Active Mines and Mineral Processing Plants in the United States in 2003

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Frequently anticipated questions:


What does this data set describe?

Title:
Active Mines and Mineral Processing Plants in the United States in 2003
Abstract:
This data set includes mineral and metal operations in the United States. The data represent commodities monitored by the National Minerals Information Center of the USGS, and the operations included are those considered active in 2003 and surveyed by the MIT.
Supplemental_Information:
Additional mineral and metal operations information can be obtained from the U.S. Geological Survey National Minerals Information Center web page at: http://minerals.usgs.gov/minerals/
  1. How might this data set be cited?
    U.S. Geological Survey, 2005, Active Mines and Mineral Processing Plants in the United States in 2003: U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia.

    Online Links:

  2. What geographic area does the data set cover?
    West_Bounding_Coordinate: -162.865000
    East_Bounding_Coordinate: -67.659000
    North_Bounding_Coordinate: 68.070000
    South_Bounding_Coordinate: 19.628500
  3. What does it look like?
  4. Does the data set describe conditions during a particular time period?
    Calendar_Date: 2003
    Currentness_Reference:
    ground condition
  5. What is the general form of this data set?
    Geospatial_Data_Presentation_Form: vector digital data
  6. How does the data set represent geographic features?
    1. How are geographic features stored in the data set?
      Indirect_Spatial_Reference:
      U.S. Department of Commerce, 1987, Codes for the Identification of the States, the District of Columbia and the Outlying Areas of the United States, and Associated Areas FIPS 5-2): Washington, D.C., National Institute of Standards and Technology.

      U.S. Department of Commerce, 1990, Counties and Equivalent Entities of the United States, Its Possessions, and Associated Areas, (FIPS 6-4): Washington, D.C., National Institute of Standards and Technology.
      This is a Vector data set. It contains the following vector data types (SDTS terminology):
      • Entity point (6738)
    2. What coordinate system is used to represent geographic features?
      Horizontal positions are specified in geographic coordinates, that is, latitude and longitude. Latitudes are given to the nearest 0.01. Longitudes are given to the nearest 0.01. Latitude and longitude values are specified in Decimal degrees. The horizontal datum used is North American Datum of 1927.
      The ellipsoid used is Clarke 1866.
      The semi-major axis of the ellipsoid used is 6378206.400000.
      The flattening of the ellipsoid used is 1/294.978698.
  7. How does the data set describe geographic features?
    Active Mines and Mineral Processing Plants in 2003
    Locations of active mines and mineral processing plants in 2003 (Source: U.S. Geological Survey National Minerals Information Center.)
    COMMODITY
    The mineral(s) and/or metal(s) produced or processed by the facility. (Source: U.S. Geological Survey National Minerals Information Center)
    Formal codeset
    Codeset Name:Mineral Commodity Summaries 2006, or http://minerals.usgs.gov/minerals/pubs/mcs/
    Codeset Source:U.S. Geological Survey, National Minerals Information Center
    ID
    internal feature number (Source: U.S. Geological Survey National Minerals Information Center)
    Range of values
    Minimum:1
    Maximum:6842
    SITE_NAME
    Name of the location; may be the name of the mine or plant or the nearest locality (Source: U.S. Geological Survey National Minerals Information Center) There is no predefined set of standard site names.
    COMPANY_NA
    The name of the company operating at the location. (Source: U.S. Geological Survey National Minerals Information Center) There is no predefined set of standard company names.
    STATE_LOCA
    State in which the site is located (Source: U.S. Geological Survey National Minerals Information Center)
    Formal codeset
    Codeset Name:U.S. Department of Commerce, 1987, Codes for the Identification of the States, the District of Columbia and the Outlying Areas of the United States, and Associated Areas (Federal Information Processing Standard (FIPS) 5-2): Washington, D.C., National Institute of Standards and Technology.
    Codeset Source:http://www.itl.nist.gov/fipspubs/
    COUNTY
    County in which the operation is located. (Source: U.S. Geological Survey National Minerals Information Center)
    Formal codeset
    Codeset Name:U.S. Department of Commerce, 1990, Counties and Equivalent Entities of the United States, Its Possessions, and Associated Areas. (Federal Information Processing Standard (FIPS) 6-4): Washington, D.C., National Institute of Standards and Technology.
    Codeset Source:http://www.itl.nist.gov/fipspubs/
    LATITUDE
    The latittude of the operation in decimal degrees. (Source: U.S. Geological Survey National Minerals Information Center)
    Range of values
    Minimum:19
    Maximum:68
    LONGITUDE
    The longitude of the site in decimal degrees (Source: U.S. Geological Survey National Minerals Information Center)
    Range of values
    Minimum:-162.865
    Maximum:-67.659
    PLANT_MIN
    Whether the operation is a mine, a plant, or both (Source: U.S. Geological Survey National Minerals Information Center.)
    ValueDefinition
    MThe operation is a mine
    PThe operation is a plant
    M/PThe facility is both a mine and a plant

Who produced the data set?

  1. Who are the originators of the data set? (may include formal authors, digital compilers, and editors)
    • U.S. Geological Survey
  2. Who also contributed to the data set?
  3. To whom should users address questions about the data?
    Robert Callaghan
    U.S. Geological Survey
    989 National Center
    Reston, VA

    703-648-7709 (voice)
    rcallaghan@usgs.gov

Why was the data set created?

The digital data set of the National Minerals Information Center is used to create electronic and hard copy maps that depict various mineral or metal mine and/or processing locations on a national map. The data are meant to give an overview of mining and mineral processing operations in the United States.

How was the data set created?

  1. From what previous works were the data drawn?
    AMIS (source 1 of 2)
    U.S. Geological Survey, Unpublished Material, Automated Minerals Information System (AMIS).

    Type_of_Source_Media: Internal USGS server
    Source_Contribution: Minerals operations descriptions
    Minerals Yearbook 2003 (source 2 of 2)
    U.S. Geological Survey, 2004, USGS Minerals Yearbook -- 2003.

    Online Links:

    Type_of_Source_Media: online
    Source_Contribution:
    The USGS Minerals Yearbook (MYB) contains statistical information on over 90 commodities. These reviews summarize activity in the commodity. From tables and other information in the MYB lists of active operations were determined.
  2. How were the data generated, processed, and modified?
    Date: 2005 (process 1 of 2)
    AMIS contains both proprietary and nonproprietary information. For each commodity, the National Minerals Information Center extracted from AMIS the nonproprietary information useful for this application and placed this information in a separate database. This information includes company name, site name, county, state, and coordinates. This information is reported by the company with the exception of coordinates, which have been added by the MIT in an ongoing process that began in 1997. Latitude and longitude for each operation was obtained from at least one of the following sources: Minerals Availability System/Minerals Industry Location System (MAS/MILS) CD-ROM, U.S. Bureau of Mines Special Publication 12-95, web searches using general internet search services (queries by company name or name of the specific operation), company contact, map interpolation, and searches of the EPA database. Whenever possible the location information was checked for accuracy and added to the AMIS database. After 2003 coordinates being added were checked, or obtained, when possible using USGS air photos available through Microsoft Terraserver. Not all coordinates could be checked; some coordinates are accurate only to county level especially if known operation addresses were post office boxes. Data sources used in this process:
    • AMIS
    Date: 2005 (process 2 of 2)
    Records extracted from AMIS were compared to information available in the National Minerals Information Center's 2003 Minerals Yearbook and were reviewed by commodity specialists to create the 2003 Active Mines and Plants dataset. Data sources used in this process:
    • Minerals Yearbook 2003
  3. What similar or related data should the user be aware of?

How reliable are the data; what problems remain in the data set?

  1. How well have the observations been checked?
  2. How accurate are the geographic locations?
  3. How accurate are the heights or depths?
  4. Where are the gaps in the data? What is missing?
    This data set includes only U.S. mineral and metal operations monitored by the National Minerals Information Center of the U.S. Geological Survey and considered currently active in 2003. No energy minerals operations (for example, coal) are included. Aggregates operations are limited to those producing over 30,000 tons per year in 2002. Peat operations in Alaska are not included. Placer deposits (gold) in Alaska are not included. Clay operations (ball clay, common clay) may have many satellite pits, not all of which are specifically included. An attempt was made to add locations that may be considered representative of the companies. Not all mines of a company are included. Plants are limited to operations considered primary -- those which process a mineral or metal to create the first raw material from which products are made. Downstream operations (operations that reprocess a raw material into another raw material or final product) and recycling operations are not included.
  5. How consistent are the relationships among the observations, including topology?
    No tests for logical consistency were performed on this data set.

How can someone get a copy of the data set?

Are there legal restrictions on access or use of the data?
Access_Constraints: None
Use_Constraints:
None. Acknowledgment of the National Minerals Information Center, U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior, government of the United States of America would be appreciated in products derived from these data.
  1. Who distributes the data set? (Distributor 1 of 1)
    Peter Schweitzer
    U.S. Geological Survey
    954 National Center
    Reston, VA

    703-648-6533 (voice)
    pschweitzer@usgs.gov
  2. What's the catalog number I need to order this data set? Downloadable Data
  3. What legal disclaimers am I supposed to read?
    Although these data have been processed successfully on a computer system at the U.S. Geological Survey, no warranty expressed or implied is made by the U.S. Geological Survey regarding the utility of the data on any other system, nor shall the act of distribution constitute any such warranty. Coordinates are in some cases accurate only to the county level and must not be used as an authoritative location source for legal purposes.
  4. How can I download or order the data?

Who wrote the metadata?

Dates:
Last modified: 07-Dec-2016
Metadata author:
Robert Callaghan
U.S. Geological Survey
989 National Center
Reston, VA

703 648 7709 (voice)
rcallaghan@usgs.gov
Metadata standard:
Content Standard for Digital Geospatial Metadata (FGDC-STD-001-1998)

This page is <https://mrdata.usgs.gov/metadata/mineplant.faq.html>
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