flows. Rocks included in this unit are located almost entirely in the large volcanic fields south and west of Flagstaff, in smaller fields in northwesternmost Arizona, and in the Hopi Buttes volcanic field on the Navajo and Hopi Indian Reservations north of Holbrook. Original volcanic landforms have been obscured by erosion. (4-8 Ma)
Pliocene to middle Miocene volcanic rocks (Middle Miocene to Pliocene)
Rhyolite to andesite deposited as lava flows and related rocks associated with basaltic rocks of map units Tby and Tb. (2-12 Ma)
California
Carboniferous marine rocks, unit 6 (Northeastern Sierra Nevada) (Mississippian to Early Permian)
Shale, sandstone, conglomerate, limestone, dolomite, chert, hornfels, marble, quartzite; in part pyroclastic rocks
Eocene marine rocks (Paleocene to Oligocene)
Shale, sandstone, conglomerate, and minor limestone; in part Oligocene and Paleocene.
Miocene marine rocks and Franciscan schist (Cretaceous(?) to Miocene)
Miocene nonmarine rocks (Oligocene to Pleistocene)
Sandstone, shale, conglomerate, and fanglomerate; in part Pliocene and Oligocene.
Oligocene nonmarine rocks, unit 2 (Central and Southern California) (middle Eocene to early Miocene)
Sandstone, shale, and conglomerate; in part Miocene and Eocene.
Oligocene nonmarine rocks (?), unit 2 (Southeastern California) (Cretaceous(?) to Oligocene(?))
Paleozoic marine rocks, undivided, unit 4 (Western Sierra Nevada) (Ordovician to Triassic)
Undivided Paleozoic metasedimentary rocks. Includes slate, sandstone, shale, chert, conglomerate, limestone, dolomite, marble, phyllite, schist, hornfels, and quartzite
Plio-Pleistocene and Pliocene loosely consolidated deposits (Miocene to Pleistocene)
Pliocene and/or Pleistocene sandstone, shale, and gravel deposits; in part Miocene.
Silurian and/or Ordovician marine rocks, unit 4 (Northern Sierra Nevada) (Ordovician to Devonian)
Sandstone, shale, conglomerate, chert, slate, quartzite, hornfels, marble, dolomite, phyllite; some greenstone
Tertiary nonmarine rocks, undivided (Paleocene to Pliocene)
Undivided Tertiary sandstone, shale, conglomerate, breccia, and ancient lake deposits.
Upper Cretaceous marine rocks, unit 2 (Klamath Mountains) (late Early to Late Cretaceous)
Upper Cretaceous sandstone, shale, and conglomerate
Illinois
Middle Devonian (Devonian)
Middle Devonian
Upper Valmeyeran (Aux Vases, Ste. Genevieve, St. Louis) Series (Mississippian)
Upper Valmeyeran (Aux Vases, Ste. Genevieve, St. Louis) Series
Massachusetts
Mount Toby Formation (Lower Jurassic)
Mount Toby Formation - Breccia of amphibolite at Whitmore Ferry; interpreted as landslide deposit. The Mount Toby Conglomerate is here revised and renamed the Mount Toby Formation of the Newark Supergroup. It includes only the sedimentary strata in the Deerfield basin above the slump zone unconformity defined by Cornet (1977), or its projected equivalent at its contact with the underlying Turners Falls Sandstone. It includes conglomerates at the type locality, landslide deposits within the conglomerate, and sandstone and lake beds above the slump zone unconformity, which were formerly included in the Turners Falls Sandstone. Other rocks mapped as Mount Toby Conglomerate by Emerson (1898) in the Hartford, Deerfield, and Northfield basins have been assigned to the Portland, Sugarloaf, and Turners Falls Formations. Age is Sinemurian and Pliensbachian, based on the discovery by Cornet (1977) of palynoflora in these strata (Robinson and Luttrell, 1985).
Mount Toby Formation (Lower Jurassic)
Mount Toby Formation - Breccia of granitic gneiss at Taylor Hill; interpreted as landslide deposit. The Mount Toby Conglomerate is here revised and renamed the Mount Toby Formation of the Newark Supergroup. It includes only the sedimentary strata in the Deerfield basin above the slump zone unconformity defined by Cornet (1977), or its projected equivalent at its contact with the underlying Turners Falls Sandstone. It includes conglomerates at the type locality, landslide deposits within the conglomerate, and sandstone and lake beds above the slump zone unconformity, which were formerly included in the Turners Falls Sandstone. Other rocks mapped as Mount Toby Conglomerate by Emerson (1898) in the Hartford, Deerfield, and Northfield basins have been assigned to the Portland, Sugarloaf, and Turners Falls Formations. Age is Sinemurian and Pliensbachian, based on the discovery by Cornet (1977) of palynoflora in these strata (Robinson and Luttrell, 1985).
Michigan
Mackinac Breccia (Early Devonian)
Mackinac Breccia
Montana
Devonian, undifferentiated (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Devonian)
Devonian, undifferentiated: comprises Three Forks formation consisting of carbonaceous and calcareous shale with some sandstone and limestone, Jefferson limestone, and unnamed units of Devonian age.
Nevada
Dolomite (Silurian to Early Devonian)
DOLOMITE-Includes units such as Laketown and Lone Mountain Dolomites. Locally includes rocks of Early Devonian age at top.
Texas
Cienequita Formation (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Carboniferous Pennsylvanian-Middle Pennsylvanian-Late)
Cienequita Formation
Starke Limestone (Phanerozoic | Paleozoic | Silurian)
Starke Limestone NOTE: This unit is represented within the map unit explanation of (Geol. Map of Texas, 1992, Bur. Econ. Geol.) but does not occur on the map and is NOT included in the spatial data.
Virginia
Konnarock Formation (Proterozoic Z)
Konnarock Formation - Maroon diamictite, rhythmite, and arkose.
Newark Supergroup; Breccia, mudstone clasts (Upper Triassic)
Breccia, mudstone clasts
Vermont
Bascom Formation, and undifferentiated Luke Hill, Naylor Ledge and Hastings Creek Limestones (Ordovician)
Bascom Formation, and undifferentiated Luke Hill, Naylor Ledge and Hastings Creek Limestones - Interbedded dolomite, limestone or marble, calcareous sandstone, quartzite and limestone breccia; irregular dolomitic layers, thin sandy laminae, and slaty or phyllitic partings characterize limestone and marble of lower, middle, and upper parts of the Bascom, respectively; south of West Rutland it includes some of the Chipman formation. The combined Luke Hill, Naylor Ledge, and Hastings Creek, east of Philipsburg thrust, are stratigraphically equivalent to the Bascom.
Washington
Cambrian limestone and dolomite (Early Cambrian-Middle Ordovician)
Mostly massive dolomite, with a basal unit of gray to dark-gray limestone interbedded with limy shale, and an upper unit of fine-grained massive limestone with some marble; Pend Oreille and northern and central Stevens Counties. Three-fold division less evident in Colville area. Dolomite, with minor basal unit of interbedded limestone and phyllite in the Addy-Dunn Mountain area of Stevens County. Marble, dolomite, limestone, and limy slate in Hunters' district. Dolomitic marble in southern Stevens and northern Lincoln Counties. Middle Cambrian fossils near base in Metaline district, and Bathyuriscus-Elrathina fauna in lower unit in Leadpoint district. Phosphatic brachiopods in upper unit in Leadpoint district tentatively assigned to Middle and Upper Cambrian.
Lower upper Eocene marine and nonmarine rocks (Eocene)
Predominantly massive to well-bedded tuffaceous marine siltstone with interbedded arkosic and basaltic sandstone. Includes conglomerate in King County and along north side of Olympic Peninsula. Minor lava flows and breccia in western Lewis County and eastern Grays Harbor County. Coal seams in central Lewis County and north-central Pierce County.

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